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Toronto

Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA)

Exhibition Detail
trans/FORM - Matter as Subject > New Perspectives
Curated by: David Liss
952 Queen Street West
Toronto, Ontario M6J 1G8
Canada


June 22nd, 2012 - August 12th, 2012
 
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© Courtesy of the artist & The Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA)
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The exhibition features eight Toronto artists exploring new approaches to producing artworks whose meanings and essence are revealed through the tactile and factual characteristics of the material from which they are made. Working primarily from within recognizable forms such as painting, sculpture and installation, they combine found, vernacular and traditional materials and lo-tech, industrial and handcrafted processes with an astute resourcefulness and informed conceptual strategies. Their inventive actions and processes transform materials into a coherent poetic language of form that animates the latent expressive potential of matter, awakening within the viewer new ways of seeing and making sense of the world around us. For these artists material and matter is the subject of their work. trans/FORM presents new perspectives on form, meaning and material that are essential to the very definition of art.

Jaime Angelopoulos is a Toronto based sculptor, who received her MFA from York University, and BFA from NSCAD University. She has participated in group exhibitions and artist residencies internationally, and recently presented solo exhibitions at Parisian Laundry (Montreal, QC), Stride Gallery (Calgary, AL) and YYZ Artist Outlet (Toronto, ON). The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ALDO Group, York University, and the Bank of Montreal have acquired her works.

Georgia Dickie (b. 1989) graduated with a BFA from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2011. She currently lives and works in Toronto. Her work addresses the complexities of contemporary object-based practice, and is characterized by a deep interest in found materials and their inherent limitations. She has shown in a number of group shows in Toronto including at Thrush Holmes Empire, MKG127 and Erin Stump Projects.

Aleksander Hardashnakov was born in 1982 and lives in Toronto. He is the founder, along with Hugh Scott-Douglas and Tara Downs, of Tomorrow Gallery.

Niall McClelland grew up in Toronto, spent many of his summers in Northern Ireland, did his school in Vancouver and eight years later returned to Toronto where he now lives. His work has been published in Adbusters, Arkitip, Color, Design Anarchy, Hunter and Cook, I-Live-Here, Lowdown, Made, and The Walrus. McClelland was also included along with Jeremy Jansen, Ellsworth Kelly and Richard Serra in the group show Black To Back And Light at Clint Roenisch Gallery in 2009.

Derrick Piens is a Toronto based sculptor who works primarily with plaster, wood and found object, creating large-scale hybrid constructions. Derrick received his MFA from Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX) in 2007, and BFA from NSCAD University (Halifax, NS) in 2005. In 2009 Derrick was a resident artist at the Toronto School of Art.

Sasha Pierce, Toronto-based artist, holds an MFA from the University of Waterloo. She has exhibited at ACME, Los Angeles; Jessica Bradley Art + Projects, Toronto; Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto; Cambridge Galleries; and Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, Guelph. Pierce was awarded Honourable Mention in the RBC Canadian Painting Competition in 2009.

Jennifer Rose Sciarrino: born in Toronto, Canada in 1983, represented by Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto, Ontario.

Hugh Scott-Douglas was born in 1988 in Cambridge, England and lives in Toronto. He studied at Pratt (2005) and OCAD (2010). Scott-Douglas makes work that refers to production itself, to its consumption and to its container, using visual cues gleaned from minimalism and op art. The central dialectic of the work springs from the tension between the need for a rigid authority figure, on the one hand, and the very possibility of establishing such an authority, given that it is so easily subverted by its own parts.

 


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