Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Under the Radar: Louise Laffaille | Graham Livingston | Iliana Tosheva <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/496164-louise-laffaille?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Louise Laffaille &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1074969?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1074969/u3azr9/20171106141438-CC4E9E00-0318-4431-AD47-D6A5F8A17FC5.jpeg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1086814?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1086814/y8wnrh/20180208142910-E838F9DD-86FC-4BBE-9CFC-0E90F8A545A7.jpeg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1086818?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1086818/y8wnrh/20180208142921-936CDB72-1FFD-41CD-B89D-8C0E2B95CBBB.jpeg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1086821?utm_source=FeiFanZhang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1086821/y8wnrh/20180208142923-2F2BFEF4-C43F-44D3-9C85-8890A8782E1E.jpeg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/501031-graham-livingston?utm_source=GrahamLivingston&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Graham Livingston &ndash; Chicago</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1088066?utm_source=GrahamLivingston&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1088066/u3azr9/20180214045725-Stacked.gif" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1088063?utm_source=GrahamLivingston&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1088063/y8wnrh/20180214045205-Vague_Spaces_02.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1088062?utm_source=GrahamLivingston&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1088062/y8wnrh/20180214045152-Vague_Spaces_01.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1088064?utm_source=GrahamLivingston&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1088064/y8wnrh/20180214045313-Livingston_Graham__4_36_X15_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/195239-iliana-tosheva?utm_source=IlianaTosheva&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Iliana Tosheva &ndash; London</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1068832?utm_source= IlianaTosheva&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068832/u3azr9/20171017113244-THE_SECRET_GARDEN.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1068833?utm_source=IlianaTosheva&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068833/y8wnrh/20171105145221-NOT_MEANT_TO_BE.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1074827?utm_source=IlianaTosheva&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1074827/y8wnrh/20171105145719-WINTER_SECRETS.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1068461?utm_source=IlianaTosheva&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068461/y8wnrh/20171015113425-PRIMAVERA.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20180222200008-ArtSlant_Prize_X_2018-01.png" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48965-our-new-residency-is-now-accepting-applications-process-park" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204002549-Process-park-logo-sq.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 23 Feb 2018 06:33:02 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list For the Culture: Towards Curating Black Art by Aesthetic, Not Struggle <p>Unlike <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48362-sprawling-group-shows-deny-black-revolutionary-artists-the-space-and-time-they-deserve" target="_blank">recent major shows</a> that are chronological surveys of Black art in the context of political upheaval and communal struggle, the exhibition <em>Transformative Space</em> centers the aesthetics, techniques, and innovation of its artists. Now at the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh, the exhibition magnifies the interstices of the Black experience that push against the historical watersheds that have come to over-define Black life. The onus of <em>Transformative Space</em> is not to couch Black art as a mere reaction to political oppression orchestrated by lethal white imaginations; instead, it draws on what can be revealed in Black aesthetics when we come to them as a way to animate the imagination and examine the innovative capacities and techniques of its artists. The exhibition honors Blackness not because of hardship&mdash;it honors Black artistry for Black artistry&rsquo;s sake, which is enough of a reason.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223140124-Installation_View_01.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>Transformative Space: The N&rsquo;Namdi Collection</em>, 2018, The August Wilson Center, Pittsburgh.<br /> Courtesy of the August Wilson Center</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The exhibition asks about the sometimes wild, sometimes shocking, narratives and methodologies that appear on the canvas as a result of a Black artist&rsquo;s passion for their process. The primary context of <em>Transformative Space</em> is not suffering, but craftsmanship and artistic enterprise. Be it Jack Whitten sculpting ravines into his tesserae pieces with an Afro-pick, Allie McGhee folding multi-hued canvases into lovely cramps of color, or Rashid Johnson turning a scan of his elbow into a work of compelling minimalist art, the show&rsquo;s gravitational center is the experimental and creative urge.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223140432-1o__Jack_Whitten__Summit__Mixed_media_on_canvas_84_x_73in_1998.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jack Whitten, <em>Summit</em>, 1998, Mixed media on canvas, 84 x 73 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Transformative Space: The N&rsquo;Namdi Collection</em> brings together 29 rare works from George and Carmen N&rsquo;Namdi&rsquo;s Detroit-based collection of predominantly abstract post-war and contemporary work by artists from the African Diaspora. The 250-work collection is invaluable not only in its dedication and promotion of these artists, but also in the way its diverse assemblage speaks to a universal human experience. In this latest collection presentation, Pittsburgh-based art historian and curator Kilolo Luckett sets a new example for how to properly highlight, honor, arrange, and contextualize the works of these master artists. Although the August Wilson Center is smaller than the Brooklyn Museum or Tate Modern, which both staged surveys of Black American art in 2017, its position as an institution of Black arts provides the opportunity to transform the context in which said art is analyzed. The curatorial mandate shifts from historical justification to revealing the merit inherent in the style, experimentation, and daring. The artwork in this space can be appreciated for the dialogue it generates with the art world rather than isolated in a tokenized corner.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223141601-4__Bob_Thompson__Caledonia_Flight__Oil_on_Canvas_77_x_57in_1963.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Bob Thompson, <em>Caledonia Flight</em>, 1963, Oil on Canvas, 77 x 57 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The historical contexts for a number of prominent exhibitions of Black art recently have been <a href="https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/touring/we_wanted_a_revolution_black_radical_women_196585" target="_blank">revolution</a> and <a href="http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/soul-nation-art-age-black-power" target="_blank">politics</a>, comprised of&nbsp;<a href="https://cmoa.org/exhibition/2020-studio-cmoa/" target="_blank">artworks</a> viewed through the <a href="https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/touring/witness_civil_rights" target="_blank">lens of their engagement</a> with the <a href="https://hammer.ucla.edu/now-dig-this/" target="_blank">sociopolitical and sociocultural ails</a> of their time. Larger art institutions seem preoccupied with this spectacle of overcoming, rather than the ways in which Black artists&rsquo; work is intricately woven within art history more broadly, and is in conversation with work by non-Black contemporaries and forebears. Bob Thompson and Henri Matisse, for example, share similar tastes in color and form: it is clear that Matisse influenced Thompson, who then distilled this influence in his own imaginative and technical manifestations. All artwork is multidimensional in its function. Yes, Black artists&mdash;like all artists&mdash;respond to their circumstances; but they also create and experiment in techniques that are new to the art world in their time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223140550-22__Chakaia_Booker__Pioneer__Rubber_Tire__wood__photo_collage_and_paint_19_x_12_x_7in_1995-98.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Chakaia Booker, <em>Pioneer</em>, 1995&ndash;98, Rubber Tire, wood, photo collage and paint, 19 x 12 x 7 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The works in <em>Transformative Space</em> have several aesthetic values in common: layering, texture, and exploration with materials and themes. Highlighting interrelated narratives of color and form, tracing relationships between work non-chronologically, Luckett makes each artwork memorable, specific, and present in its designated space. An example of this balance and harmony is how Whitten&rsquo;s <em>Summit </em>(1998) a dynamic mosaic of black, grays, and greens, interacts with Chakaia Booker&rsquo;s sculpture,<em> Pioneer </em>(1995&ndash;1998), a pair of slippers made from tires. The slippers&rsquo; bristling textures not only call upon the tactile quality of <em>Summit</em>, but also summon sustainability and environmental themes, which were important in Whitten&rsquo;s work as well. Installed in a triangular matrix, these works hum in tune with the layered hues of Ed Clark&rsquo;s <em>The Circle </em>(1968), which shares the black and silvery undertones of Whitten and Booker&rsquo;s pieces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223140631-18__Ed_Clark__The_Circle__Acrylic_on_Canvas_72__Diam_1968.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ed Clark, <em>The Circle</em>, 1968, Acrylic on canvas, Diameter 72 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Characteristics such as color, line, and texture might seem like trivial formal connections on which to build curatorial relationships in 2018. Yet, few Black artists have been afforded the luxury of having their work celebrated for its formal qualities, for its technical and material experimentation. Permanent collections of museums of Modern art around the world, on the other hand, have organized work by (predominantly white male) artists using these very principles for decades. At the August Wilson Center, the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection doesn&rsquo;t need to provide an excuse to a predominantly white audience for why these works should be seen. This exhibition&rsquo;s heart is the joyous canvas that encapsulates the energy of artists pushing themselves to the creative limit to emote their interiority as people. It speaks to how Black positionality can be deeply specific and puissant, yet capable of piquing the imagination of any viewer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223141632-5__Vincent_Smith__In_the_Yard__Oil__sand__collage_on_canvas_48_x_70in_1972.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Vincent Smith, <em>In the Yard</em>, 1972, Oil, sand, collage on canvas, 48 x 70 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>An example is Vincent Smith&rsquo;s painting <em>In the Yard </em>(1972). Across the foreground of the painting are four Black men in identical prison uniforms, their faces reminiscent of the angular feminine figures in Picasso&rsquo;s <em>Les Demoiselles D&rsquo;Avignon</em>. A dark hallway opens up behind them, an opaque yellow light illuminating their house of incarceration. A barred window reinforces their looming captivity. Yet, to the left of the men, behind the grate of their cage, possibility is formed through light. Different from the yellow interior glow, the outside luminosity is built up of supple autumn reds and oranges, with lime green highlights. This is an image that portends suffering, but it is not on display because of its narrative: the work is a study in light. Its aesthetic responds to the fantasy of <em>Les Demoiselles</em>, a gorgeous, but masculine vision of femininity with the potential that the &ldquo;Africanized&rdquo; faces tickle in the white imagination. Through stylized figuration Smith reveals the realities of mass incarceration that have been with the United States since Reconstruction.</p> <p><span style="text-align: center;">On the same wall is the first work collected by the N&rsquo;Namdis: an abstract painting by Phyllis Diane Jones entitled </span><em style="text-align: center;">Stan&rsquo;s Dance</em><span style="text-align: center;"> (1968). Made of distressed mixed-media images and fields of curling black and white space, the orange-red field dominating the left-hand side of the image plays call and response with Smith&rsquo;s painting. The juxtaposition based on color and aesthetic as opposed to chronology fosters a harmonious and balanced visual relationship, enhancing the abilities and creative impulse of the artist&mdash;it allows the work to be better seen on its own terms.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223141711-19__Barbara_Chase-Riboud__The_Enigma_of_Isadora_Duncan_Monument_to_Man_Ray__Monoprint_32__x_25__2001.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Barbara Chase-Riboud, <em>The Enigma of Isadora Duncan Monument to Man Ray</em>, 2001, Monoprint, 32 x 25 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Another wall lines up high contrast works with playful essences. Rashid Johnson&rsquo;s <em>Untitled (Manumission Papers Series)</em> (2000) and Leonardo Drew&rsquo;s <em>Untitled</em> (2014) share tinny, earthy palettes; they are sparse in figures, but high in texture and delicate evidence of the artists&rsquo; hands. They communicate in line and color but their subject matter tends to the idea of freedom and the endless possibilities present in minimalism. Capping this installment is a rare two-dimensional work on paper by Barbara Chase-Riboud, <em>The Enigma of Isadora Duncan Monument to Man Ray</em> (2001). We see her artistic obsessions: her handwriting is present; ropes form a girdle around draping lines, shaping an almost topographical space. Although two-dimensional, Chase-Riboud&rsquo;s sculptural sensibilities signal a palette change as well as a spatial one; it offers a bridge from Johnson and Drew&rsquo;s minimalist artworks into the louder conversation taking place between Sam Gilliam and Allie McGhee. The latter two artists paint in psychedelic brightness, shaping their canvases into three-dimensional bodies as a way to experiment with space. There is no limit to the amount of passion Luckett has unleashed in building relationships between these diverse works. The artworks, some still political in nature, are a laying bare of interiority and imagination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180223140840-12__Allie_McGhee__Visit__Mixed_Media_on_Fiberglass_48__x_50__x_4__2015.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Allie McGhee, <em>Visit</em>, 2015, Mixed Media on Fiberglass, 48 x 50 x 4 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Transformative Space</em> is an important signpost to remind curators and viewers alike that there is a way to curate and enjoy Black Diasporan art that eschews the reissuance of status quo gestures of tokenism, isolation, and historical stereotyping. <em>Transformative Space</em> reveals how the absolute, remarkable capacities of humanity demonstrated through artistry can be unveiled, named, and acknowledged. With in-depth and caring curation the art world can approach Black art for the sake of what has been sweat and emoted onto the canvas; for the sake of its bravery, risk, and ultimate form. It is time that Black Diasporan Art&rsquo;s place in the art historical conversation be expanded and diversified as a way to honor and match its daring.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490259-jessica-lanay?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Jessica Lanay</a></p> <p><em>Jessica Lanay is a poet and short story writer from the Florida Keys living in Pittsburgh. Her work can be found in Salt Hill Journal, Tahoma Literary Review, and is forthcoming in Fugue and The Common.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Phyllis Dianne Jones,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Stan&rsquo;s Dance</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">, 1968, Mixed Media and acrylic on canvas, 35 x 31 in. Courtesy of the N&rsquo;Namdi Collection, Detroit)</span></p> Fri, 23 Feb 2018 09:02:23 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Ultimatums <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Grayscale nuances have no place in the propagandist&rsquo;s world. Propaganda is a black tiled vision, a zero-sum game. Visually, this is portrayed with a split-image showing a dystopic landscape of foreign influence contrasted by a &ldquo;purer&rdquo; nationalist one.</p> <p>Below is my rendering of an image circulated by the National Front during the last election:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180222090439-Artslant_5_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>On one side you see the rolling hills, flowers, and cobblestones associated with the France of Lonely Planet guidebooks. On the other, the viewer is presented with debauched, fiery Mad Max despair. The text asks the viewer to &ldquo;Choose Your France.&rdquo;</p> <p>This is literally the oldest trick in the propagandist&rsquo;s book.</p> <p>Below is a drawing of a 1943 Nazi Germany poster warning of the ravages of Bolshevism which uses the same scare tactic. The text translates to, &ldquo;Victory or Bolshevism.&rdquo; Even the fonts are similar: simple san-serifs that express an urgent call to arms.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180222090515-Artslant_5_2.jpeg" /></p> <p>The consistency in this approach reflects the heart of propaganda: to stereotype and flatten the &ldquo;other&rdquo; while characterizing ethnic nationalism as just, ethical, and necessary. Part of this involves creating a hellscape that threatens long-held institutions and portends a dark future. Consider this self-aware racist meme of Jack Nicholson that went viral during Trump&rsquo;s 2016 campaign:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180222090541-Artslant_5_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>This represents a slightly different approach tailored for meme-spreading, but the idea is the same: foreigners are terrifying and their behavior is inextricably linked to criminality. Just last week, there was uproar over a <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/09/584686212/albuquerque-newspaper-apologizes-for-racist-cartoon-about-dreamers" target="_blank">wildly racist cartoon</a> at the <em>Albuquerque Journal </em>which linked &ldquo;Dreamers&rdquo; to gang violence and jihadism. It&rsquo;s depressingly similar in both construction and tone to racially-charged cartoons from the early 20th century.</p> <p>Racist caricature as a tool is immediate and powerful. I&rsquo;ve often wondered: is all caricature racist? Or at least, are the roots of caricature fundamentally racist? Consider the trope of the rat. It has been employed again and again to demonize minority communities, most famously in Nazi Germany. In 2015, at the height of the refugee crisis in Europe, the cartoonist Mac published a cartoon in the <em>Daily Mail</em> *again* depicting immigrants as invasive vermin.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180222090621-Artslant_5_4.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Image <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/shortcuts/2015/nov/18/rats-the-history-of-an-incendiary-cartoon-trope" target="_blank">via</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Ugh. This simplified and destructive use of comics sometimes makes me question the medium as a tool that can be used for the greater good.</p> <p>France has a particularly interesting (and sometimes problematic) relationship to caricature. Next week I&rsquo;ll talk a bit more about France&rsquo;s drawn history, starting with Daumier and social satire.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180222090711-Artslant_5_5.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Image <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Caricature_(1830–1843)#/media/File:Caricature_Charles_Philipon_pear.jpg" target="_blank">via</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald" target="_blank">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 22 Feb 2018 01:45:46 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Ghosts, Devils, and Advertising <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In his book, <em>A Little Guide&nbsp;to the 15th Arrondissement for the Use of Phantoms</em>, Roger Caillois examines the sleepy district in Paris where he grew up, the same district where I&rsquo;m staying now.</p> <p>I bought the book imagining a witchy, postmodern guide to my new home, but actually, Caillois&rsquo; &ldquo;phantom beings&rdquo; are symbols. They are stand-ins for immigrants and asylum-seekers, <em>&eacute;trangers</em> who were driven from their homes in the 15th Arrondissement as the Seine&rsquo;s waterfront was being developed.&nbsp;The book itself is a bizarrely fascinating take on psychic architecture and the impact of space on our memory. He&rsquo;s especially fond of narrow buildings, which are seemingly incapable of housing anything truly fleshy.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220083812-Artslant_4_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>Caillois describes a childhood in Paris in the 20s and 30s which was covered in gigantic, painted advertisements and posters.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220083840-Artslant_4_2.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220083858-Artslant_4_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>With the prominence and ease of poster-making in the 20th century, France&rsquo;s former glories could suddenly be used not only to recruit people for war efforts, but also to sell products.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092000-Artslant_4_4.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092040-Artslant_4_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>The link between national icons, patriotism, propaganda, and advertising is a relatively strong one. But it brings up a foggier question: is advertising always a form of propaganda?</p> <p>Even if there were a metric to measure (dis)honesty in advertising, visuals are slippery and not beholden to the same rules as written text. It&rsquo;s pretty clear that advertising and political propaganda frequently exchange the same visual strategies: seductive women, burly men, and awakened national sentiment.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092121-Artslant_4_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>In <em>How Propaganda Works</em>, Jason Stanley argues that advertising is especially propagandistic when it aims to sell us products that are harmful or irrelevant. This is depressingly clear in the omnipresent promise of beautiful women in ads, or the bizarre appropriation of a Martin Luther King speech in a Dodge Ram commercial.</p> <p>Both advertising and propaganda seek to simplify: to make things black and white, good versus evil. In advertising, the perfect life awaits you at the bottom of a bottle of Pernot. In political propaganda, viewers are threatened with the loss of the old world order to something or someone &ldquo;evil.&rdquo;</p> <p>Next time, I&rsquo;ll go into this (over)simplification a bit more. In the meantime, please enjoy this belated Valentine-slash-World-War-I-propaganda-poster of the Kaiser kissing the devil.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180220092153-Artslant_4_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 20 Feb 2018 08:14:03 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Jesse Farber Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/main/show_new_email/84518?obj_type=User&amp;re_id=85197683&amp;template_id=48823" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/501157-jesse-farber" target="_blank">Jesse Farber</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>There is a way in which I think we are very alienated from ourselves, in trying to understand ourselves as material beings existing in the world. We learn more and more about the nature of matter and our physical systems, but it&rsquo;s still so difficult to feel in any visceral sense that this is actually happening inside us and around us&mdash;that it&rsquo;s in fact who we are, on a fundamental level. Instead, a muddle of textbook diagrams, conceptual frameworks, x-rays, family trees, religious hierarchies, and endless other schemata shapes our fragmented material identities. My work examines this confused sense, deep within us, of what we think we are made of, and therefore, who and what we are.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I believe artworks should change how we perceive and understand the world. Artists have the power to help us learn, grow, and expand our awareness in an infinite variety of ways. It is the artist&rsquo;s responsibility to contribute to this. In an age of cultural saturation, with aesthetic pleasure readily available, artists should demand more of themselves than making nice things to look at. Fortunately, however, even the simplest work can evoke a profound experience, if we are willing to let it teach us.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180219101031-img935-c-col-pu.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>O\s&frasl;&ordm;&frasl;&ordm;</em>, 2018, Digital print, 130 x 130 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I always feel this way about whatever I&rsquo;ve just finished making!</p> <p>I completed this large print work called&nbsp;<em>O\s&frasl;&ordm;&frasl;&ordm;</em>&nbsp;just a few days ago, so it grabs the title for now. Really, I&rsquo;m very happy about this whole series. For me, the objects and situations in these prints are these kind of ontological puzzles, modeling our fragmented sense of our material self. They have recognizable real-world qualities, and are photographically rendered, but they are not truly identifiable.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;ve learned a lot of coding over the last several years, and recently started developing my collage prints into animated algorithmic environments. That work I will definitely make, but I could also imagine a future point at which it would be somehow possible to actually render these elements as living lifeforms, not merely as algorithmic simulations in a virtual environment. This thought repulses me, but, then again, as a fan of horror sci-fi films, I can&rsquo;t help being intrigued by it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180219101001-20171030195146-img626-b-final.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>1gY&#39;lli</em>, 2017, C-print, 130 x 130 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Joerg Simon (Frankfurt, DE)&mdash;Joerg combines the best of alienated paranoiac collage with a humanistic, personal approach. We have also collaborated on collages, and an album of soundworks. <a href="https://www.ausstellungsraum-becker.de/ausstellungen/sketch-show/" target="_blank">This link</a> is to a recent exhibition of his. You can also hear the album we did together <a href="https://www.jessefarber.com/artist/audio" target="_blank">here</a> (where a free audio player is embedded.)</p> <p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100008180257011" target="_blank">Malcolm Smith</a> (Alabama, USA)&mdash;Mind-blowing techno-mysticism. We haven&rsquo;t collaborated yet, but I hope we get to someday.</p> <p><a href="https://www.instagram.com/not_just_ice_/" target="_blank">Jasmine Justice</a> (Berlin, DE)&mdash;Painting which crystallizes the information atmosphere. Another great collaboration partner! Also check out her upcoming April show at <a href="http://www.65grand.com" target="_blank">65Grand</a> in Chicago.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>l)(y&bull;k</em></span><span style="font-size:12px;">, 2017, C-print, 130 x 130 cm)</span></p> Tue, 20 Feb 2018 01:10:32 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Portrait: Katie Stout Defies Genre with Her Touchable, Usable, Body Positive Artworks <p><em>This photo portrait was originally published as a longer interview feature on </em><a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/by-subverting-the-expected-brooklyn-artist-katie-stout-takes-a-welcome-humanistic-approach-to-her-art"><em>Freunde von Freunden</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>In a vast warehouse in the Bed-Stuy neighborhood of Brooklyn, Katie Stout crafts couches out of various textiles and her signature Girl Lamps out of clay, celebrating womanhood with colors and textures in the form of functional pieces.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Stout&rsquo;s creative process is bold, experimental, and constantly evolving&mdash;during our studio visit she was feverishly finding a way to support a desk she was assembling out of papier-mâché and wire for an upcoming show. Katie&rsquo;s work can be intimidating because of its sheer boldness, but when you strip it down, it&rsquo;s a reflection of the woman behind the work: engaging, approachable, confident, and fun.</p> <p>Freunde von Freunden met the artist in Brooklyn to chat about her genre-defying artwork and furniture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144802-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4616.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I think you can spill milk on something and still treat it like a piece of art.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What type of work do you create?</strong></p> <p>I make art that functions as furniture but sometimes it doesn&rsquo;t. I&#39;m not totally committed to any material; I use scraps around my studio, a lot of clay, and I love papier-mâché. I tend to take any opportunity to work with a new material. I like using everything and learning about different processes and then doing things the wrong way. Love easy low-brow materials like crayons, trash, things like clay that can be mushed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144833-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4351.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How did your childhood influence your creativity?</strong></p> <p>I grew up in a household where creativity was celebrated. I had a whole zone to myself where I could make a mess and there was never a shortage of art supplies. My mom also went to RISD and her mother had been a photographer. When I wanted to be a cheerleader in fourth grade, my dad said, &ldquo;No, you&#39;re going to be cheered for.&rdquo; Might be the coolest thing he&rsquo;s ever said.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215144943-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4438.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145559-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4354.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Your furniture is designed to not only be art, but also to be used as actual furniture in a household. Do you find people treat it as both after purchasing a piece, or do they covet it more like a piece of art not to be touched?</strong></p> <p>I think people are sometimes confused about how they&rsquo;re supposed to use it. It&rsquo;s a space that people feel uncomfortable in, which I love. But I think you can spill milk on something and still treat it like a piece of art. I guess art is defined by the viewer. In general I think people revere prescribed art too much and lesser known art too little. Someone spending $450 million on a painting is gross. Especially if it&rsquo;s da Vinci. I couldn&rsquo;t get out of the da Vinci show at the Met fast enough because the hype eclipsed the merits of the work.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I want to take a more humanistic approach to art and art making, one where it can be touched and used and provides a different and more welcoming approach to how it&rsquo;s viewed and how it functions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145306-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4372.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150855-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4356.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">(left) Shady Lady lamps in progress</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>You explore themes around sexuality in your work. Is this a particular statement?</strong></p> <p>I was interested in exploring the objectification of women by of extreme objectification. There&rsquo;s a frenzy of conversation about sexual abuse in the media with #MeToo, Hollywood, U.S. gymnastics, Donald Trump. Women have inarguably been treated as objects to be used. By parodying the art objects of women, the ladies I create own their bodies. I imagine them holding the lampshade up as a choice they&rsquo;ve made. They defy traditional categories of what women are supposed to be by being domestic and choosing to be sexually open. Don&rsquo;t call it naughty.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215145329-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4443.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="50%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150048-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4455.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is your favorite piece you&rsquo;ve ever created?</strong></p> <p>My favorite piece has been Wench Bench due partially to the unexpected and automatic nature of its actualization. I had a chainsaw artist in Duluth carve nude female forms out of pine stumps. (You know chainsaw art&mdash;like those carved bears in upstate New York?) The nude ladies were various apathetic positions lying on the floor&mdash;in fetal position after having given up&mdash;and I had them carved out of stumps into little stools. But the carvings came back much smaller than I expected and were too low to sit on. So I puzzle pieced them all together into a bench, which I called Wench Bench, which made for a far more dynamic piece than my original idea.</p> <p><strong>What is the best thing you&rsquo;ve done for your career?</strong></p> <p>The best thing I&rsquo;ve done is pursue it full-time and not really listen to people who thought I was insane.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150346-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4497.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215150330-Freunde-von-Freunden-Katie-Stout-4433.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Read the full interview and find more images of Katie Stout and her BK studio on </em></strong><a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/by-subverting-the-expected-brooklyn-artist-katie-stout-takes-a-welcome-humanistic-approach-to-her-art"><strong><em>Freunde von Freunden</em></strong></a><strong><em>.</em></strong></p> <p>Adapted from text and photography by <a href="https://www.freundevonfreunden.com/tag/Erin-Little/">Erin Little</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 07:12:08 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The ArtSlant Prize X: Apply Today + Juror Announcement! <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20180213174127-ArtSlant_Prize_X_2018-01.png" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Round 1 of the ArtSlant Prize X closes February 26th.</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes and an exhibition in New York during Armory Week!</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><strong>To apply</strong>, sign in to <a href="https://www.artslant.com" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;"><strong>artslant.com</strong></a>, click the menu navicon <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170906130218-Screen_Shot_2017-09-06_at_9.01.04_AM.png" style="width: 25px;" />&nbsp;at the top and select&nbsp;<strong>ArtSlant Prize</strong>.</i></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i>The&nbsp;</i><em><strong>ArtSlant Prize IX Exhibition</strong></em><i>&nbsp;will take place during Armory Week in New York at&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a></strong>, March 6&ndash;12, 2018, booth 2231.&nbsp;</i></font><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">Purchase tickets for the fair&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/o/springbreak-art-show-12813445625" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">here</a></strong>.</i></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size:18px;"><strong><em>ROUND 1 JURORS:</em></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180215134930-Screen_Shot_2018-02-15_at_14.41.57.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Roberto Acosta Oyarzo</strong> is <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/500475-roberto-acosta-oyarzo" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>printmaker</strong></a>, film maker and curator based in Valpara&iacute;so, Chile.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Tiana Webb Evans</strong> is a <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/500995-tiana-webb-evans" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>cultural producer</strong></a>, a marketing and communications professional, and an advocate for diversity in the arts. </font></p> <p style="text-align: center; line-height: 30px;"><font face="georgia" size="4"><strong>Margaret Clinton</strong> is the owner and director of <a href="http://koenigandclinton.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;"><strong>Koenig &amp; Clinton</strong></a>, a gallery based in Brooklyn, NY.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">ARTSLANT PRIZE X</span></strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170320214133-artslant-springbreak.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 385px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a> at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. The prize recognizes artists who critically engage with their medium and culture at large. Up for grabs are exhibition opportunities and cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;Learn more&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">here</a></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Art page</a></strong><span style="line-height: 21px;">. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners</a></strong>&nbsp;have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors, and personalities.</span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2017+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize IX:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">David Rios Ferreira,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472559-sabato-visconti" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Sabato Visconti,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Katya Grokhovsky,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478928-daapo-reo" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Da&agrave;P&ograve; Reo</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VIII:</a>&nbsp;</strong></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VII:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize VI:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize V:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize IV:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Veronica Bruce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Susan Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize III:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize II:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize I:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> Thu, 15 Feb 2018 05:51:29 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Process Park Artist Residency: Final Days to Apply!! Deadline: Feb 18 <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We are proud to announce a new experimental residency created by ArtSlant in collaboration with Chashama.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Process Park</span></strong>&nbsp;is a funded four-week residency for 3-4 artists at&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.chashama.org/chanorth" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;" target="_blank">chaNorth Artist Residency</a>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">in Pine Plains, NY, the goal of which is to learn to live and work better through a process-oriented approach to art making and existing. The residency will conclude with an exhibition/symposium in New York that will be conceived and planned as a group during the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">The Spring 2018 residency&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">runs April 1&ndash;April 29</span>. Application <span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">deadline: February 18, 2018.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214173900-PP.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Process Park, Main House at chaNorth</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park is designed to foster an engaged community through developing engaged individuals.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Artists and cultural producers need space and time to interrogate and refine the ways they work and create while retaining a sense of amateurism. To this end, Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">encourages research and play</span>. Through knowledge-sharing, making, and experimentation, this residency aims to generate deeper connections between people and the visual and material culture they consume.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">focuses on reinserting ourselves into the act of production</span>, to interrupt the paradigm of contemporary alienation. Residents will be encouraged to develop a stronger&nbsp;relationship to</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">&nbsp;the food we eat, the images we ingest, and the omnipresent algorithms that fundamentally shape our lives</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">. Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">pushes back on throw-away consumption</span>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">We ask participants to bring knowledge to share and a willingness to learn from the residency&rsquo;s facilitators, visitors, and co-residents.&nbsp;The emphasis will be on learning through doing. The goal is not only to share knowledge useful in art making but to share knowledge which will be useful in the practice of everyday life. Intensives take the form of teaching or&nbsp;learning the basics of a given skill in a day. Residents will practice those skills throughout the duration of the residency to incorporate that new knowledge into their lives.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">If we create what supports and sustains us and our practices, our investment in the world is made richer, deeper.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Process Park&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">includes Room &amp; Board for four weeks, educational intensives, and an exhibition/symposium in NYC.</span>&nbsp;Residents are encouraged to continue their own practices during the residency but are expected to participate in courses and scheduled group meals and events.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214174104-298116_252439538127025_881163471_n.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Communal dining at chaNorth, Summer 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Application Requirements:</span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong>Who:</strong>&nbsp;All artists, cultural producers, writers, musicians, programmers, and researchers,&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">21+</span></strong>, looking to enrich their relationship with a mode of production are welcome to apply.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Course Proposal</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Residents will lead an intensive, one-day course, sharing a skill of their choice with other residents. This skill can be part of your practice or not. You don&rsquo;t need to be an expert but should feel comfortable enough that you can assist people in exploring a given area of knowledge. Your course proposal should be a brief description of the skill you want to teach, and how (max 250 words) and be entered into the field &ldquo;Statement of Intent&rdquo; on the application page.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Current intensives available by residency facilitators for Spring 2018 include planting, pickling, fermentation, basic HTML, felting, podcasting, clay-refinement, digital publishing, kiln and oven construction, and baking.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Further intensives will be proposed and offered by residents.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Statement of Intent</span>:</strong>&nbsp;Following your course proposal, your statement of intent should introduce your practice and provide a connection between your practice and what you hope Process Park will allow you to achieve within its unique parameters. Discuss what you will gain from this experience and what you can bring to the group&rsquo;s dynamic. How would a process-based approach inform your practice going forward? How do you envision using your time at Process Park?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">(max 500 words)</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Please also include c</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">ontact information for&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">two references</span></strong>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">and your<strong>&nbsp;<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">CV</span></strong>.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">You must apply using your&nbsp;<strong><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">ArtSlant Profile.</span></strong>&nbsp;Sign up&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/intros/plans" target="_blank">here</a>&nbsp;if you don&#39;t have one already. Use your profile to include supporting images or texts for your application. An application fee of $25 will be required to submit your application. The fee goes to the operating costs of the residency.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 24px; font-family: serif; font-size: large;">Questions? See the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/48841-faq-process-park" target="_blank">FAQ</a>. Still have questions? Email us at&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:residency@artslant.com" style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">residency@artslant.com</a>.&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204002549-Process-park-logo-sq.jpg" style="height: 249px; width: 250px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;"><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Apply&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation/index/10">here</a></span></strong><span style="font-family: serif; font-size: large;">.</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.chashama.org/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003616-chashama-logo-2017.png" style="width: 280px; height: 60px;" /></a></td> <td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171204003642-ArtSlant-Logo-2014-01.jpg" style="width: 245px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 19 Feb 2018 01:48:22 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Lorna Mills Cracks The Great Code <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&rsquo;re interested in what&rsquo;s happening with art on the web. Every other Wednesday online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you have even a passing interest in net art then you are likely familiar with the work of <a href="http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/LornaMillsImageDump/">Lorna Mills</a>. The Toronto-based artist and curator has been hugely successful in promoting the medium to a wider audience, both through her own work and as a conduit for other artists. In her own practice, Mills works mainly in the GIF format, creating digital collages with manipulated elements of found GIFs. Her work brazenly straddles the line between &ldquo;high art&rdquo; and low (digital) culture with punkish irreverence and wicked humor.</p> <p>As a curator Mills is best known for uniting 115 digital artists in an ambitious remake of the John Berger documentary <em>Ways of Seeing</em>, which was shown as part of <em>Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art</em> at the Whitney in 2017. <em>Ways of Something</em>, as Mills retitled it, not only stands as an unassailable document of the state of the digital art nation at its time of release, but also successfully proves that the truths of Berger&rsquo;s insights are as relevant today as they ever were.</p> <p>Mills famously beamed her&nbsp;<em>Mountain Light/Time</em>&nbsp;GIF on giant screens around New York&rsquo;s Times Square in 2016, cementing her reputation as one of the most significant contemporary new media artists. The artist&nbsp;has a longstanding relationship with New York&rsquo;s Transfer gallery, where she&rsquo;s just opened her latest solo show, <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/463002-the-great-code" target="_blank">The Great Code</a></em>. The exhibition, which Mills says she&rsquo;s been working on for the last 15 years and includes the covers of some 3,075 books the artist has read, plays with the definition of &ldquo;code&rdquo; and suggests that &ldquo;the order of knowledge has been collapsed and compressed.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152216-Vancouver_5_4.gif" /></p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were you like as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Lorna Mills:</strong> I was a precocious reader, manic, rude, and very irritating (some adults were charmed by this, but not the adults in my family). I am still a reader, less rude perhaps, but still irritating.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first use a computer creatively?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> 1993&ndash;94, delivery was on floppy disks and CD-roms.</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you make?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> A CD interactive environment/portrait of a musician friend titled <em>The Man They Couldn&rsquo;t Deconstruct Because He Knew Too Much</em>.&nbsp;When he saw it he said, &ldquo;This is more about you than it is about me,&rdquo; ...well, yeah.&nbsp; A few other hard to describe things, all done in Director, so the images were very rich, but I suspect that all the early stuff is unplayable now. I never set max speeds on the animations so on my current system, everything whips by super fast in those early pieces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152139-Prison_7.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>When did you first become aware of the GIF format?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Mid-90s, but they were all graphics and I didn&rsquo;t like drawing tools.&nbsp;At that point I had been programming children&rsquo;s educational games in Director and later in Flash, working with illustrators and basically making things come alive in an interactive setting. It was something I really enjoyed professionally because I had good timing (and a real respect for other people&rsquo;s drawing skills.)</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first recognize its creative possibilities?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> The creative possibilities for my own work didn&rsquo;t crystalize until I saw what <a href="http://www.sallymckay.ca/" target="_blank">Sally McKay</a> was doing with GIFs using photographic sources, so early to mid-2000s.&nbsp;At that point there was a lot more activity online from people posting video-sourced GIFs, so I was making GIFs from my own video footage and looking at existing animations made by people who didn&rsquo;t position themselves as artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154641-river3.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When does a GIF become a piece of art? Does the maker have to</strong> <strong>identify as an artist?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I don&rsquo;t know the answer to that question, generally art comes from people who do declare themselves artists, but there are always exceptions. It&rsquo;s not something I worry about.</p> <p><strong>CP: How has your relationship with the internet evolved since you first used it?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I was attracted to aggregate sites from the beginning&mdash;I was never a good surfer. I also participated in the heydays of blogging;&nbsp;the audiences were small and the conversations were exciting. Later on, social media was comfortable for me because I had already defined an online persona that I was comfortable with.&nbsp;</p> <p>On Facebook and Twitter, I have the endearing belief that total strangers are delighted to hear from me. This is probably a major error on my part.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I prefer my important conversations IRL now.&nbsp;The potential for ridiculous misunderstandings on social media is too high and I don&rsquo;t want to spend my time defining all my terms to strangers or defending misreadings of what I am trying to say.&nbsp;So now I only post images of my giant dog and my animated GIFs. I spend a lot more time reading other people&rsquo;s posts. I&rsquo;m a major lurker and liker.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153454-1360_9_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize there was a scene building around &ldquo;Internet Art&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Aside from Sally&rsquo;s work, I was attracted to the artists in the surf clubs, so mid-2000s. (I was a major fan of Guthrie Lonergan and Chris Ashley.)</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>What were the surf clubs and what attracted you the them?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> You don&rsquo;t know about <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surfing_club">surf clubs</a>???? Google!&nbsp;Nasty nets and <a href="http://www.loshadka.org/">Loshadka</a> were a couple of the places where all the net art kids were playing together.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153526-SPAMM_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your process when making a GIF?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> My process is very congenial.&nbsp;(It&rsquo;s a nice way to live. I&rsquo;m very lucky.) I spend every day looking and downloading animated GIFs while watching Netflix or BBC and then spend countless hours cutting them up frame by frame, again while watching Netflix or BBC.&nbsp;(I&rsquo;m very good at mindless tedious tasks.)</p> <p>Once I have all the raw materials on hand, the collage work&mdash;the combination and placement of GIFs onto a picture plane&mdash;comes very quickly and instinctively, and that is when I get to surprise myself. (I admire conceptual artists mostly because I will never be one myself.)</p> <p><strong>CP: How obsessive are you?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I&rsquo;m focused and driven, but I don&rsquo;t mind the term obsessive applied to me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154042-Histokay_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Humor is often a big part your work.</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I have a well-honed sense of the ridiculous, I can&rsquo;t ignore it.&nbsp;I&rsquo;d rather feel alive in my work with all its profanity. I don&rsquo;t aspire to be relentlessly transcendent, lofty, minimal, or sacred.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Are you funny IRL?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Hell yeah. (Sometimes funnier than I mean to be.)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154241-Prison_6.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your art school experience and what influence</strong> <strong>it&rsquo;s had on your ongoing practice?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I went to small independent art schools that no longer exist and I was trained as a painter.&nbsp;That early training manifests itself in the formal undercurrents of my work. I learned that visual art should be interesting to look at.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s such a simple requirement, yet many artists fail.</p> <p><strong>CP: What does &ldquo;post internet&rdquo; mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> It&rsquo;s not something I worry about. (Why do people keep on asking me that?)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153939-Boom.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: I read that you have an interest in Nazi art&mdash;what draws you to that subject?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> WTF???????&nbsp;LOL,&nbsp;art in the service of a totalitarian state is not generally great art. I&rsquo;m only interested in Leni Riefenstahl who is problematic because she was a force of nature, a genius and a Nazi, though she claims she wasn&rsquo;t.&nbsp;And if she wasn&rsquo;t, she&rsquo;d have to be the most mind-numbingly ambitious artist in the history of the universe to align herself with the Nazis so she could make her films.&nbsp;</p> <p>Leni&rsquo;s two most famous films are <em>Triumph of the Will</em> about the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremburg, and <em>Olympia</em>, a documentary on the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. b/t/w in later life she claimed that <em>Triumph</em> was about &ldquo;jobs and peace.&rdquo;&nbsp;These films are acknowledged as masterpieces and in the 30s she was recognized as a brilliant but contentious artist worldwide (also much admired by many American film makers, especially Walt Disney, who also knew a thing or two about the enthralling grip of Mythologies.) (Uncle Walt was a fascist too.)</p> <p>She believed that art was something pure and beautiful. Of course, after WWII she was demoted from artist to propagandist by people who also think that art is something pure and beautiful.</p> <p>I have no use for purity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152342-DSC_2914-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of Transfer Gallery</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How did your association with Transfer Gallery begin?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I met Kelani Nicole at <a href="http://gli.tc/h/">gli.tc/h</a> festival in Chicago in 2012. She told me that she had just moved to NYC and was going to open a gallery and would I like a show? I said yes.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about the importance of Transfer Gallery on the wider digital art scene?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> Kelani expanded the gallery scene for digital art and has tirelessly promoted emergent practices that very few other galleries were interested in or even aware of five years ago.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214152511-Detail_4.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the genesis of the idea for your new show <em>The Great Code</em>?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> <em>The Great Code</em> is a title I stole from the writer Northrop Frye. (The title of my previous show <em>At Play in the Fields of the Lord</em> was stolen from the writer Peter Matthiessen.)</p> <p>I wanted to play with the many definitions of code by showing a print installation that consists of about 3,075 small glazed images of book covers.&nbsp;I&rsquo;ve been working on this project for about 15 years and plan to continue it as long as I live.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154952-Detail_2.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Right after 9-11, a now expired section of the Patriot Act required libraries to hand over records&mdash;without a warrant&mdash;if requested by law enforcement (they also weren&rsquo;t allowed to inform library patrons that their records had been reviewed). Of course the American Library Association fought it in court, because unlike most legislators, librarians have spines. (Apparently many libraries had signage that read, &ldquo;The FBI has not been here. (Look very closely for the removal of this sign.)&rdquo;) So it was in this climate that I decided to do a big beautiful data-dump of every book I can remember reading in my life, highbrow, lowbrow, and everything in between (I read fast and retain very little).</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a giant, brightly lit, shiny pile of prints on a seven by seven foot table. Openness about my reading habits was not a motivation&mdash;the volume of prints prevents a viewer from really seeing much more than what is sitting on top&mdash;and since I install the work, I get to choose what you actually can see. I&rsquo;m a deceptive creature.</p> <p>I also included an installation of six animated GIF collages with even more mixed messaging.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/105731173?byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/105731173" target="_blank">Ways of Something - Episode 1</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you learn from curating/overseeing the <em><a href="https://vimeo.com/105731173" target="_blank">Ways of Something</a> </em>project? What was the best thing about it being shown at the Whitney?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> I learned the limitations of an artist-curated project.&nbsp;When artists curate, they bring their own set of blindness and insight to a project.&nbsp;I may tackle something like that again if I come up with an engaging idea and a different format, but I don&rsquo;t plan to apply that particular formula again.&nbsp;</p> <p>The best thing about showing at the Whitney was bringing over 115 people to show with me. I also enjoyed sending out the announcement with a two-word cover letter: FUCK YEAH.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153723-timessquare.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you describe you emotions when you saw your work being shown on giant screens in Times Square?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:&nbsp;</strong>It was disconcerting because I&rsquo;ve never shown at that scale without knowing what it would look like beforehand. It was bewildering so I didn&rsquo;t feel like celebrating, and being Canadian, I thought that I should apologize: &ldquo;Sorry, just a big &rsquo;ole yellow GIF.&rdquo; A few nights later, I saw it a second time and realized that it was really good.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214153824-Mt_Light_sm.gif" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: The internet and digital art have become a popular medium for the expression of feminist ideas&mdash;why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong>&nbsp;The internet is where misogyny thrives, so the battle has to take place there.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180214154507-CRT_20.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up this year?</strong></p> <p><strong>LM:</strong> In mid-March I will be showing a multi-projection and multi-monitor GIF installation full of gratuitous internet filth at at Festspielhaus Hellerau in Dresden for the <em><a href="http://www.digitalfeminism.net/2018/">dgtl fmnsm</a></em> festival. On March 24, Transfer will be launching my catalog with an essay by Seth Watter as well as celebrating the 5th anniversary of the gallery. Then the next day, the 25th, at 3pm, all four episodes of <em>Ways of Something</em> will be screened at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Courtesy of the artist and Transfer Gallery)</span></p> Wed, 14 Feb 2018 09:03:38 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What Makes Up the Parisian Mystique? Part Two <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&ldquo;City of Lights, City of Fonts&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;blog and visual diary created by ArtSlant&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1517302926405000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG2iJiiFloEnyaBex_3a9Pp4gWxdQ" href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" target="_blank">Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence</a>, Ali Fitzgerald.&nbsp;Fitzgerald will explore France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.&nbsp;With sketches, writing, and graphic vignettes, she will document fonts, signage, and France&#39;s history of drawing as activism.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last week <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/49102-what-makes-up-the-parisian-mystique-part-one" target="_blank">I asked</a> what decorative beauty inspires in us. This week, I felt the overwhelming power of ornamentation as I walked around the Notre Dame Cathedral.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155104-Artslant_3_1.jpeg" /></p> <p>The mouths of its infamous gargoyles were swollen with icicles because of a recent snowstorm. I wondered: besides being grotesquely cute, what is the purpose of gargoyles?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213161235-Artslant_3_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Architecture and built structures have often been used as propaganda to alter the attitudes and ideals of citizens. Giant towers and buttresses are church- or state-sponsored shows of power through built beauty. Some structures inspire awe, some reverence, others fear. Sometimes, like with soviet statues, their sheer grandiosity is meant to compel an emotional response.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155143-Artslant_3_3.jpeg" /></p> <p>On Sunday I traversed the Place de R&eacute;publique, a square centered around a triumphant monument of Marianne. She loomed over teenagers as they smoked and shuffled and exchanged tentative first kisses.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213160339-Artslant_3_4.jpeg" /></p> <p>Marianne is an overt appeal to patriotism carved in stone, but there are also less tangible threads of manipulative artistry around Paris. How do the light and air and presentation of things affect us?</p> <p>On my street alone I marvel at orderly rows of curated shrimp, bright macarons, and well-manicured trees.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155233-Artslant_3_5.jpeg" /></p> <p>This ambient beauty is a part of the Parisian mystique, a fantasy used to entice, convince, and laud quintessential &ldquo;Frenchness.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Sometimes this feeds into traditional notions of European beauty co-opted by political parties to stir patriotism alongside artistic appreciation.</p> <p>For instance, the National Front often employs a blue rose, its delicate beauty obscuring darker exclusionary aims. The Bloc Identitaire, an anti-Islam group in France, employs traditional French symbols like medieval shields to underline a preferred ancestry.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155257-Artslant_3_6.jpeg" /></p> <p>Marveling at and questioning the links between French beauty and identity is a great way to spend a February snow week in my humble opinion.</p> <p>Next time I&rsquo;ll write a little about advertising as propaganda and look at Roger Caillois&rsquo; visions of a mid-century Paris covered with posters. Here&rsquo;s a busty preview:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180213155327-Artslant_3_7.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald">Ali Fitzgerald</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 22 Feb 2018 01:23:35 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list