ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Portrait: Katie Stout Defies Genre with Her Touchable, Usable, Body Positive Artworks <p><em>This photo portrait was originally published as a longer interview feature on </em><a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/by-subverting-the-expected-brooklyn-artist-katie-stout-takes-a-welcome-humanistic-approach-to-her-art"><em>Freunde von Freunden</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>In a vast warehouse in the Bed-Stuy neighborhood of Brooklyn, Katie Stout crafts couches out of various textiles and her signature Girl Lamps out of clay, celebrating womanhood with colors and textures in the form of functional pieces.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Stout&rsquo;s creative process is bold, experimental, and constantly evolving&mdash;during our studio visit she was feverishly finding a way to support a desk she was assembling out of papier-mâché and wire for an upcoming show. Katie&rsquo;s work can be intimidating because of its sheer boldness, but when you strip it down, it&rsquo;s a reflection of the woman behind the work: engaging, approachable, confident, and fun.</p> <p>Freunde von Freunden met the artist in Brooklyn to chat about her genre-defying artwork and furniture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144802-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4616.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I think you can spill milk on something and still treat it like a piece of art.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What type of work do you create?</strong></p> <p>I make art that functions as furniture but sometimes it doesn&rsquo;t. I&#39;m not totally committed to any material; I use scraps around my studio, a lot of clay, and I love papier-mâché. I tend to take any opportunity to work with a new material. I like using everything and learning about different processes and then doing things the wrong way. Love easy low-brow materials like crayons, trash, things like clay that can be mushed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144833-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4351.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How did your childhood influence your creativity?</strong></p> <p>I grew up in a household where creativity was celebrated. I had a whole zone to myself where I could make a mess and there was never a shortage of art supplies. My mom also went to RISD and her mother had been a photographer. When I wanted to be a cheerleader in fourth grade, my dad said, &ldquo;No, you&#39;re going to be cheered for.&rdquo; Might be the coolest thing he&rsquo;s ever said.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144943-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4438.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145559-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4354.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Your furniture is designed to not only be art, but also to be used as actual furniture in a household. Do you find people treat it as both after purchasing a piece, or do they covet it more like a piece of art not to be touched?</strong></p> <p>I think people are sometimes confused about how they&rsquo;re supposed to use it. It&rsquo;s a space that people feel uncomfortable in, which I love. But I think you can spill milk on something and still treat it like a piece of art. I guess art is defined by the viewer. In general I think people revere prescribed art too much and lesser known art too little. Someone spending $450 million on a painting is gross. Especially if it&rsquo;s da Vinci. I couldn&rsquo;t get out of the da Vinci show at the Met fast enough because the hype eclipsed the merits of the work.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I want to take a more humanistic approach to art and art making, one where it can be touched and used and provides a different and more welcoming approach to how it&rsquo;s viewed and how it functions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145306-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4372.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150855-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4356.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">(left) Shady Lady lamps in progress</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>You explore themes around sexuality in your work. Is this a particular statement?</strong></p> <p>I was interested in exploring the objectification of women by of extreme objectification. There&rsquo;s a frenzy of conversation about sexual abuse in the media with #MeToo, Hollywood, U.S. gymnastics, Donald Trump. Women have inarguably been treated as objects to be used. By parodying the art objects of women, the ladies I create own their bodies. I imagine them holding the lampshade up as a choice they&rsquo;ve made. They defy traditional categories of what women are supposed to be by being domestic and choosing to be sexually open. Don&rsquo;t call it naughty.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145329-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4443.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150048-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4455.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is your favorite piece you&rsquo;ve ever created?</strong></p> <p>My favorite piece has been Wench Bench due partially to the unexpected and automatic nature of its actualization. I had a chainsaw artist in Duluth carve nude female forms out of pine stumps. (You know chainsaw art&mdash;like those carved bears in upstate New York?) The nude ladies were various apathetic positions lying on the floor&mdash;in fetal position after having given up&mdash;and I had them carved out of stumps into little stools. But the carvings came back much smaller than I expected and were too low to sit on. So I puzzle pieced them all together into a bench, which I called Wench Bench, which made for a far more dynamic piece than my original idea.</p> <p><strong>What is the best thing you&rsquo;ve done for your career?</strong></p> <p>The best thing I&rsquo;ve done is pursue it full-time and not really listen to people who thought I was insane.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150346-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4497.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150330-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4433.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Read the full interview and find more images of Katie Stout and her BK studio on </em></strong><a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/by-subverting-the-expected-brooklyn-artist-katie-stout-takes-a-welcome-humanistic-approach-to-her-art"><strong><em>Freunde von Freunden</em></strong></a><strong><em>.</em></strong></p> <p>Adapted from text and photography by <a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/tag/Erin-Little/">Erin Little</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 07:12:08 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The ArtSlant Prize X: Apply Today + Juror Announcement! <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20180213174127-ArtSlant_Prize_X_2018-01.png" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Round 1 of the ArtSlant Prize X closes February 26th.</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes and an exhibition in New York during Armory Week!</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><strong>To apply</strong>, sign in to <a href="https://www.artslant.com" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;"><strong>artslant.com</strong></a>, click the menu navicon <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170906130218-Screen_Shot_2017-09-06_at_9.01.04_AM.png" style="width: 25px;" />&nbsp;at the top and select&nbsp;<strong>ArtSlant Prize</strong>.</i></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i>The&nbsp;</i><em><strong>ArtSlant Prize IX Exhibition</strong></em><i>&nbsp;will take place during Armory Week in New York at&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a></strong>, March 6&ndash;12, 2018, booth 2231.&nbsp;</i></font><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">Purchase tickets for the fair&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/o/springbreak-art-show-12813445625" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">here</a></strong>.</i></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size:18px;"><strong><em>ROUND 1 JURORS:</em></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215134930-Screen_Shot_2018-02-15_at_14.41.57.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Roberto Acosta Oyarzo</strong> is <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/500475-roberto-acosta-oyarzo" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>printmaker</strong></a>, film maker and curator based in Valpara&iacute;so, Chile.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Tiana Webb Evans</strong> is a <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/500995-tiana-webb-evans" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>cultural producer</strong></a>, a marketing and communications professional, and an advocate for diversity in the arts. </font></p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Margaret Clinton</strong> is the owner and director of <a href="http://koenigandclinton.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;"><strong>Koenig &amp; Clinton</strong></a>, a gallery based in Brooklyn, NY.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">ARTSLANT PRIZE X</span></strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170320214133-artslant-springbreak.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 385px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a> at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. The prize recognizes artists who critically engage with their medium and culture at large. Up for grabs are exhibition opportunities and cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;Learn more&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">here</a></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Art page</a></strong><span style="line-height: 21px;">. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners</a></strong>&nbsp;have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors, and personalities.</span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2017+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize IX:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">David Rios Ferreira,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Sabato Visconti,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Katya Grokhovsky,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Da&agrave;P&ograve; Reo</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VIII:</a>&nbsp;</strong></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VII:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VI:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize V:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize IV:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Veronica Bruce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Susan Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize III:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize II:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize I:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:51:29 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Process Park Artist Residency: Final Days to Apply!! Deadline: Feb 18 <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We are proud to announce a new experimental residency created by ArtSlant in collaboration with Chashama.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Process Park</span></strong>&nbsp;is a funded four-week residency for 3-4 artists at&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.chashama.org/chanorth" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;" target="_blank">chaNorth Artist Residency</a>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">in Pine Plains, NY, the goal of which is to learn to live and work better through a process-oriented approach to art making and existing. The residency will conclude with an exhibition/symposium in New York that will be conceived and planned as a group during the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">The Spring 2018 residency&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">runs April 1&ndash;April 29</span>. Application <span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">deadline: February 18, 2018.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214173900-PP.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Process Park, Main House at chaNorth</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park is designed to foster an engaged community through developing engaged individuals.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Artists and cultural producers need space and time to interrogate and refine the ways they work and create while retaining a sense of amateurism. To this end, Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">encourages research and play</span>. Through knowledge-sharing, making, and experimentation, this residency aims to generate deeper connections between people and the visual and material culture they consume.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">focuses on reinserting ourselves into the act of production</span>, to interrupt the paradigm of contemporary alienation. Residents will be encouraged to develop a stronger&nbsp;relationship to</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">&nbsp;the food we eat, the images we ingest, and the omnipresent algorithms that fundamentally shape our lives</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">. Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">pushes back on throw-away consumption</span>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We ask participants to bring knowledge to share and a willingness to learn from the residency&rsquo;s facilitators, visitors, and co-residents.&nbsp;The emphasis will be on learning through doing. The goal is not only to share knowledge useful in art making but to share knowledge which will be useful in the practice of everyday life. Intensives take the form of teaching or&nbsp;learning the basics of a given skill in a day. Residents will practice those skills throughout the duration of the residency to incorporate that new knowledge into their lives.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">If we create what supports and sustains us and our practices, our investment in the world is made richer, deeper.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">includes Room &amp; Board for four weeks, educational intensives, and an exhibition/symposium in NYC.</span>&nbsp;Residents are encouraged to continue their own practices during the residency but are expected to participate in courses and scheduled group meals and events.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214174104-298116_252439538127025_881163471_n.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Communal dining at chaNorth, Summer 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Application Requirements:</span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong>Who:</strong>&nbsp;All artists, cultural producers, writers, musicians, programmers, and researchers,&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">21+</span></strong>, looking to enrich their relationship with a mode of production are welcome to apply.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Course Proposal</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Residents will lead an intensive, one-day course, sharing a skill of their choice with other residents. This skill can be part of your practice or not. You don&rsquo;t need to be an expert but should feel comfortable enough that you can assist people in exploring a given area of knowledge. Your course proposal should be a brief description of the skill you want to teach, and how (max 250 words) and be entered into the field &ldquo;Statement of Intent&rdquo; on the application page.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Current intensives available by residency facilitators for Spring 2018 include planting, pickling, fermentation, basic HTML, felting, podcasting, clay-refinement, digital publishing, kiln and oven construction, and baking.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Further intensives will be proposed and offered by residents.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Statement of Intent</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Following your course proposal, your statement of intent should introduce your practice and provide a connection between your practice and what you hope Process Park will allow you to achieve within its unique parameters. Discuss what you will gain from this experience and what you can bring to the group&rsquo;s dynamic. How would a process-based approach inform your practice going forward? How do you envision using your time at Process Park?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">(max 500 words)</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Please also include c</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">ontact information for&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">two references</span></strong>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">and your<strong>&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">CV</span></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">You must apply using your&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">ArtSlant Profile.</span></strong>&nbsp;Sign up&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/intros/plans" target="_blank">here</a>&nbsp;if you don&#39;t have one already. Use your profile to include supporting images or texts for your application. An application fee of $25 will be required to submit your application. The fee goes to the operating costs of the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Questions? See the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/48841-faq-process-park" target="_blank">FAQ</a>. Still have questions? Email us at&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:residency@artslant.com" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">residency@artslant.com</a>.&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204002549-Process-park-logo-sq.jpg" style="height: 249px; width: 250px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Apply&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation/index/10">here</a></span></strong><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">.</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.chashama.org/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003616-chashama-logo-2017.png" style="width: 280px; height: 60px;" /></a></td> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003642-ArtSlant-Logo-2014-01.jpg" style="width: 245px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Wed, 14 Feb 2018 09:52:42 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Lorna Mills Cracks The Great Code <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&rsquo;re interested in what&rsquo;s happening with art on the web. Every other Wednesday online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you have even a passing interest in net art then you are likely familiar with the work of <a href="http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/LornaMillsImageDump/">Lorna Mills</a>. The Toronto-based artist and curator has been hugely successful in promoting the medium to a wider audience, both through her own work and as a conduit for other artists. In her own practice, Mills works mainly in the GIF format, creating digital collages with manipulated elements of found GIFs. Her work brazenly straddles the line between &ldquo;high art&rdquo; and low (digital) culture with punkish irreverence and wicked humor.</p> <p>As a curator Mills is best known for uniting 115 digital artists in an ambitious remake of the John Berger documentary <em>Ways of Seeing</em>, which was shown as part of <em>Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art</em> at the Whitney in 2017. <em>Ways of Something</em>, as Mills retitled it, not only stands as an unassailable document of the state of the digital art nation at its time of release, but also successfully proves that the truths of Berger&rsquo;s insights are as relevant today as they ever were.</p> <p>Mills famously beamed her&nbsp;<em>Mountain Light/Time</em>&nbsp;GIF on giant screens around New York&rsquo;s Times Square in 2016, cementing her reputation as one of the most significant contemporary new media artists. The artist&nbsp;has a longstanding relationship with New York&rsquo;s Transfer gallery, where she&rsquo;s just opened her latest solo show, <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/463002-the-great-code" target="_blank">The Great Code</a></em>. The exhibition, which Mills says she&rsquo;s been working on for the last 15 years and includes the covers of some 3,075 books the artist has read, plays with the definition of &ldquo;code&rdquo; and suggests that &ldquo;the order of knowledge has been collapsed and compressed.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152216-Vancouver_5_4.gif" /></p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were you like as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Lorna Mills:</strong> I was a precocious reader, manic, rude, and very irritating (some adults were charmed by this, but not the adults in my family). I am still a reader, less rude perhaps, but still irritating.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first use a computer creatively?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> 1993&ndash;94, delivery was on floppy disks and CD-roms.</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you make?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> A CD interactive environment/portrait of a musician friend titled <em>The Man They Couldn&rsquo;t Deconstruct Because He Knew Too Much</em>.&nbsp;When he saw it he said, &ldquo;This is more about you than it is about me,&rdquo; ...well, yeah.&nbsp; A few other hard to describe things, all done in Director, so the images were very rich, but I suspect that all the early stuff is unplayable now. I never set max speeds on the animations so on my current system, everything whips by super fast in those early pieces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152139-Prison_7.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>When did you first become aware of the GIF format?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Mid-90s, but they were all graphics and I didn&rsquo;t like drawing tools.&nbsp;At that point I had been programming children&rsquo;s educational games in Director and later in Flash, working with illustrators and basically making things come alive in an interactive setting. It was something I really enjoyed professionally because I had good timing (and a real respect for other people&rsquo;s drawing skills.)</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first recognize its creative possibilities?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> The creative possibilities for my own work didn&rsquo;t crystalize until I saw what <a href="http://www.sallymckay.ca/" target="_blank">Sally McKay</a> was doing with GIFs using photographic sources, so early to mid-2000s.&nbsp;At that point there was a lot more activity online from people posting video-sourced GIFs, so I was making GIFs from my own video footage and looking at existing animations made by people who didn&rsquo;t position themselves as artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154641-river3.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When does a GIF become a piece of art? Does the maker have to</strong> <strong>identify as an artist?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I don&rsquo;t know the answer to that question, generally art comes from people who do declare themselves artists, but there are always exceptions. It&rsquo;s not something I worry about.</p> <p><strong>CP: How has your relationship with the internet evolved since you first used it?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I was attracted to aggregate sites from the beginning&mdash;I was never a good surfer. I also participated in the heydays of blogging;&nbsp;the audiences were small and the conversations were exciting. Later on, social media was comfortable for me because I had already defined an online persona that I was comfortable with.&nbsp;</p> <p>On Facebook and Twitter, I have the endearing belief that total strangers are delighted to hear from me. This is probably a major error on my part.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I prefer my important conversations IRL now.&nbsp;The potential for ridiculous misunderstandings on social media is too high and I don&rsquo;t want to spend my time defining all my terms to strangers or defending misreadings of what I am trying to say.&nbsp;So now I only post images of my giant dog and my animated GIFs. I spend a lot more time reading other people&rsquo;s posts. I&rsquo;m a major lurker and liker.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153454-1360_9_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize there was a scene building around &ldquo;Internet Art&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Aside from Sally&rsquo;s work, I was attracted to the artists in the surf clubs, so mid-2000s. (I was a major fan of Guthrie Lonergan and Chris Ashley.)</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>What were the surf clubs and what attracted you the them?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> You don&rsquo;t know about <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surfing_club">surf clubs</a>???? Google!&nbsp;Nasty nets and <a href="http://www.loshadka.org/">Loshadka</a> were a couple of the places where all the net art kids were playing together.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153526-SPAMM_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your process when making a GIF?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> My process is very congenial.&nbsp;(It&rsquo;s a nice way to live. I&rsquo;m very lucky.) I spend every day looking and downloading animated GIFs while watching Netflix or BBC and then spend countless hours cutting them up frame by frame, again while watching Netflix or BBC.&nbsp;(I&rsquo;m very good at mindless tedious tasks.)</p> <p>Once I have all the raw materials on hand, the collage work&mdash;the combination and placement of GIFs onto a picture plane&mdash;comes very quickly and instinctively, and that is when I get to surprise myself. (I admire conceptual artists mostly because I will never be one myself.)</p> <p><strong>CP: How obsessive are you?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I&rsquo;m focused and driven, but I don&rsquo;t mind the term obsessive applied to me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154042-Histokay_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Humor is often a big part your work.</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I have a well-honed sense of the ridiculous, I can&rsquo;t ignore it.&nbsp;I&rsquo;d rather feel alive in my work with all its profanity. I don&rsquo;t aspire to be relentlessly transcendent, lofty, minimal, or sacred.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Are you funny IRL?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Hell yeah. (Sometimes funnier than I mean to be.)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154241-Prison_6.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your art school experience and what influence</strong> <strong>it&rsquo;s had on your ongoing practice?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I went to small independent art schools that no longer exist and I was trained as a painter.&nbsp;That early training manifests itself in the formal undercurrents of my work. I learned that visual art should be interesting to look at.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s such a simple requirement, yet many artists fail.</p> <p><strong>CP: What does &ldquo;post internet&rdquo; mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> It&rsquo;s not something I worry about. (Why do people keep on asking me that?)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153939-Boom.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: I read that you have an interest in Nazi art&mdash;what draws you to that subject?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> WTF???????&nbsp;LOL,&nbsp;art in the service of a totalitarian state is not generally great art. I&rsquo;m only interested in Leni Riefenstahl who is problematic because she was a force of nature, a genius and a Nazi, though she claims she wasn&rsquo;t.&nbsp;And if she wasn&rsquo;t, she&rsquo;d have to be the most mind-numbingly ambitious artist in the history of the universe to align herself with the Nazis so she could make her films.&nbsp;</p> <p>Leni&rsquo;s two most famous films are <em>Triumph of the Will</em> about the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremburg, and <em>Olympia</em>, a documentary on the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. b/t/w in later life she claimed that <em>Triumph</em> was about &ldquo;jobs and peace.&rdquo;&nbsp;These films are acknowledged as masterpieces and in the 30s she was recognized as a brilliant but contentious artist worldwide (also much admired by many American film makers, especially Walt Disney, who also knew a thing or two about the enthralling grip of Mythologies.) (Uncle Walt was a fascist too.)</p> <p>She believed that art was something pure and beautiful. Of course, after WWII she was demoted from artist to propagandist by people who also think that art is something pure and beautiful.</p> <p>I have no use for purity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152342-DSC_2914-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of Transfer Gallery</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How did your association with Transfer Gallery begin?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I met Kelani Nicole at <a href="http://gli.tc/h/">gli.tc/h</a> festival in Chicago in 2012. She told me that she had just moved to NYC and was going to open a gallery and would I like a show? I said yes.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about the importance of Transfer Gallery on the wider digital art scene?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Kelani expanded the gallery scene for digital art and has tirelessly promoted emergent practices that very few other galleries were interested in or even aware of five years ago.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152511-Detail_4.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the genesis of the idea for your new show <em>The Great Code</em>?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> <em>The Great Code</em> is a title I stole from the writer Northrop Frye. (The title of my previous show <em>At Play in the Fields of the Lord</em> was stolen from the writer Peter Matthiessen.)</p> <p>I wanted to play with the many definitions of code by showing a print installation that consists of about 3,075 small glazed images of book covers.&nbsp;I&rsquo;ve been working on this project for about 15 years and plan to continue it as long as I live.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154952-Detail_2.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Right after 9-11, a now expired section of the Patriot Act required libraries to hand over records&mdash;without a warrant&mdash;if requested by law enforcement (they also weren&rsquo;t allowed to inform library patrons that their records had been reviewed). Of course the American Library Association fought it in court, because unlike most legislators, librarians have spines. (Apparently many libraries had signage that read, &ldquo;The FBI has not been here. (Look very closely for the removal of this sign.)&rdquo;) So it was in this climate that I decided to do a big beautiful data-dump of every book I can remember reading in my life, highbrow, lowbrow, and everything in between (I read fast and retain very little).</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a giant, brightly lit, shiny pile of prints on a seven by seven foot table. Openness about my reading habits was not a motivation&mdash;the volume of prints prevents a viewer from really seeing much more than what is sitting on top&mdash;and since I install the work, I get to choose what you actually can see. I&rsquo;m a deceptive creature.</p> <p>I also included an installation of six animated GIF collages with even more mixed messaging.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/105731173?byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/105731173" target="_blank">Ways of Something - Episode 1</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you learn from curating/overseeing the <em><a href="https://vimeo.com/105731173" target="_blank">Ways of Something</a> </em>project? What was the best thing about it being shown at the Whitney?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I learned the limitations of an artist-curated project.&nbsp;When artists curate, they bring their own set of blindness and insight to a project.&nbsp;I may tackle something like that again if I come up with an engaging idea and a different format, but I don&rsquo;t plan to apply that particular formula again.&nbsp;</p> <p>The best thing about showing at the Whitney was bringing over 115 people to show with me. I also enjoyed sending out the announcement with a two-word cover letter: FUCK YEAH.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153723-timessquare.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you describe you emotions when you saw your work being shown on giant screens in Times Square?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:&nbsp;</strong>It was disconcerting because I&rsquo;ve never shown at that scale without knowing what it would look like beforehand. It was bewildering so I didn&rsquo;t feel like celebrating, and being Canadian, I thought that I should apologize: &ldquo;Sorry, just a big &rsquo;ole yellow GIF.&rdquo; A few nights later, I saw it a second time and realized that it was really good.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153824-Mt_Light_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: The internet and digital art have become a popular medium for the expression of feminist ideas&mdash;why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong>&nbsp;The internet is where misogyny thrives, so the battle has to take place there.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154507-CRT_20.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up this year?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> In mid-March I will be showing a multi-projection and multi-monitor GIF installation full of gratuitous internet filth at at Festspielhaus Hellerau in Dresden for the <em><a href="http://www.digitalfeminism.net/2018/">dgtl fmnsm</a></em> festival. On March 24, Transfer will be launching my catalog with an essay by Seth Watter as well as celebrating the 5th anniversary of the gallery. Then the next day, the 25th, at 3pm, all four episodes of <em>Ways of Something</em> will be screened at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Courtesy of the artist and Transfer Gallery)</span></p> Wed, 14 Feb 2018 09:03:38 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What Makes Up the Parisian Mystique? Part Two <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last week <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/49102-what-makes-up-the-parisian-mystique-part-one" target="_blank">I asked</a> what decorative beauty inspires in us. This week, I felt the overwhelming power of ornamentation as I walked around the Notre Dame Cathedral.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155104-Artslant_3_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>The mouths of its infamous gargoyles were swollen with icicles because of a recent snowstorm. I wondered: besides being grotesquely cute, what is the purpose of gargoyles?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213161235-Artslant_3_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Architecture and built structures have often been used as propaganda to alter the attitudes and ideals of citizens. Giant towers and buttresses are church- or state-sponsored shows of power through built beauty. Some structures inspire awe, some reverence, others fear. Sometimes, like with soviet statues, their sheer grandiosity is meant to compel an emotional response.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155143-Artslant_3_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>On Sunday I traversed the Place de R&eacute;publique, a square centered around a triumphant monument of Marianne. She loomed over teenagers as they smoked and shuffled and exchanged tentative first kisses.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213160339-Artslant_3_4.jpeg" /></p> <p>Marianne is an overt appeal to patriotism carved in stone, but there are also less tangible threads of manipulative artistry around Paris. How do the light and air and presentation of things affect us?</p> <p>On my street alone I marvel at orderly rows of curated shrimp, bright macarons, and well-manicured trees.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155233-Artslant_3_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>This ambient beauty is a part of the Parisian mystique, a fantasy used to entice, convince, and laud quintessential &ldquo;Frenchness.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Sometimes this feeds into traditional notions of European beauty co-opted by political parties to stir patriotism alongside artistic appreciation.</p> <p>For instance, the National Front often employs a blue rose, its delicate beauty obscuring darker exclusionary aims. The Bloc Identitaire, an anti-Islam group in France, employs traditional French symbols like medieval shields to underline a preferred ancestry.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155257-Artslant_3_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>Marveling at and questioning the links between French beauty and identity is a great way to spend a February snow week in my humble opinion.</p> <p>Next time I&rsquo;ll write a little about advertising as propaganda and look at Roger Caillois&rsquo; visions of a mid-century Paris covered with posters. Here&rsquo;s a busty preview:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155327-Artslant_3_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 13 Feb 2018 08:13:02 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing the ArtSlant Prize IX Winners <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p>We are very excited to announce the ArtSlant Prize IX Winners. Thank you all the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456">jurors</a> from the ArtSlant Prize IX showcase and congratulations to all our <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=juried%5E2017+Winners">juried winners</a>! It is from this pool of juried winners that ArtSlant&rsquo;s Editorial Board selected the ArtSlant Prize Winners. The ArtSlant Prize IX Exhibition will take place during Armory Week in New York at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 6&ndash;12, 2018, booth 2231. Purchase tickets for the fair&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/o/springbreak-art-show-12813445625">here</a>.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>SPRING/BREAK Art Show is an internationally recognized exhibition platform transforming underused, atypical, and historic New York City exhibition spaces to activate and challenge the traditional cultural landscape of the art market. The seventh annual fair will be held&nbsp;from March 6&ndash;12, 2018, at 4 Times Square.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4">&nbsp;</font></em></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; background-color: #00cfa6; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none;">ArtSlant Prize IX Winners:</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1001144/u3azr9/20160731001832-Untitled2016_02sized.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">FIRST PLACE: $3,000</span>&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="color: #000000;">David Rios Ferreira</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1080434/u3azr9/20171216224650-dacalog_04_13_med.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">SECOND PLACE: $1,000</span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti" style="color: #000000;">Sabato Visconti</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1079249/u3azr9/20171206044830-1.KatyaGrokhovskyBadWoman.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">THIRD PLACE: $1,000</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky" style="color: #000000;">Katya Grokhovsky</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067597/u3azr9/20171010035810-daaPo_reo_01.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">HONORABLE MENTION:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo" style="color: #000000;">Da&agrave;p&ograve; Reo</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. The prize recognizes artists who critically engage with their medium and culture at large. Up for grabs are exhibition opportunities and cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;Learn more <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456">here</a>.</p> <p>Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase">Art page</a>. &nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners</a> have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 12 Feb 2018 13:44:37 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What Makes Up the Parisian Mystique? Part One <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a> is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>My gossamer vision of Paris, flimsy and informed by movies, comprises the following things:</p> <p>Douchebag Woody Allen characters who love the rain</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094347-Artslant_2_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>Floral perfumes</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094413-Artslant_2_2.jpeg" /></p> <p>Getrude Stein and her band of modernist cool kids</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094442-Artslant_2_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>Stylized, angry cats</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094614-Artslant_2_4.jpeg" /></p> <p>And Art Nouveau. As I was walking around the city (in the rain) I noted the lilting, romantic flourishes of Art Nouveau all around me. Some signs were from the late 19th century, while others were made to look like they were. Why does this period of ornate line define our aesthetic vision of Paris?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094711-Artslant_2_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>Bombed out Berlin (where I live) has almost no remnants of Art Nouveau left. It&rsquo;s too butch for that. If the two cities were typefaces, they would look something like this:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094743-Artslant_2_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>Art Nouveau took hold during La Belle &Eacute;poque, where prosperity and peace allowed for artistic experimentation and projected wealth. Pre-war Paris is often portrayed as a creative wonderland full of optimism, dotted with posters by Alphonse Mucha and Toulouse-Lautrec. These posters featured a lot of natural, organic forms: like naked women surrounded by flowers.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207094850-Artslant_2_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>This vision of Paris has endured and become its own golden brand, imbuing the city with anachronistic romance. Is that a kind of propaganda? What does this investment in decorative beauty inspire in us? I&rsquo;ll take a look at these and other questions in the second part of this blog post.</p> <p>In the meantime, here&rsquo;s a picture of some earlier, <a href="https://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_pornographic_propaganda_that_was_used_against_marie_antoinette" target="_blank">pornographic propaganda</a> which effectively smeared the original queen of opulence, Marie Antoinette.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180207095000-Artslant_2_8.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Image <a href="http://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_pornographic_propaganda_that_was_used_against_marie_antoinette" target="_blank">via</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 07 Feb 2018 01:59:13 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What’s Lost in the Art World’s Fixation on Price? <p><em>Red is good &ndash; brown is bad &ndash; and nothing with fish</em>. So goes our education in the alchemy of divining an artwork&rsquo;s appeal, as delivered by one of the collectors featured in Nathaniel Kahn&rsquo;s new documentary <em>The Price of Everything</em>. Through candid interviews with artists and industry specialists the film takes us on a pacey journey through the high end of the commercial art world. What does our current relationship with art, creativity, and the commercial structures we have built around them really say about our appreciation of value?</p> <p>With record sales happening left, right, and center, a huge part of popular discourse about art focuses on its price tag. And at the heart of the film are the complex dynamics&mdash;sometimes harmonious, sometimes uneasy&mdash;between commerce and creativity. &ldquo;Art and money have always gone hand in hand,&rdquo; says auctioneer and collector Simon de Pury. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s very important for good art to be expensive. You only protect things that are valuable. If something has no financial value, people don&rsquo;t care.&rdquo; Meanwhile artist Larry Poons asserts that &ldquo;art and money have no intrinsic hook up,&rdquo; and Gerhard Richter asks if it really adds up for a painted canvas to cost more than a house. The film&rsquo;s title evokes Oscar Wilde&rsquo;s definition of a cynic, who &ldquo;knows the price of everything and the value of nothing.&rdquo; Even the most na&iuml;ve art lover knows the &ldquo;value&rdquo; of an artwork has very little to do with any intrinsic material worth. But is our fascination with price in the world of contemporary art causing us to lose sight of true value? And what are the costs of the excesses of a soaring art market?</p> <p>Today the contemporary art sector dominates all other categories of fine art in a market fuelled not only by passionate collectors but by speculation and buying for investment purposes. As the supply of Old Masters and Modern artworks diminished, a young, wealthy set of collectors turned to collecting living artists. The Robert C. Scull auction in 1973 is considered the start of the bullish contemporary art market. The film includes archival footage (including a tense exchange between Scull and Robert Rauschenberg about the profit enjoyed by the former on the sale of a work by the latter), linking early speculative investment in art and the relationship of the secondary market to living artists. Edward Dolman, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Phillips, remembers strong initial resistance from auction houses to the new, unproven, seemingly risky sale category that now accounts for more than half the value of the entire art market<a href="#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title="">[1]</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180206171717-the-price-of-everything---still-3_38479095784_o.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Collector Stefan Edlis appears in&nbsp;<em>The Price of Everything</em>&nbsp;by Nathaniel Kahn, an official selection of the U.S. Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by US Four Productions</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the ensuing years the top end of contemporary art has become synonymous with luxury. <em>The Price of Everything </em>takes us inside multi-million-dollar auction sales, as well as the vast studio of Jeff Koons, where an army of assistants manages the physical production of artworks while the artist discusses $25-35 million commissions, and we&rsquo;re introduced to an exclusive collaboration with Louis Vuitton handbags. The question of &ldquo;value&rdquo; in these vignettes seems to square firmly with the notion of art as commodity, or even as brand. But this high-level system of production strikes a strong contrast with other artists in the documentary, whose style and working processes are less fitting with the lavishness of the current market.</p> <p>Despite the fact that collectors are clamoring for work by living artists, the market can be surprisingly disconnected from the creators themselves. The film follows MacArthur Foundation Grant Award-winning artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby as she watches one of her works get &ldquo;flipped&rdquo; and sold for a huge profit at auction&mdash;none of the resale value is transferred to her, and there is a risk that the new leap in price may set a difficult precedent for her to follow. Akunyili Crosby&rsquo;s artistic process is labor-intensive and time-consuming and, despite demand, her output is limited to around 12 works a year. Her response to the sale is surprise, disappointment, acceptance. Could the heat of the art market be at the expense of artists themselves?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180206171644-the-price-of-everything---still-1_37990467434_o.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Artist Larry Poons appears in&nbsp;<em>The Price of Everything</em>&nbsp;by Nathaniel Kahn, an official selection of the U.S. Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Bob Richman</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Another unexpected casualty of the market&rsquo;s influence may be the evolution of an artist&rsquo;s oeuvre over time. Under growing expectations to produce more&mdash;and more similar&mdash;work, it may be harder than ever for emerging artists to aim towards traditional career development, forming a full range of early, developing, and mature styles. This is by no means a new calculation, however. Larry Poons, an 80-year-old American abstract painter who came to prominence in the 1960s but did not follow an expected career trajectory, emerges as the film&rsquo;s hero of non-conformity. He challenged critical and commercial expectations, refusing to continue producing work in his early op art style. The implication is that Poons did so at the expense of the greater success conferred upon his peers. The flipside, however, is that he has achieved longevity: in his rural, snowy farmhouse studio he prepares large-scale abstract works for an upcoming show. Other artists react differently. George Condo works quickly, almost despite the market, virtually producing a finished artwork before our eyes and happily recreating a character form he has used in previous works. He says that although there is no need to sell everything, it is important not to ignore a creative impulse.</p> <p>The commodification of art is not a new phenomenon. In a Q&amp;A, director Nathaniel Kahn made the point that, viewing the art world as a microcosm of the wider world, what we spend money on reveals our values as a society. In this respect, on some level the surging interest in contemporary art could be seen as positive: by focusing appreciation on the work of living artists, collectors are supporting and embracing a diversity of voices for the benefit of future generations.</p> <p>But in a world where appreciation is as market-based, and the values are so noteworthy&mdash;as the film&rsquo;s closing shot of Leonardo da Vinci&rsquo;s <em>Salvator Mundi</em> selling for $450 million reminds us&mdash;we must be mindful of the effects of a top-heavy market on the lower and mid levels of the industry and on the creative processes and livelihoods of artists in particular. As art writers, readers, art lovers and appreciators, we can also aim to push a discourse which consciously focuses on the creative, cultural, intellectual, and emotional values of contemporary art, not solely the financial spectacle.</p> <p><a href="http://thepriceofeverything.com/" target="_blank"><em>The Price of Everything</em></a><em> premiered at the </em><em>2018 Sundance Film Festival, January 18-28, Park City, Utah. It </em><em>will open in theaters in at least a dozen U.S. markets before debuting on HBO.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/414240-antonia-ward?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Antonia Ward</a></p> <p><em>Antonia Ward is a Los Angeles-based writer, and regional liaison for global art membership organization The Cultivist.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div> <hr align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div id="ftn1"> <p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1" title="">[1]</a> The Art Basel and UBS report &ldquo;<a href="https://d33ipftjqrd91.cloudfront.net/asset/cms/Art_Basel_and_UBS_The_Art_Market_2017.pdf" target="_blank">The Art Market 2017</a>&rdquo; found that in 2016 post war and contemporary art accounted for as much as 52% of total sales by value.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Jeff Koons appears in&nbsp;<em>The Price of Everything</em>&nbsp;by Nathaniel Kahn, an official selection of the U.S. Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by US Four Productions)</span></p> </div> </div> Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:11:56 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Peddling Patriarchy, Profiting from Pain: The Art World’s Funding Problem <p>In October 2017, <a href="http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a12775932/sackler-family-oxycontin/" target="_blank"><em>Esquire</em></a> and <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/30/the-family-that-built-an-empire-of-pain" target="_blank">the <em>New Yorker</em></a> published penetrating articles linking the Sackler family, known to most as patrons of the arts, with the growing opioid crisis in America. The unsympathetic accounts described a family whose empire was built on the aggressive marketing of painkillers, particularly OxyContin; a family that has for decades gone out of their way to keep their name separate from the drug company, Purdue Pharma, and associated activities from which they derived their wealth.</p> <p>These revelations should have rocked the art world. The Sackler name is plastered on art institutions and universities across the globe. Would the family&rsquo;s ties to the opioid epidemic be a new rallying cry in institutional critique?</p> <p>Hardly. At least not yet. The articles, predated by a <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexmorrell/2015/07/01/the-oxycontin-clan-the-14-billion-newcomer-to-forbes-2015-list-of-richest-u-s-families/#1cefe28975e0" target="_blank">2015 <em>Forbes</em> report</a> on the U.S.&rsquo;s richest families and a 2011 piece in <a href="http://fortune.com/2011/11/09/oxycontin-purdue-pharmas-painful-medicine/" target="_blank"><em>Fortune</em></a>, came and went with few ripples on the art front until January when <em>Artforum</em> published <a href="https://www.artforum.com/inprint/issue=201801&amp;id=73181" target="_blank">a personal account</a> by photographer Nan Goldin. The essay divulges her years-long addiction to OxyContin and hard-fought recovery, concluding with the announcement of P.A.I.N. (Prescription Addiction Intervention Now), a group and <a href="https://www.change.org/p/hold-the-sackler-family-and-purdue-pharma-accountable-for-the-opioid-crisis" target="_blank">petition</a> organized to hold the Sackler family accountable for their role in the opioid crisis.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BeQuSwCF-EE/" data-instgrm-version="8" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" margin:8px 0 0 0; padding:0 4px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BeQuSwCF-EE/" style=" color:#000; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none; word-wrap:break-word;" target="_blank">Story of my addiction to OxyContin and the Sackler family who are filthy rich off them. SIGN THE PETITION AGAINST THEM. Link in bio. @sacklerpain</a></p> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;">A post shared by <a href="https://www.instagram.com/nangoldinstudio/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px;" target="_blank"> Nan Goldin</a> (@nangoldinstudio) on <time datetime="2018-01-22T18:10:26+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 22, 2018 at 10:10am PST</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Goldin has been widely commended for her initiative, most recently by philanthropist Elizabeth Sackler herself, who offered solidarity and support. &ldquo;I admire Nan Goldin&rsquo;s commitment to take action and her courage to tell her story,&rdquo; <a href="https://hyperallergic.com/422738/elizabeth-sackler-nan-goldin-opioid-epidemic/" target="_blank">she told Hyperallergic</a> in a statement last month. &ldquo;I stand in solidarity with artists and thinkers whose work and voices must be heard.&rdquo;</p> <p>What sounds like an opportunity to make amends, however, quickly shifts gears when Sackler denies her father&rsquo;s, and by extension her own, culpability in the opioid epidemic: &ldquo;My father, Arthur M. Sackler, died in 1987, before OxyContin existed and his one-third option in Purdue Frederick was sold by his estate to his brothers a few months later.&rdquo;</p> <p>It&rsquo;s true that Elizabeth Sackler&rsquo;s branch of the family does not currently benefit from Purdue Pharma, and they are, as <em>Esquire</em> describes them, &ldquo;mere multi-millionaires&rdquo; to their billionaire cousins. What she leaves out of this refutation, however, is the fact that her inherited wealth stems from something equally sinister.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205172446-valium-1971.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://prescriptiondrugs.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=005642" target="_blank">Valium advertisement</a>, 1971</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Drug Addiction Is a Feminist Issue</strong></p> <p>Arthur Sackler&rsquo;s work in drug advertising ultimately paved the way for a groundbreaking painkiller to become a deadly epidemic. He was not a drug developer, but a peddler, responsible for developing and establishing norms for some of the most unethical and predatory practices in drug marketing today, like marketing directly to physicians. Arthur, a psychiatrist, got rich promoting the tranquilizers Librium and Valium during the sixties, largely as an addictive panacea for shifts in gender relations. &ldquo;Most of the questionable practices that propelled the pharmaceutical industry into the scourge it is today can be attributed to Arthur Sackler,&rdquo; proposes Allen Frances, former chair of psychiatry at Duke University School of Medicine in the <em>New Yorker</em> expos&eacute;. Speaking about Elizabeth Sackler&rsquo;s statement, Goldin told <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/jan/22/nan-goldin-interview-us-opioid-epidemic-heroin-addict-oxycontin-sackler-family" target="_blank">the <em>Guardian</em></a> recently, &ldquo;She&rsquo;s not off the hook.&rdquo;</p> <p>Drug addiction&mdash;particularly to prescription painkillers and tranquilizers&mdash;has long been a feminist issue. Women have been <a href="https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/gqmx9j/here-lady-take-some-pills-for-your-hysteria-253" target="_blank">liberally fed pills</a> for their anxiety, depression, and pain for over a century. At one point, the former First Lady of the United States, Betty Ford, undertook addiction treatment for, among other things, tranquilizer abuse. Librium and Valium &ldquo;<a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMbkrev0809177" target="_blank">were unabashedly promoted as wonder drugs</a> that could be used to help manage an enormous range of life problems, ranging from tension, nerves, and irritability to menopause, juvenile delinquency, family and marital difficulties, and problems at work.&rdquo; Arthur Sackler&rsquo;s advancement of these tranquilizers as a means of maintaining patriarchal harmony in the modern home cost how many women&rsquo;s lives? These drugs&rsquo; commercial success (Valium was the first $100 million drug in the U.S.) shaped the aggressive marketing template replicated by drug companies to this very day. It is the greatest irony that fifty years after <a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001P2NI38/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&amp;btkr=1" target="_blank">feminists united against Valium</a> (which they were prescribed <a href="https://www.alternet.org/drugs/falling-love-again-amazing-history-marketing-and-wide-legal-use-todays-dangerous-drugs" target="_blank">twice as often</a> as men), the grand matron of feminist art&rsquo;s wealth comes from the marketing of that very drug. No, it&rsquo;s not OxyContin, but it&rsquo;s not irrelevant either.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205172619-femsingle.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://prescriptiondrugs.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=005637" target="_blank">Valium advertisement</a>, 1970</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Elizabeth Sackler&rsquo;s shallow display of solidarity and denial of culpability raises thorny questions that implicate not only her family, but all of us: Who is to blame in a problem as intricate and diffuse as the opioid epidemic: the drug makers or the hustlers? Are inheritors responsible for their parents&rsquo; sins? Can &ldquo;solidarity&rdquo; exist without remorse? What do we want to know about the money undergirding our art institutions? Are we, as makers, consumers, and lovers of art, also &ldquo;not off the hook&rdquo;?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Our Problematic Faves</strong></p> <p>One of the most troubling outcomes of Sackler&rsquo;s solidarity statement is how quickly the art world appeared to breath a sigh of relief. In comments across social media people seemed thankful that they didn&rsquo;t have to address their discomfort over a beloved scholar and benefactor&rsquo;s relationship to a deadly epidemic. People seem not only ready and willing, but <em>grateful</em> to be able to give Elizabeth Sackler a pass. She&rsquo;s largely been taken at her word, a luxury we are more than happy to afford this rich woman rather than confront our own uneasy feelings about enjoying the fruits of her wealth.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205172904-Sackler_comments_6.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205172950-Sackler_comments_5.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the wake of Goldin&rsquo;s <em>Artforum</em> essay, Hyperallergic published <a href="https://hyperallergic.com/419850/our-incomplete-list-of-cultural-institutions-and-initiatives-funded-by-the-sackler-family/">a list of institutions</a> funded by the Sacklers. However, satisfied by a promissory note documenting the sale of Arthur Sackler&rsquo;s Purdue Frederick stock options to his brothers, Mortimer and Raymond, Hyperallergic removed all institutions that received donations by Elizabeth and Arthur Sackler from their list. There was no interrogation of the money those institutions were funded with.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205173115-Sackler_comments_1.png" /><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205173057-Sackler_comments_3.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://news.artnet.com/opinion/discussion-sacklers-oxycontin-facts-elizabeth-a-sackler-1203458" target="_blank">This artnet op-ed</a> even better describes the mental gymnastics some are taking to ignore the truth about their problematic faves. Natalie Frank, an artist and member of the Council for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, makes the argument that we shouldn&rsquo;t implicate Arthur or Elizabeth Sackler because it &ldquo;jeopardizes their legacies.&rdquo; The Sackler Center&rsquo;s &ldquo;mission is important,&rdquo; Frank urges, going on to praise the museum&rsquo;s pivotal exhibitions and Elizabeth Sackler&rsquo;s unapologetic use of the word &ldquo;feminist.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>So, Can I Still Go to My Favorite Museum?</strong></p> <p>Good deeds do not cancel out bad ones, but do bad ones discredit the good? It&rsquo;s not a zero sum game. The Sacklers can do tremendous things for the arts <em>and</em> have skeletons in their closets. But let&rsquo;s confront that dynamic at least, not let Sackler and her representatives take control of the narrative. The editorial board of the <em>Harvard Crimson</em> penned <a href="http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2018/1/26/editorial-harvard-oxycontin/">a piece</a> last month urging the University to investigate the intricacies of the Sackler family, &ldquo;its finances, ethics, and societal influence,&rdquo; and consider severing ties with the extended family (including the descendants of Arthur). We must ask the same of our institutions, however uncomfortable that makes us.</p> <p>The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum has done incredible work in exhibitions and programming to honor women and their artwork. Sackler herself is lauded as a prominent feminist cultural historian and philanthropist. But it is the worst face of white feminism to fight for your right to oppress others while simultaneously denying the harm you are doing. It&rsquo;s clear that the art world wants her money; but you know who else could use that money? Prescription drug and heroin addicts, needle exchange programs, rehabilitation centers, education programs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BdifKbLBrc6/" data-instgrm-version="8" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" margin:8px 0 0 0; padding:0 4px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BdifKbLBrc6/" style=" color:#000; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none; word-wrap:break-word;" target="_blank">Nan Goldin with Alex Sturrock, Sackler Grid, 2017</a></p> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;">A post shared by <a href="https://www.instagram.com/sacklerpain/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px;" target="_blank"> Sackler PAIN</a> (@sacklerpain) on <time datetime="2018-01-04T19:13:09+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 4, 2018 at 11:13am PST</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To make those sort of amends would be tantamount to admitting guilt, however, and the descendants of Arthur Sackler appear unready to confront the dark side of their privilege. It&rsquo;s much easier to condemn others (one&rsquo;s own family, even!), than to try to make things right in any meaningful way. And that extends to us, the artists and writers and art lovers who benefit from cultural philanthropy. Drug overdoses are currently the leading cause of death for Americans under 50, taking some <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/epidemic/index.html" target="_blank">115 lives</a> a day. Sure, we&rsquo;d rather enjoy our museums without thinking about death and suffering, but we must examine the connection, even if we can&rsquo;t agree on an easy solution.</p> <p>Being an ethical human being is hard. We all draw our own lines of acceptability, and we get it wrong, constantly. What we must not do is turn a blind eye to avoid the uncomfortable work of drawing those lines. You can enjoy the Met, or the Brooklyn Museum, or the Serpentine Sackler, and still demand they do better&mdash;whether you want them to investigate the connections between their donors and the opioid crisis; fully divest themselves of drug-related money; rename their rooms, and escalators, and institutes; sponsor educational programming related to opioid addiction; host fundraisers or give something back to affected communities across the nation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BdltuvPFalb/" data-instgrm-version="8" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" margin:8px 0 0 0; padding:0 4px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BdltuvPFalb/" style=" color:#000; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none; word-wrap:break-word;" target="_blank">@sacklerpain</a></p> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;">A post shared by <a href="https://www.instagram.com/nangoldinstudio/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px;" target="_blank"> Nan Goldin</a> (@nangoldinstudio) on <time datetime="2018-01-06T01:18:10+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jan 5, 2018 at 5:18pm PST</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>From Dirty Money, Restitution</strong></p> <p>Can ill-gotten money ever be disconnected from its source? This is a perennial question. It pops back into our consciousness every time we are reminded of the ties between capitalism and the arts: when a performance space in Lincoln Center is <a href="https://davidhkochtheater.com/" target="_blank">renamed after a Koch brother</a>, when a company running asylum seeker detention centers <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/11/sydney-biennale-boycott-victory-shows-that-divestment-works" target="_blank">sponsors a biennial</a>, when our museums are &ldquo;<a href="https://vimeo.com/76011774" target="_blank">battlefields</a>&rdquo; bankrolled by weapons manufacturers. Our <a href="https://www.widewalls.ch/9-billionaire-art-patrons-backing-presidential-candidates/larry-ellison-2/" target="_blank">billionaire arts benefactors have political points-of-view</a>, naturally, and their money comes from industries we may not always be comfortable with. Allow me this brief, but important tangent: As long as our arts institutions have little or no public funding, we will continue to confront these unsettling questions. Can we envision a system that doesn&rsquo;t rely on the obscenely wealthy using arts as a rebranding strategy? A system where institutions are accountable not to trustees and tourists, but their local constituents? A system that truly believes the arts are in the public interest?</p> <p>Descendents are not inherently guilty of their ancestors&rsquo; misdeeds but, in some cases, they do benefit from them. Elizabeth Sackler has done admirable philanthropic work in the arts but her wealth originated in the drug-based maintenance of patriarchal norms. Does the permanent installation of Judy Chicago&rsquo;s <em>The Dinner Party </em>absolve her? No. When stories about her family&rsquo;s connections to the opioid epidemic began to circulate, she could have said nothing, simply maintaining a status quo that has long worked in her favor. But her denial of the ways her privilege stems from the death and suffering of others, those in poverty and pain, belies her message. It marks her statement as the hollow virtue signaling it is. We must not reward her for that.</p> <p>On Thursday, Elizabeth Sackler <a href="https://www.artforum.com/inprint/issue=201802&amp;id=73656" target="_blank">responded in <em>Artforum</em></a> to Nan Goldin&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.change.org/p/hold-the-sackler-family-and-purdue-pharma-accountable-for-the-opioid-crisis" target="_blank">petition</a>. Instead of using this platform to outline the shape her solidarity would take, she took the opportunity to reiterate her innocence. Much more interesting was Goldin&rsquo;s response, published beneath Sackler&rsquo;s statement, welcoming Sackler as an ally and detailing tangible ways her family&rsquo;s wealth and influence can stem the tide of the opioid crisis. Elizabeth Sackler can stand in true solidarity with survivors and victims by using her money and the goodwill she clearly has in the arts community to fund addiction treatment and education. She must encourage her extended family to do the same. Real solidarity begins with restitution.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p><em>Andrea Alessi is the Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <a href="https://nyamcenterforhistory.org/2013/01/09/symbols-in-a-life-of-psychic-tension/" target="_blank">Valium advertisement</a>, 1970)</span></p> Mon, 05 Feb 2018 14:07:44 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Doraelia Ruiz Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show_as_email/46511-under-the-radar-doraelia-ruiz-joseph-gurka-elisabeth-wedenig" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/465743-doraelia-ruiz" target="_blank">Doraelia Ruiz</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Wow this question, for me, is really loaded. As an artist I try my best to communicate my experience as a human being living in this time and age. I&#39;ve done work about everything from heartbreak to social class to mass commercialization&mdash;you name it. In the end I always work from a place of passion. What might make me passionate today might make me apathetic tomorrow. My paintings can sometimes &ldquo;die out&rdquo; because I look at them and only see that moment in time. Like looking at an old photograph of yourself: you know it&rsquo;s you but sometimes it&rsquo;s unrecognizable.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205134038-20170416061034-Other_Half.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I don&rsquo;t think an artist has a responsibility to anyone but themself. The idea of &ldquo;responsibility&rdquo; stopped me from being an artist for many years. It really isn&rsquo;t every parent&rsquo;s dream for their child to become a starving painter living in a tiny studio in Hollywood. I believed I owed the opportunities I was given at Brown to pursue a more steady career. I realized years later I put those responsibilities on myself, needlessly. So I am not much of a believer in responsibility. Art is an incredibly selfish profession and it needs to be; you should never do art for anyone but yourself. So I guess if an artist has any responsibility, it is to make sure they are being true to themself. That&rsquo;s the only way any authentic work can be made.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205134000-Solo_MFA_thesis_Show_2016.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Probably the installation for my MFA thesis show. In the weeks leading up to the show, I worked harder than I ever have before and became addicted to the drama of it.&nbsp;I was able to splurge on materials and make the large-scale works I have always wanted. Together with my father, his girlfriend, and my best friend we installed the show in a way we felt was perfect. The result was a fantastic failure. The installation infuriated my core faculty who felt the layout undermined the work. I spent the hours before my opening arguing tooth and nail for my vision. They asked me to change the installation one hour before opening, and they weren&rsquo;t sure they were going to sign off on my thesis. I was shell-shocked. When it came time for my opening talk, I hadn&rsquo;t even had any time to prepare. I barely had time to get dressed after the arguing had extended into hours. So I walked up and I gave the most passionate and driven talk about what that show meant to me. I wouldn&rsquo;t have been able to really know what my work meant, what my installation meant, or what I meant as an artist had I not had that terrible crit right before. I am still really proud of that epic failure.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Never say never! Seriously though, there&rsquo;s nothing that I haven&rsquo;t thought about that I would resign to say it would never happen. Finances change, technology changes, personal interests change. I am living in a reality I once thought would &ldquo;never&rdquo; happen.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180205134340-20160908051229-image.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>I can&rsquo;t say for sure you wont know them but:</p> <p><a href="http://www.mekajean.com/" target="_blank">Tameka Jenean Norris</a> is an amazing artist working around concepts of race, class, and education. She uses almost any medium. When I am sad, and often when I was abroad for my work and lonely, I would listen to her album <em>Ivy League Ratchet</em>, and lyrics like &ldquo;I&rsquo;m so strong, I&rsquo;m all alone&rdquo; and &ldquo;can&rsquo;t shit on my dreams cuz I got a yale degree&rdquo; really resonated with me. I love how she embraces both the worlds of being low-income and being an Ivy League graduate openly.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.meganstclair.com" target="_blank">Megan St. Clair</a> is a wonderful mixed media artist I met in grad school. I saw Megan&rsquo;s path differ from mine: she came in as a conceptual artist and left grad school with a messy painter&rsquo;s studio. I saw her just give in to her passion and voice as an artist and release any preconceived notions of &ldquo;should.&rdquo; Megan now runs Softcore LA, a pop-up gallery for emerging artists, and has written for Hyperallergic, Fresh Paint Magazine, and more. She is one of the hardest working, most ethical, and talented artists I know. I am definitely extremely proud to be in her cohort. She is one of the few artists that make me continue to believe in art.</p> <p><a href="http://www.sallybruno.com/" target="_blank">Sally Bruno</a> was a year ahead of me in graduate school and is one of the best painters I have ever met. The photos of her work do not do justice to their texture and flow of color. It&rsquo;s as if they freeze solid while turning 3D and the colors just mind-glowingly blend, flow, and fight together in the most nonsensical ways.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of Doraelia Ruiz)</span></p> Mon, 05 Feb 2018 10:24:03 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Genevieve Goffman Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48765-under-the-radar-genevieve-goffman-katrina-majkut-sheelah-mahalath-bewley" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from</em><em> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490681-genevieve-goffman" target="_blank"><em>Genevieve Goffman</em></a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I demonstrate how narratives both outline the path of and frequently propel the distribution of power. How dominant power structures parabolize history, co-opt memory, and distort perceptions of current events. I am mildly obsessed with charting how states or political movements use memorialization as tool to manipulate communal memory and weaponize emotions. On the flip side, I&rsquo;m also committed to highlighting narrative details and fragments that fall through the cracks. I&rsquo;m interested in the ways individuals use tropes from stories, especially fantasy stories, to create narratives that empower them to sidestep rigid structures of value, toxic relationship forms, or allow them to escape the expectations of capital.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129132945-20180117225951-_MG_7297edit.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Genevieve and the Hydra</em> (detail),&nbsp;2017, Offset Lithograph print on newspaper, 20 x 29 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I think that different artists have different responsibilities. As an artist with my specific privileges, opportunities, and skills I have a specific set of responsibilities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I am committed to seriously exploring the pedagogical role of art. Art has a tremendous potential to make information available through nontraditional methods that could be more accessible and appealing than traditional education. Part of this power is the unique role art can play in encapsulating contradictions. If there are two truths that contradict each other, they can both be presented together undamaged.</p> <p>That said, I am not interested in making propaganda. I am fascinated by the German Anti-Monumentalists, such as Esther and Jochen Gerz who struggled with the concept of making anti-fascist monuments, give the fascist connotations of monuments in and of themselves. I think that art, especially public art, can be dictatorial and co-opt emotions. It is not the responsibility of artists to engage in emotional extortion or spell out how people should perceive the stories around them, but I do think we can lay out information, narratives, and histories while making space for the audience to develop their own.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p>I think the best things I make are often screen shots or little artifacts I find online. But I guess one time I did Photoshop my friend&rsquo;s face on to Jacques-Louis David&rsquo;s <em>The Death of Marat. &nbsp;</em>I thought that was pretty clever.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129132641-Screenshot_2018-01-17_20.06.16.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I am never going to direct or star in a music video, that&rsquo;s sort of the dream, right? I used to fantasize about it when I was younger. I love the music video as a concept. But I honestly don&rsquo;t know how to make videos. And honestly, I mostly fantasized about being like the love interest so maybe that&rsquo;s not the most inspiring dream. Also I&rsquo;m never going to build a boat. That would be dangerous and I don&rsquo;t actually even know if I want to.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129133104-20170916202843-111316_GGoffman-31.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Exfantasy</em> (curtain 2 of 5),&nbsp;2016, Digital Print on Fabric, 35 x 64 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.imanie.info/" target="_blank">Imani Elizabeth Jackson</a> is a poet and artist from Chicago, who also makes beautiful zines and books. I love her and everything she does.</p> <p><a href="http://www.tabithanikolai.com/" target="_blank">Tabitha Nikolai</a> is an artist and professor from Portland. She just makes the most crazy inspired sculptures and virtual reality projects. Just like the best of geek culture, video games, fantasy, etc., but also deeply grounded in historical research and like material mastery. She recently did a show in Tokyo and the clothing she made, I don&rsquo;t even know if I can describe it as clothing, but you should check it out.</p> <p>I also really like <a href="http://www.ginawynbrandt.com/" target="_blank">Gina Wynbrandt</a>&rsquo;s comic books about sex. I don&rsquo;t like most art about sex at all, but these are good.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Genevieve and the Hydra (print),&nbsp;</em>2017, Inkjet on canvas, 20 x 30 inches)</span></p> Mon, 29 Jan 2018 05:35:17 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Emmanuel Monzon | Irina Raffo | FeiFan Zhang <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/428889-emmanuel-monzon?utm_source=EmmanuelMonzon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Emmanuel Monzon &ndash; Seattle</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1015329?utm_source=EmmanuelMonzon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1015329/u3azr9/20161104185815-emmanuel_monzon_1.jpg.JPG" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1015330?utm_source=EmmanuelMonzon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1015330/mf2ji7/20161104185924-emmanuel_monzon_3.jpg.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1015333?utm_source=EmmanuelMonzon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1015333/mf2ji7/20161104190035-emmanuel_monzon_5.jpg.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1015334?utm_source=EmmanuelMonzon&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1015334/mf2ji7/20161104190052-emmanuel_monzon_9.jpg.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494373-irina-raffo?utm_source=IrinaRaffo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Irina Raffo &ndash; Buenos Aires &amp; Montevideo</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073681?utm_source= IrinaRaffo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073681/u3azr9/20171101153043-Irina_Raffo_008_W.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073683?utm_source=IrinaRaffo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073683/mf2ji7/20171101153045-Irina_Raffo_010W.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073680?utm_source=IrinaRaffo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073680/mf2ji7/20171101153038-Irina_Raffo_004_W.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073684?utm_source=IrinaRaffo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073684/mf2ji7/20171101153046-Irina_Raffo_011W.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494363-feifan-zhang?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">FeiFan Zhang &ndash; Chicago</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/1071881?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1071881/u3azr9/20171030081216-1272_Fixed_5-S_44x55in_240dpi_18_sm_copy_copy.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1071887?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1071887/mf2ji7/20171030081829-_No_Man_s_Land___No.1284__2017.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1071883?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1071883/mf2ji7/20171030081219-1281_4_cleaner-S_44x55in_240dpi_30_sm_copy_copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1071885?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1071885/mf2ji7/20171030081224-1278_7_Fixed-S_44x55in_240dpi_15_sm_copy_copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48965-our-new-residency-is-now-accepting-applications-process-park" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204002549-Process-park-logo-sq.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:57:06 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list City of Lights, City of Fonts <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a> is a</em><em>&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;</em><em>Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Over the last few years I&rsquo;ve done comics about hungover bears, art zombies, and queer mermaids. See a particularly emo Hungover Bear below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129090440-ArtslantScan1small.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>More recently, I&rsquo;ve focused on visual interviews, comic reportage, and a non-fiction graphic novel based on immigration and bohemia in Berlin. It was while researching Germany&rsquo;s political climate for this graphic novel that I fell into a *font-wormhole.</p> <p><span style="font-size:16px;">*This is when your friends roll their eyes as you lecture them about the inherent terribleness of gothic blackletter fonts over ramen.</span></p> <p>While in the grip of this affliction, I researched fonts of the Third Reich, including &ldquo;Fraktur,&rdquo; an ultra-Germanic typeface revived then discarded by the Nazis.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129090552-ArtslantScan2small.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It made me curious about the evolving aesthetics of nationalism and how they relate to our current, tumultuous moment. The AFD, Germany&rsquo;s ascendant right-wing party, uses &ldquo;Bold Futura,&rdquo; a font favored in Wes Anderson movies, the TV show <em>Sesame Street</em>, as well as other bright, symmetrical, non-fascist entertainment.</p> <p>France&rsquo;s National Front political party, when helmed by Jean-Marie Le Pen, also used a variant of Futura in posters. Now the party deploys a variety of fonts and symbols to laud ethnic &ldquo;Frenchness&rdquo; and demonize otherness: specifically, immigrants. During the election last year, Marine Le Pen positioned herself visually as a new &ldquo;Marianne.&rdquo; Marianne, a national symbol of liberation often starred in World War I recruitment posters for France, imploring patriots to join her cause. She was usually draped in or waving a flag and cast as the defiant, topless defender of the republic.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129090617-ArtslantScan3small.jpg" /></p> <p>So what are the aesthetics of nationalism and propaganda? That&rsquo;s one of the questions I&rsquo;ll ask in this blog. We all recognize chiseled men holding things up triumphantly from Soviet propaganda, but what visual strategies are being used in 2018?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129090644-ArtslantScan4small.jpg" /></p> <p>How have politicized and weaponized visuals evolved? People have spoken a lot about the 2016 U.S. election and campaigns of misinformation, but thinkpieces have mostly focused on words, captions, and taglines. What about the images we consumed? In a world that&rsquo;s becoming increasingly visual, how are images being dispersed and how are we absorbing them?</p> <p>Some tropes endure. For example, giant hands aggressively gripping things seems to be a pretty consistent hallmark of political propaganda. Here is an image from a recent National Front ad, imploring French voters to &ldquo;Defend Our Colors.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129091355-ArtslantScan5small.jpg" /></p> <p>Images can manipulate emotions in ways that defy rational thought, evoking nebulous and romantic ideas of heroism and morality. The term &ldquo;propaganda&rdquo; originated in the Catholic Church after all, helping to inspire fantastic and ecstatic belief. But despite its current, negative connotation, not all propaganda is harmful:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129091427-ArtslantScan6small.jpg" /></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px;">*Quote by Martin Luther King Jr. from <em>How Propaganda Works</em> by Jason Stanley</span></p> <p>So what is the difference between harmful propaganda that appeals to *&ldquo;flawed ideologies&rdquo; and images that appeal emotionally to further the greater good?</p> <p><span style="font-size:16px;">*also from <em>How Propaganda Works</em></span></p> <p>I&rsquo;m not sure. But Paris, the former ground zero for competing forms of propaganda, is a good place to start visual sleuthing.</p> <p>This blog will be a visual diary of contemporary and historical Paris, looking at the dueling propaganda poster-wars of the 1940s, Art Nouveau metro stops, contemporary signage, and right-wing memes. What kinds of propaganda are there in the City of Lights? And what images make up the flickering Parisian mystique?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180129091510-ArtslantScan7small.jpg" /></p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 07 Feb 2018 01:58:52 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list A Dog in the Fight: The Exploitation of Animals in Art <p>We kill them, hunt them, destroy their habitats and communities, display them, wear, buy, use, and discard them. Occasionally we attempt to save them from what we&#39;ve done. Animals are the original victims of helotry, oppressed and wherever possible forced into servitude in pursuit of humankind&rsquo;s betterment. Our presumption of ownership, and mistreatment in the name of religious rituals, clothing, entertainment, or work is the eternal hallmark of our depravity. In the art world, animals, dead and alive, are too often procured as raw material, justified by inauthentic claims of raising issues regarding their plight, or as metaphors for our own appetites. In the most egregious cases, they are not more than tortured vehicles, driven hard in pursuit of undeserved attention.</p> <p>Art is supposed to be out in front of its society, a clarion vision of what is coming. Or, it responds to what is, or has recently happened, elucidating problems that might otherwise slip beneath the streaming, digital sludge that is visual life today. Animal abuse is never <em>out</em> of the news, and nobody can assert ignorance of it unless willfully. So what points are artists who inflict it, flirt with it, or denigrate an animal&rsquo;s dignity, adding to our collective consciousness? Most often they expose only their own limitations by placing art behind the curve, at the back of the conversation, chasing, rather than alerting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>Art is supposed to be out in front of its society... artists who abuse animals place art behind the curve, at the back of the conversation.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Physical Harm</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180126094853-helena.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Marco Evaristti,&nbsp;<em>Helena</em>. Courtesy of <a href="https://www.evaristti.com/helena-el/" target="_blank">the artist</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Rightfully, there is little tolerance for artists who have most shockingly pained or executed animals. Among them is Tom Otterness, who once shot and <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/19/tom-otterness-central-subway-contract_n_970040.html" target="_blank">killed a dog</a> and is now reduced to littering subway stations with his asinine, gnomish globules straight from the clearance shelves of a Christmas store in January. So lurid is the shadow of his action that even creative <a href="http://gothamist.com/2014/09/05/otterness_shot_dog_statue.php" target="_blank">responses</a> to his shame seem smug and predictable; Jesse Power, and his cohorts hanged, slit the throat of, and <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/27/movies/a-selfproclaimed-artist-and-an-inexplicable-act-of-cruelty.html" target="_blank">disemboweled a cat</a>, apparently as some form of artistic investigation; the infantile antics of Marco Evaristti include inviting his audience to <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/3040891.stm">liquefy goldfish</a> (two were killed); while <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinkebell" target="_blank">Katinka Simonse</a>&nbsp;(Tinkebell), <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2008/mar/30/art.spain" target="_blank">Guillermo Vargas</a>, <a href="http://www.nathaliaedenmont.com/change/" target="_blank">Nathalia Edenmont</a>, and many others are gratingly coy in acknowledging the veracity of their processes or one-liner art, garnering them notoriety, without quite proving the amorality or illegality of their actions.</p> <p>As was widely reported over the last few months, several works in the Guggenheim&rsquo;s recent exhibition <em><a href="https://www.guggenheim.org/exhibition/art-and-china-after-1989-theater-of-the-world" target="_blank">Art and China After 1989: Theater of the World</a></em> stirred public consternation, causing several pieces to be withdrawn. Huang Yong Ping&rsquo;s titular piece consists of a domed, gladiatorial arena containing insects, arachnids, and reptiles, imprisoned in unnatural proximity, and left to consume each other in bloody combat. The piece has <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/vancouver-insect-art-exhibit-removed-1.658916" target="_blank">faced controversy before</a>. Coming into the Guggenheim, artist and museum both knew the reactions they would receive, but crept ahead anyway behind that insufferable shield of artistic license.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a-vxuesH75w" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Other banished works include a video of Sun Yuan and Peng Yu&rsquo;s 2003 work&nbsp;<em>Dogs That Cannot Touch Each Other</em>&nbsp;featuring pairs of pit bulls leashed to treadmills, facing each other, snarling and agitated just beyond each other&rsquo;s reach, and&nbsp;Xu Bing&rsquo;s 1994 film&nbsp;<em>A Case Study of Transference</em>&nbsp;depicting&nbsp;two swine having sex, stamped with English and Chinese textual motifs.</p> <p>This is not to infer that artists best avoid utilizing animals within, or as, art <em>at all.</em> Whether an artist <em>ought </em>to make an artwork is a quite different conversation from demanding that they <em>mustn&rsquo;t. </em>But if we do not expect artists to move past our basest urges, if we cannot require them to be clever enough to surpass sophomorism and exalt discourse, then the societal potential of art is surrendered to self-indulgence and grotesque snuff tactics.</p> <p>Perhaps no occasion illuminates the point more vividly than deranged animal abuser and all-star sociopath Kim Jones&rsquo; repellent 1976 crime <em>Rat Piece</em>, which comprised the burning alive of three male rats. Set to their agonized, screaming deaths, the artist romped about covered in mud as a toddler might. While it doesn&rsquo;t merit critical attention as art, it reverberates as much for the selfishness of his response, as his unhinged cruelty.</p> <p>&ldquo;People still get upset about it,&rdquo; Jones <a href="https://books.google.nl/books?id=-Y4AAwAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PT145&amp;lpg=PT145&amp;dq=%25E2%2580%259CI+can+understand+that+because+I+tortured+the+animals+to+death,+but+it+was+important+for+me+to+have+that+experience+as+an+art+piece.%25E2%2580%259D&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=2XTh9Y_-yP&amp;sig=Xws1yG0PD1-kZyUYGdk9BwIS9Rw&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwiz7vCu5_DYAhXSIlAKHXRgCpgQ6AEIKTAA%23v=onepage&amp;q=%25E2%2580%259CI%2520can%2520understand%2520that%2520because%2520I%2520tortured%2520the%2520animals%2520to%2520death%252C%2520but%2520it%2520was%2520important%2520for%2520me%2520to%2520have%2520that%2520experience%2520as%2520an%2520art%2520piece.%25E2%2580%259D&amp;f=false" target="_blank">has said</a>. &ldquo;I can understand that because I tortured the animals to death, but it was important for me to have that experience as an art piece.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Less Extreme Use of Animals and Dignity Infringement</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180126093214-6889090241_423090e11e_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Darren Bader installation at MoMA PS1, 2012. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/garrettziegler/6889090241/" target="_blank">Garrett Ziegler</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In relatively benign cases such as Naveen Thomas&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.hindustantimes.com/india/artiste-in-soup-for-confining-pigeons/story-uav2W3ytGVPLxRRjD0VQHL.html" target="_blank">pigeon and copper wire installation</a>, or Miru Kim&rsquo;s laughable Beuys homage, <em><a href="http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/miru-kims-nude-art-with-pigs-made-them-sick-activist-says-6385782" target="_blank">I Like Pigs and Pigs Like Me</a></em>, welfare remains of concern, if not perhaps, outright alarm. There is another concern though: the abuse of art itself through the meritless futility of such pathetically superficial artworks.</p> <p>The vapidness of many animals-as-artworks further erodes the public&rsquo;s already tenuous relationship with contemporary art as anything relatable or substantive, because while it is relatively easy to make work with animals, it is exceedingly difficult to make <em>successful</em> work with animals. It requires a balancing of the affection in which animals are held generally, a note of humility and extreme care, with simply stated commentary on universally accessible experiences that may be highlighted by the animals&rsquo; presence.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>Just because a gallery gives you enough room to swing a cat doesn&rsquo;t mean it&rsquo;s advisable.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Darren Bader <a href="http://observer.com/2012/04/when-is-a-cat-not-a-cat-when-its-a-sculpture/" target="_blank">displayed cats</a> in a gallery, and referred to them as artworks. They were not artworks; they were cats. Bader&rsquo;s sanctimonious, semantic aggrandizing is the kind of hollow gesture that critics behold with glee for its attempted subversion of staple terms. But just because a gallery gives you enough room to swing a cat doesn&rsquo;t mean it&rsquo;s advisable. It was a clumsy lurch at the boundaries of material definition, but at least the cats were presumably well cared for&mdash;if not entirely comfortable&mdash;and available for adoption. The employment of art world terms to describe matter that is jarringly incongruous to that assertion can be a sign of a marketing-savvy artist, but one in creative disarray. Wim Delvoye submitted to the same tactic, when he referred to <a href="https://wimdelvoye.be/work/art-farm/tattooed-pigs-1/" target="_blank">his tattooed pigs</a>, as &ldquo;canvasses.&rdquo;</p> <p>Additionally, a great handicap of using live creatures is that animals are more intriguing and captivating in and of themselves, than anything an artist might try to say <em>through</em> them. The audience then is engaged by the natural wonder of proximity to even a relatively common animal. At that juncture art&rsquo;s feebleness in surmounting such fascination is exposed, and its messaging is lost. Here, the zookeeper is of greater value than the artist.</p> <p>Jannis Kounellis&rsquo;&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.artnews.com/2015/06/25/kounellis-horses-have-first-u-s-showing-at-gavin-browns-enterprise/" target="_blank">Untitled (12 Horses)</a></em> might have set up a lovely experience, but that is because horses are marvelous, not because Gavin Brown says they are art. Artists then must be aware of these challenges and be capable of managing them; most aren&rsquo;t. Instead they succumb to the lure of the quick buck of notice that animals can bring. Perhaps museums and galleries don&rsquo;t care about the wider consequences of inauthenticity or degenerating art&rsquo;s reputation, but they might, for otherwise they are steering their very own Titanic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180126170754-7588637124_4f9ad4423f_k.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Human, the dog, in artwork by Pierre Huyghe. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mischah/7588637124/" target="_blank">Mischahr</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>An approximate guide to animal treatment&mdash;and how to utilize them smartly&mdash;could be whether we might like to be displayed in a museum without consultation as to the circumstances: to have our legs <a href="https://unframed.lacma.org/2014/11/26/human-pierre-huyghe%25E2%2580%2599s-dog-residence" target="_blank">painted pink</a>; to be locked in a room with a coyote (as Beuys notoriously subjected a coyote to involuntary containment with a human); or to be rehoused in a contrived environment <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47812-anicka-yi-life-is-cheap" target="_blank">pumped full of &ldquo;hybrid scent&rdquo;</a> to engineer the nonsense notion of &ldquo;psychic exchange&rdquo; with a colony of ants. As we know primevally when we have been violated, so we know when we have violated, even notionally. Denial is a choice. Using <em>any</em> animal expressly killed as material&mdash;<a href="https://news.artnet.com/art-world/damien-whats-your-beef-916097" target="_blank">or one million animals, as in Damien Hirst&rsquo;s case</a>&mdash;or merely a living and seemingly unharmed animal, is always going to be fraught, if by a matter of degrees. But if art has any interest in hoisting the aspirations and vision of humanity, leaving living animals alone is a prudent choice. There is just no need.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The Sliding Scale of Acceptabilities</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180126095314-13965208913_d7edf5597a_k.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Cai Guo Qiang,&nbsp;<em>Head On</em>, Installation view from&nbsp;<em>Falling Back to Earth</em>, GOMA. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cathy-j-ross/13965208913/" target="_blank">seejayarr</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="text-align: center;">And yet, animals are a part of our lives, our families. We are going to make work about them, as civilizations always have&mdash;our Paleolithic ancestors carved into rocks and sketched onto cave walls far more animals than humans.</span></p> <p>Taxidermy, roadkill, or otherwise deceased creatures or their remains are a different matter. If an animal&rsquo;s demise was not met directly to become art, then where are the lines of what is and isn&rsquo;t acceptable for artists availing themselves of the carcass or remnants?</p> <p>Chinese artist, Cai Guo Qiang&rsquo;s <em><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/nov/27/falling-back-to-earth-a-simple-message-of-survival" target="_blank">Head On</a></em> is not only visually spectacular, but its execution, combined with the artist&rsquo;s conceptual intelligence makes his work far more effective as &ldquo;metaphors for humans&rdquo; than the dubious endeavors of his Guggenheim compatriots. The wolves are fashioned from sheepskin, painted and modeled. By tapping the grandeur and mythological resonance of lupine grace, he acknowledges their majesty, while their likenesses speak simply, and sensitively of our experiences. Similarly, <em><a href="http://www.caiguoqiang.com/projects/heritage" target="_blank">Heritage</a></em> comprises various animals hewn from goat hide.</p> <p>But what about the sheep and goats? Had they been slaughtered for the piece, there would also have been a negative response, but if they were lifted from another industry&mdash;food?&mdash;where death was inevitable, tensions are reduced and art can slip in the back door. Perhaps our responses are based not only on hierarchies of animals&rsquo; values and our culturally engineered sensibilities that farm animals are fair game for mass consumption while elephants and giraffes are sacrosanct. It&rsquo;s complicated. If it were only about the status we have conferred onto certain animals in the West, nobody would have cared about three rats. Reactions surely include the majority&rsquo;s innate sense of right and wrong, something that becomes increasingly subjective and personal, though nevertheless influenced by the dominant ideology of carnism, as we move away from the extremes of dog-shooting and cat-disemboweling.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>Our innate sense of right and wrong becomes increasingly subjective as we move away from the extremes of dog-shooting and cat-disemboweling.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><br /> <a href="http://jordaneagles.com/" target="_blank">Jordan Eagles</a> works with animal blood from an abattoir&mdash;the byproduct of deaths he has no hand in&mdash;to create sculptural objects of incandescent beauty, thrumming with the cycle of life, spiritual contemplation, and cosmological wonder. He in fact has gone a step further, in his <em><a href="http://jordaneagles.com/blood-mirror/" target="_blank">Blood Mirror</a></em> project, which consists of donated human blood, a remonstrance against prejudice and scientific omission regarding governmental blood donation policy pertaining to gay and bisexual men. He is aware of the violence inherent in the animal-blood&rsquo;s origin, but its reconstitution is handled with nobility and respect.</p> <p>Kimberly Withal <a href="https://roadsideresurrections.wordpress.com" target="_blank">fashions roadkill</a> she finds in her home state of New Jersey into still life vignettes and photographs them. They are exquisite images, that highlight the brevity of life and the melancholy of its passing. After the artwork is completed, she buries the remains as a reverential conclusion to physical presence.</p> <p>Perhaps, as it is for many regarding the ethics of food production and consumption, it is less that we eat animals, but how we treat them on their way to our plates that is of concern. Including the hide of a plentiful animal that most accept as edible&mdash;and hopes [peeking through fingers]<peeking fingers="" through="">&nbsp;<peeking fingers="" through="">has been well raised and well killed&mdash;permits the artwork to stand higher than its parts. Or maybe history will not look kindly upon any artwork employing the bodies or residue of animals. Today at least, for the science and food industries, animals are routinely experimented upon or slaughtered en masse, and the matter is controversial, but the greater good of medical advancement or a population&rsquo;s sustenance mutes much opposition; grumbling tolerance is reached for these inconvenient truths. But times, appetites, and awareness are changing. Like entertainment (Ringling Bros. pitched its final tent in 2017, in part because of animal rights activism and societal pressure), art just isn&rsquo;t as vital to our survival, and so lacks any such moral defense.</peeking></peeking></p> <p>Of his <em>A Case Study of Transference</em>, involving the stamped pigs having sex, Xu Bing, has&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/20/arts/design/guggenheim-art-and-china-after-1989.html">stated</a> that, &ldquo;Animals are completely uncivilized and Chinese characters are the expression of supreme civilization.&rdquo;</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a statement counter to our anthropomorphization of&nbsp; &ldquo;terms of venery&rdquo; wherein we have bestowed upon groups of animals a sense of our most dignified and aspirational institutions&mdash;a congress of baboons, a parliament of owls, a committee of vultures&mdash;while we fail in such aspirations ourselves. If genuine, not only does this moronic comment expose the man&rsquo;s imperialistic haughtiness, but it throws into contrast an ironic point, quite missed in this debate. Animals tend not to mutilate or kill each other for fun, sport, or false religious superstition, permit their prejudices to disenfranchise their own kind, or bankrupt their own social structures. When considering art that involves the degradation of our fellow creatures, or society&rsquo;s pillage of them generally, it isn&rsquo;t animals that lack civility. It is us.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16357-darren-jones?tab=REVIEWS" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Darren Jones</a>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Darren Jones is a Scottish, US-based critic and artist. His new book,&nbsp;with David Carrier,&nbsp;</em>The Contemporary Art Gallery: Display, Power and Privilege,<em>&nbsp;is available now.</em></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Joseph Beuys,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">I Like America and America Likes Me</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">, 1974, Performance. Photo: via&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.wikiart.org/en/joseph-beuys/i-like-america-and-america-likes-me" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">WikiArt</a>)</div> Fri, 26 Jan 2018 09:26:35 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Lauren C. Sudbrink Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/45487-bunder-the-radar-lauren-c-sudbrink-anne-marie-giroux-yasmin-khalafb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from</em><em> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/376296-lauren-c-sudbrink" target="_blank"><em>Lauren C. Sudbrink</em></a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>As an artist, musician, and performer my work is concerned with the possibilities of social engagement. Drawing on my early work in photography, my practice seeks to examine and assert the notion that art is never passive or static, but a constellation of systems and processes that determine, affirm, and condition our experiences. On account of this, my work is always political and is concerned as much with process as it is with product. My work explores the limits and gains of the simple gesture, employing common everyday objects as mediums such as glue, balloons, ice; simple performative gestures such as breathing onto glass, burning paper; and musical performances centered around non-hierarchical ways of sonic experience such as Fluxus instructional scores and music designed for non-musicians. Within this investigation, I am interested in illuminating the potentials in the overlooked, a strategy that, on a larger scale, speaks to the historical position of which the marginalized is often placed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180122142015-20180117021124-Ice_Piece_1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Ice Piece</em>, 2017, Participatory performance with ice, cassette tapes, glass bowls, and sound, Duration variable&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>For me, I believe it is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility to engage visually and stimulate conversation through their work&mdash;sharing a message or movement, provoking action or reaction, making secrets or revealing them, asking questions, seeking answers and then asking more questions. There are often no answers for artists and that is what generates the vigor and unending drive with which they practice. If all questions were answered and all inquiries tied up neatly and efficiently, there would be no need to make anything. It is the constant curiosity and insatiable appetite to learn, teach, and make that fuels visual communication. Ideally, our making generates critical dialogue that transcends barriers of language and the need for answers&mdash;whether the questions are heavy and political or light and humorous, they drive culture and visualize what cannot always be spoken.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>I wouldn&rsquo;t say this is the best thing I&rsquo;ve ever made, but this blanket I knitted for my cat is pretty great:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180122141945-IMG_2921.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>To start an artist colony on the moon.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t? </strong></p> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/chrislittle" target="_blank">Chris Little</a>, <a href="http://www.soheilaazadi.com/" target="_blank">Soheila Azadi</a>, <a href="http://www.theandrealves.com/" target="_blank">Andre Alves</a>, <a href="http://theotherchrisreeves.com/" target="_blank">Chris Reeves</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Wish Piece</em>, 2017, Participatory performance with wishes and fire, Duration vartiable)</span></p> Mon, 22 Jan 2018 06:28:18 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Nicole Ruggiero: Our Devices, Ourselves <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&rsquo;re interested in what&rsquo;s happening with art on the web. Every other Wednesday online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>New York City artist and designer <a href="http://www.nicoleruggiero.com/">Nicole Ruggiero</a> has her thumb on the pulse of popular, contemporary internet art. Her <a href="https://www.instagram.com/nicoleruggiero/" target="_blank">work</a> succinctly reflects the overarching aesthetics and emotional obsessions of a rapidly expanding community of young digital artists. The world that Ruggiero documents and fabricates is one where the distinction between on- and off-line personas is increasingly blurred. There is a distinct sense of a new, evolving reality lurking within the hyper-reality of her slick, pastel-neon compositions&mdash;a vision manifested by a generation of artists whose lives have been entwined with digital experiences since their formative years. Ruggiero tries to be as &ldquo;authentic as possible&rdquo; both &ldquo;online and IRL,&rdquo; which could act as the perfect manifesto for this rising, global wave of contemporary internet artists and their followers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141644-14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">she was looking directly back at me and she said my name quietly&hellip;almost as if it was hers too&hellip;&nbsp; (Collaboration with Johnny Komar), 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were you like as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Nicole Ruggiero:</strong> As a kid I was really curious and hyper and loud. Both sides of my family have artists and musicians, and my dad was a musician, so he really encouraged my creative side (though didn&rsquo;t think it was a useful career path). I really liked cartoons and refused to watch &ldquo;real people shows.&rdquo; The closest movie I would get to live action was Mary Poppins (which was half-animated). I was also really into anime, especially Pok&eacute;mon, and would cry if I missed an episode. 

</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117140822-11.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">ur my click-bait baby girl, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your earliest memories of using the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I remember when we first got the internet, my great uncle (who lived with us) got this weird internet TV thing. It was like MSN or something and I remember being like &ldquo;this is weird and boring,&rdquo; but then I figured out how to go into chat rooms on the internet TV and started talking to people in chat rooms. It was so bizarre to me but so intriguing. I got really excited and shortly after that I convinced my family to get AOL for the computer. I used the computer fairly often before then but after we got the internet I was obsessed. It went from being an isolated experience to being a shared experience and I was so into that. 

</p> <p><strong>CP: How has your relationship with the internet changed since then?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> LOL I don&rsquo;t know that it has much. I&rsquo;m still really social online. I primarily use the internet to share my art and connect with people, all of which has been part of my process since early on. I think the platforms have changed as have the complexities of the internet but the reason why I use it has stayed constant. 

</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117140853-3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Virtually Real (Collaboration with Terrell Davis), 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What were your early experiences of making digital art?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I started getting really into drawing when I found different online forums on which I could connect with people and receive feedback. At first I was just drawing anime characters from manga like Ranma &frac12; and .Hack and some video game characters. I was really into JRPGs [Japanese role-playing games] and drew a lot of characters from Kingdom Hearts. I would scan the characters and then outline and paint them in Photoshop and then post them online to get feedback.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117140927-6.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">tie me up daddy, 2018</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the first online community you felt part of?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Probably those forums I was talking about. I went onto this forum called &ldquo;IcyBrians&rdquo; as well as Deviant Art and Gaia Online. I also was on LiveJournal, Xanga, and Myspace a lot too. 

</p> <p><strong>CP: What online community do you feel part of now?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I think the community I&rsquo;m part of now is more nebulous, half IRL and half online. My friends, collaborators, and colleagues occupy a space somewhere in between digital and real. I say this because I think our lives are heavily integrated with presenting online an authentic self, so I think we all try to be seamless with who we are in both realms. 

</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141003-10.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">hey i&#39;ve been thinking about you...yeah...mhm...can i call you later? wanna cyber ??, 2016</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first start to understand the profound impact that the internet was having on you personally?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR: </strong>About two years ago is when I first started doing 3D. At the time my roommate kept calling me an &ldquo;internet person,&rdquo; to which I responded &ldquo;doesn&rsquo;t everyone use the internet???&rdquo; It sunk in around the same time that the internet was really important to me and why, so I decided to make work about it.&nbsp; 

</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141051-9.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">sink, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the first work you made about the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR: </strong>The first formative piece (which I think still might be my most reblogged piece on Tumblr) I made that was influenced by internet subculture and chatting online<a href="http://nnnicoleruggiero.tumblr.com/post/158374331988/nnnicoleruggiero-running-my-fingers-down-ur-skin" target="_blank"> is this 3D still grab from an animation I was doing</a>. It&rsquo;s an image of a woman&rsquo;s hip and hand with the caption &ldquo;running my fingers down ur skin, I can feel every inch of u.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you define the term &ldquo;Internet Art&rdquo;? </strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Internet Art, to me, has two definitions. The first would be any art that is primarily promoted and shown online. The second definition would be any works that are inspired and influenced by the internet and online culture. 

</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141138-7.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">limewire virus, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How much does nostalgia influence your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Nostalgia is a huge influence to my work. Recently one of my collaborators, Molly Soda, and I hosted this AIM chat for the closing day of AOL Instant Messenger. It was actually the same day that Net Neutrality got struck down. So we talked a lot about that and we also talked about how we used to use the internet and things that really affected ourselves during that time. We had about 50 people in the chat talking about things like getting Limewire viruses, the y2k crash, &ldquo;scene queens&rdquo; from Myspace, etc. After that I had a lot of really good ideas about art pieces I could make. 
</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/194186295" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/194186295" target="_blank">Goddess Sphere</a>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe &ldquo;net art aesthetics&rdquo; and their evolution?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Oh wow, I feel like this is a difficult question to answer because there are so many different areas of &ldquo;net art&rdquo; so I&rsquo;ll try to give an example instead. When I first started making work I really looked at what unique hashtags people were making to describe different aesthetics. For example &ldquo;cybertwee&rdquo; is an online community whose members describe and curate its own specific aesthetic style in art and fashion. The cybertwee style contains a lot of pastels as well as light/playful themes. I think subcultures like this (as well as meme subculture/trends) influence more current and critical internet art as its being created. 

</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141237-12.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">can you call me later...? text me? idk can I just see you...for minute? please ?? just...let me know, soon okay?, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What prompted you to start working in 3D?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> It was suggested to me as a competitive way to get ahead in the motion industry, and being competitive in NYC is important, aha. So I decided to learn it, really just for technical purposes, but then I wound up falling in love with it.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141442-4.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">T_T (Collaboration with Kevin Cornish), 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Net art has become a popular creative medium for young feminist artists&mdash;why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Well, if this is towards me, I consider myself a feminist but I don&rsquo;t consider myself a &ldquo;feminist artist.&rdquo; I think, however, net art is a good way for many different kinds of people to express their ideas in a forward-thinking manner without having to be pre-approved by a gallery or institution. You can read into that however much you want. 

</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think your work is political?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> No, I don&rsquo;t.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141317-13.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">bad mood, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you feel an emotional connection to the &ldquo;people&rdquo; you create?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I definitely feel like when I pose a figure, I am putting a lot of emotion into the expression of their body and their face to give them a &ldquo;voice&rdquo; or a feeling, a vibe. In this way I feel very connected to them, yes.</p> <p><strong>CP: How autobiographical is your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I would say that I am most directly influenced by impactful emotional events that me or the people around me are experiencing, so in that way it is autobiographical.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141718-5.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Offline Portrait (Collaboration with Abi Laurel and Toshi Salvino), 2017</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Is there a distinction between your online persona and your IRL persona?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Not really, no. I try to be as authentic as possible online and IRL.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you ever feel an urge to disconnect?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I think I&rsquo;m just really social. It&rsquo;s really rare that I&rsquo;m like &ldquo;ugh I want to get off of the internet.&rdquo; I love talking to people online and IRL. There are times, however, when I don&rsquo;t want to talk to certain people, so I&rsquo;m avoiding the internet but more so just avoiding that person/those people. I did experience a pretty intense period last year during which I was caught up in a really toxic situation which affected my internet usage and relationship with it for months. Generally speaking though, I really like being online. 

</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/234150112" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/234150112" target="_blank">The New iPhone XXX</a>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your relationship with your phone?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I&rsquo;m on my phone a lot, LOL. But when I&rsquo;m hanging out with people IRL, especially one-on-one, I keep my phone put away unless I&rsquo;m referencing an image or something to the person I am hanging out with IRL. I do check it periodically, though, to make sure I haven&rsquo;t missed anything mega important either.</p> <p><strong>CP: Is there a distinction between your commercial work and your art?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> Depends. Sometimes I get commissioned to make artwork and sometimes I get commissioned to make work for a brand. When I do work for a brand sometimes the art direction is shared and it&rsquo;s not only my vision. However, with my artwork, I usually have full control over the direction, or if it&rsquo;s a collaboration it&rsquo;s a mutually shared direction and agreed upon.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="640" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/220042666" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="640"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/220042666" target="_blank">No ESC Trailer (VR Experience)</a>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What have you discovered through collaborations with other artists?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> This past year I learned how to work both in augmented reality and virtual reality, which would not have been possible without the help of some wonderful collaborators and teams. ❤ 

</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/214614965" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/214614965" target="_blank">Slide To Expose (AR Exhibition)</a>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How do you think the work you do and contemporary internet art in general will be perceived in the future, perhaps as a document of early internet life?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR:</strong> I think it will largely be a document for the culture/feelings/usage surrounding our devices and technology. I primarily focus on socializing through the internet and tech, so I like to explore what this feels like, what emotions it evokes. I like to document the subtleties that often go unnoticed but are or have been really formative to what is memorable to the online individual. Sometimes this looks like drawing from real life experiences and making that digital, and sometimes it involves pulling from digital experiences and making them realistic. That is also why I like 3D as a medium; it&rsquo;s very in between IRL and the digital.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180117141900-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Self-Portrait (Ad Commission Mimicking Pulp Fiction Poster), 2017</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>NR: </strong>I&rsquo;m going to be starting a portrait series very soon, which is going to be a long-term solo project exploring individuals&rsquo; earliest and most memorable personal experiences online. I&rsquo;m aiming to have a print component and a 360-video component for that project.</p> <p>I&rsquo;m also going to be starting a collaborative clothing line as well which I&rsquo;m really excited about too ❤</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: I&rsquo;ll wait forever, 2017)</span></p> Wed, 17 Jan 2018 06:33:09 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list