Bigindicator

Cobra Museum

Venue  |  Exhibitions  |  Reviews
20150309175126-cobra_maart_2015_mg_7848

The Biggest Challenge Museums Face: Rekindling the Collection

by Edo Dijksterhuis
When passing the ticket booth at the Cobra Museum everything seems business as usual: white walls with informative texts in an inoffensive font, the bold colors associated with the art movement's practioners Appel, Constant, Corneille, and Alechinsky visible from afar. But brace yourself and turn the corner. Entering Brutal Vitality is like receiving shock treatment—the sudden visual overload had me gasping for breath. Multi-colored bricks, blown-up black and white photographs, a bicycle, raggedy carpets, “eek eek/ naa naa/ gok gok” written on the wall, African masks. Only afte... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 3/9/15
20130411064859-michael_tedja__snake__installation_view__photo_by_gert_jan_van_rooij

There's a Snake in the Cobra Museum

by Nicola Bozzi
Honestly, I've never been a big fan of Cobra and their brand of playful semi-figuration, although that is primarily due to me not really being a painting guy (to stay within the movement, I'd take one of Robert Jacobsen's primitivism-infused industrial artifacts over a Karel Appel painting any day). As geographically de-centered as the group of artists involved was (Copenhagen-Brussels-Amsterdam, hence the name), their legacy lives on in Amstelveen's Cobra Museum. And, it turns out, the movement’s spirit echoes in contemporary art today in ways that resonate with me more than the original corp... [more]
Posted by Nicola Bozzi on 4/11/13
20110923111216-affichecobrastudiotoscane

Karel Appel & Roberto Barni, Studio Toscane

by Nicola Bozzi
As a co-founder of the North European abstract expressionist avant-garde group that gives the CoBrA Museum its name, Karel Appel is definitely at home in Amstelveen. Richly featured in two out of three shows, if he was still around it wouldn't be a surprise to see the Amsterdam-born artist walking around in a dressing gown and slippers, with a cup of tea in his hand. While the CoBrA group show on the ground floor covers a wide range of his paintings, especially focusing on the 40s-50s period, the Studio Toscane exhibition upstairs presents a more heterogeneous selection from the artist's Tuscan p... [more]
Posted by Nicola Bozzi on 12/4/11
20101203005939-banier_bouchet-350

Mike Bouchet

The Cobra Museum exhibits new work by the American artist, Mike Bouchet (b. 1970 Castro Valley, California, USA). His 'Sir Walter Scott' installation is a reworked version of the spectacular presentation that Bouchet created for the 2009 Venice Biennale. In one of the canals of the old city, the artist built a two story floating Suburban model home. Houses such as this are the dominant form of architecture in the United States, and have become increasingly popular all over the world. During the installation of the artwork titled, "Watershed", for the 53rd Venic... [more]
Posted by Abhilasha Singh on 11/1/10
Schwartz-passion

Johannes Schwartz

Johannes Schwartz presents a new series of photographs, entitled Passion. Over the last year, he has photographed a recently abandoned house. The result is a series of film-like moments in a sober interior that seems unchanged since the 1950s. The furniture and objects are a reflection of the personality of someone who lived in the house for many years. In all of his series, Johannes Schwartz works according to a fixed formula, in which the subject is first determined and subsequently explored in depth. Although his interior photographs are registrations of an existing situation as he f... [more]
Posted by ArtSlant Team on 5/18/10
Tentoon-ouburg

Pioneering Work of Piet Ouborg

        The Cobra Museum presents highlights of the pioneering work of a forerunner and innovator in Dutch art. In the Netherlands, Piet Ouborg was well ahead of his time. Ouborg’s work gave visual art a radically new identity. This extensive exhibition comprises a selection of Piet Ouborg’s masterpieces, including drawings, gouaches and paintings from all the periods of his career, with special emphasis on his later work. These works show how Ouborg - always guided by his own personal compass - developed as an artist, from his first figurative, surrealistic works in the 1930s to his visionary a... [more]
Posted by ArtSlant Team on 1/19/10