ArtSlant - Contemporary Art Network http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/show en-us 40 Paris Dispatches: The Day of the Markets / Bon Dimanche <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paris Dispatches is <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/213864-brett-day-windham?tab=BLOG" target="_blank">the blog</a> of ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence, Brett Day Windham, who will be undertaking her residency in Paris during January and February 2015. She will be using the blog to share her process, work, and experience throughout the residency. </em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Georgia Fee Summer 2015 Residency Session is now accepting applications. You can find more information about the residency and how to apply&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/42184" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/296279" target="_blank">Le Journal d'un Seul Jour</a></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;For Allison&mdash;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;What strange phenomena we find in a great city, all we need do is stroll about with our eyes open. Life swarms with innocent monsters.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 180px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">―Charles Baudelaire</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I see the sun spots reflected on my courtyard walls. It rained like crazy yesterday and now there's a sun and bluebird skies. I shake off the exhaustion from hours of drawing the night before. I wash away most of the evil thoughts towards my upstairs neighbor, who<em> sawed</em> away on something until four and then started blasting french gangster rap at eight. Dress, coffee, and out the door.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">First, to Bastille.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/lwH-Hh3vdZQy_fzm9MfzvuD3ep6qJJ-8zrfpZ5GzJNZEmK044jrapXBs83Z-7OvunkUpmOvxYY2pY4r9uouldvCMGIlUc6rmOZLYPCYI-3nAFzml2y5S-5stCOs8CVIicyVVfQQ" alt="2015-02-11 09.32.56-1.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Outside the Picasso Museum</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I take a route that leads me past the<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_des_Vosges" target="_blank"> Place des Vosges</a>.&nbsp;It&nbsp;is sunny, and Sunday, and I want to see it full of children and families just once before I leave (for some reason it&rsquo;s usually nighttime/raining/bitterly cold when I happen by). I cruise easily through the empty streets of the Haute Marais, skirt the line at the gorgeous Picasso Museum, and <em>l&ecirc;ch&eacute; les vitrines</em> before some shuttered Japanese-French boutiques. The Place Des Vosges is just as I had hoped: full of liveliness.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/UveWlz9CnXKzLBz0GVNX5Nsm1KH_EIwcqj75sRC70FprHSsbMt2ZfCv-vxqPbEPwQh8QmQzaIMdlI05Vw0TRecg3lqaE5v1_A7spQumMj3m2avMMp1oOGfAvtZcLe6c2_CZ-LdM" alt="2015-02-24 14.24.17.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /> <span style="font-size: small;">Peeking into the Place des Vosges at Night, as it is when I usually seem to pass by</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_Column" target="_blank">Colonne de Juillet </a>comes into view, and then so does <a href="http://s3.amazonaws.com/trazzler-images/af/46565/Bastille_market_-_498x332_-_Laura_Woodman.jpg" target="_blank">Le March&eacute; Richard Lenoir. </a>On and on, row after row, it stretches for blocks to the northeast. The most beautiful assortments of baguettes are <a href="http://www.worldwanderingkiwi.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Bastille-market-Paris.jpg" target="_blank">dusted with flour and stacked like building blocks</a>, and there are striped canvas cloths displaying <a href="https://endellionbarge.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/egg-stall.jpg" target="_blank">rows and rows of eggs</a>. Upended sea urchins (displaying their soft orange goo) bump spikes with cashmere scarves at the next table. Beggars sit on the ground, panhandling to Dior-shaded women in sneakers and fur. Attractive Parisian Ladies bring their Moroccan mint tea out in tall etched glasses to sun on a bench, mid-market. Men sing the names of their produce as though songs from their native tongue; one man&rsquo;s oranges become the object of lost love in an Algerian ballad, tomatoes a Spanish jig. The constant appeal of "Madame, Bonjour Madame" echoes down the crowded stalls, all part of the orchestra. Young women carry <a href="http://www.themarketbasketco.com.au/includes/templates/my_template/images/homepage_img.gif" target="_blank">straw market baskets with leather straps</a>, while practical middle-aged ladies have forsaken all that for the <a href="http://flux.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/img_0565.jpg" target="_blank">canvas-covered pull-cart</a>. Everywhere, the practical butts up against the tempting. I curse my stupidity for having eaten breakfast at home. I try to remember that I'm working&mdash;eyes down for artifacts of the market&mdash;but find only pink plastic bag tabs, and some <a href="https://spaark.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/dsc_0295.jpg" target="_blank">red mesh from the tops of clementine boxes.</a> I shove them dutifully into the specimen bag and keep going. (Note: It is too crowded to get my camera out, and I am relishing the experience too much to bother, but this market is very well documented...as you will see if you follow the links.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6Wufeci4dQP_Nfnfow8uBQw2QgkcNmUbqbI4anA6wC5nfC-JLearbFfyKJD7-S8HV8O1Omt9_q-hHZjm4QsINBBucTW2ot7QifN6TuaKnsufaZ3AfF6lPEg7d3EgSeZePhuF0Ds" alt="P1040956.JPG" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">This part of the market smelled of roses and clementines</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Next, I descend into the Metro, bound for Les Puces at Porte des Vanves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vanves is everything I wanted the flea market to be. I'm sorry that when I was here with my parents we wasted our time at the grand market at St.-Ouen. The market is around the corner from the metro station. The dealers&rsquo; various Astro vans create a kind of automotive privet hedge, rendering the market invisible and protected from the street as it winds around a huge soccer field. At <a href="http://www.timeout.com/paris/en/shopping/marche-aux-puces-de-la-porte-de-vanves" target="_blank">Vanves things are affordable, it is friendly</a>, I can respectfully take photos, I feel welcome. There are little things to enjoy. I could easily fill a home with one visit here. I do not find the vintage <a href="http://france.hermes.com/la-maison-des-carres.html" target="_blank">Hermes scarf</a> of my dreams, nor do I find any <a href="https://www.google.fr/search?q=hermes+scarves&amp;es_sm=119&amp;tbm=isch&amp;tbo=u&amp;source=univ&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=xvbqVLD_LOnLygO_zIKAAg&amp;ved=0CD8QsAQ&amp;biw=1213&amp;bih=695" target="_blank">Hermes scarves</a> at all, but I find gifts for the people I love. The gifts are weird little bits and bobs, and they may be the wrong things, but the urge to leave with treasure is too strong.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/PGjzbeQigUFyD9npRIaEz5K644pZGW8Q1feVcYDMHwAIL25VA36ppVa5ihdxRpOUlwdhb5TXVj02kJhoVNwVF78pW97r3GyVawXKrPsqDJVKpnzKXd08xtzDtLfBH_-P8ehfyN4" alt="2015-02-22 08.09.58.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">March&eacute; Aux Puces at Porte De Vanves, creating crystal goblet desires</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As I walk on I admired ancient dirty tunics of bleached heavy linen, delicate christening gowns, dozens of pince-nez, beautiful leather cases for anything you could ever need, birds wings fastened into hatpins, brass pots, a beautiful brass chandelier of painted flowers, fur coats, books, beautiful cartographer&rsquo;s tools in molded and flocked cases, pottery, cameras, boar&rsquo;s heads on plaques, a seashell coinpurse with a hinge, and souvenir spoons. At the edges, at the highway overpass, are the poor. They are there with their rags spread out on blankets, miscellaneous chargers and outdated electronics on cardboard.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/zwFt8mapi4Pu1w_qJHBANCTW4HHOUlBM7YanXoaG-4ZcxOvZbfe2bbU41gNR6mqAOIvEcz1koSDonm5EKnOoVDD2uXT0u07hKzNYQsl-flowDiARh01ff9p1UJVV9tpEadkE-Zg" alt="2015-02-22 08.03.08.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Heaped fabrics at the <em>march&eacute;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As the market began to close, I retrace my steps. Through the thinning crowds, I notice things on the sidewalk: bits of antique lace, old buttons, a long and probably bootleg ribbon marked &ldquo;Hermes 2013,&rdquo; a tiny antique French Boy Scouts book stuffed with vintage black-and-white photographs, pieces of pottery and a pile of torn-up old Italian lire. This marks my transition from fl&acirc;neuse to gl&acirc;neuse; if walking gently and idly with the crowd through the flea market was the perfect gentile expression of the modern day fl&acirc;neur, being the batty lady picking up discarded ancient bits takes my presence and state of mine from the observer to scavenger. And thus I skirt feminist archetypes (pun semi-intended). I find so many little things as the market folded into parked vans and disappeared that I feel I might have rubbed the magic away. It is a weird feeling, to go from coveting beautiful antiques to scavenging for discarded remnants under the trees. Almost immediately, the next shift arrives. Swarthy looking men are already setting up their tents and tables for cheap clothes and dollar candies; clearly they mark the next market cycle of the day. All is temporary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/sO8z_gS-UEIuQyUhBiMXfniBwI2K2r9Sx1N5rzBb4Sq83xElQVMU3yDRc5s97txb3n3jG0HxL42DHJI0QB2EVKMt29TgSQtRH2jsL7c32CbtmtKkmg31YUY4ZM4ASK4pLQW8g3Q" alt="2015-02-26 10.46.57.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">The assortment of finds from the Market at Vanves, ready to be logged into my specimen-sketch book</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While I collect feathers and scraps, I meet <a href="http://pucesdevanves.typepad.com/exposants/2012/05/bourdon-yves.html" target="_blank">Yves Bourdon,</a>an antique carpet dealer, with ancient rugs thrown up over the chain link wall behind him and on the ground, to create an instant Souk. Whenever people look a little uncomfortable, I try to explain my project a little bit.</span><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">In general, I have found that as soon as I explain what I am doing (in my broken French, free from the confines of tenses or grammar) people are absolutely lovely to me&mdash;I could be wrong, but it feels like this is a city that celebrates its creative class as heroes. When I do my little song and dance for him he gets very excited. He wants me to come to his shop in town and possibly make watercolors of some of the rugs, or propose another artist's project to him. I take his card, thank him, and extract myself.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/mV7ORhvBnsSl8awmmed0E91BZoXPUcRtu2oj0gTQ5D1h8oFH2O_62LSHBB2OeAAeTWzukhUngj-NDq8hi7Qatv-9W6MtZodaY4FyHgZIW2uVhhoX2P3VawyeNYRws71ZxKr0ZFE" alt="2015-02-22 10.57.26.jpg" width="306px;" height="166px;" /><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/0tM397NSw-7QVMk3lHXbmKvjm3cN8F-z7jaOII2O8XPCeHSwM7KQ_dTutgdd1neY5D2ZCuXGkk1oct_rFTGqhe3YPO_lFp83d09LWWNvXaEOW7xxMtE-O7pev9AQqiQ9Bem4Vas" alt="2015-02-22 10.57.34.jpg" width="299px;" height="166px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Case in point: An hour later, I stumbled on these plaques in the vestibule of Hotel Delambre</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And now, as I walk back into town from the periphery, following signs for Montparnasse, I am determined not to use a map. Back in fI&acirc;neur mode, I am more and more determined to find my way serendipitously. I am dictating this essay into my iPhone as I walk north on Rue Raymond Losserand, past the Passage des Arts and then a typical Parisian florist-hospital-funeral home complex. I think <a href="http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/charles-baudelaire#poet" target="_blank">Baudelaire </a>would have loved iPhone dictation; he would never have to stop and jot down notes, he could continue move, eyes up, roving the crowd and the streets as he spoke quietly into his phone.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/awxU7CJ35bVwhacjBBx7mnNI6ECT2jbtZ1MqbTdEYQ09xwVNZ0hLxJKTncf49GUW_i1gfCl3qfAYC21hN1170pqntmFBeudiY5OzxL_QX6JvGPCrvfrPfPg6-eclGBdw79mRB3Y" alt="2015-02-22 09.30.31.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">The southern edge of Paris, empty on a Sunday afternoon</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Suddenly I have arrived in Montparnasse. The tower rises up to my left as I cross the busy Avenue De Maine, and move towards the quiet wall at the<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montparnasse_Cemetery" target="_blank"> cemetery.</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/tOt3z6zwd1iw6Nw40V7yBddm-JwvAjKiX2HwDOV6TPDAmaGfx4gVXVcH3wgUx4zOpHc_GiRno7G4LH5IAsz-A3RduqzjM9h0qMTOjPdIwdZzcFja94ev2tC00As_0Np4Vh9Ha-I" alt="2015-02-22 10.46.45.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Crossing through the walled road between two sections of Cimitiere du Montparnasse</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I pass through, and on through streets like the stunning, sun-drenched <a href="http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rue_du_Cherche-Midi" target="_blank">Rue du Cherche Midi</a>, with portal doors open on the courtyard of the old Thuileries Palace, with it&rsquo;s sculpture of Neptune. I keep walking until I bump headlong into the Bon March&eacute;, closed for Sunday. The Gl&acirc;neur rears her scavenging head as I note the <a href="http://www.buro247.com/thumb/640x960_0/Webster%20and%20Le%20Bon%20Marche146.jpg" target="_blank">special-edition flamingo wallpaper</a> in the dumpster, unreachable due to jagged sheets of broken glass around it. I am suddenly exhausted, and head down the steps to <a href="http://fr.topic-topos.com/image-bd/france/75/acces-sevres-babylone-saint-thomas-d-aquin.jpg" target="_blank">Sevres Babylon.</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/6CzpLqPtTfS-dKh-l_MC-9gDo-jNvlmLmNgvSD-SLC8y_ZnP_qeg_88URD-ur5CblvTeRBdgmdVw2nE_EBZqqjKEn6il0I8U-FjrNpKUI9A82miM8P2_fnzuAdupo6jlQvNp0wQ" alt="2015-02-26 11.13.34.jpg" width="624px;" height="351px;" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">A sketch book page-in-progress with treasures found around the Bastille Market and further afield</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/213864-brett-day-windham" target="_blank">Brett Day Windham</a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></em><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://brettdaywindham.com/" target="_blank">Brett Day Windham </a>(born Cambridge, England, raised Providence, Rhode Island) is a multidisciplinary artist working with sculpture, installation and collage. You can find the full list of blog posts from her Paris residency <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/213864-brett-day-windham?tab=BLOG" target="_blank">here</a>.</span></em></span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: Front and Back Covers for Physiology of the Fl&acirc;neur, Louis Huart, 1841&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Source: Gallica.bnf.fr,&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;" href="http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8530312c/f132.planchecontact">National Library of France</a></span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">)</span></span></p> Sun, 01 Mar 2015 12:17:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Botanical Arts: a Heritage of Naturalist Imperialism <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Colombian artists have shown a fascination with nature over the last two decades. Many of these artists apply pseudo-scientific methods and tools to address issues of the relationship between humanity and nature. This interest is so prevalent in Colombian art that Jos&eacute; Roca, one of Colombia&rsquo;s most respected curators, opened up <a href="http://arteflora.org/en/" target="_blank">FLORA ars+natura</a>, a space dedicated to the relationship between art and nature in Bogot&aacute; in 2012. These artists exercise a vast array of approaches: from drawing, video, and photography to more specific strategies and disciplines like sociology, taxonomy, ethnography and botany.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There are various ways in which Colombian artists have engaged with nature in their art, but botany in particular is employed as a means to explore and critique the political history of their country. Roca, who held the temporary post of Adjunct Curator of Latin American Art at Tate Modern, has been a curator since the 90s and was among the first to write about Colombian artists' use of botany to address political and historical concerns. In &ldquo;Flora Necrologica&rdquo; (2001), Roca wrote: [Colombian artists] have established connections between the classification of natural resources in the colonies, in itself paving the way for the capitalist exploitation of the land, and the &ldquo;scientific&rdquo; establishment of social inequalities as one of the roots of the country's current situation.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As Roca suggests, this strategy was a way of getting to the root of the country&rsquo;s more recent conflict. Botany becomes a means for artists to deal with the legacy of colonial expeditions, sometimes directly reappropriating the pseudo-scientific methods of the 18th&nbsp;and 19th&nbsp;century explorers, in order to deal with or critically engage the legacy of the colonization of the &ldquo;New World.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150226135029-Alberto_Baraya-1.jpg" alt="" height="440" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150226135041-Alberto_Baraya-2.jpg" alt="" height="440" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Alberto Baraya, (left) <em>Orquidea Vanda y 4 antropometr&iacute;as artificiales</em>, 2013, Found object, photograph and drawing on cardboard 60 x 45 x 5 cm (right) <em>Expedici&oacute;n Nueva Zelandia, Plate 02,</em> 2009, Found objects &ldquo;made in China&rdquo;, photograph and drawing on cardboard 60 x 45 x 8 cm, Via <a href="http://ocula.com/art-galleries/galeria-nara-roesler/artists/alberto-baraya/" target="_blank">Ocula</a></span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These artists see the history of colonial expeditions, often sponsored by the Spanish Royal Crown, as a way to rationalize and comprehend the violence in second&nbsp;half of the 20th&nbsp;century in Colombia, even though they do not approach these as &ldquo;rational&rdquo; or &ldquo;scientific.&rdquo; Instead these artworks point to the irrational, arbitrary essence of the colonization of the Americas, which in turn they see as having produced, either directly or indirectly, the irrational, absurd, and incoherent political situation in the present.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This approach is exemplified by Alberto Baraya&rsquo;s ongoing project, <em>Herbario de Plantas Artificiales</em> (<em>Herbarium of Artificial Plants</em>) (above). Since 2001 Baraya has been collecting a vast array of found and artificial flora made out of different materials&mdash;plastic, glass, wood, wire, and fabrics&mdash;during &ldquo;expeditions&rdquo; in cities such as New York, Mexico City and Venice. The herbarium takes different forms: photographs or framed assemblages with notations and ink stamps not unlike those found in natural history museums or antique scientific illustration books.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150226135851-Alberto_Baraya__Invernadero_de_plantas_artificiales__2007.png" alt="" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">Alberto Baraya, <em>Greenhouse of&nbsp;Artificial Plants</em>, 2007. Courtesy <a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/naturaleza-nominal" target="_blank">Arco Colombia</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150226143710-Alberto_Baraya-3.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Alberto Baraya, <em>Planta pluma - Antropometr&iacute;a argentina</em>, 2013, Found object, photograph and drawing on cardboard 80 x 60 x 8 cm.&nbsp;Via&nbsp;<a href="http://ocula.com/art-galleries/galeria-nara-roesler/artists/alberto-baraya/" target="_blank">Ocula</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Baraya&rsquo;s entire project is widely understood as a parody of 18th&nbsp;and 19th&nbsp;century travelers&rsquo; own attempts to research, catalogue, and categorize flora and fauna in America. By dissecting countless artificial flowers and categorizing them, he parodies the pseudo-scientific methodology, stressing the arbitrary and problematic role botany had with colonialism. In short, the expeditions were, either directly or indirectly, used to exploit and dominate these lands and the indigenous people living in them. The &ldquo;science&rdquo; was not objective but motivated. In short, a critique of instrumental reason. But, putting aside that reason has always been instrumental, Baraya is not archiving rare plants that face the risk of extinction in the age of the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/41699" target="_blank">anthropocene</a>;&nbsp;he has focused on objects that are either machine or hand made. Although they are often considered tacky, cheap or tasteless, these flowers carry within them the symbolic values given to nature (even if in a degraded form). These artificial objects have a use-value, not only an exchange value, and they can embody nature without being from the natural world. Baraya&rsquo;s near-compulsive aesthetic project is more interesting as deconstruction of the everyday, or the construction of a universe of artifice, than it is for its critique of colonialists' use of botany.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What makes this project even more interesting, however, is the ambivalence it has towards itself. In the artist&rsquo;s compulsion to collect these flowers and reproduce the naturalists&rsquo; methodology, he highlights the double-sided character of these expeditions. He shares the non-objective fascination, the curiosity, and the intense desire to know and learn about obscure, foreign, and unfamiliar things. The work embodies the problematic nature of the approach, without being an absolute negation of the enlightenment impulse. </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Another project addressing the relationship of botany with colonialism is Felipe Arturo&rsquo;s <em>The Migration of Plants</em>. Arturo focuses on the history of the human-lead migration of plants like sugarcane or coffee that travelled from Africa along the shores of the Mediterranean to the Iberian Peninsula and eventually to places like Colombia in America.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150226134552-Screen-Shot-2013-09-22-at-10.24.10-PM.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Susana Mej&iacute;a, <em>Color Amazonia</em>, 2006&ndash;2013, Courtesy <a href="http://arteflora.org/2013/" target="_blank">arteflora</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Then there are the artists who demonstrate a fascination with nature&mdash;its exoticism, its beauty, its majesty, its still to be explored elements, its still untold stories&mdash;without the immense historical baggage of colonialism. Susana Mej&iacute;a&rsquo;s <em>Color Amazonia</em> (2006&ndash;13), for example, is the result of a seven-year enthobotanical research project about natural pigments in the Colombian Amazon jungle. In a floor-to-ceiling installation, color tinted fibers simulating the way indigenous people hang these fibers to dry, showcase rare bright pigments she identified as being the among the most used by the region's indigenous people. The project was conducted with scientific scrutiny and with the collaboration of the indigenous people of the Colombian Amazon.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Color Amazonia</em> is currently included in&nbsp;<em>Waterweavers: The River in Contemporary Colombian Visual and Material Culture,</em> a group show curated by Jos&eacute; Roca that has traveled from the Bard Graduate Center galleries to <a href="http://www.condeduquemadrid.es/">Centro Cultural Conde Duque</a> in Madrid. It is on view through April 12th. Felipe Arturo&rsquo;s <em>The Migration of Plants</em> is on view at <a href="http://www.centrocentro.org/centro/exposicion_ficha/117">Centro Centro in Madrid until May 31st</a>.&nbsp;Alberto Baraya&rsquo;s work is also included in <em>Waterweavers</em> as well as&nbsp;in the exhibition&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ca2m.org/en/future/naturaleza-nominal-arco-colombia"><em>Naturaleza Nominal</em></a>, or&nbsp;<em>Nominal Nature</em>, at Centro de Arte 2 de mayo (CA2M), curated by Jaime C&eacute;ron. The exhibition opens on February 28th and runs through April 26th.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Laurie Rojas</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Alberto Baraya, from&nbsp;<em>Naturaleza Nominal</em>, or Nominal Nature, at <a href="Naturaleza%20Nominal,%20or%20Nominal%20Nature,%20at%20Centro%20de%20Arte%202%20de%20mayo%20(CA2M)%20in%20Madrid" target="_blank">Centro de Arte 2 de mayo (CA2M)</a></span>)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:47:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Made-Up With Danny Volk: S1E4 with Paul Mpagi Sepuya <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danny Volk talks to artists in their studios about life and art&mdash;while they do his make-up. This concept was a new one for us, and, unsurprisingly, it produces some unique moments: see artists like Theaster Gates, Pope.L, and Jessica Stockholder working in their studios as you've never seen them before.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Revisit Season 1 as we anticipate the all-new Made-Up Season 2, to be released this Spring on ArtSlant.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This week: Danny is at the studio of photographer&nbsp;Paul Mpagi Sepuya.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ZkKL60oAPA0" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="float: right;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150129205110-10299099_219201961624218_7214582499433800077_n.jpg" alt="" width="150" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>More About Made-Up With Danny Volk&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Made-Up is created and hosted by Danny Volk.&nbsp;Volk was born in 1979 in Akron, OH and currently lives and works in Chicago, IL. Volk got his MFA in Visual Art from the University of Chicago in 2014, and his BA in Theater Studies at Kent State University in 2006.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Produced by | Danny Volk and Stephanie Anne Harris Trevor</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cameras | Bryce Peppers,&nbsp;Valia&nbsp;O'Donnell</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Technical consultant | Ben Chandler</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Comic Strip" by Serge&nbsp;Gainsbourg&nbsp;remixed by&nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/flashcookie">DJ&nbsp;Flashcookie</a></span></p> Sun, 01 Mar 2015 11:47:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list #ArcoColombia: Colombia Across Madrid <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In its 34th</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;edition, ARCOmadrid has invited Colombia to participate as guest of honor under the moniker <a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/" target="_blank">#ArcoColombia</a>. Since 1996, the organization has presented a special focus on a different country each year (last year we covered ARCO's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/38446" target="_blank">#FocusFinland</a>, also furnished with a readymade hashtag). This year the special program encompasses a selection of 10 galleries curated by Juan A. Gait&aacute;n for the main fair alongside a broad repertoire of exhibitions and events that will parallel ARCOmadrid during the months of February and March across the city.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The suite of tandem events are organized under two main branches. <strong>Focus Colombia</strong> is an initiative of the Colombian Government that brings together twelve exhibitions curated by the Colombian cultural producers Mar&iacute;a Wills Londo&ntilde;o, curator of Museos del Banco de la Rep&uacute;blica in Colombia, and Jaime Cer&oacute;n, curator, art critic and visual arts advisor for the Ministry of Culture in Bogot&aacute;. The <strong>Colombia in Madrid</strong> program serves as a complement to Focus, injecting renowned names of Colombian contemporary art into the Madrid art scene and institutions. These periphery expos, like the main fair, aim to present a historic panorama of Colombian art of the last 40 years, while diving deeply into the impact of Colombian art domestically and abroad in the last decade.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Do check out the 10 Colombian galleries at the main fair, but be sure to complete your tour with these five off-site highlights that speak to some of Arco Colombia's most prominent curatorial themes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225180656-murillo.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Oscar Murillo. Courtesy: Arco Colombia 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>#SoloShow #Geopolitics #ColombiaEnMadrid</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/de-marcha-%C2%BFuna-rumba-no-s%C3%B3lo-un-desfile-con-%C3%A9tica-y-est%C3%A9tica" target="_blank"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">De marcha &iquest;una rumba? No, solo un desfile con &eacute;tica y est&eacute;tica</em></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, February 24&ndash;March 20 at the cultural center Dao&iacute;z y Velarde, Ave. Ciudad de Barcelnoa 162</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oscar Murillo is a key name in the Latin American art world and a leader of the artistic vanguard, both in Colombia and abroad. Currently based in London and represented by David Zwirner, Murillo&rsquo;s work deals extensively with contextualizing globalization and exploring notions of migration, multiculturalism, identity, and sociocultural differences that are rooted in concept and the artist&rsquo;s own life experiences.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An initiative of the Embassy of Colombia, <em>De marcha &iquest;una rumba? </em>grapples with the artist&rsquo;s own cultural ties in a multimedia exhibition that seeks to chart a meeting point between different geopolitical and cultural situations, including #ArcoColombia itself. The artist&rsquo;s birthplace of La Paila, Colombia, the fair&rsquo;s host city of Madrid, and even the site of the actual exhibition are all incorporated in a personally driven effort to find an intersection between European urban space and the Colombian countryside.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225180811-Untitled.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Camilo Lleras, <em>Tri&aacute;ngulo prohibido (Forbidden Triangle)</em>, 1972, Courtesy: Arco Colombia 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>#PrivateCollection #Conceptual #Photography #FocusColombia</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/autorretrato-disfrazado-de-artista-arte-conceptual-y-fotograf%C3%ADa-en-colombia" target="_blank">Autorretrato disfrazado de artista: Arte conceptual y Fotograf&iacute;a en Colombia en los a&ntilde;os 70</a>, (Self-portrait disguised as artist: Conceptual art and Photography in Colombia in the 1970s), </em>curated by Santiago Rueda at the <a href="http://www.cervantes.es/cultura_espanola/novedades_culturales_cervantes/novedades_culturales_2015/artes_plasticas_arquitectura/exposicion_autorretrato_disfrazado_artista_arcocolombia_madrid.htm" target="_blank">Instituto Cervantes</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">According to curator Santiago Rueda, Photoconceptualism&mdash;or Conceptual Photography as it&rsquo;s more commonly known&mdash;was short lived in Colombia and comprised mostly of a small group of artists. Now, drawing from the private collection of respected Colombian art collector Jos&eacute; Dar&iacute;o Guiti&eacute;rrez, Rueda attempts for the first time to map the photographic movement&rsquo;s main practitioners in a meditative and critical exploration of 1970s Colombian photography.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibition spans themes of popular architecture, landscape, sexual politics, and abstraction and comprises works by 11 artists: Camilo Lleras, Jaime Ardila, Jorge Ortiz, Eduardo Hern&aacute;ndez, &Oacute;scar Monsalve, &Aacute;lvaro Barrios, Miguel &Aacute;ngel Rojas, Fernell Franco, Antonio Inginio Caro, Manolo Velloj&iacute;n y Bernardo Salcedo.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225181042-Untitled2.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Cecilia Arango, Canasto tejido por la communidad Guacamaya (Basket woven by Macaw Community), 2014. Courtesy: Arco Colombia 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>#GroupShow #Nature #Multimedia #FocusColombia</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/tejedores-de-agua-el-r%C3%ADo-en-el-arte-el-dise%C3%B1o-y-la-cultura-material" target="_blank">Tejedores de agua: El r&iacute;o en la cultura visual y material contempor&aacute;nea en Colombia </a>(Waterweavers), </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">curated by Jos&eacute; Roca, Associate Curator of Latin American Art Estrellita B. Brodsky at Tate Modern and artistic director of <a href="http://arteflora.org/en/" target="_blank">FLORA ars + natura</a>, with the assistance of the curator and editor Alejandro Martin, February 25&ndash;April 12, 2015 at <a href="http://www.condeduquemadrid.es/evento/tejedores-de-agua-arcolombia/" target="_blank">Conde Duque</a></span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Though the conflicts of Colombians today are increasingly defined by political upheaval, social struggles, and rapid migration into the nation&rsquo;s major&mdash;and distinctly mountainous&mdash;cities, <em>Tejedores de Agua</em> investigates the force of culture inherent in the multitude of Colombia&rsquo;s rivers. The exhibition takes as its subject a total of seven rivers, ranging geographically from the first streams of the Amazon to the expansive floodplains of the Magdalena that empty into the Caribbean.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The collective effort of 18 artists identifies the growing rift between Colombia&rsquo;s heavily populated urban centers and its largely isolated villages and tribes, linked only by the rivers, which have remained fraught with violence for decades from black market activity and clashes between guerilla militias. Employing materials and craft both traditional and contemporary, fiber arts, video installation, and <em>objet trouv&eacute;s</em> weave together to form a wholly immersive exhibition that&rsquo;s dredged the historically and socially rich sediments of the rivers and assembled them as a distressed delta.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225181144-Untitled3.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mar&iacute;a Jos&eacute; Arjona. Courtesy: Arco Colombia 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>#Performance #Meditative #Time #ColombiaEnMadrid</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/performance-de-mar%C3%ADa-jos%C3%A9-arjona-construcci%C3%B3n-de-un-tiempo" target="_blank">Construcci&oacute;n de un Tiempo (Construction of a Time): Performance by Mar&iacute;a Jos&eacute; Arjona</a>, </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">at <a href="http://obrasocial.lacaixa.es/nuestroscentros/caixaforummadrid/caixaforummadrid_es.html" target="_blank">Caixa Forum Madrid</a> on February 27 &amp; 28</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Time&mdash;the passing and the loss of it&mdash;is difficult to see, measure, concretize. While fleeting, rarely does it leave a physical trace of its construction. On the occasion of her performance at Caiza Forum Madrid for ARCO2015, Maria Jose Arjona&mdash;perhaps one of the most recognized Colombian performance artists who has, notably, worked with Marina Abramovic&mdash;will perform <em>Construction of a Time</em>, a variation of <em>Act of Fable</em>, which showed for the first time under the Proyecto Pent&aacute;gono in 2001.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Arjona&rsquo;s performance evokes the creation of Tibetan sand mandalas. A meditative, repetitive action performance that consists of the artist scooping up, transferring and depositing sand with her hands, moving the material from one filled place to an empty place. In the process of relocating the sand, grains are inevitably lost between her fingers to form a film on the ground, forcing not only the protagonist, but also the spectators, to confront the materialization of time lost.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225181232-Untitled4.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Courtesy: Arco Colombia 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>#Conference #Archive #Colonialism #FocusColombia</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/%C2%BFpero-esto-es-arte-performance-de-milena-bonilla-y-luisa-ungar" target="_blank"><em>&iquest;Pero esto es arte? (But is it art?): Performance of Milena Bonilla and Luisa Ungar </em></a>at the <a href="http://www.ca2m.org/en/" target="_blank">CA2M (Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo)</a> on March 5th, 6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Presented in tandem with the exhibition <a href="http://www.ca2m.org/en/future/naturaleza-nominal-arco-colombia" target="_blank"><em>Naturaleza Nominal (Nominal Nature)</em> </a>curated by Jaime Cer&oacute;n, the lecture-performance <em>&iquest;Pero esto es arte?</em> by Milena Bonilla and Luisa Ungar, proposes what they refer to as &ldquo;a visual exploration of archival materials pertaining to the development of European colonial fairs.&rdquo; The conference attempts to review notions of development linked to colonial exploitation as a means to uncover the process by which cultural representation and visual vocabulary is subverted by instances of power and the construction of historic, social, and political realities in Colombia.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At the intersections of multimedia artist Milena Bonilla&rsquo;s artistic practice are discursive questions that link economy, territories, and politics with daily life. Similarly, Luisa Ungar investigates </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">through her work t</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he construction and institutionalization of social and cultural norms and seeks to reconnect archival or academic material back to their everyday popular use.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/147418-nicole-rodr%C3%ADguez?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Nicole Rodriguez</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Olga de Amaral, Umbral 21 (r&iacute;o), 2000. Photo: Diego Amaral Ceballos. Exhibited in <em><a href="http://www.arcocolombia2015.com/arcocolombia/exposiciones-paralelas/tejedores-de-agua-el-r%C3%ADo-en-el-arte-el-dise%C3%B1o-y-la-cultura-material" target="_blank">Tejedores de agua: El r&iacute;o en la cultura visual y material contempor&aacute;nea en Colombia</a>,&nbsp;</em>Courtesy Arco Colombia)</span></p> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:48:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Has the Net Made Us More Nervous? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A handful of the UK&rsquo;s young artists </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">have nervousness on the brain&mdash;or so it seems, judging by a recent crop of artistic endeavors discussing 21st</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;century anxiety.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Among current examples are&nbsp;Helen Carmel Benigson&rsquo;s solo show <a href="http://www.carrollfletcher.com/exhibitions/37/overview/" target="_blank"><em>Anxious, Stressful, Insomnia Fat</em></a> at Carroll/Fletcher, London; Rosamund Lakin&rsquo;s cyberchrondriac film <em>First Opinion</em> at Modern Art Oxford and "This is not a Symptom," a South London Gallery lecture series on the micropolitics of nervousness, facilitated by artist Sidsel Meineche Hansen. Each of these projects grapples with the ways in which digital-age anxiety is at once widespread/structural/networked and personal/intimate/embodied. They probe at anxiety&rsquo;s origins and its current manifestations and permutations.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150225142109-1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation view from Rosamund Lakin&rsquo;s <em>First Opinion</em>, 2014. Rear projection screen attached to desk, 10 min. Courtesy Rosamund Lakin</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These artists have more than their subject matter in common: they also belong to the Millenial Generation. Rosamund Lakin recently graduated from The Ruskin; Sidsel Meineche Hansen received her Masters from Goldsmiths a few years ago; and Helen Carmel Benigson was awarded a scholarship in 2014 to pursue a DPhil at Oxford. Is the type of networked nervousness being explored at the moment the result of being raised on and in the Internet&mdash;or are preexisting anxieties simply finding new nodes to inhabit?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rosamund&rsquo;s degree show, <a href="http://rosamundlakin.com/first-opinion.html" target="_blank"><em>First Opinion</em>,</a> was selected by Modern Art Oxford to be exhibited in its experimental space, Platform. Her fragmented piece knits together videoed screen captures of anxious and often health-related Google searches paired with an unnerving soundtrack.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/101351989" frameborder="0" width="500" height="281"></iframe></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Rosamund Lakin, <em>First Opinion</em>, 2014. 10 min. Courtesy Rosamund Lakin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The viewer self-consciously stands by as the hypochondriacal searches unfold and quickly avalanche. &ldquo;Do microbes really live on your skin?&rdquo; leads to a video of squirming microbes which morphs into a search for &ldquo;How does your body know to stop breathing?&rdquo; which shifts to an image search for &ldquo;normal tongue.&rdquo; Who hasn&rsquo;t, upon googling the symptoms of their common cold, been convinced that they have a terminal illness? <em>First Opinion</em> captures an escalating, self-reinforcing cyberchrondria that feels very real in the age of WebMD reliance. For many, the troves of readily available information that you&rsquo;d expect to assuage health-related anxieties just make them worse.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While Lakin&rsquo;s video may seem critical of the web, she told me that she views the Internet as a mixed bag: a domain in which one can at once find support and empathy and indulge in anxiety and dysfunctional behavior. &ldquo;Like most of the &lsquo;worried well&rsquo; I google all of my ailments, often in a premeditative way. Google largely acts as a conduit for our self-involvement and our neuroses.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Lakin&rsquo;s contemporary, Sidsel Meineche Hansen&mdash;whose work explores the normalization of nervousness&mdash;has come to see the organization of her seminar series as an integral part of her artistic practice. In 2010 she facilitated the lecture series "Towards a Physiological Novel". Now she organizes "<a href="http://southlondongallery.org/page/3049/THIS-IS-NOT-A-SYMPTOM/1060" target="_blank">This is not a Symptom</a>"&nbsp;at South London Gallery. While art constitutes one flexible space in which questions about anxiety can be posed, the conversation is clearly interdisciplinary&mdash;something Hansen takes into account in inviting speakers. Those who have participated at "This is not a Symptom" include Erika Biddle, who researches the desires produced by the feedback mechanisms of social networks; Robert McRuer, whose focus is &ldquo;crip theory&rdquo;; and Chris Millard, who considers the politics of self-harming will speak in upcoming events. The talks are contextualized by reading material and film screenings.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150225142203-6.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Still from Sidsel Meineche Hansen&rsquo;s <em>Seroquel&reg;</em>, 2014. HD video and CGI animation, 8 min. Commissioned by Cubitt Gallery. Courtesy Sidsel Meineche Hansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150225142350-7.jpg" alt="" /><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Still from Sidsel Meineche Hansen&rsquo;s <em>Seroquel&reg;</em>, 2014. HD video and CGI animation, 8 min. Commissioned by Cubitt Gallery. Courtesy Sidsel Meineche Hansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While <em>First Opinion </em>lets a scene of anxiety at the nexus of the body and technology unfold and allows resultant questions to emerge, "This is not a Symptom" actively asks about wresting back power with an anarchic ambience. There is a certain level of suspicion of big pharma, concern about the disenfranchising potential of psychopharmacology, mistrust of the rhetoric of productivity, and a declared need to reclaim our biological subjectivity. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re examining how nervousness is produced, how it is both pathologized and falls into production,&rdquo; Sidsel said. &ldquo;I think of the production of nervousness as something that is connected to technology in the sense that we&rsquo;re often working on a computer.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Through all of this artistic probing, the question remains: to what extent is the nature of anxiety <em>actually</em> changing? In the latter half of the 19th&nbsp;century, there was a widespread belief that modern life (think steam power and the telegraph) had exhausted the nerves. In any case, rest assured: with these artists, nervousness is normal.&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/416843-cassie-packard?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Cassie Packard&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: promotional image, "This is not a Symptom,"&nbsp;South London Gallery. Courtesy South London Gallery.)</span></p> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 27 Feb 2015 12:14:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Making of Violence: Doris Salcedo at the MCA Chicago <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Internationally acclaimed artist Doris Salcedo&nbsp;opened her first US museum<ins cite="mailto:Andrea%20Alessi" datetime="2015-02-25T11:37"> </ins>retrospective&nbsp;at the&nbsp;Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago&nbsp;(MCA) last week to great anticipation: Latin Americanists had been anxiously awaiting the opening of the Bogot&aacute;-born&nbsp;artist&rsquo;s survey, and it seemed all of&nbsp;Chicago was enthusiastic as well. Co-curated by MCA Director Madeleine Grynsztejn, Curator Julie Rodrigues Widholm, and with assistance from Steven L. Bridges, the exhibition presents Salcedo&rsquo;s large body of work in roughly chronological order, from her early mid-1980s&nbsp;<em>Untitled</em>&nbsp;installations to her most recent 2014 series&nbsp;<em>Disremembered</em>. Salcedo&rsquo;s collected objects&mdash;&ldquo;installations,&rdquo; as she prefers to call them&mdash;are grounded in rigorous fieldwork and research on loss and trauma due to war, violence, and other calamities.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the fourth floor of the museum, we first see a large installation titled&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www3.mcachicago.org/2015/salcedo/works/plegaria_muda/">Plegaria Muda</a></em>&nbsp;(&ldquo;Silent Prayer&rdquo;) (2008&ndash;10). The space is filled with multiple sculptures each composed of two wooden tables, one inverted upon the other, sandwiching soil and live grass, which grows upward from within. Walking in between these sculptures, which are the size and shape of human coffins, arranged in the room much as tombs are placed in a cemetery, is a powerful and intense experience. The upside down tables&mdash;with their legs pointing up to the ceiling&mdash;have a disturbing and mournful presence. The work was driven by the artist&rsquo;s research on gang vi</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">olence in Los Angeles&mdash;but this happens in other places too, including, as we know, Chicago. Salcedo&rsquo;s work is universal. As she softly said at the press conference: &ldquo;Even though I&rsquo;m a woman, I&rsquo;m from the third-world, and I have curly hair, I want to make art that effaces those small differences.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225131807-Image_2_Doris_Salcedo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Installation view,&nbsp;<em>Doris Salcedo</em>,</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;MCA Chicago. Photo: Nathan Keay, &copy; MCA Chicago</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Despite the funerary atmosphere and the fixed shapes of each sculpture, Salcedo&rsquo;s installations seem to come alive. She asks the viewer to become &ldquo;involved&rdquo; in the adventure of viewing them.<a title="" href="https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#14bbe6a2f68181e2__ftn1">[1]</a>&nbsp;Therefore, the work momentarily has a subtle and illusory identity at the same time as being persistently present. To achieve this presence, Salcedo meticulously takes the context into consideration: lights, ceiling, distance between the works, floor, and labels. Because her work involves objects (mostly furniture) from domestic places, it is important for her to evoke something else when they are in an art space&mdash;a displacement. This displacement is not just in the context of art and its display, but also in the actual world.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the creation of&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www3.mcachicago.org/2015/salcedo/works/la_casa_viuda/" target="_blank">La Casa Viuda&nbsp;</a></em>(&ldquo;The Widowed House&rdquo;) (1992&ndash;1995), Salcedo interviewed rural Colombian women who were forced to move out of their homes in search of a better life. Here, worn wooden doors are sawed in half, their pieces folded at right angles against one another, one half resting on the gallery floor. On one of these sculptures, Salcedo places a rusty, metal seat, which could be part of a children&rsquo;s toy. This small chair is supported by the curves of two human rib bones. Were it not for a description in the small exhibition brochure, viewers would not know that the work references the specific situation of displaced women in Colombia. Yet knowing this precise context is not essential for understanding the works&mdash;the sculptures speak for themselves. It could be in Colombia, Los Angeles, or Chicago, as &ldquo;violence happens everywhere,&rdquo; according to Salcedo.&nbsp;She creates spaces of empathy that refer to violent events that cause irreparable damage, ones that are not limited to obvious signifiers of&nbsp;<em>violence</em>&nbsp;(natural, political, social), but instead ones that mankind finds or invents.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Salcedo&rsquo;s site-specific public projects have been a fundamental part of her career. In the lead up to the exhibition, there had been quite an expectation in the Chicago art community to see a new public project in the city, but disappointingly, due to lack of funds and other factors, the project could not be realized. Instead, the MCA produced a <a href="http://www3.mcachicago.org/2015/salcedo/videos/publicworks/#documentary" target="_blank">video documentary</a> that highlights some of these public works through interviews with the artist, her studio assistants, and scholars.&nbsp;Accompanying the video in the exhibition is a simple white shelf with selected books by Salcedo in English and Spanish by Jean-Luc Nancy, Paul Celan, Emmanuel Levinas, and Derrida, among others. Although somewhat revealing, the austerity of this room and the simplified informational video leave us wanting more. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Salcedo&rsquo;s metaphoric and abstract installations deal with intense political topics that create an ambivalent aesthetic of &ldquo;enjoyment,&rdquo; with both pleasure and displeasure. In other words, we empathize with the crucial factor in the artworks that is therefore, the sensation itself: the inner motion, the inner life, and the inner self-activation. While the artist intentionally directs us toward the artworks&mdash;as compassionate witnesses, as appreciators&mdash;one cannot help but at times feel distant under the pressure to relate.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150225131935-Image_3_Doris_Salcedo.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Doris Salcedo,&nbsp;<em>A Flor de Piel</em>&nbsp;(detail), 2011&ndash;12, Rose petals and thread, Installation view, White Cube, London, 2012. Photo: Ben Westoby</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is also tension between this sensation of empathy and a sense of mysticism present in the work. The delicate labor and craft displayed in Salcedo&rsquo;s work is a testament to the large number of people in working in her studio in Bogot&aacute;, and it&rsquo;s hard not remain in awe of the detail in her installations. In one of the last galleries, a stretch of deep red material spreads across the floor in delicate folds (<em><a href="http://www3.mcachicago.org/2015/salcedo/works/a_flor_de_piel/" target="_blank">A Flor de Piel</a></em>, 2011&ndash;2012, 2014). How was Salcedo able to sew thousands of rose petals, transforming them into this huge blanket? Similarly, in&nbsp;<a href="http://www3.mcachicago.org/2015/salcedo/works/atrabiliarios/" target="_blank"><em>Atrabiliarios</em></a>&nbsp;(1992&ndash;2004), worn women&rsquo;s shoes are encased in niches embedded into the gallery wall, each covered with a thin layer of cow bladder, which is affixed to the wall with medical stitches. Though the installation is complete, a number of the hollows built into the gallery are left empty, negatively but also realistically, anticipating more death to come.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Unfortunately, history suggests that the future waits with more tragedies, like the terrible events Salcedo&rsquo;s work has grappled with in the past. In light of this knowledge, art should give an alternative, a better form of abstraction, or at least enough awareness to not despair. And this is precisely Salcedo&rsquo;s investment: to produce a common place to stop and reflect. Her installations produce this universal space, where it does not matter who we are, where we come from, or what we believe in, but where we can empathize around an artwork as one connected community.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/171869-ionit-behar?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Ionit Behar</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#14bbe6a2f68181e2__ftnref1">[1]</a>&nbsp;See American sculptor David Smith&rsquo;s quote: &ldquo;My position for vision in my works aims to be in it&hellip; It is an adventure viewed.&rdquo; G. McCoy (ed.),&nbsp;<em>David Smith</em>&nbsp;(New York and London, 1973), pp. 82-3.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Doris Salcedo,&nbsp;<em class="first_child">Plegaria Muda</em>&nbsp;(detail), 2008-10. Installation view,&nbsp;<em>Doris Salcedo</em>, MCA Chicago.&nbsp;Inhotim Collection, Brazil. Photo: Nathan Keay, &copy; MCA Chicago)</span></p> Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:33:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Fractal Realities: A Look at Lala Abaddon's Amazing Photo-Weavings <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mixing painting and weaving with 35mm photography, Brooklyn-based artist Lala Abaddon creates intricate woven works that &ldquo;create space and time within a stationary moment&rdquo; through her use of color and contrast. By cutting printed photographs into hundreds of strips, which she then weaves together, Abaddon creates a deconstructed collage of worldly experience, exemplifying alternate realities of chaos, color, and the universe. Her work dives into the cerebral components of human connection within the world, reiterating her play with interrelation and the interconnecting webs of reality. "There is a web that connects all beings and energies and transcends all conceived boundaries of time and space."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132150-meatweave-webbing__9_of_11_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224134912-fortumblr__1_of_1_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While she attempted collegiate training, Abaddon found that she already had the tools she needed to realize her work. Her mission going forward as an artist was clear: to envision alternate worlds and manifest those inner complexities in still artworks. Her work represents her ideas about existence and the constructs of one&rsquo;s mind within, and in relation to, reality. Working across several mediums&mdash;from poetry to photography&mdash;Abaddon found herself weaving her sliced ideas back together. As she continued to analyze her initial weavings, she found that this process of de- and re-construction allowed her thoughts on space and time to collide physically within her practice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Her upcoming show, <em>Fractal Realities</em>, continues to play with the metaphysical ideas she has considered throughout her career. The patterns she uses have specific metaphorical significance within her continued research, allowing for each of her weavings to better combine and present notions of human connection through its physical interconnection. Transported elements of time and space from the present, past, and future, speak to the interconnectivity of the universe and bind themselves together within the basket-weaves of her work. In addition to her elaborate weavings, Abaddon has also created a site-specific installation at Castor Gallery, which will illustrate webs of her experiences, memories, reflections, and the space between various realities.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the occasion of her upcoming exhibition, the artist and Castor Gallery shared with ArtSlant photographs of Abaddon&rsquo;s &nbsp;studio, process, and most recent work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132220-meatweave-webbing__1_of_1_-3.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132402-CAM00310.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132546-ss-1-10.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224135005-arrestedmotion70dpi__12__.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132437-meatweave-webbing__1_of_1_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132721-topost__1_of_1_.jpg" alt="" height="425" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224132803-OverSpilledMilk__1_of_1_-2.jpg" alt="" height="425" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224133457-studioshots__4_of_5_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150224133742-studioshots__1_of_1_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Abaddon&rsquo;s <em>Fractal Realities</em>, featuring new site-specific works, opens Thursday, February 26th at Castor Gallery, 254 Broome Street, on the Lower East Side. The opening reception will be from 6&ndash;9pm, and the exhibition runs through March 29. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409890-andrea-zlotowitz?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Zlotowitz</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images courtesy of the artist and Castor Gallery)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Tue, 24 Feb 2015 15:16:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Preview: MENAM at Armory 2015 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Middle East-centric shows are having a moment in American museums, but the Middle East, North Africa, and Mediterranean (MENAM) focus at this year&rsquo;s </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.thearmoryshow.com" target="_blank">Armory Show</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> (March 4-8) will mark the first time a fair in the US has brought a large showing of art from the region to a commercial environment. Curator Omar Kholeif and focus partners </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://edgeofarabia.com" target="_blank">Edge of Arabia</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> and <a href="http://aljci.org/category/our-initiatives/art-culture" target="_blank">Art Jameel</a> have selected a handful of galleries, each of which will feature a maximum of two artists, balanced between modern and contemporary. The overall curatorial vision for the section remains vague at this stage, but the line up of artists is top notch. Here are some of the things we expect to love or question the most:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223145333-4._Raed_Yassin.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="text-align: left;">Raed Yassin</span>,&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;"><em>Ruins In Space,</em> 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">Courtesy Kalfayan Galleries, Athens | Thessaloniki</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Lawrence Abu Hamdan&rsquo;s specially commissioned project, <em>A Convention of Tiny Movements</em>, will be presented at different points around the fair and is slated to include an audio essay, a series of &ldquo;amalgamated objects,&rdquo; and 5,000 potato chip packets distributed as freebies to the public. Abu Hamdan is known for audio installations that pinpoint the convergence of listening and politics. Potato chips are certainly much more accessible, but let&rsquo;s hope that the symbolism behind these specially designed packages is not too gimmicky. On the other hand, who doesn&rsquo;t appreciate a good salted snack, especially mid-fair trudge?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223140754-1._Mona_Hatoum_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mona Hatoum, <em>Turbulence (Black)</em>, 2014. &copy; Mona Hatoum, Photo: George Darrell</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223140947-8._Marwan__The_Bed_Sheet___Das_Laken___1971___72___Oil_on_canvas._Courtesy_of_Meem_Gallery__Dubai_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Marwan,&nbsp;<em>The Bed Sheet (Das Laken),</em> 1971-72,.Courtesy of the artist and Meem Gallery</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223141541-3._Dia_Al-Azzawi.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><a style="text-align: left;" href="file://localhost/sh/q3kq7fx5zsniee4/AADXAXjpx__hqWKbyNTp8fQya" target="_blank">Dia Al Al-Azzawi</a><span style="text-align: left;">,&nbsp;</span><em style="text-align: left;">Blue Bird</em><span style="text-align: left;">, 2013. Copyright Dia Al-Azzawi, Courtesy Claude Lemand Gallery, Paris</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Palestinian born powerhouse Mona Hatoum&rsquo;s <em>Turbulance</em> project will involve loads of black glass marbles laid out in a circle in Alexander and Bonin&rsquo;s booth. Dubai&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.meemartgallery.com">Meem Gallery</a> will present work from the 1960s&ndash;90s by Syrian-born Marwan, who rather touchingly first exhibited paintings in New York more than five decades ago and has spent his life studying the human face and its various distortions on the canvas. Also from the modern camp are works by Dia Azzawi and Hugette Caland for good measure.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223142131-10._Ahmed_Mater_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="text-align: left;">Ahmed Mater,&nbsp;</span><em style="text-align: left;">Cowboy Code (Hadith),</em><span style="text-align: left;"> 2012, Pier 94: Focus Lounge Plastic Gun Caps, Courtesy of the artist and Athr Gallery</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In contrast, Athr Gallery (which is at the forefront of Jeddah&rsquo;s budding contemporary art scene) will show Ahmed Mater&rsquo;s <em>Cowboy Code (Hadith),</em> a playful installation made up of red plastic toy gun caps, which displays portions of Hadith (Islam&rsquo;s code of conduct) beside the old West&rsquo;s cowboy code of ethics. The installation has wowed audiences in the Middle East who know a thing or two about the Wild West thanks to Hollywood, but let&rsquo;s hope American visitors are savvy enough when it comes to understanding Islam to pick up the message of commonality here.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223142405-7_Wafaa_Bilal._Canto_III._Rendering._2015._Courtesy_Lawrie_Shabibi_and_the_artist..jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Wafaa Bilal&nbsp;<em>Canto III, Rendering</em>, 2015. Courtesy of Lawrie Shabibi and the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Lawrie Shabibi will be presenting <em>Canto III</em>, a solo installation by Iraqi performance artist <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/rackroom/21387-wafaa-bilal" target="_blank">Wafaa Bilal</a>, whom gallery co-founder William Lawrie describes as &ldquo;an artist who needs an audience.&rdquo; Expect to be offended or captivated by a 6-foot tall golden bust raised on a plinth, which is a replica of the absurd monument that Sadaam Hussein&rsquo;s supporters once planned to shoot into space to orbit the earth. We won&rsquo;t spoil the rest, except to mention that a collaboration with US veterans of the Iraq War is involved, as are some wonderfully kitsch tourist souvenirs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223145928-6._Huguette_Caland.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Huguette Caland,&nbsp;<em>Rossinante Under Cover</em>, 2011.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Courtesy of the artist, Lombard Freid Gallery, and Galerie Janine Rubeiz</span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Exhibitions devoted to the Middle East's contemporary scene are popping up everywhere from <a href="http://asiasociety.org/new-york/exhibitions/iran-modern" target="_blank">The Asia Society</a>, to MFA Boston, MoMa Ps1, and the <a href="http://www.fotofest.org/2014biennial/arabprograms.htm" target="_blank">2014 Fotofest Biennial Arab Exhibitions</a>. Most of these, though perhaps well intended, make the Middle East out to be a war zone, dangerously reinforcing stereotypes of the region (camels, bombs, and <em>burqas</em>) that do not represent everyday realities and simply add fodder to western media&rsquo;s biased representation of the region. LACMA, which promoted <a href="http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/islamic-art-now-contemporary-art-middle-east" target="_blank"><em>Islamic Art Now</em> </a>with Shirin Neshat&rsquo;s <em>Speechless</em>, a photograph of a somber woman beside the front sight of a pistol, is one such example. Refreshingly, The New Museum&rsquo;s 2014 exhibition <a href="http://www.newmuseum.org/exhibitions/view/here-and-elsewhere" target="_blank"><em>Here and Elsewhere</em> </a>managed to avoid these worn out narratives entirely. However, all of these shows continue to keep the region&rsquo;s artists in a box, rather than giving them the chance to be seen as stand alone international artists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223143608-12._LAMIA_JOREIGE.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="text-align: left;">Lamia Joreige,
&nbsp;</span><em style="text-align: left;">Beirut, 1001 Views, </em><span style="text-align: left;">2010
&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">Black and white, silent, 16 minute video animation,&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">Courtesy of the artist and Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York</span></span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150223144917-11._FAY_AL_BAGHRICHE_11._FAY_AL_BAGHRICHE_11._.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Faycal Baghriche,&nbsp;<em>Elective Purification, </em>2004-2014, Wall painting
, Courtesy of the artist and Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Taymour Grahne is a former blogger who now runs the rising star of a NYC gallery by the same moniker that will present work by artist documentarians Lamia Joreige and Faycal Baghriche at the fair. Grahne told us, &ldquo;I am a big proponent of calling artists 'artists,' and not putting regional labels on them&hellip;That being said, I think what the Armory is doing with this focus is important, because it is one of the first times Middle Eastern artists are being presented to an American collector base&mdash;it is a great and much needed introduction.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Let&rsquo;s see if Grahne is correct and Omar Kholeif is perceptive enough to avoid the regular weaknesses, or if the presentation plays into the (excuse the pun) loaded images of the region that some collectors might be keen to discover at Armory. There will be plenty of chances for conversations and debate about this at the MENAM Symposium running March 7-8. Regardless, we&rsquo;ll be the ones noisily munching on Lawrence Abu Hamdan&rsquo;s potato chips in the corner.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danna Lorch</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: Nil Yalter,&nbsp;<em>Harem,</em> Video, 1979 45&rsquo; Courtesy of the artist and Galerist)</span></p> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Tue, 24 Feb 2015 11:59:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list A Major Survey of Belgian Art Opens... in Havana <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">So you walk into El Floridita, one of many Havana bars that prides itself on being a former haunt of barfly Ernest Hemmingway, and there is <strong>Guillaume Bijl</strong>, the Belgian artist known for absurd installations in which he brings a driving school or travel agency into a museum context. On your way out, you try to hail a taxi, but it is already occupied by <strong>Jo&euml;lle Tuerlinckx</strong>. In a nearby eatery, video artist <strong>Johan Grimonprez </strong>is having lunch. It feels like Havana is having a Belgian moment&mdash;and in a way, it is.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the exhibition <em>The Importance of Being&hellip;</em>in <a href="http://www.bellasartes.cult.cu/" target="_blank">Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes</a>, Cuban curator Sara Alonso G&oacute;mez selected 40 top-notch artists born or living in Belgium, including stars like <strong>Marcel Broodthaers</strong>, <strong>Wim Delvoye</strong>, <strong>Berlinde De Bruyckere</strong>,<strong>&nbsp;</strong>and&nbsp;<strong>Francis Al&yuml;s</strong>, to showcase Belgian art&mdash;with all the complications and multiple identities that term implies&mdash;across Latin America. Through July 2016 the show will travel to three other museums in South America: Museo de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and Museu de Arte Contempor&acirc;nea da Universidade de S&atilde;o Paulo, Brazil.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223105420-DSC06725.JPG" alt="" width="550" /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223113408-Screen_Shot_2015-02-23_at_12.33.42_PM.png" alt="" width="550" /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223113048-DSC08228.jpg" alt="" width="550" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">From top: Wim Delvoye, Guillaume Bijl, Kendall Geers</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A number of artists were busy during their Cuban sojourn making new artwork commissioned specially for the exhibition. I caught up with three artists</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">two of whom are also participating in the upcoming&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">2015 Havana Biennial&mdash;w</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">hose work responds directly to context and environment of the host nation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Koen van den Broek</strong> is making a new painting for every country where the <em>The Importance of Being</em><em>...</em>&nbsp;will take place. Van den Broek is known for paintings in which he renders generous details of the urban landscape, like curb stones, in a style between figuration and abstraction. &ldquo;My work is often on location,&rdquo; he says, &ldquo;as the grey and clouded Belgian landscape does not work for me. First I wanted to render the run-down beauty of Havana, but since I was here last time, I noticed they have been restoring a lot. And that was a bit too complex. I found a location in the street opposite Hotel Presidente, one of the oldest high-rise buildings in Havana. In this painting, there is a strong contrast between the architecture and the vegetation. This is only the second time I&rsquo;ve used this kind of green. It is a green that you see everywhere, and which has a kind of Miami atmosphere.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223113734-Screen_Shot_2015-02-23_at_12.36.30_PM.png" alt="" width="550" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Koen van den Broek</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Making the work on the spot was easier said than done. &ldquo;We are here in a tropical climate with a high humidity. Because of that, the paint took a much longer time to dry. At 2 x 3 meters, it is also a big format. The work could not even enter the apartment where I was supposed to work. Then they proposed a garage, but there was not enough light and too much dust. In the end, after some bureaucracy, I was allowed to make it in the museum, as I had hoped from the beginning.&rdquo; The artist also took precautions to ensure he had all the material he needed. &ldquo;We sent over a crate of 300 kilograms with all kinds of paint, even staples and a screw driver. Finding material is not always easy here&hellip; Later, the crate will also travel to Buenos Aires and Rio. It almost becomes like a kind of mini-atelier.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Peter de Cupere</strong>, who typically works with smell, is one of the three Belgian artists&mdash;together with Koen van Mechelen and Michel Fran&ccedil;ois&mdash;who will be participating in the upcoming Havana Biennial. De Cupere visited Cuba some time ago to do some advance research, and for <em>The Importance of Being&hellip; </em>he wanted to realize a work that captured the smell of Havana, including the powerful scent of gasoline that the old Chevys and Buicks spit out. &ldquo;The pollution is strong here,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;Initially I almost got sick from it. I took some samples from the various smells and sent it to a special laboratory in Paris. You only have three such laboratories in the world. I asked them to make a perfume from it. But I also added a smell that recalls smoked meat. As a reference to the pollution we inhale with our lungs.&rdquo; The resulting artwork is created in a kind of cloud, in which the visitor can put his head in order to smell it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223110235-IMG_5150.jpg" alt="" height="400" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223110312-IMG_5159.jpg" alt="" height="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Peter de Cupere with his&nbsp;<em>Smoke Cloud</em>, which reproduces the scent of Havana</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the Havana Biennial, which opens in late May, he will present <em>The Smell of a Stranger</em>. In the Botanical Garden, he will give one plant the smell of another one, by manipulating some of its components.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For over a decade <strong>Koen van Mechelen </strong>has been working on his <a href="http://www.koenvanmechelen.be/cosmopolitan-chicken-project" target="_blank">Cosmopolitan Chicken Project</a>, which crossbreeds domestic chickens from around the world to create a truly global specimen. He&rsquo;s presented various steps of his research across the globe, including in the most remote areas in the world, and now the CCP comes to Cuba. For <em>The Importance of Being&hellip; </em>he shows a 3D rendering of a chromosome of all the cross-breedings. &ldquo;It is a visual rendering of immunity. It would show more resistance. The image is a chromosome of the <a href="http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechelse_koekoek" target="_blank"><em>Mechelse koekoek</em></a> [a Flemish breed of chicken]. It is a very realistic image, which I call <em>Evolution of a Hybrid</em>, combined with a more poetic image. It is a kind of breeding center that consists of glass bowls with glass eggs that are under water. It is one installation, but consists of a meeting between two universes.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150223111235-IMG_5154.jpg" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Koen van Mechelen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Van Mechelen will also participate in the Havana Biennial. &ldquo;I was here in 2007 basically looking for the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cubalaya" target="_blank">Cubalaya</a>, a chicken species from Cuba that I could not find anywhere&mdash;until I was invited by a collector in the countryside, one hour from New York. In the fields, I saw a Cubalaya and asked the owner for some of the eggs. The [collector] has died now, so apparently, I am one of the few people in the world who has all the varieties of the Cubalaya! When I was invited to the Biennial, I immediately decided to bring the Cubalaya back where it belongs: in Cuba! We have sent some of the breed installations and eggs over, which was not easy at all. But we got support from the highest level, so it was possible. We have already bred some of the animals, but will continue to do so in Havana. In a library, we will also show all the documentation material of our research, and we are organizing a symposium on fertility, inviting professors from all over the world.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Looks like Cuba hasn&rsquo;t seen the end of Belgium quite yet. In a perfect metaphor for the complexities of global and national identities, a trace of Belgium&mdash;in the form of a native Cuban chicken&mdash;will remain in Havana even after the artists have left.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377999-sam-steverlynck?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Sam Steverlynck</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Importance of Being... <em>is on view at &nbsp;Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana, Cuba until April 26, 2015. It will then travel to&nbsp;Museo de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo, Buenos Aires, Argentina (July 4&ndash;September 12, 2015), Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (December 2, 2015&ndash;February 14, 2016) and Museu de Arte Contempor&acirc;nea da Universidade de S&atilde;o Paulo, Brazil (April 11&ndash;July 14, 2016).</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><br /></em><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <em>The Importance of Being...</em></span><span style="font-size: x-small;"> Installation view with works by&nbsp;Angel Vergara Santiago and Pascale Marthine Tayou)</span></span></p> Mon, 23 Feb 2015 13:56:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Kehinde Wiley's Empire of Vulnerability <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;Kehinde Wiley is everywhere right now,&rdquo; said Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum, as the small press tour began. This was not an exaggeration by any means; Wiley garnered recent attention when his paintings appeared as </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/01/arts/design/kehinde-wiley-puts-a-classical-spin-on-his-contemporary-subjects.html" target="_blank">backdrops in Fox's&nbsp;<em>Empire</em></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, a highly stylized melodrama from Lee Daniels and Danny Strong that collages black stereotypes while positioning black bodies into a King Lear-like drama, and for his fashion week photoshoot with </span><em><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/42030" target="_blank">New York Magazine</a></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. Wiley has been an art star since the mid 2000s when his masterful paintings of black men posing in the tradition of classical portrait painting first began making the rounds, yet he is certainly having a moment right now with the </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/369059-a-new-republic" target="_blank">opening today</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;of the largest survey to date on the 37-year-old artist&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">at the Brooklyn Museum.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;New works include masterful stained-glass portraits from Prague and appropriated from Christian chapels, bronze busts crafted in China, and a selection from his series <em>An Economy of Grace</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150220161406-EL137.63.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Kehinde Wiley (American, b. 1977),&nbsp;<em>The Sisters Z&eacute;na&iuml;de and Charlotte Bonaparte</em>, 2014, Oil on linen, 83&frac12; x 63 in. (212 x 160 cm). &copy; Kehinde Wiley. (Photo: Robert Wedemeyer, courtesy of Roberts &amp; Tilton, Culver City, California)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As many critics have noted over the years, Wiley is well-packaged. A young black artist from a disadvantaged background, raised on the mean streets of LA by a single mother, etc.&mdash;Wiley fits the narrative. His practice of &ldquo;street casting&rdquo;&mdash;where he asks people he sees on the street to select poses to inhabit from the art historical canon&mdash;as well as his brilliantly-direct practice of inserting black bodies in poses of power and affluence is often derided as too easy. It <em>is</em> easy, but it should not be disregarded. <em>New York Times</em> Critic Martha Schwendener <a href="http://www.villagevoice.com/2008-08-19/art/kehinde-wiley-s-pomp-and-black-circumstance/" target="_blank">is not a fan</a>, and has on <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/23/arts/design/the-diaspora-is-remixed.html?ref=topics&amp;_r=1&amp;" target="_blank">multiple occasions</a> dismissed the premise behind Wiley&rsquo;s paintings while refusing to go into the intricacies of black male identity that his work takes on. In one of her shadiest rebukes, Schwendener uses Wiley&rsquo;s premise itself to discount his project:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 30px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">From the outside, the problem might seem merely that Wiley's genre is stale. He's coming late to the game of figurative art; what he's doing isn't particularly new or interesting, except that he's depicting African-Americans and Africans instead of white Europeans.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Schwendener goes on to point out that Wiley isn&rsquo;t the first to insert black bodies into the Western art historical canon&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/47492-barkley-l-hendricks">Barkley Hendricks</a> was doing this back in the 70s to much more controversial effect. But who really cares about firsts other than historians? The contestation of black identity within a visual culture of white supremacy&mdash;it takes a lot of visual repetition to inscribe the black body with violence and danger&mdash;must be an ongoing project.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150220161555-L2005.6.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Kehinde Wiley (American, b. 1977), <em>Napoleon Leading the Army over the Alps</em>, 2005, Oil on canvas, 108 x 108 in. (274.3 x 274.3 cm). Collection of Suzi and Andrew B. Cohen. &copy; Kehinde Wiley. (Photo: Sarah DiSantis, Brooklyn Museum)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The criticism of Wiley as "too packaged" betrays a lack of nuanced understanding behind the project itself&mdash;for it has an agenda far beyond the art world. His brand drifts between confrontational and consumable and his prior use of only black male bodies as his subjects (<em><a href="http://www.pbs.org/arts/programs/kehinde-wiley-economy-grace/" target="_blank">An Economy of Grace</a></em>, focuses on the black female body for the first time in his practice) reveals the artist&rsquo;s intention of remaking the brand of the black man in Western society. Wiley&rsquo;s work is consumable and it needs to be if it wants to be successful at more than finding its way into museum collections and TV-mansions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150220162519-EL137.55.jpg" alt="" height="700" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 9px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Kehinde Wiley (American, b. 1977).<em> Saint Remi,</em> 2014, Stai</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">ned glass, 96 x 43 1/2 in. (243.8 x 110.5 cm). <br />Courtesy of Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris. &copy; Kehinde Wiley</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The concept and practice of branding is practically synonymous with self-identity in a culture that primacies the visual the way ours does. Brands can elevate; they can evoke power, affluence, and class, but they can also denigrate. A particularly detached marketing executive might say that &ldquo;the black man needs some rebranding.&rdquo; Wiley&rsquo;s project is just this: an extensive rebranding project that hinges on the deep, racial assumptions within American culture. A representative study Wiley painted in 2006 is on view in <em>The New Republic</em>: a careful painting of a young black man on a white background. Underneath his image is a set of large, white-washed numbers that indicate the painting is of a mugshot. Wiley says he found the mugshot crumpled up on the sidewalk one day and the young man&rsquo;s image struck him: his softness, his vulnerability. This point of view is where Wiley diverges from popular culture.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150220162726-IMG_2271.JPG" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Kehinde Wiley, <em>Mugshot Study</em>, 2006, Oil on Canvas, 36 x 24 in. Sender Collection.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;Image courtesy of the author</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Herman Gray, Chair of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz, puts it succinctly in his essay "<a href="http://sites.middlebury.edu/soan191/files/2013/08/hermangray.pdf" target="_blank">Black Masculinity and Visual Culture</a>": &ldquo;Self representations of black masculinity in the United States are historically structured by and against dominant (and dominating) discourses of masculinity and race, specifically (whiteness).&rdquo; This posturing counter to the visual hegemony of whiteness led to the seemingly mutually beneficial &ldquo;thug/gangsta&rdquo; trope where whiteness can accept the black body as outsider and criminal and the black subject can enact resistance and participate in self representation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Empire</em> engages with these tropes melodramatically, portraying a black hero who rose to the top through breaking the law and sometimes murdering his closest friends, or as it is characterized on the show: &ldquo;hustling.&rdquo; The fine line here is between a portrayal of very real life experiences for many oppressed and marginalized people and the reification of damaging stereotypes, a line that is echoed in <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/41960" target="_blank">feminist debates on self-representation of the female nude</a>. The brilliance of Wiley, for this writer, is that he is able to redirect the discussion towards vulnerability and stage that vulnerability as power.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wiley&rsquo;s <em>New Republic</em> is an empire of vulnerability as strength.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/website/joel-kuennen/REVIEWS?site=ny">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Kehinde Wiley (American, b. 1977). <em>Shantavia Beale II</em>, 2012. Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9 cm). Collection of Ana and Lenny Gravier, courtesy Sean Kelly, New York. &copy; Kehinde Wiley. Photo: Jason Wyche)</span></p> Sun, 01 Mar 2015 17:37:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Made-Up With Danny Volk: S1E3 <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danny Volk talks to artists in their studios about life and art&mdash;while they do his make-up. This concept was a new one for us, and, unsurprisingly, it produces some unique moments: see artists like Theaster Gates, Pope.L, and Jessica Stockholder working in their studios as you've never seen them before.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Revisit Season 1 as we anticipate the all-new Made-Up Season 2, to be released this Spring on ArtSlant.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This week: artist Zachary Harvey and host Danny Volk dress up as cowboys.</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7rvqwnIigAE" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="float: right;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150129205110-10299099_219201961624218_7214582499433800077_n.jpg" alt="" width="150" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>More About Made Up With Danny Volk&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Made Up is created and hosted by Danny Volk.&nbsp;Volk was born in 1979 in Akron, OH and currently lives and works in Chicago, IL. Volk got his MFA in Visual Art from the University of Chicago in 2014, and his BA in Theater Studies at Kent State University in 2006.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Produced by | Danny Volk and Stephanie Anne Harris Trevor</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cameras | Bryce Peppers,&nbsp;Valia&nbsp;O'Donnell</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Technical consultant | Ben Chandler</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Comic Strip" by Serge&nbsp;Gainsbourg&nbsp;remixed by&nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/flashcookie">DJ&nbsp;Flashcookie</a></span></p> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:01:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Morning Star: Marshall Scheuttle Photographs Las Vegas in a New Light <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Las Vegas-based photographer <a href="http://marshallscheuttle.com/" target="_blank">Marshall Scheuttle</a> explores the American landscape, documenting archetypes of American youth and the narratives which develop around them&mdash;e</span></em><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">xploring our place and identity within the world.&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Borderland</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, his first body of work, focused on the individual and their surroundings; his latest project,&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Morning Star</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, turns its attention to the specific dynamic of Las Vegas, in response to the stories he uncovered in his earlier series. Scheuttle shoots analogue using a large-format 8 x 10 view camera. His passion and drive for photographing contemporary America allow him to experience his journeys cerebrally, further opening his lens to the people he meets and the stories he watches unfold. The photographer shared his thoughts and images from his latest work,&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Morning Star, <em>with ArtSlant.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I consider photography to be a beautiful double-edged sword of a medium. There are no absolute victories or triumphs; it is a craft that dwells in fleeting absolutes. My love for it stems from its inherent ability to speak to moments of dying certainty, that an image can posses everything and nothing but rest solely on the notion that it can never exist again as it was. Slowing down a poem into arm's reach without truly defining the terms of its existence.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My latest body of work, <em>Morning Star</em>, focuses very specifically on a set geographic area. I moved to the Las Vegas valley as a transient exile to explore and photograph a city that I always found to be a last stop refuge for the disenfranchised. In retrospect, I view <em>Borderland</em>&nbsp;as a series that is very heavily attempting to resolve the notion of birth and identity into modern America, whereas <em>Morning Star</em>&nbsp;is the second entry in an ongoing story. Perhaps I view Las Vegas as the somewhat natural progression into a darkness and solitude that was born out of my explorations in my previous work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I continue to photograph in the style I employ, albeit archaic and problematic, because I believe in the stories I'm after. That is not to say I seek to gain recognition through their exposition&mdash;rather I feel like they are songs floating through the noise I inhabit. It is simply a natural reaction to actively participating in the worlds I inhabit. I'm not to say whether these narratives or concepts would remain as they are without my interaction. More so, it's my nature to respond to them photographically as it's how I process the visual chaos. A dream within a dream.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219104537-2.FunCityMotel.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Fun City Motel, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219104603-4.WonderMotel.2013.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Wonder Motel, 2013</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219104626-7.Zion.2013.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Zion, 2013</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219104915-8.BondageDungeon.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Bondage Dungeon, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105002-9.street.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Street, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105026-11.NevadaBorder.2013.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Nevada Border, 2013</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105049-13.Brothel__Lida_Junction.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Brothel, Lida Junction, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105131-15.Rain.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Rain, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105150-17.AsAbove.2013.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">As Above, 2013</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105212-18.Myschel.2014.jpg" alt="" /><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Myschel, 2014</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105229-20.RyRy.2014.jpg" alt="" /><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Ry Ry, 2014</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105247-21.10ofSwords.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">10 of Swords, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105306-23.SelfPortrait.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Self Portrait, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105325-25.Tomb.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Tomb, 2014</span><img style="text-align: left;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105427-30.WeddingVeil.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Wedding Veil, 2014</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150219105555-27.Thomas.2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Thomas, 2014</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><object width="600" height="337"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="https://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=92436135&amp;force_embed=vimeo.com&amp;fullscreen=1" /></object></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/92436135" target="_blank">Artist Profile: Marshall Scheuttle</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/nathanperacciny" target="_blank">nathan m peracciny</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com" target="_blank">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409890-andrea-zlotowitz?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Zlotowitz</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">(All photographs courtesy Marshall Scheuttle, from&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Morning Star</em>)</p> Sat, 21 Feb 2015 11:16:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Buy a Cardigan and the Holocaust Painting Is Half Price <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">About eight years ago, before J.Crew arrived in Toronto, I was having a conversation with a colleague at the University of Toronto. He was an Art History PhD&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">from Ohio</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, who specialized in medieval Italian church frescoes and dressed like the quintessential preppy yuppie: buttoned-down gingham cotton shirts, khaki pants, Clarks</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. He complained about how he couldn&rsquo;t shop in Toronto, because it hadn&rsquo;t yet caught up with &ldquo;civilization&rdquo; by having a J.Crew.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Recently, I found myself wandering one of Toronto&rsquo;s J.Crew locations for the first time. I harbored great expectations, remembering his words. The clothes weren't really my taste, nor was the cacophony of eager shoppers descended after the Christmas holidays to find a bargain among the otherwise pricey attire. What caught my attention instead was their particular choice of visual merchandising: hundreds of art books, for sale, displayed amongst the neatly arranged piles of folded denim and t-shirts, or placed as pedestals for this season&rsquo;s suede leopard print heels. I look at the books&rsquo; subjects,&nbsp;most of them artist monographs, including Anselm Kiefer, Gerhard Richter, Louise Bourgeois, Wassily Kandinsky, Josef Albers, Abstract America, Robert Smithson, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Dan Flavin, etc.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150219102320-Image_2.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><a href="http://www.selectism.com/2013/10/22/store-visit-inside-londons-j-crew-menswear-store-no-38/" target="_blank">Via</a>&nbsp;Ivan Ogilvie/Selectism</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The impulse for referencing art (especially modern and contemporary) in public locations that ostensibly have very little to do with art seems to go way back. The predilection, of course, seems most commonly to be for Modern Abstraction&mdash;you will find modern abstract paintings and their derivatives adorning the walls of neighborhood banks, dentists&rsquo; waiting rooms, the home d&eacute;cor sections in department stores, and restaurant restrooms. The preponderance of abstract paintings on hotel walls places the art movement in a strange place, hovering between the giant gap of cheap commercial kitsch and high brow&mdash;abstraction is, after all, the art of the <em>modern genius, </em>though&nbsp;the modern genius today is, arguably, dead. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Looming figures like Pollock and de Kooning dominate the western art historical cannon; they have been written about, referenced, bought, sold, and reproduced on mugs and t-shirts for decades. Now, they stand as consumable idols immortalizing a past, with images of a man smoking a cigarette in his studio surrounded by his good paintings created in a perfect moment, with his perfect gesture. Because these artists and their work stand for something romantic, respected, and bygone, it is almost inevitable that they have entered the commercial sector to help sell a certain image or lifestyle.&nbsp;The average consumer (in stores of the socio-economic calibre of J.Crew) does not need to have an art history degree to recognize that abstraction has a complex history, that it&rsquo;s reputable and often expensive, and maybe that that guy Pollock was an alcoholic.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150219100527-Image_5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Looking at the selection of books displayed at J.Crew, I wondered: is there any type of art out there that <em>cannot</em> be commercialized? Is there art that can resist? Perhaps not. This may be proven by the presence of several artists in the store&rsquo;s selection that do not fit with the brands that Kandinsky and Pollock now represent&mdash;namely, Gerhard Richter and Anselm Kiefer. There are several different editions for the two contemporary German painters carefully displayed on small wooden easels throughout the store, including one Kiefer book found between the<em>&nbsp;</em>"Tilly Cardigan" and J. Crew&rsquo;s custom iPhone cases. The issue with using a book on Kiefer as retail d&eacute;cor is simple: the painter and sculptor's output embodies the horrors of a recent history, in particular, the Holocaust. Common themes that he addresses are concentration camps, World War II Nazi rule and its inhumane sadistic behavior towards Holocaust prisoners, human suffering, death and decay. Kiefer&rsquo;s oeuvre is well respected by critics and academics for its representation of the ugliness of twentieth century history and controversial, taboo issues that few brave to approach today.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nor does Richter&rsquo;s presence at J.Crew fall short in its problematic nature. Like Kiefer, a number of his paintings concern a dark German past. A book on his portraiture, displayed as a centerpiece above a rack with the 2015 Spring Collection, entails paintings showing the deceased captured criminals from the Red Army Faction (RAF) which took place in the 1970s. The RAF was a criminal socialist group that sprung in opposition to Germany&rsquo;s fascist past, instigating palpably familiar and unwanted radical attitudes within a recovering post-World War II German society. The RAF became a controversial topic, largely kept out of sight, and was later critically addressed by Richter in his haunting 1988 paintings with titles such as <em>Man Shot Down</em> and <em>Dead</em>. The titles are a stark and unforgiving reflection of the canvas' portayals.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150219100714-Image_3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Thus, the issue with having such artists present at J.Crew for decorative purposes is far more sinister than meets the eye. A painful history inadvertently becomes the target of consumerism, carried in the vessel of another casualty: art. Kiefer and Richter command millions of dollars in the art world&mdash;just last week Richter became <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/artsales/11407110/Richter-breaks-record-for-most-expensive-living-artist-in-Europe.html" target="_blank">the most expensive living artist in Europe</a>. Their works are inherently commercialized. But there's nevertheless something cynical about seeing their artwork&mdash;and what their artwork represents&mdash;displayed as a prop to sell an image of luxury, intellect, or Culture. Could these topics, works, and artists become clich&eacute;d like Pollock and Kandinsky, and also enter what seems to be the inevitable cycle of popular consumption? Will Kiefer and Richter begin representing a certain label and become celebrities?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I tried to find why J.Crew decided to display art books as eye-catching decoration and merchandise. The answers I received from a representative in visual merchandising were that the editions compliment the store&rsquo;s aesthetic and current product.<em>&nbsp;</em>Their vision is to make creative cross-references between designers and artists, and also promote education. The books do bring pops of color. And the white tees look just fantastic next to a Kiefer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150219101441-Image_1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/396844-yoli-yoanna-terziyska" target="_blank">Yoli (Yoanna) Terziyska</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images courtesy of the author, unless otherwise noted)</span></p> Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:36:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list 15 Curators to Watch in 2015 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Curators are stealing the spotlight in the art world&mdash;mostly, for a good reason. This year brings an international showcase from a growing cohort of curators who, from Miami to Tel Aviv, have organized exhibitions we can look forward to&mdash;including public art and analogue photography.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ask a curator how they feel about curating and you might get mundane answers about the day-to-day tediums of mothering artists and battles with the internet, but the big picture is ever more exciting. The following curators (or curatorial duos) shared with us thoughts on their craft, demonstrating their passion and vision for what they do. Without further ado, here is the latest crop of curator stars of this year.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218093422-1._IvToshain_AnnaCeeh.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Anna Ceeh&nbsp;and Iv Toshain</strong><br /> Artists and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fxxxx.me/" target="_blank">curators</a>, co-founders of&nbsp;<strong>FUCK</strong><strong>i̶s̶m̶<sup>TC</sup></strong>&nbsp;art label&nbsp;<br />Vienna</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;Anna Ceeh is curating <em>Red. My colour is red</em>, a performance&nbsp;tour on the cutting edge of video art, public interventions, performance, and hip hop from March to April at the<a href="http://www.ncca.ru/en" target="_blank">&nbsp;NCCA</a>, Moscow, as well as the Skwee Club at the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.uh.hu/" target="_blank">UH Festival</a>&nbsp;in Budapest showing video art,&nbsp;performance,&nbsp;and a Skwee Club mix from&nbsp;September 27 to October 4. Iv Toshain is showing in <em><a href="http://www.belvedere.at/en/ausstellungen/ausstellungsvorschau/vienna-for-arts-sake!-e196721" target="_blank">Vienna for Art's Sake!</a></em>,&nbsp;13 site-specific art interventions at the Winterpalais Prinz Eugen, Belvedere, as well as Galerie GALERIST, curated by Kendel Geers, Istanbul, Turkey and Galerie Charim, Vienna.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Art and curatorship can<strong>&nbsp;</strong>no longer separate, shock, or polarize but is&nbsp;regaining its subversive power to undermine, destroy, and revolutionize from within.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218093551-2._Nadim_Samman.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Nadim Samman</strong><br /><a href="http://nadimsamman.com/" target="_blank">Curator</a> at the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tba21.org/" target="_blank">Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary</a><br />Vienna</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming: &nbsp;</strong><em>Rare Earth</em>&nbsp;at the Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary until May 31, 2015&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating: &nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;A&nbsp;curator plays the role of a double agent, representing both material exigencies&mdash;including the patron or commissioning institution's needs and desires&mdash;and the artist's will. In addition to this, he smuggles in a few of his own interests. He is both an accomplice and an agent provocateur. Curators don't always write, but they should. Having said this, the best justification for making an exhibition is that what is being communicated could not be put across better in another format.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218093833-3._Carson_Chan_by_Trevor_Good.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: Trevor Good</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Carson Chan</strong><br />Princeton</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;Chan is co-curator with Tim Goossens, Julia Kaganskiy, and Aja Martin, of</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.dallasaurora.com/" target="_blank">Aurora Dallas</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a public new media art exhibition in downtown Dallas&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">October 2015</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. &ldquo;Since curating the Marrakech Biennale (2012),&rdquo; says Chan, &ldquo;which was part outdoor, and the Biennial of the Americas in Denver (2013), which was entirely outdoor, I&rsquo;ve been very keen on making exhibitions in public places. I like that you don&rsquo;t even need to know you&rsquo;re attending an exhibition to see and engage with artwork. I&rsquo;m hoping that these exhibitions could help form a practice of thoughtful, critical engagement with the urban world."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Make sure your exhibition requires your audience&rsquo;s physical presence; for everything else there&rsquo;s the Internet.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218094023-4._Kathy_Grayson.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Kathy Grayson</strong><br />Owner and director of&nbsp;<a href="http://theholenyc.com/" target="_blank">the Hole NYC</a><br />New York City</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:&nbsp;</strong>Post Analogue Painting at the Hole this April.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Filling a hole in the downtown community&rdquo; is our goal.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218121608-Anthony_Spinello_photo_by_Al_Diaz.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: Al Diaz</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Anthony Spinello</strong><br />Director at&nbsp;<a href="http://spinelloprojects.com/" target="_blank">Spinello Projects</a><br />Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Past and Upcoming:&nbsp;</strong>The touring exhibition&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.autobody-movement.com/" target="_blank">Auto Body Miami</a></em>&nbsp;(2014) heads to&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.facebook.com/autobodymovement?ref=hl" target="_blank">Auto Body Buenos Aires</a>&nbsp;</em>(2015)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Although I'm not billed as a 'curator' for <em>Auto Body,&nbsp;</em>I would be considered Founder and Producer. <em>Auto Body</em>,&nbsp;a video and performance project that debuted during Miami Art Week,&nbsp;presents performativity as a powerful vehicle for transcendence, movement and transformation. By examining the political and economic inequalities of the art world, <em>Auto Body</em> serves as a platform for a variety of female voices. Focusing on time based practices as an alternative to an object driven market, the exhibition presents the body as language.&nbsp;Selected artists were nominated by a curatorial platform consisting of 26 international female curators. <em>Auto Body&nbsp;</em>is traveling to Faena Art Center in Buenos Aires Argentina this year taking place during ArteBa art fair and Argentina's first performance Biennale. As the show travels, the non-commercial project will continue to add local artists and local curators allowing new conversations to take shape.&rdquo;</span><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218094507-6._ChenTamir_photo_by_Yoav_Weinfeld.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: Yoav Weinfeld</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Chen Tamir<br /></strong>Curator of the <a href="http://cca.org.il/" target="_blank">Center for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv</a><br />Tel Aviv</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;Tamir has two upcoming solo shows at the CCA of Oliver Laric and Toony Navok,&nbsp;May 21&nbsp;to July 18, plus the CCA's s</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ummer exhibition from&nbsp;July 30 to September 26.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">She will also be speaking at the Armory Show in New York about regionalism in the Middle East on March 8.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;When I applied to Bard, I had to write a personal statement about why I wanted to be a curator. It was titled 'God is a Curator' and was a riff on DJing. I can't believe they let me in, but I'm so happy they did. Those two years taught me stuff about curating I didn't even know I didn't know.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218094434-7._Olli_Piippo_photo_by_Tanja_Nedwig.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Olli Piippo<br /></strong>Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;The&nbsp;<a href="http://www.blackmarketart.org/" target="_blank">Black Market</a>&nbsp;exhibition series, co-curated with Marcus Eek, will be announced soon with shows in Berlin, Helsinki and Leipzig.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">More info on the forthcoming exhibitions will be online soon&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(site is currently down, sorry).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;I aim to curate with a similar feeling as I paint.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218094837-8._Power_Ekroth_by_Petter_Lehto.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Power Ekroth</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.powerekroth.net/" target="_blank">Curator</a>, Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming: </strong>Ekroth is working on upcoming solo shows of Klas Eriksson at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.prosjektromnormanns.com/" target="_blank">Prosjektrom Normanns</a> in Stavanger, Norway, from&nbsp;April 17 to May 31, and John Bock at&nbsp;<a href="http://kulturhusetstadsteatern.se/English/" target="_blank">Kulturhuset</a> in Stockholm from May 30 to&nbsp;Sept 20. She also has a group show (currently untitled) at <a href="http://www.darb1718.com/" target="_blank">Darb 1718</a> in Cairo in November, public art projects in Oslo, and is working for KORO, Public Art Fund, Norway, as well as a board member of the R&ouml;da Sten Konsthall in G&ouml;teborg, Sweden.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Being a curator is like being the artists' best friend, critic, mother, therapist and mistress in one. One has to be a little perverse to enjoy it. Naturally, I love it!&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218094942-9._Sorcha_Carey.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Sorcha Carey</strong><br />Director Edinburgh Art Festival<br />Edinburgh</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;Edinburgh Art Festival: July 30&ndash;August 30, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve worked almost exclusively commissioning and curating artists&rsquo; projects outside formal gallery contexts and I love the multitude of conversations that requires (from artist through to road sweeper), the way in which it allows you to continually renew your relationship to a city and its spaces, and the whole process of helping an idea take form and come to life.&nbsp; &lsquo;Curator&rsquo; has its roots in the Latin <em>curare</em> meaning &lsquo;to care for&rsquo;&mdash;and for me that word is a wonderful shorthand for the many roles a curator needs to adopt. It communicates that deep sense of emotional investment&nbsp;as well as a sense of responsibility and respect for someone else&rsquo;s ideas, the pragmatic &lsquo;taking care of things&rsquo; combined with a much more pastoral and relational &lsquo;taking care of&rsquo; artists and audiences.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218095029-10._Marianne_Katzman.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Marianne Katzman<br /></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Director of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/" target="_blank">Katzman Contemporary</a><br />Toronto</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Current and Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;<em>Reciprocity</em>&nbsp;by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/yoshikawa-kissick-press-release" target="_blank">Akira Yoshikawa</a>&nbsp;with contemporary cellist Alex Waterman until February 21 and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/artists/#/merylmcmaster/" target="_blank">Meryl McMaster</a>&nbsp;running from&nbsp;September 10 to October 17, which&nbsp;opens simultaneously with a mirror solo show in Santa Fe Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. &ldquo;She&rsquo;s a young woman but a real shooting star,&rdquo; says Katzman. &ldquo;I took her on right from school.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">From October 22 to&nbsp;November 20 the gallery will feature&nbsp;<a href="http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/artists/#/susanschelle/" target="_blank">Susan Schelle</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/artists/#/markgomes/" target="_blank">Mark Gomes</a>, a husband and wife art duo that do a ton of public art but have never shown together.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;I&rsquo;m bored with all the exhibitions that are the same. I aim to curate artists by connecting ideas and suggesting relationships, specifically outside my gallery and roster. Work does not exist in a vacuum. My gallery is a living organism that breathes the work; it's transformed by each exhibition.&rdquo;</span><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218095126-11._Silvia_Gaetti.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Silvia Gaetti</strong><br />Curator at the Ethnological Museum Berlin and freelance curator<br />Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Current and Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;Humboldt Forum at the <a href="http://www.smb.museum/en/museums-and-institutions/ethnologisches-museum/home.html" target="_blank">Ethnological Museum Berlin</a>, East Asian rooms (ongoing) until opening 2019 and the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.analoguenow.com/" target="_blank">analogueNOW!</a>&nbsp;Festival for Analogue Photography, January 2016.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Curating is translating the artists&rsquo; visual or conceptual languages into a language, which is comprehensible for the public. In the last years, the artistic media and languages became more and more multifaceted and so should the translations. We are entering a Tower of Babel's era!&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218095211-12._Cornelia_Irja.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Cornelia B&auml;stlein and Irja Kr&auml;tke</strong><br />Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Current:</strong>&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://corneliabaestlein.com/" target="_blank">Cornelia B&auml;stlein</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, a graphic designer and&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://multimedia-autorin.de/" target="_blank">Irja Kr&auml;tke</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, a writer and multimedia artist, have been friends for years.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Their first curatorial venture is Lore Kr&uuml;ger's&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.co-berlin.org/lore-krueger-ein-koffer-voller-bilder" target="_blank">A Suitcase Full of Pictures</a></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;until&nbsp;April 10, 2015&nbsp;at&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.co-berlin.org/" target="_blank">C/O Berlin Photography Foundation</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;In 2007, they went to a political conference in Berlin, where they saw a German-Jewish translator and Nazi resistance fighter, Lore Kr&uuml;ger, speak. They developed a friendship with&nbsp;Kr&uuml;ger and visited her home, where she showed them her portfolio of previously unseen&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">black-and-white</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">photos she had taken from 1933 to the late 1940s, first influenced by the Bauhaus, then portraits of politicos and intellectuals in America, where&nbsp;Kr&uuml;ger fled in exile during WWII. They worked in cooperation with&nbsp;her to show her photographs, but&nbsp;Kr&uuml;ger&nbsp;died before they could realize an exhibition together. For their inagural exhibition, they brought to life the works of a forgotten photographer and hope to tour the exhibition around museums this and next year.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Curating is like a journey into uncharted land."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218095247-13._Aura_Seikkula.JPG" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Aura Seikkula</strong><br />Curator at <a href="http://www.artipelag.se/en" target="_blank">Artipelag Konsthall</a> and freelance curator<br />Stockholm</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;I will be developing two separate large-scale initiatives supporting curatorial and artistic practices. I am collaborating with a couple of partners to launch an international program for curatorial research as well as to initiate a new international art prize celebrating cultural sustainability of artistic practices. Both of these initiatives have got a lot to do with my PhD research, out of which I will be publishing sections scientifically also&nbsp;<a href="http://www.agencyauteur.com/" target="_blank">later this year</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;C(JTB + EB) = CK.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218095320-14._Laura_Koonikka.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Laura K&ouml;&ouml;nikk&auml;</strong><br />Curator at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.finnishartagency.com/services/" target="_blank">Finnish Art Agency</a><br />Helsinki</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming:</strong>&nbsp;Group exhibition by 15 artists called <em>New Narrative and Reader</em>&nbsp;opening&nbsp;June 5 until August 29&nbsp;at the Bury Art Museum and Sculpture Center in Manchester. It continues from October 17 to January 17, 2016 at the Salo Art Museum, Finland.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:</strong>&nbsp;&ldquo;Confusion, it&rsquo;s healthy&mdash;it&rsquo;s a sign of something new.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150218095633-15._Leah_Stuhltrager.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Leah Stuhltrager</strong><br />Director at&nbsp;<a href="http://thewye.de/" target="_blank">The Wye</a>, advisory board at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tedxberlin.de/" target="_blank">TEDxBerlin</a>&nbsp;and freelance curator<br />Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Upcoming: &nbsp;</strong>Co-curator with Cris Dam of <a href="http://www.damstuhltrager.com/" target="_blank">Dam Stuhltrager </a>of <em>Williamsburg on Warren</em>&nbsp;exhibition this May at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.oneartspace.com/tour.php" target="_blank">One Art Space</a>&nbsp;in New York City and project managing for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cyland.org/site/" target="_blank">CYLAND's</a>&nbsp;<em>On My Way</em>, parallel with the 54th&nbsp;Venice Biennale this Spring at Ca&rsquo; Foscari University in Venice. Stuhlrager is part of the CYLAND/<a href="http://cylandfest.com/site/?lang=en" target="_blank">CYBERFEST</a>&nbsp;curatorial team, which tours cities through the fall and winter in Berlin, NYC, and St. Petersburg in collaboration with the PRATT Digital Media Department and Made in NY Media Center by IFP.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A quote on curating:&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Give me a ladder&mdash;I&rsquo;ll do it myself.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Thu, 19 Feb 2015 13:50:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Is Beirut Going Blank? New National Policy Threatens City's Street Art <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Savvy Lebanese talk show host </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.zavenonline.com" target="_blank">Zaven Kouyoumdjian</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;broke a story on February 10 announcing that Beirut Municipality may remove all street art murals and graffiti from the city as part of a new overarching national policy to ban political slogans, posters, banners, and flags from public spaces.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While technically street art has always required a permit from the municipality, that rule was seldom enforced in the past, and writers from all over the world have visited Beirut to beautify the already vivacious city&rsquo;s walls. Street art in Beirut has become so mainstream in recent years that, as Alexandra Talty noted in a 2013 article for <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahljacobs/2013/05/03/the-booming-business-of-beirut-street-art-2/" target="_blank">Forbes</a>,&nbsp;enterprising filmmakers, liquor companies, and even clothing brands regularly commission stencils or murals in trendy neighborhoods like Hamra.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Earlier this month, a mural in the Tabari neighborhood attributed to identical twin writers <a href="http://outlookaub.com/2015/02/16/ashekman-the-peoples-champion/" target="_blank">ASHEKMAN</a> (aka Mohamed and Omar Kabbani) in collaboration with anti-censorship <a href="http://www.marchlebanon.org/en/Home" target="_blank">NGO March,</a>&nbsp;was taken down, despite loud public outcry. It did not seem to have any bearing that the city&rsquo;s governor, Ziad Chebib, had originally approved the mural,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">which read in Arabic, "To be Free or not to Be."</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Following a grassroots social media campaign under the hashtag #SaveBeirutGraffitti<em>,</em> Chebib conceded that the mural&rsquo;s removal had been a mistake and <a href="http://blogbaladi.com/beirut-governor-ziad-chebib-admits-mistake-ashekmans-graffiti-to-be-repainted/" target="_blank">tweeted</a>&nbsp;to invite the duo to apply for a permit to repaint the wall.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150217133135-10679532_821686057879619_2657138770294774474_o.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Yazan, Arabic Calligraphy Cement Sculpture, beside stairs by <em><a href="https://www.facebook.com/Dihzahyners" target="_blank">Paint Up</a>,</em> Beirut, via Facebook</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the list of potential hits were graffiti icon Yazan Halwani&rsquo;s murals, several of which have long reached canonical status among students, 20-somethings, and are even highlighted must-sees in some tourist guidebooks. Yazan wrote on his public <a href="https://www.facebook.com/YazanOne" target="_blank">Facebook page</a>&nbsp;&ldquo;I respect the objective of the municipality to want to improve the streets of Beirut and apply laws, and I think we both have the same object (smile emoticon). But I also think there should be a distinction between artistic murals that look good and are loved by citizens and the political slogans scribbled everywhere.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Yazan&rsquo;s works at risk included a much-photographed <a href="https://www.facebook.com/YazanOne/photos/pb.318060401575523.-2207520000.1424183522./518056284909266/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">mural of songstress&nbsp;</a></span><a href="https://www.facebook.com/YazanOne/photos/pb.318060401575523.-2207520000.1424183522./518056284909266/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fayrouz</span></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(i.e., the Whitney Houston of the Arab world) on Gemmayzeh Street and a wall on Bliss Street titled, "<a href="https://www.facebook.com/YazanOne/photos/pb.318060401575523.-2207520000.1424183517./819407394774152/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">The King of Hamra</a>," which remembers a homeless man named Ali Abdallah who froze to death during a winter storm on the buzzing avenue near the American University of Beirut. Good thing Abdallah&rsquo;s story and Yazan&rsquo;s practice have been documented to last in both volumes of Nino Azzi&rsquo;s <em>Beirut Street Art</em>.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While street art is inherently impermanent, it seems misplaced that these works of public art could possibly be removed as collateral damage for a recent diplomatic deal between Hezbollah and The Future Movement. Beirut Municipality should be wise enough to realize the demoralizing effect this move will have on the city&rsquo;s emerging art scene as well as the larger implications of censorship. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hopefully the approval of repainting the ASHKEMAN mural is a sign of a positive resolution for all.&nbsp;As a result of continued public outcry and public dialogue with Yazan, Beirut Municipality announced most recently that graffiti resembling vandalism or containing political references will be removed, while the fate of all other street art will fall to owners of the individual walls and the public. It looks like Beirut&rsquo;s color is safe for now, but not its residents&rsquo; freedom of expression.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danna Lorch</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">:&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em><a style="text-align: left;" href="https://www.facebook.com/Minus1lb" target="_blank">Minus 1</a></em><span style="text-align: left;"> gate, Gemmayzeh, Beirut, via Yazan Halwani's&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/YazanOne?fref=photo" target="_blank">Facebook</a></span>)</span></p> Tue, 17 Feb 2015 18:05:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Freelance Cafe Guide: Berlin <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You know who I'm talking about: sipping the dregs of an hour-cold flat white, hidden amidst a fortress of MacBooks and Moleskines, using a public cafe as their own personal workspace. Yeah, you've see them&mdash;you may even be one of them. And I confess to you: I too am one of those people.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> It wasn't always like this. I used to rent a studio space. It was cold, smelled of fish (from the market below) and the WiFi was more selective than the bouncers at Berghain. More and more often, I found myself bunking off to work in the nearest cafe, and what I found there was inspirational: <em>life in flux</em>. For many in the position to work remotely, cafes offer a constantly shifting hub atmosphere. Pay rent in coffee and lunch and never read another post-it note about whose turn it is to buy milk ever again.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> As it happens, I'm in Berlin once again, and so to compile the first in an ad hoc series into the world's best laptop-friendly cafes for freelancers, I'll start from where I'm currently sat, which is...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150217123902-Sankt_Oberholtz.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Sankt Oberholz<br /></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Rosenthaler Stra&szlig;e 72A, 10119 Berlin</span><br style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">U8 Rosenthaler Platz<br /> <a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" href="http://www.sanktoberholz.de/">www.sanktoberholz.de</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This is it. The <em>Citizen Kane</em>, the <em>OK Computer</em> of laptop cafes. And I&rsquo;m not just talking Berlin. The legitimacy of spending long amounts of time working in a cafe is validated by the amount of plug sockets on offer; here, it is plug city. I'm sat along one of the chunky benches that fold along the lower floor (there are two floors) as the huge windows spray in swathes of natural light from the busy Rosenthaler Platz and the staff spark like a team rather than a collection of mismatched haircuts. Every time I get here I feel like a passenger on a happy caffeine-fuelled ship. Hub experience at its best, as good for people-watching as it is for deadline-crunching.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150217124208-Kaffe_Bar.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>KaffeBar<br /></strong>Graefestr. 8, 10967 Berlin<br />U8 Sch&ouml;nleinstrasse<br /><a href="http://www.kaffeebar-berlin.com/" target="_blank">www.kaffeebar-berlin.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Key benefit of hot-desking: without being tied to a rigid office, you have a responsibility to yourself to find the cafe that suits your mood (and workload). KaffeBar is ideal for mornings. Located a cigarette's walk from Sch&ouml;nleinstrasse U Bahn in Kreuzk&ouml;lln&rsquo;s leafiest grid, KaffeBar is clean and cozy yet spacious enough to find a bit of desk or sofa to get a couple of hours' work done, if not a whole day. I say mornings, because like Climpsons in Hackney or Grumpy&rsquo;s in Greenpoint, it has that feel of waking human traffic: charge up with their delicious eggs benedict and a green super smoothie, read the papers, do your emails, and move on.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150217124300-Tischendorf.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Tischendorf<br /></strong>Friedelstrasse 25, 12047 Berlin <br />U8 Sch&ouml;nleinstrasse<br /> <a href="http://www.tischendorfe-berlin.de" target="_blank">www.tischendorfe-berlin.de</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hidden gem alert. Seriously cute tea room, a Beatrix Potter&rsquo;s lair of mismatched vintage furniture and curated bric-a-brac. Being polite to staff and other customers, I don&rsquo;t think you&rsquo;d want to push more than a few hours here. However, as an afternoon choice, it makes a great double bill with the nearby KaffeBar.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150217124704-Betahaus.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Betahaus<br /></strong>Prinzessinnenstra&szlig;e 19-20, 10969 Berlin</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">U8 Moritzplatz</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.betahaus.com/" target="_blank">www.betahaus.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A short walk from Kottbusser Tor, Betahaus, in the heart of Kreuzberg, offers both a laptop friendly cafe as well as (like Sankt Oberholz) private studio space. Being set off the road, it has this University canteen feel and can get extremely busy&mdash;so if you're up late you run the risk of hunting for a tiny bit of space wide enough to work on. It has this rather charming wooden raised seating area in the middle of it, like a treehouse. They do fantastic chai lattes and if you order lunch, you have to listen out for your name being called out over a muffled tannoy&mdash;which some may not find as charming as I.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150217124733-Michelberger_2.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Michelberger Hotel<br /></strong>Warschauer Str. 39/40&nbsp;10243 Berlin <br />U1 Warschauer Str<br /> <a href="http://www.michelbergerhotel.com/" target="_blank">www.michelbergerhotel.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Disadvantage: it's a hotel, so the clientele is more likely to be flux in travel rather than a settled Berlin hub. Advantage: the design! It has book cases, it has a zebra-striped bathroom. Detail. Detail. Detail. The Overlook Hotel reimagined by Wes Anderson. And how you react to that description totally determines if it&rsquo;s your cup of latte macchiato or not.</span><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/408013-paul-hanford" target="_blank">Paul Hanford</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Michelberger.&nbsp; All images: Paul Hanford)</span></p> Tue, 17 Feb 2015 14:10:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list What Does Christian Marclay's Glass Harp Sound Like? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is a certain subset of art that sustains the moment prior to critical thinking: that place before or beyond thought. Aesthetically attuned, the spectator is an empty glass resonating with vibrations, an orange pricked by a thumbnail, but not yet peeled. It&rsquo;s a sweet pleasure&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">to immerse myself in visual and aural sensations without probing them, questioning them, demanding the things of them that we must demand, as the socially responsible culture consumers that we are.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Biweekly performances at <a href="http://whitecube.com/" target="_blank">White Cube Bermondsey</a>, led by the illustrious artist-turntablist Christian Marclay, put their audience in that hypersensitive, pleasurable headspace. In concert with Marclay&rsquo;s solo exhibition at the gallery, the program features sound art performances each weekend until the exhibition closes (April 12). On Saturdays, Marclay and eminent &ldquo;special guest&rdquo; musicians perform (Marclay said coquettishly in an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/f5263964-a164-11e4-8d19-00144feab7de.html#axzz3RLoMQKeT" target="_blank">interview with Peter Aspden</a>&nbsp;that his&nbsp;guest performers are contingent upon whether &ldquo;any of [his] musician friends are in town&rdquo;); the London Sinfonietta leads performances on Sundays.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150220144521-CM_Singing_Saw___Glass_Harp__Jon_Lowe___18_.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Singing Saw &amp; Glass Harp Performance, February 7, 2015. Photo: John Lowe</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I headed to the gallery for a Saturday afternoon performance that would feature Marclay spinning vinyl and conducting a retinue of singing saw players and glass harpists. I knew a little about the <a href="file://localhost/watch" target="_blank">singing saw</a> due to its frequent appearance in folk music; the musician pulls a violin bow across the flat end of a handsaw, and the resultant friction produces an ethereal tone. Having no idea what a glass harp would entail, I envisioned some hybrid between a classical harp and a towering ice sculpture.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Entering the room where the performance was to take place, I saw the glass harp right away: a motley collection of glasses&mdash;pint glasses, champagne flutes, tumblers&mdash;lined the gallery wall at bar-height. Marclay, his blue jeans tucked nonchalantly into worker&rsquo;s boots, took his position at the turntable. Upon his cue, the glass harpists&mdash;a group of students from local arts universities&mdash;began to play, stroking the rims of the glasses for a sound that was so clear and high it felt celestial. Each glass contributed its own tone as air moved through its unique shape and volume; the sculptural form of the glasses was inextricably intertwined with the sound art produced. As the performance began its upward crescendo, the harpists also produced a tinkling &ldquo;glass bell&rdquo; effect by tapping glasses against one another.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The two singing saw players began to bend and pluck at their saws, coaxing music out of these basic quotidian objects. The sound produced was strange, evocative of a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wQsWL-lMJw" target="_blank">Theremin, </a>the bizarre electrical instrument used to create the alien noises in 1950s sci-fi movies. A guitarist entered the fray, playing his open-tuned guitar with anything but the strings. He scratched at the strings behind the bridge, producing a trilling noise; he tapped the guitar&rsquo;s headstock on the speaker, bending the instrument&rsquo;s neck. Like the glass harp, the entire guitar vibrated to produce its sound.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At the center of the performance&mdash;visually and aurally&mdash;was Christian Marclay. A pioneer of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turntablism" target="_blank">turntablism</a>, the artist was one of the first DJs to scratch vinyl in the late 70s. The act of scratching warps the music while foregrounding the record&rsquo;s physicality. The scratch wasn&rsquo;t the only mark Marclay made on vinyl: in his practice he frequently cuts up various records and glues together his own configurations of the fragments, producing sampled sound collages that rasp and surprise. John Cage is Marclay&rsquo;s most obvious art historical predecessor. Cage similarly emphasized the musicality of all sounds and considered his performances to be open scores, events open to possibilities rather than closed structures. Marclay&rsquo;s use of recorded sound in &ldquo;sound montages&rdquo; also connects him to French composer Pierre Schaeffer, who conceived of <a href="http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/399309/musique-concrete" target="_blank"><em>musique concr&egrave;te</em></a> in the 1940s.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At the White Cube performance, Marclay played prerecorded sounds&mdash;ranging from musical to atonal to abstract&mdash;and then warped them, damaged them, processed them, and amplified them. The noises were readymades transformed into music at Marclay&rsquo;s touch. Deploying the conventional DJing techniques of squeezing and scratching the record, Marclay also got esoteric: at one point, he put paper on top of the spinning vinyl for a digitizing effect as the needle missed grooves. His sound was gritty in combination with the alternately angelic and alien singing saw and glass harp. In its 20-minute entirety, the concert was wholly immersive, making the whole room and everybody in it reverberate. </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As <em><a href="http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/close_to_the_edit/">Frieze</a>&nbsp;</em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">aptly said</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> of Marclay's 2003 exhibition at the Hammer Museum, for all its discordance, there is a &ldquo;part of Marclay&rsquo;s work in which the needle brushes up against the sublime.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150220144110-CM_Vinyl_Coriander_5Feb15__6___George_Darrell_.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">The Vinyl Factory Press &copy; White Cube. Photo: George Darrell.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Courtesy The Vinyl Factory and White Cube</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the corner of the concert hall is nestled a recording station, the initial step of a vinyl press that has found its way into the exhibition courtesy of the hyphenate pressing-plant-record-shop-music-magazine-visual-arts-collaborator <a href="http://www.thevinylfactory.com/" target="_blank">The Vinyl Factory Press</a>. (The remainder of the vinyl press is in the next room, inhabiting a 7-tonne shipping container.) The animating, performative element that Marclay brings to the recorded music lives on in meta-format, pressed into records that audience members can take home for an affordable 25 GBP. Scratch with care; you hold a veritable sound sculpture in your hands.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/416843-cassie-packard?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Cassie Packard</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All photos: Christian Marclay, Solo Exhibition, White Cube Bermondsey, Jan 28&ndash;April 12, 2015.&nbsp;&copy; White Cube.&nbsp;Courtesy of White Cube.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Laurent Estoppey, January 31, 2015. Photo: George Darrell)</span></p> Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:05:44 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Tick, Tick, Bang: On Painting in <em>The Forever Now</em> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Between 1942 and 1963 Dorothy Canning Miller was the curator of the highly perceptive and ultimately influential <em>Americans</em> shows at the Museum of Modern Art. Beginning with <em>Americans 1942: 18 Artists From 9 States</em> and ending with <em>Americans 1963</em>, Miller presented the work of artists such as Hyman Bloom, Robert Motherwell, Jay DeFeo, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Lee Bontecou, and Frank Stella&mdash;artists who would ultimately be the defining contributors to the mid-century American art historical canon. After a gap of nearly a half-century, MoMA once again is reviving this tradition with Laura Hoptman&rsquo;s <em>The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemoporal World</em>, an exhibition of 17 artists representing current trends in painting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In contrast to Miller's US-centric exhibitions of the past, <em>The Forever Now</em> emphasizes the concept of &ldquo;atemporality,&rdquo; as defined by the science fiction writer and cultural theorist William Gibson, who used the term to describe "a cultural product of our moment that paradoxically does not represent through style or content, or through medium, the time from which it comes." According to Hoptman, &ldquo;Atemporality, or timelessness, manifests itself in paintings as an ahistorical free-for-all, where contemporaneity as an indicator of new form is nowhere to be found, and all areas coexist.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150216094947-in2306_02_cccr.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World</em>&nbsp;at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (December 14, 2014-April 5, 2015). Photo by John Wronn &copy; 2014 The Museum of Modern Art</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is an interesting conceit to an exhibition to, largely, evade the criticism of categorization by pretty much saying &ldquo;everything is in play here.&rdquo; However, if there is one overarching theme that patinates the work in this exhibition, it is the effects of the late eighties blue chip Neo Expressionism (read: Basquiat, Schnabel, Penck) and post-internet image reproduction, largely the currency of the moment. While much has been made of the fact that most of the artists in this exhibition are currently enjoying a moment of market rush: Mark Grotjahn, <em>Untitled (Circus No. 3 Face 44.20)</em> (2013); Joe Bradley, <em>Man Made Dirigible</em> (2008); and the punching-bag of this sort of painting, Oscar Murillo, <em>7+</em> (2013&ndash;14)&mdash;these artists and their work are made almost criticism-proof, as most of the discussion of their works focuses on the market rather than the works themselves. In fact, judging by the paintings in this show, these works support the benign sort of response that Peter Schjeldahl gave in <em>The New Yorker</em> magazine, a capitulation that they weren&rsquo;t really bad enough to bother talking about. (On Joe Bradley, Scheldahl opined, &ldquo;How little can a painting be and still satisfy as a painting? Very little, Bradley ventures. After straining for a sterner response to the works, I opted to relax and like them.&rdquo; On Josh Smith: &ldquo;As with Bradley, resistance to Smith is understandable but, in the end, too tiring to maintain.&rdquo;)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150216094722-vonheylcarlotta.jpg" alt="" width="450" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Charline von Heyl,&nbsp;<em>Carlotta</em>, 2013, Oil, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 82 x 76&rdquo; (208.3 x 193 cm). Ovitz Family Collection, Los Angeles. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York. Photo: Jason Mandella</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is good painting here, though&mdash;and it shows that work that flies below the radar of the contemporary fascination with auction prices is being made. Amy Sillman's&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Head)</em> (2014) and Charline von Heyl's&nbsp;<em>Carlotta </em>(2013) are excellent examples. Yet these two artists seem out of place in an exhibition of &ldquo;atemporal art.&rdquo; In fact, both these painters are very much of their time. Their use of tropes and methods are both in reaction to and a result of a deep understanding of art history, the place of painting in it, and a careful response to it. By saying that their work represents a sort of free-flowing, dissociated activity does a great disservice to work that is both necessary at the moment and of historical value to the future.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150216094443-williamswalldog2013.jpg" alt="" width="450" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Michael Williams,&nbsp;<em>Wall Dog</em>, 2013, Inkjet and airbrush on canvas, 8&prime; 1 1/4&Prime; x 6&prime; 6 1/8&Prime; (247 &times; 198.4 cm). Private collection, New York. Courtesy CANADA</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ultimately this show hinges on the work of two painters: Michael Williams and Nicole Eisenman. Williams and Eisenman have a preternatural grasp of the contingency of painting and use humor and intelligence to critique painting while expanding the uses of it. Williams, like von Heyl, is what we might call a student of the Martin Kippenberger school. While von Heyl understands completely the politics of painting, Williams appropriates from Kippenberger the idea that the art process does not end at the art made. His works are remnants of a process that best resembles a frat party of the art making process. His works defy criticism, or at best, elicit formal responses. This completely misses the point. His use of children&rsquo;s digital paint programs, blue-collar tools like air-brushes and spray cans, and &ldquo;Bad Painting&rdquo; circa 1978 styles, show a wealth of techniques&mdash;an arsenal with which to undress the Emperor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150216094226-eisenman_189_guycapitalist_raw.jpg" alt="" width="450" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Nicole Eisenman,&nbsp;<em>Guy Capitalist</em>, 2011, Oil and mixed media on canvas, 76 x 60&rdquo; (193 x 152.4 cm).&nbsp;Collection Noel Kirnon and Michael Paley. Courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In Eisenman&rsquo;s "big head&rdquo; paintings (<em>Guy Capitalist</em>, 2011), one perceives a deep understanding of the history of both "art" and perhaps what we call "art history," as well as a sense that humor, on the level of High Satire, is the tool most appropriate for returning the artist as critical thinker, as well as maker, to the arena of painting. While many of the artists in <em>Forever Now</em> use reproduction, appropriation, and stylistic role-play in their work, we do not get the sense that there is an end game. In Eisenman&rsquo;s work a variety of elements come together, and the idiosyncratic humor (for example, the little African figure collages and the mid-period Picasso hand smoking a cigarette) are attempts to&nbsp;bring ideas into play through stylistic absorption rather than through mere appropriation. Eisenman says about the work: &ldquo;Some objects/approaches resonate and work themselves into the fabric of your think/feeling, it's not a choice, it's a condition. And then there are works that become benchmarks of influence. I've got a shitload of those.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There was a time, not all that long ago, but in a period now obscured by art movements with names like &ldquo;relational aesthetics&rdquo; and &ldquo;zombie formalism,&rdquo; when a punk aesthetic was necessary to the making of paintings. One defined one&rsquo;s own work largely by showing what it was <em>not</em>. For want of any better term, we might call this The Poetry of Hating Shit. There is an abundance of painters today who still adhere to this practice (Albert Oehlen, Nicola Tyson, and Mira Schor leap to mind), and one hopes that future atemporal painting shows at MoMA will show us, through some art historical wormhole, paintings, like Williams' and Eisenman&rsquo;s, that are more poetry than prose.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216789-bradley-rubenstein?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Bradley Rubenstein</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World</em>&nbsp;at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (December 14, 2014-April 5, 2015). Photo by John Wronn &copy; 2014 The Museum of Modern Art)</span></p> Mon, 16 Feb 2015 11:06:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Exterior Edges of a Cave <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Theresa Ganz's methodology is like making paper out of paper: she builds rocks from rocks.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<em>Heart of a Cave</em>, her current exhibition at Peterborough's Evans Contemporary,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">comprises works executed in black and white digital photography, with one colorful exception. Her images represent caves, slabs of stone, and landforms&mdash;all assembled from photographs of geological formations taken by the artist. Generating in the viewer a curiosity to look deeper, to work out how it was assembled, Ganz&rsquo;s postmodern practice makes meaning through the imperfections of mimesis and combination.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The body of work in </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Heart of a Cave</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> demands a close encounter with landscape, and careful reading. </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Panorama</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> and </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cave of the Heart</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> are the exhibition's two largest artworks, but they operate differently within the gallery space. Where </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cave of the Heart</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;(at top) invites the viewer to peer into it, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Panorama</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> presumes a punk posturing with its shocks of electric orange and pink. It is playfully in dialogue with the dynamics of the space; it&rsquo;s mounted directly to the wall it occupies and seems to be crawling up it or asserting itself onto it&mdash;alive, perhaps&mdash;and in progress.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150212164615-theresa-ganz.png" alt="" width="500" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Theresa Ganz,<em> Panorama</em> (installation view), 2014. Photo: Paolo Fortin</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Images often dissolve upon a closer look; gestural paintings reveal brush strokes, billboards pixelate. In <em>Panorama</em>&nbsp;and several other works in the exhibition, rather than breaking down upon closer scrutiny, the image shifts, and one encounters the materiality of the photograph. Jagged edges where &ldquo;stitching&rdquo; software has lost its thread define the boundary between the wall and the work. The details of rock surfaces are all there, but reorganized. These marks&mdash;like those jagged edges, juxtaposing clarity with blur&mdash;are signature traces of the images&rsquo; digital pedigree.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="float: left; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 10px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150212164935-GanzTheresa_image02.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><img style="float: right; margin-left: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 10px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150212164952-GanzTheresa_image03.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Theresa Ganz, <em>Serpentine III</em> and <em>Serpentine IV</em>, 2014. Courtesy of the Artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Landscapes assembled from photographs of landscapes&mdash;rocks from rocks&mdash;become animated, shifting the gaze constantly. Their irregular form somehow warps the picture plane just enough to disrupt its pictorial characteristics.&nbsp;<em>Is that a waterfall? Is that a positive form or a negative space?</em> Ganz negotiates her images&rsquo; edges either by cutting them with a scalpel before assembling or leaving visible the digital rifts generated by software interface slippages. Through this push-pull, there is an ongoing making of the subject via one&rsquo;s own looking. Throughout, there is the deployment of &ldquo;hide and seek&rdquo;: Ganz inverts the images (positives and negatives) and separates them. The same forms reappear in different works, becoming archetypes within the logic of <em>Heart of the Cave.</em>&nbsp;What is a shadow here may be a white figure there, again tugging at the material reality of a digital practice. <span style="background-color: #f4f905;"><br /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; background-color: #ffffff;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150212165107-GanzTheresa_image10.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; background-color: #ffffff;">Theresa Ganz, <em>Slab III</em>, 2015. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; background-color: #ffffff;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="background-color: #ffffff;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Peering closely at the layers of hand-cut photographs reveals tiers of texture. There are the pieces of physical photographic prints cut out, assembled, inverted, and layered. I</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">n the darkest parts of the </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cave of the Heart</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, the texture of the rock formations read like elephant hide. The work itself is analogous to </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%BCrer's_Rhinoceros"><span style="background-color: #ffffff;">D&uuml;rer&rsquo;s rhinoceros</span></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">; there is a separation between experiencing the actual thing and the trying to reconstruct it in one&rsquo;s studio. All of the correct elements are here, but there is something in the execution that is overly symmetrical; it becomes decorative. For Ganz, u</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">nlike D&uuml;rer,</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">this invocation stirs up some necessary ghosts. Baroque forms and demeanor successfully undercut narratives of landscape as an ideological receptacle for an imperialist gaze.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150212165137-GanzTheresa_image06.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Theresa Ganz, <em>Serpentine V</em>, 2014. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In his 1954 forward to <em>A History of Infamy</em>, Jorge Luis Borges wrote: &ldquo;I would define the baroque as that style that deliberately exhausts (or tries to exhaust) its own possibilities, and that borders on self- caricature.&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a> Ganz addresses landscape through a performative baroque, as she thoroughly works materials into new forms via physical and digital cutting and assembling. The materials are specific: photographs, yes, digitally manipulated and material, yes.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>If these rocks could talk.</em> These rock formations are particular. Ganz took her photographs of rocks in proximity to sites generations of people have worshipped; they are charged with cathexis. Ganz&rsquo;s meticulous assembly and inclusion of detail (decorative nature, even) demands a close look&mdash;a <em>very</em> close look, at times bordering on claustrophobic. The outcome is a re-orienting relationship with landscape where the viewer no longer dominates, but is overcome, absorbed. It abides the excess described by Borges, and flattens the divide between nature and culture.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman" target="_blank">Gillian Dykeman</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a>Borges, Jorge Luis, and Andrew Hurley. 1998. Collected fictions. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Viking.</span></p> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">(Image at top: Theresa Ganz,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Cave of the Heart</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">, 2014. Courtesy of the artist)</span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> Fri, 13 Feb 2015 16:55:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Burden of <em>Represent: 200 Years of African American Art</em> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When the Philadelphia Museum of Art announced <em>Represent: 200 Years of African American Art</em>&nbsp;last November, my reactions were mixed. The timely press release reporting that the museum would showcase a retrospective of African American art felt almost like a needed institutional response in a year notable for the increased visibility of racial injustice and police brutality in the US. Given Philadelphia&rsquo;s large black and activist communities, expectations for the PMA to accurately and sensitively trace two centuries of art in one exhibition seemed impossibly high. Not only did the curation have to grapple with the historical obfuscations of racism and elitism, but it also had to account for artistic differences across geographic, gender, and ethnic lines&mdash;not to mention across centuries&mdash;without sterilizing the subject matter.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Now that it has opened, it's clear that&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Represent </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">cites but&mdash;as <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/museums/200-years-of-african-american-art-at-philadelphia-museum-of-art/2015/01/13/5f3f03ac-9b44-11e4-bcfb-059ec7a93ddc_story.html">critics</a> <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/jan/16/represent-african-american-art-review">have</a> <a href="http://www.departures.com/art-culture/represent-200-years-african-american-art-philadelphia-museum-art">noted</a>&mdash;fails to "represent" adequately its titular 200 years</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. Indeed, given the scope, and the fact that the museum only included work from its own collection, r</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">eductive measures were not just probable, but expected.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<em>Represent&nbsp;</em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is peppered with odd oversights, but the quality of treasures unveiled in the attempt provides hope for similar major retrospectives of African American art to come.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150213112941-REPRESENT_IMAGE_3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Henry Ossawa Tanner,&nbsp;<em>The Annunciation</em>, 1898, Oil on canvas. Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased with the W.P. Wilstach Fund, 1899</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In terms of range and quality of work, the show is outstanding; it includes well-knowns such as Henry Ossawa Taylor&mdash;the first black artist collected by the PMA in 1899&mdash;outsider artist Bill Traylor, Lorna Simpson, and Kara Walker. The subject matter defies tidy inventory, so the exhibition smartly chose to allocate works into familiar chronological and stylistic eras spanning from before the Civil War, through Reconstruction and the Civil Rights era, and into the present day. Dodging overt political or philosophical discussions, the divisions aid visitors in digesting the material while implicitly contextualizing the works within the wider art historical canon. On one wall of the small temporary gallery that houses the exhibition is an assemblage of portraits, and seats where the viewer can contemplate the different faces and facets of self-represented Black American identity.&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150213113230-REPRESENT_IMAGE_11.jpg" alt="" /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Sarah Mary Taylor,&nbsp;<em>"Hands" Quilt</em>, 1980,&nbsp;Pieced and appliqu&eacute;d cotton and synthetic solid and printed plain weave, twill, flannel, knit, dotted swiss, and damask. Courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art,&nbsp;The Ella King Torrey Collection of African American Quilts, 2006</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">While the PMA owns more than 750 works by African American artist in storage, it only brought out 75 for <em>Represent</em>. This extreme edit is one of several curatorial fumbles despite curator John Vick's collaboration with consulting curator Dr. Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw from the University of Pennsylvania. Seventy-five is respectable but hardly a ripple in two centuries. African American art is usually associated with craft, folk, and political art, mostly due to a lack of access and support from art institutions for artists of color. The array of styles&mdash;those born by necessity outside of the rarified art world, and those solidly within it&mdash;are spectacular and rich with technique and sensitivity, from the quilted <em>"</em></span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Hands"</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;"> (1980) by Sarah Mary Taylor to Barbara Chase-Riboud&rsquo;s political monument </span><a href="http://www.philamuseum.org/exhibitions/763.html" target="_blank"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Malcolm X #3</em></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;"> (1969). The PMA at least touches upon the scope and complexity of African American art, if not manifesting its full wealth. &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150213113513-REPRESENT_IMAGE_12.jpg" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">John Woodrow Wilson,&nbsp;<em>Martin Luther King, Jr.</em>, 1981. (Purchased with funds contributed by the Young Friends of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in honor of the 125th Anniversary of the Museum and in celebration of African American art, 2000-34-1) &copy; John Wilson/Licensed by VAGA, New York</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">However, one oversight is almost unforgivable. The exhibition is located in the Honickman and Berman Galleries on the ground floor and is roughly the size of the gift shop directly opposite. While the PMA regularly holds special exhibitions in the space,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">typically reserved for prints, drawings, and photographs,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the choice of location&mdash;modest, away from traffic and the general eye&mdash;felt insensitive&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">considering&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the history of black suppression and marginalization in the context of the purported scale of the exhibition.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img style="float: left; margin: 0px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150213114123-REPRESENT_IMAGE_14.jpg" alt="" width="250" /></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">T</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he first piece the visitor sees on the way in is John Woodrow Wilson&rsquo;s 1981 portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. The drawing itself is movingly rendered and well-examined. However, given the display, its art is diminished; King&rsquo;s legacy feels appropriated into a sympathetic disclaimer.</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The previous day, I had attended <a href="http://voxpopuligallery.org/calendar-event/4th-aux-fellowship-metropolarity/" target="_blank">Vox Populi&rsquo;s reading</a> by <a href="http://metropolarity.net/" target="_blank">Metropolarity</a>. There, Metropolarity member and AfroFuturist Affair founder Rasheedah Phillips noted that non-Occidental cultures conceptualize time as a shifting cycle rather than an uncompromising line. With her words in mind, I cite Glenn Ligon&rsquo;s outstanding <em>Untitled (I'm Turning Into a Specter before Your Very Eyes and I'm Going to Haunt You) </em>(1992), a painting often exhibited in the PMA's Modern and Contemporary galleries, included now in <em>Represent</em>. A vertical canvas is stenciled repeatedly with the parenthetical title, a quote from Jean Genet&rsquo;s <em>Les N</em><em>&eacute;</em><em>gres</em>. Much as speech becomes babble with repetition, the text becomes murkier and messier with the force of every reprint, and the base of the painting is almost illegible. However, while the text effaces itself, the dire gravity of the message connects through the saturation of the ink. </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Is&nbsp;<em>Represent</em>&nbsp;just another lip-service to minority audiences during the one month out of the year when Black culture is celebrated as a part of America's heritage,&nbsp;or should we take its oversights as symptomatic of struggling yet sincere reform in our art institutions? Perhaps the most imporant question is: what needs to be done differently?</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/354852-s-v-kim?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Sarah Kim</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at bottom left: Glenn Ligon,&nbsp;<em>Untitled (I'm Turning Into a Specter before Your Very Eyes and I'm Going to Haunt You)</em>, 1992, (Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Adele Haas Turner and Beatrice Pastorius Turner Memorial Fund, 1992-101-1) &copy; Glenn Ligon; courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Regen Projects, Los Angeles</span></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Jacob Lawrence,&nbsp;<em>The Libraries Are Appreciated</em>,</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;1943. (Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Louis E. Stern Collection, 1963-181-40) &copy; 2014 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)</span></span></p> Fri, 13 Feb 2015 16:09:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Cheers! Prost! Santé! The World's Best Art Bars <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art bars are legendary. They&rsquo;re the place where ideas are born, scenes are formed and historical photos are taken and fondly remembered.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.parisbar.de/" target="_blank">Paris Bar</a>&nbsp;in Berlin was the hotspot of Martin Kippenberger and friends, while NYC's <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedar_Tavern" target="_blank">Cedar Tavern</a> frequented guests like Willem de Kooning. Some art bars have closed; other have become historical landmarks in upscale neighborhoods. Today there are new art bars that draws artists either for their location, concept, cheap drinks, or their warm vibes. The "world&rsquo;s best" is a big statement to make, but here&rsquo;s some of the latest art bars I&rsquo;ve come across that are definitely worth stopping into for a drink or some inspiration.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211113939-LARRYBerlin_PhotoRobertoKr_tzmann2__1280x854_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">LARRY Club &amp; Bar</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Chauseestra&szlig;e 131</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Berlin, Germany</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> <a href="http://www.facebook.com/larryclubberlin" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/larryclubberlin</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The daughter of a slot machine tycoon, Rebecca Brodsky is the owner of this gritty bar in the heart of Mitte. At this retro anti-cocktail bar with an eclectic drink menu, try the "Instant Margarita," a drink without a glass: the bartender pours the bottles of tequila and Cointreau triple sec simultaneously into your mouth. This is where Berlin art scenesters gather. <em>Monopol</em> art magazine has hosted their afterparties here, as has famed Berlin gallery <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/venues/show/2446-galerie-eigen-art-berlin" target="_blank">Eigen + Art</a>. One frequent DJ is Nic Sleazy (a.k.a gallerist Henryk Gericke) who runs the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/venues/show/23426-staatsgalerie-prenzlauer-berg" target="_blank">Staatsgalerie Prenzlauer Berg</a>. Don&rsquo;t miss their dance floor on Saturday nights or their Bobby Orr 1977 pinball machine in the back room&mdash;no coins necessary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211114531-Double_Double_Land_Toronto2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Double Double Land</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">209 Augusta Avenue</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Toronto, Canada</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.doubledoubleland.com/photos.html" target="_blank">http://www.doubledoubleland.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Co-founded by Daniel Vila and Jon McCurley (where the name hails from a play he made), as well as several arty friends, this second-story &ldquo;adult children&rdquo; playground is a must-see in Toronto. If you want to check out dada performance work by star artists like Zeesy Powers or Amy Lam, screenings by local Ontario College of Art and Design students, or local indie bands like Tradition, or even Corpusse, this is your stop in the heart of the hippie Kensington Market area. They just celebrated their five-year anniversary; let&rsquo;s hope for another ten years.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211114612-The_Narrows_BK.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Narrows</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">1037 Flushing Avenue</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Brooklyn</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/thenarrowsbar/" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/thenarrowsbar/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Named after the tidal strait between Brooklyn and Staten Island, Bushwick is home to this chill cocktail and craft beer bar with a back patio open in the summer (warning, it can get busy). They have a famed $6 beer and tequila shot special and a cash-only policy, but it&rsquo;s a good place to kick off your night and then bar hop around the neighborhood.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211114653-Isole_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">L&rsquo;Isol&eacute;</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">14 Rue Frochot</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paris, France</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://instagram.com/isolepigalle/" target="_blank">http://instagram.com/isolepigalle</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Pigalle red light district has an art bar called L&rsquo;Isol&eacute; (The Isolated) which has a no-social-media rule (except for Instagram). Co-founders Guillaume Le Donche and Antoine Galabert want to bring back the human touch with vis-&agrave;-vis networking rather than being &ldquo;lost in the maze of the internet.&rdquo; The glass bar is inspired by 1980s Italian designers, the Memphis Group, while the visual art director&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ineslongevial.com/" target="_blank">In&egrave;s Longevial</a>&nbsp;hangs a fresh batch of paintings on a rotating basis. Expect to hear old school R&amp;B, hip hop, and soul karaoke.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211114744-Loophole5__1280x853_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Loophole</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Boddinstrasse 60</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Berlin, Germany</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.loophole-berlin.com/" target="_blank">www.loophole-berlin.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A colorful, unpretentious event space, this multi-purpose bar is in the heart of Berlin&rsquo;s thriving arty district of Neuk&ouml;lln. Co-founded by the artists from the K:ITA collective, this space is home to performances by electronic artists like LAL Forest from Toronto and White Wigwam from Prague. Don&rsquo;t miss their annual film festival, the&nbsp;<a href="http://2015.boddinale.com/" target="_blank">Boddinale</a>, which runs until&nbsp;Feb. 15. Set in a former brothel, they&rsquo;ve been open since 2009 and have been a hub for artists in the neighborhood, showing installations, film, and sound art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211114841-Franks_Cafe_and_Campari_Bar_London2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Frank&rsquo;s Caf&eacute; and Campari Bar</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Peckham Multi-Story Carpark, 95A Rye Lane</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">London, England</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://frankscafe.org.uk/" target="_blank">http://frankscafe.org.uk</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Open only in the summer, this anti-pub Peckham hotspot is where you might find Jeremy Deller hanging out with Goldsmiths students&mdash;while sipping on Campari on ice. Set on the roof of a multi-story car park, the space was co-founded by Frank Boxer and Hannah Barry from the Bold Tendencies art project. Just look up and you&rsquo;ll find the space. Don&rsquo;t miss the concerts in the summer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211120504-Old_Hairdressers_Glasgow.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Old Hairdressers</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">27 Renfield Lane</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Glasgow, Scotland</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://theoldhairdressers.com/" target="_blank">http://theoldhairdressers.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Old Hairdressers is an indie arts center with a cafe and bar that's also used for exhibitions, installation art, and interventions. Draught beer and cider are behind the bar, while they host regular supper nights paired with artist hosts for entertainment for a mere &pound;5. They also show exhibitions by artists like Jessica Susan Higgins who studies at the Glasgow School of Art, and film nights hosted by the Matchbox Cineclub. Local artists like Oliver Braid can be found perusing the bar.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211120745-Skinny_Dennis_NYC3.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Skinny Dennis</span></strong><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">152 Metropolitan Avenue</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Brooklyn</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/skinnydennisbar/" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/skinnydennisbar/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is so difficult to find a fun, cheap bar in Williamsburg, but this honky tonk, kitschy country bar might be the answer. Named after Skinny Dennis Sanchez, a country musician from L.A. who was mentioned in a Guy Clark song, the place has a Nashville vibe and a framed portrait of Willie Nelson. It reeks of unpretentiousness and is worth stopping by, even if Dolly Parton isn&rsquo;t on your playlist. They have 18 beers and a wide selection of whiskeys behind the bar. Hit the old school jukebox to change the tune.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Loophole, Berlin)</span></p> Tue, 17 Feb 2015 21:54:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Our Favorite Pow! Wow! Hawaii Murals <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hawaii's annual <a href="http://powwowhawaii.com/" target="_blank">Pow! Wow! </a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">jam officially kicked off on February 7, and artists will be busy painting into the weekend. The arts festival brings together curators, artists, photographers, and musicians for a week of painting, parties, and IG-friendly beaches.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Curated by Japser Wong, Pow! Wow! is only in its fifth&nbsp;year, but with its sheen of street-styled glamor and exotic vibes it has managed to attract some of the best artists on the mural festival circuit.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The predeliction is still for old school graf heros: this year it&rsquo;s Saber and Miss Van on the international roster. They&rsquo;ve also got a eye for the current in-demands: Maya Hayuk, Alexis Diaz, David Flores, Tristan Eaton, Maser, and Ganzeer are all painting on the island this week. Mural painting across Honolulu's Kaka'ako retail district began on the 10th and you can see first pictures of the new walls as they happen via @powwowhawaii on <a href="http://instagram.com/powwowhawaii/" target="_blank">Instagram</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/powwowhawaii" target="_blank">Twitter</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Meanwhile, for a flavor of what to expect, here are our favorite murals that have come out of previous years' editions of Pow! Wow! Hawaii.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174357-7K9A1695-Edit-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Mural by Reach. Located on Pohukaina and Cooke Street.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174440-7K9A1707-Edit-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Mural by Push. Located on Coral Street.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174522-7K9A1747-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Classic Aaron De La Cruz pattern work graces the interior wall of Bevy in Kaka&rsquo;ako.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174634-7K9A0250-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Honoring the life and achievements of King Kalakaua, Madsteez and Roid paint an impressive mural that utilizes portraiture and typography. Located at the opening of Lana Lane.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174729-IMG_5859-Edit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">The last wall painted during the 2012 edition of POW! WOW! Hawaii. Located on the old Fisherman&rsquo;s Wharf building on Ala Moana Boulevard, 123Klan wanted to leave a lasting thank you to everyone on the islands.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174842-7K9A0168-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Hannah Stouffer and Kamea Hadar collaborated on a mural at the Ink Nation on Ahui street. Hannah brings her iconic geometrical designs coupled with Kamea&rsquo;s famous lip image.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210174901-7K9A0156-Edit-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Bringing a bit of South Africa to Hawaii, Faith47 painted the silent musings of a female figure coupled with swans in flight. The mural is located on Queen street.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210175001-7K9A2031-Edit-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Gif-iti wall by Roids and Insa. Located on Ala Moana Boulevard.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210175052-7K9A1729-1277x848.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Mural by Know Hope hidden away in the stairways of Salt.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150210175313-7K9A1326-Edit-1277x848.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">DAL painted his recognizable wire-made animal forms on Queen street. For POW! WOW! Hawaii 2013 he masterfully composed an eagle in flight.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You can check out Pow! Wow! Hawaii's mural map <a href="http://powwowhawaii.com/mural-map/" target="_blank">here</a> for more info on murals and locations.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">(All images courtesy Pow! Wow!)</span></p> Thu, 12 Feb 2015 12:18:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list <em>Tangerine</em>: More Than Just a Movie Made with an iPhone <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Independent filmmaker Sean Baker&rsquo;s latest film, <em>Tangerine</em>, premiered at this year's Sundance Film Festival. The comedy-drama, which explores the lives of transgender sex workers in Hollywood, is filmed entirely with the iPhone 5s. It received positive critical reception at Sundance and was picked up by Magnolia Pictures. I chatted via Skype with the Los Angeles-based filmmaker about the process of making this bleeding-edge film, his collaborative approach to telling a story about transgender lives, and his reluctant decision <em>not</em> to cast his dog&mdash;this time around.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211093410-20150210121714-Tangerine_Mya_Taylor.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Production still featuring Mya Taylor, <em>Tangerine</em>, Magnolia Pictures</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cassie Packard: So </span></strong></em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tangerine</span></strong><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> got rave reviews at its Sundance premiere...</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Sean Baker:</strong> Yes, it premiered at Sundance in the <em>Next</em> section, which is for innovative and groundbreaking films; we were happy to be part of that crowd. It seems like the critics have taken nicely to it, and so have audiences. I thought that people were either going to love or hate the film but right now there&rsquo;s just a lot of love around it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: Can you talk a little bit about the plot, and the way you shot the film?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> The film looks at two tales of infidelity that converge one night on the corner of Santa Monica and Highland, a notorious Los Angeles intersection located in a red light district frequented by transgender sex workers. [Protagonist] Sin-Dee, after spending 28 days in jail, meets with her friend and finds that her boyfriend has been cheating on her. It&rsquo;s her mission to find the &ldquo;fish,&rdquo; or biological woman that he&rsquo;s been sleeping with, and bring her to him for a confrontation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: And the film was shot entirely on iPhone?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> Yes we shot entirely on the iPhone 5s. While I shot my first film on 35mm and would like my next film to be shot on film, there were a lot of benefits to using an iPhone. I&rsquo;m talking about its size, the fact that almost everybody and their grandmother has a smart phone so no one is intimidated by it, and its inconspicuous nature that allowed us to shoot clandestinely. With a low budget and a small crew we wanted to keep our footprint small, and we didn&rsquo;t want to draw attention to ourselves in some of the hairier areas we were shooting in.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The iPhone ended up being an aesthetic asset as well. We could do impromptu crane shots 25 feet in the air by putting the iPhone on the end of a painting pole; I was able to get on my 10-speed and do 360s around my actors for a shot that was really fluid and mobile. Critics have also been pointing out that the digital image complemented the world we&rsquo;re shooting in because it makes Los Angeles look radioactive, giving it a pop verit&eacute; feel. So our method of shooting ended up working on several levels, generating responses in the cinema world and the tech world.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: What additional technology did you use to make shooting with an iPhone viable?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> We had this wonderful little anamorphic adapter that fits onto the end of the iPhone. It allowed us to shoot with a widescreen aspect ratio, which gave the film a very cinematic scope. We also used an inexpensive app called Filmic Pro; it locks exposure and focus, and most importantly it shoots at 24 frames a second. The adaptor and the app are what made me believe we could make an iPhone movie that looked like a film. I was pleasantly surprised to see that the film has a Super 16 feel on the big screen. [In post-production] we added grain and pumped up the colors, which added to the cinematic look and achieved something unique.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211093436-20150210123327-Tangerine_Kiki_Kitana_Rodriguez_Mya_Taylor.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Production still featuring Mya Taylor and Kitana Kiki Rodriguez,&nbsp;<em>Tangerine</em>, Magnolia Pictures</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: It&rsquo;s not just your shooting methods that were unconventional; you also collaborated with your actresses on the script.</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> Yes, we collaborated extensively. If you&rsquo;re a screenwriter who wants to tell a story about a world you&rsquo;re not in, you need to do so with as much collaboration and research as possible. Because if you don&rsquo;t do that, you&rsquo;re literally being irresponsible, and you&rsquo;re also being disrespectful.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We met [the first-time actress who plays Alexandra] Mya Taylor one summer morning at the LGBT Center, just around the corner from that notorious intersection. We approached her because of her look, her appeal... There was something about her even from 50 feet away. When I told her about the project, she had instant enthusiasm. The next thing you know we&rsquo;re meeting on a regular basis to discuss the film.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">She shared her stories and anecdotes, as well as stories she had heard from friends who were working the block. About two weeks in, she introduced us to [the first-time actress who plays Sin-Dee] Kitana Kiki Rodriguez. If Mya Taylor is Naomi Campbell, well, Kitana is Beyonc&eacute; on fire. So they&rsquo;re very different but complement one another, and I knew they would be a perfect onscreen duo. The film would focus on the two of them, and center around that intersection and a confrontation at Donut Time [the doughnut shop at the intersection]. We just had to figure out a story. We asked them to help us out.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kiki brought up this woman-scorned story, which we saw as providing a dramatic and dynamic plot line that would take our characters through LA. [Co-writer] Chris Bergoch and I came back to Mya and Kiki with a treatment. They had one or two notes but overall they loved it. When we wrote the script, we told them if the dialogue wasn&rsquo;t good or real to just throw it out the window.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150211093535-20150210123633-Tangerine_Kiki_Kitana_Rodriguez.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Production still featuring Kitana Kiki Rodriguez, <em>Tangerine</em>, Magnolia Pictures</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: I love the idea of collaboration as a function of social responsibility.</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> It&rsquo;s so important, these days when the lives of transgender people are represented on-screen, to represent them correctly. If they didn&rsquo;t have their voices involved in the making of this film, then I just feel as if it shouldn&rsquo;t have been made at all.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: Yeah, then it can become exploitative.</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> Yes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: The theme of sex workers is one you&rsquo;ve explored before. How did you come to it originally, back with your 2012 film </span></strong></em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Starlet</span></strong><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> I was working on a show called <em>Greg the Bunny</em>, a comedy show on MTV geared at 15 to 25-year-old guys. We were casting porn stars at the time as walk-on roles, and as we were getting to know them I was taken aback by how damn <em>normal</em> their lives were outside of the days they spent working. We were all walking our dogs and doing our laundry and cleaning our apartments and that&rsquo;s what I wanted to show. I wanted to stay away from delving into the plight of sex workers, even though that type of movie is important, because that approach doesn&rsquo;t humanize the characters as much as giving a simple narrative does.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: I&rsquo;m wondering if you have a favorite shot or sequence from </span></strong></em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tangerine</span></strong><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> That&rsquo;s a hard one. Well, there is this scene where Sin-Dee eventually finds [the other woman] Dinah at the makeshift brothel, this shady little motel. I was particularly happy with that scene because it&rsquo;s almost a miniature action scene in the middle of a small indie film. <em>Tangerine</em> is such a colorful, chaotic movie, so there are a lot of scenes I&rsquo;m happy with...I&rsquo;ll have to sleep on it!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">[Two small dogs enter the frame. He gestures at one.]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">That&rsquo;s my dog Boonee from <em>Starlet</em>, by the way.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: Oh my god, canine celebrity!</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> He&rsquo;s a good boy because he&rsquo;s tolerating this one, my sister&rsquo;s dog. You can see how he&rsquo;s just looking at me like &ldquo;Get this girl out of my face.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: He&rsquo;s definitely so over it.</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SB:</strong> We almost put him in <em>Tangerine</em>, but we thought it might have seemed forced.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CP: Next movie for sure.</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&mdash;</em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/416843-cassie-packard?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Cassie Packard</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ArtSlant would like to thank Sean Baker for his assistance in making this interview possible.</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Production still featuring Mya Taylor and Kitana Kiki Rodriguez,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Tangerine</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">, Magnolia Pictures)</span></p> Wed, 11 Feb 2015 21:17:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Titus Kaphar Pulls Back the Curtains on Racial Injustice Past and Present <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If 2014 is to be remembered by one social narrative in America, it&rsquo;s the involvement of law enforcement in the black community. The world was still mourning the death of Trayvon Martin when NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio announced his promise to end the often abused, racial profiling police tactic known as stop-and-frisk; Michael Brown was fatally shot in Ferguson by a cop&mdash;so were Rumain Brisbon and Ezell Ford&mdash;and the video of Eric Garner&rsquo;s last words &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t breathe&rdquo; went viral on the Internet. After US grand juries didn&rsquo;t indict either officer involved in the Brown or Garner deaths, political unrest hit the streets with waves of protests that ranged from setting police cruisers on fire to officers escorting protestors to shut down the main highway in Miami during Art Basel. These enduring footprints establish a strong contemporary significance in artist Titus Kaphar&rsquo;s conceptual framework. He carries this conversation into the New Year and to the forefront of the art world at both Jack Shainman Galleries in Chelsea. His two shows, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Drawing the Blinds</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> and </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ashphalt and Chalk</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, opened on January 15th.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150210105532-Titus_Portrait2_KubiatNnamdie.jpg" alt="" height="450" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150210105624-TIK14.068_HR.jpg" alt="" height="450" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 10px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(left) Titus Kaphar with&nbsp;<em>Gift of Shrouded Descent</em>, 2014, Oil and mixed media on canvas.&nbsp;Photo of the artist by Kubiat Nnamdie, styled by Clarisse Benhaim</span></p> <p style="line-height: 10px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">(right) Titus Kaphar,&nbsp;<em>The Jerome Project (Asphaly and Chalk) I</em>, 2014, Chalk on asphalt paper.&nbsp;&copy; Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 10px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">While studying at De Anza College in Cupertino, Kaphar took an African American Literature class. The seeds of his artistic practice were planted when he was introduced to the art of the Harlem Renaissance with Omonike Weusi Puryear. Nine years later he found himself as an Artist-in-Residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem, in the creative center of that historic movement.</span><span style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In 2011 Kaphar launched the <em>Jerome Project</em>, which sprung from his findings after researching his father&rsquo;s prison records. He found the files of 99 other incarcerated black men who shared his father's name: Jerome. This personal investigation materialized into an ongoing body of artwork on the overrepresentation of black males in the prison system. For Kaphar&rsquo;s show at the Studio Museum, he painted the different Jeromes based on police portraits he found online. Each panel was dipped in tar at least up to the mouth to protect each man&rsquo;s identity. The material also symbolizes the silencing of their individual rights and the great disparity in the racial makeup within the prison system.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; display: block;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150210104711-TIK14.087_The_Jerome_Project__My_Loss__white_background_MR.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Titus Kaphar,&nbsp;<em>The Jerome Project (my loss)</em>, 2014, Oil, gold leaf and tar on wood panel, Diptych, Approximately 6 x 5 feet each panel. &copy; Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At the <em>Asphalt and Chalk</em> show at Jack Shainman&rsquo;s 24th Street location, two striking portraits of Kaphar&rsquo;s father and cousin are noticeable upon entrance due to the sheer large-scale of them. They are an extension of the <em>Jerome Project</em>. The space also holds white chalk sketches of unarmed black men who were fatally shot by police, including Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Sean Bell, and Amadou Diallo. The drawings&rsquo; superimposed layers generate a dizzying result that alludes to the swelling pattern of black youths unjustly killed by law enforcement; they share effect.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150210111707-space_to_forget.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Titus Kaphar, <em>Space to Forget</em>, 2014 oil on canvas 64 x 64 x 2 3/4 inches. &copy; Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although it runs thick in the blood of Kaphar&rsquo;s work, it would be a great disservice to focus solely on its contemporary racial vernacular. The exhibit at the gallery&rsquo;s 20th Street location, <em>Drawing the Blinds</em>, takes a step back in time and challenges the deeper role of tradition and its repressive veins through recorded history in painting. Kaphar gives form and authority not only to black men, but also to the women who have been objectified or erased altogether from the art historical canon. They surface through formal interruptions in the painting process&mdash;whether through a ripped opening in the canvas to expose an interracial love affair in <em>Falling from the Gaze </em>or camouflaging a woman with the green curtains behind her in <em>Lost in the Shadows</em>. In <em>Space to Forget, </em>the spirit of the house is released in the form of a woman who has become physically inseparable from the place of her domain; an outline of her right arm blends with the wooden floor she kneels down on, sweeping. The cutout of a child sits on her back, a place of their domain. The blank figure, however, is not the subject being overlooked as described in the title. It is the individual black woman who is buried in the collective art historical memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150210104817-TIK14.067_HR.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Titus Kaphar, <em>Behind the Myth of Benevolence</em>, 2014, Oil on canvas, 59 x 34 1&frasl;4 x 7 inches. &copy; Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In what seems like an investigation on the infallibility of the American founding fathers, in <em>Behind the Myth of Benevolence</em>&nbsp;Kaphar takes a portrait of Thomas Jefferson and draws it back as a curtain to reveal another portrait of a black woman, transforming painting into sculpture. She is erotically painted in an Orientalist manner: seminude in a turban that addresses exotic fetishes found in the mythology of black sexuality. The &ldquo;revealing-the-unseen&rdquo; positioning behind a white man&mdash;a powerful US President who wrote the Declaration of Independence&mdash;sets the stage for a world of metaphors for the viewer to unravel. The artist points out&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">fundamental problems in representation, then</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;trusts his audience to create the narrative form. Above all Kaphar makes these creative jumps accessible.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/361782-stephanie-berzon?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Stephanie Berzon</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Titus Kaphar with <em>Boys in Winter</em>, 2013, Oil on canvas, 64 x 64 x 1 1&frasl;2 inches. Photo of the artist by Kubiat Nnamdie, styled by Clarisse Benhaim)</span></p> Tue, 10 Feb 2015 11:28:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Louvre Abu Dhabi: Prestige Project or Paradigm Shift? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Louvre Abu Dhabi&rsquo;s roof weighs the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower&mdash;its dome references the Islamic architectural cornerstone of the mosque. According to French architect Jean Nouvel&rsquo;s poetic vision of a &ldquo;rain of light,&rdquo; an intricate layer of geometric incisions in the dome will optimize sunlight to create a constantly changing installation inside the museum. Set to open its doors to the public by the close of 2015, the 260,000-square-foot Louvre Abu Dhabi is the first museum to be constructed in <a href="http://www.saadiyatculturaldistrict.ae" target="_blank">Saadiyat Cultural District</a>, which will also feature the <a href="http://www.guggenheim.org/abu-dhabi" target="_blank">Guggenheim Abu Dhabi</a>, the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.zayednationalmuseum.ae" target="_blank">Zayed National Museum</a>, other museums, academic institutions, as well as&nbsp;<a href="http://www.abudhabiartfair.ae" target="_blank">Abu Dhabi Art</a>&mdash;all in close proximity to luxury villas, hotels, and beaches.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150209125909-An_aerial_view_of_Saadiyat_Cultural_District__Copyright_Tourism_Development_and_Investment_Company.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Aerial View of Saadiyat Cultural District, Copyright Tourism and Development Investment Company</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Museums are one of the requisite status symbols of a developed country, and Abu Dhabi&mdash;whose culture has expanded with nothing short of unveiled audacity&mdash;is eager to be viewed in line with Paris, London, Hong Kong, and other global cultural power players. With the Louvre name having been secured by the Abu Dhabi government for a purported $525 million US dollars as part of a larger diplomatic agreement signed by the governments of Abu Dhabi and France, the institution will retain the Louvre name for 30 years, and the support of experts from the 13 <a href="http://www.agencefrancemuseums.fr/en/" target="_blank">Agence France-Museums </a>for 15 years, with around 300 masterpieces on temporary loan for a decade.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The museum&rsquo;s development has been controversial from the start, causing sceptics to wonder if culture can be franchised. Allegations that Abu Dhabi is effectively &ldquo;bankrolling&rdquo; the restoration of a wing in the Louvre Paris in exchange for using the Louvre brand, is one of many examples of bad press. However, it&rsquo;s important to be clear that the Louvre Abu Dhabi is not analogous to yet one more Louis Vuitton store imported &ldquo;cut and paste&rdquo; from Paris to a luxurious UAE mall.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a phone conversation, Jean-Francois Charnier, Curatorial Director of Agence France-Museums, clarified: &ldquo;there is not only the name of the Louvre but there are also the expertise of 100 curators and their research and library involved in this project. It is not just an empty shell of a name.&rdquo; He described the Louvre Abu Dhabi as an inventive departure from the French Louvre, emphasizing its unique ambition to become the first universal museum in the Arab world which will tell the story of art history by focusing on how cultures and civilizations have grown through common linkages, rather than isolating each school of art in an airtight wing and keeping in line with a tired (and at times inaccurate) narrative. &ldquo;We are aiming to show an alternative to the Western point of view when it comes to museums&hellip;we can see that Europe is not always in the center of things.&rdquo; Abu Dhabi, which historically served as the crossroads for global trade and today is home to residents from 140 nationalities, is a fitting testing ground for this new typology.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The 2014&nbsp;<em><a href="http://louvreabudhabi.ae/en/exhibitionsandevents/Pages/birth-of-a-museum-abu-dhabi.aspx" target="_blank">Birth of a Museum</a></em>&nbsp;exhibition&nbsp;and accompanying catalogue provided the public with a first peek into these curatorial principles. It presented visitors to Abu Dhabi&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.saadiyat.ae/en/cultural/manarat-al-saadiyat1.html" target="_blank">Manarat Al Saadiyat </a>space with an appetizer of 130 artworks including a Picasso, a Bactrian princess statuette, and nine canvases by the American painter Cy Twombly, all organized around six unifying themes that examined universal questions.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150209130200-Under_dome__Louvre_Abu_Dhabi___Design_by_Jean_Nouvel__Copyright_Tourism_Development_and_Investment__Company-2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Under Dome, Louvre Abu Dhabi, Design by Jean Nouvel, Copyright&nbsp;Tourism and Development Investment Company</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Given the immense cost of constructing the Louvre Abu Dhabi, acquiring a permanent collection, and retaining a team of highly educated experts to consult, it is a given that visitors will be expected to pay entrance fees, though there is as yet no word on the specific amount that will be assessed for admission or precise opening hours. Saadiyat Island is a long ride from the heart of Abu Dhabi and for many, a prohibitively pricey cab or bus ride from Dubai and the other emirates. Although Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority has conducted focus groups and feasibility studies, one wonders if the museum will truly be accessible to those residents and tourists who do not have cash to burn in their pockets. Many UAE residents are expats who work long weeks and may only have evenings or Friday afternoons off. Will the general population be able to justify the time and cost of admission?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is not unusual to view a world-class exhibition at one of <a href="http://www.sharjahmuseums.ae/home.aspx" target="_blank">Sharjah&rsquo;s 17 museums </a>or Dubai&rsquo;s more established galleries and find oneself completely alone with the work. Although this is thrilling for the art-obsessed visitor, these same shows would be packed shoulder to shoulder in Europe or the US&mdash;probably with a security guard clearing his throat to move crowds along through the displays. It seems that beyond compulsory school trips, the notion of visiting a museum during one&rsquo;s leisure time rather than circling a mall or slumping in a darkened, air-conditioned cinema, has not yet resonated with the general public in the region. However, the Louvre Abu Dhabi's <a href="http://louvreabudhabi.ae/en/exhibitionsandevents/talkingartseries/Pages/talking-art-series.aspx" target="_blank">Talking Art Series</a>, which provides a platform for the public to learn about the museum and its collection through lectures by experts has been standing room only&mdash;an indication that at least a modest base of participatory museum enthusiasts exists locally.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It may be a further challenge to convince tourists coming to the UAE for shopping, beach time, and nightlife to consider a sophisticated detour to the Saadiyat Cultural District. In order to really build a universal museum, the folks at the Louvre Abu Dhabi and TCA have their work cut out for them if they want to bring in the crowds that this kind of institution and its expenditure&nbsp;truly merit. However, considering that in under half a century the UAE has devised a cosmopolitan and peaceful country from a humble trade center dependent upon pearl diving, Abu Dhabi&rsquo;s potential to emerge as a cultural capital almost overnight shouldn't be doubted.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danna Lorch</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Louvre Abu Dhabi, Design by Jean Nouvel, Copyright Tourism Development Investment Company)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Thu, 19 Feb 2015 20:41:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Paolozzi's Underground Mosaic and the Preservation of Public Art <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Depressing and conflicting news comes from several London sources in recent weeks, reporting that Eduardo Paolozzi&rsquo;s sprawling mosaic at Tottenham Court Road Station is being eroded to make way for the new station serving Crossrail. Speaking of the loss of the decorated columns (previously thought safe) at the entrance to the station as-was, the 20th Century Society&mdash;campaigners to save the oft-unloved architecture that has sprung up since the First World War&mdash;said in a somewhat <a href="http://www.c20society.org.uk/news/press-release-tottenham-court-road-paolozzi-panel-saved/" target="_blank">bittersweet press release</a>&nbsp;that they felt &ldquo;delighted that TfL [Transport for London] has given assurances that the original Oxford Street entrance mosaic panel... will not be demolished and will be saved<em>,</em>&rdquo; but that they were saddened that &ldquo;the arches over the escalators have been lost.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">They went on to point out that there has also been a sizable amount of replication of the murals on the platforms, rather than retention of the original works, before continuing: &ldquo;We were given assurances when the station upgrade plans were first mooted that the mosaics would be safe, and because of this we held off putting them in for listing. With hindsight we feel these mosaics would have been better protected through the listing process. We would have then been more involved in the decision making process from the beginning, and the outcome may have different.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Speaking for the Society a few days later, Henrietta Billings <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/feb/03/public-art-paolozzi-mosaic-tottenham-court-road" target="_blank">further commented,&nbsp;</a>&ldquo;they haven&rsquo;t been trashed, but we don&rsquo;t know their current condition or future location&rdquo;&mdash;which comes as a potentially good news, although hardly the sort of solid reassurance one could expect.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">That there is reason to save the work is unquestionable. Paolozzi, after all, is in no way a lightweight: the arguable founder of Pop Art, a knighted, renowned and respected multi-disciplinarian, his works are held in permanent collections in major galleries both in his native Great Britain and internationally. He was the&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sculptor_in_Ordinary_for_Scotland" target="_blank">Sculptor in Ordinary for Scotland</a> from 1986 until his death nearly 30 year later. In 1994 he established <a href="http://paolozzifoundation.org/" target="_blank">The Paolozzi Foundation</a>, which now comprises such luminaries as Sir Christopher Frayling, Toby Treves (former curator of twentieth century British Art at the Tate), The Marquess of Queensberry, and others.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">All of which gives one pause to wonder: what the hell <em>is </em>going on?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The new station, undertaken by Hawkins/Brown (working with Acanthus Architects on the Oxford Street entrance) is to feature a minimalist permanent commission by Daniel Buren which, the TfL website assures, will &ldquo;complement the now iconic 1984 mosaic designs by the late Eduardo Paolozzi&rdquo; before continuing that &ldquo;the majority of the Paolozzi mosaics are being preserved in the upgraded station, whilst some smaller sections will be carefully removed and displayed elsewhere.&rdquo; Or, indeed, being moved to a location unknown, or disposed of&mdash;seemingly without the knowledge of anyone outside of the architect&rsquo;s firm, TfL, and the man with the lorry-load of old tile fragments.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150208102327-Permanent_commission_by_Daniel_Buren__Tottenham_Court_Road__Northern_line__Central_line__Jan_2016-courtesy_art.tfl.gov.uk.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Permanent commission by Daniel Buren, Tottenham Court Road, Northern line, Central line, Jan 2016. Courtesy crossrail.co.uk</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Buren&rsquo;s minimalist work, described as &ldquo;a colorful series of large-scale diamond and circle shapes that will be fixed to the station&rsquo;s internal glass walls&rdquo; by way of being made of &ldquo;his trademark striped vinyl,&rdquo; is presented in mock-up on the&nbsp;<a href="http://art.tfl.gov.uk/" target="_blank">Art on the Underground</a>&nbsp;branch of the TfL website. On the low-res image available this looks every bit the simplified window display, svelte minimalism which pairs down Paolozzi&rsquo;s riot into series of eminently polite colored shapes, and only avoids being swallowed by the station&rsquo;s otherwise apparently ubiquitous grey/steel utilitarian aesthetic by the force of its own great size, and&mdash;dare I say it&mdash;by its resemblance to the mosaic&rsquo;s color ways.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/Buren-brightens-up-underground/23950" target="_blank">Buren himself said</a>&nbsp;of the station that when &ldquo;working in the public sphere one must find a balance between being supple and being strong, so that one's work is not compromised...Being in the public space, a work can have a very large audience. We know that the majority of people have their reservations when it comes to contemporary art. This is compounded when a work stops working or deteriorates, and in the end, the artist is always blamed.&rdquo; This is all very well and good. R</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ecognizing that traveling on the underground can be stressful and highlighting the lack of functionality of his piece,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he continues by saying, &ldquo;it&rsquo;s a very difficult situation for everyone,&rdquo; and that he didn&rsquo;t want to create something &ldquo;irritating.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">TfL&rsquo;s own original tour of the station neglects to include the art, presenting the station as a just-add-people grey bunker&mdash;admittedly a very wide grey bunker&mdash;and gliding the viewer through its smooth, bare walls. Include a pixelated hand holding an outsize blaster and Gordon&rsquo;s your Freeman.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YPUiJqOSdMA" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At <a href="http://www.crossrail.co.uk/route/stations/tottenham-court-road" target="_blank">Crossrail&rsquo;s website</a>, the imaging of the station goes one better, presenting ersatz Londoners moving through an environment that may be better realized, but is so un-irritating as to be absolutely sterile: here&rsquo;s the depressingly familiar aluminum paneling, reflective tiles and glass&mdash;so far so contemporary architecture. Here are so many clip-art figures trapped in the clean lines of a laboratory maze, albeit one fitted with gigantic flatscreen displays (the graphic pictures the display of a series of lucent Mandelbrot visualizations: the lab rats must have room to consider the infinite, evidently). As with much of the Jubilee Line architecture, it has the concise, personality-free charm of a modern trade fair interior.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150208102121-Tottenham_Court_Road_-_architects_impression_of_western_ticket_hall_Architects_impression_image_showing_escalator_view_of_Crossrail_Tottenham_Court_Road_western_ticket_hall-_courtesy_of_crossrail.co.uk.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Tottenham Court Road. Architects impression image showing escalator view of Crossrail Tottenham Court Road western ticket hall. Courtesy of crossrail.co.uk</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">TfL have commented on the matter, saying that they consider the Paolozzi mosaics to be an &ldquo;important artwork&rdquo; and that &ldquo;over 95 percent&rdquo; of the mosaics will be retained in their current place or with a mixture of new and original tiles. So 9 1&frasl;2 out of 10, this seems to be saying, is as good as everything.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And what are a few tiles here or there? The point is that this isn&rsquo;t the same as Paolozzi&rsquo;s towering <em>Newton </em>outside the British Library, or indeed his sculpture at Kew, or his sculptural ventilation shaft at Pimlico, or <em>Piscator </em>at Euston. This artwork is an intrinsic part of the building. A part that stands in the way of progress, which comes first and thus the artwork is necessarily devalued&mdash;as an artwork&mdash;by its own lack utility. That and the fact that, scrolling through the pages of comments on <a href="http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/campaigners-disgusted-as-paolozzi-murals-at-tottenham-court-road-are-removed-10017296.html" target="_blank">London&rsquo;s primary news output</a>, <em>The Evening Standard,</em>&nbsp;the <em>opinion du jour </em>seems to vacillate between hatred and outright hatred (with apologies to the comments in the architectural press). Of course all this is absolute nonsense, and the destruction of any of the mural is an act of philistinism. But what do the mosaics have to do with the site?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paolozzi outlined his plans in <em>Underground Design </em>(published in 1984), describing his method as a reaction to what he saw as a transparent duplicity of an art market which concentrated on the creation of value from the confines of works that dealt with the artist&rsquo;s point of view alone. He describes the station scheme as &ldquo;a counterpoint to subjectivity... In order to do something like Tottenham Court Road station every line and every shape must have meaning.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/43393875?color=ffffff" frameborder="0" width="500" height="281"></iframe></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paolozzi goes on to say that the murals should act as a bridge between the larger area&mdash;the larger era&mdash;and the traveller, to present &ldquo;a kind of archaeology of what Charing Cross Road used to be and what it has become&rdquo;&mdash;this being expressed in a kind of an iconography that is &ldquo;strong, and not unlike language that has been used in the past.&rdquo; Paolozzi was concerned with tying the above ground to the subterranean; the everyday experience of the tube entrance to the wider colorful human activity and ideas surrounding it; the past to a developing future. The striding modern man in the rotunda&mdash;his brain wired to a computer terminal&mdash;is cited as being inspired by Philip K. Dick&rsquo;s <em>Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?</em>&mdash;&ldquo;anticipating the future, which will catch up with the underground.&rdquo; Indeed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Architect Peter Cook writes of Paolozzi that he is &ldquo;a strong artist, perhaps preferred by...creative people who feel that the world must be pushed forward. Who are positive themselves about civilization, and suspect that the accumulated imagery and spirit of the age, as well as anything that we need to use from another age, are ours to pile up&mdash;one on top of the other&mdash;in order to help us invent the next action.&rdquo; This is as much a beautiful trumpeting of Pop&rsquo;s mechanisms as it is a paradigm for development, as far away from the current murky situation as possible. Beneath the PR subterfuge and the after-the-fact debating about historical listing, the mixed messages about valuing an artwork (but only enough to save some&mdash;part&mdash;<em>all?</em>&mdash;of it), lies the question of what we&rsquo;ll be left with once the new station is built, and how that will mesh&mdash;or not&mdash;with Paolozzi&rsquo;s vision of a codified world to be experienced as a quotidian event. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cook&rsquo;s optimistic &ldquo;next action&rdquo; seems to be hidden behind a hoarding marked with the logos of the developers, a process that is anything if not actually visible. Yet. Of course, all this opens up wider debates: what do we want from art in public spaces?; the challenges of preservation of art in areas that are constantly evolving; even the idea that replication of part of an artwork does not constitute the artwork itself. But &nbsp;all this in some ways misses the brutal point: fiscal concerns often drown out others. What are we to take from the possible destruction of parts of this fluorescing rabbit-warren of bright mosaic? Where is the powerful voice of the Paolozzi Foundation in these headlines?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150208102403-Paolozzi_with_mural.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Paolozzi with his mural, screen shot from&nbsp;<a href="http://vimeo.com/43393875" target="_blank">http://vimeo.com/43393875</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">With that silence specifically in mind, I&rsquo;d like leave you all with a quote from Paolozzi himself, talking about his public sculptures and how he felt about their possible alteration in conversation with Edouard Roditi:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 60px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I am anxious that my works should have a permanent quality and not be subject to unnecessary change... Nothing would disturb me more than to see, a few years after complet[ion, that the details] had become detached and lost, like the postage stamp from a Schwitters collage... This whole must owe its fantastic, magical or haunting appearance to the very variety of accumulation of its crowded details. These are essential to the whole, like the choice of a tattooings on a man&rsquo;s body, clues to an understanding of his biography or the compulsive nature of his urge to modify his own appearance and to exhibit in public his private world.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 60px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/387041-thogdin-ripley" target="_blank">Thogdin Ripley&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Tottenham Court Road Mosaic, still from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AocXKIHYZdY" target="_blank">YouTube</a>)<br /></span></p> Mon, 09 Feb 2015 12:06:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Zona MACO: Around Mexico City's Premier Art Fair in 10 Artworks <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Bustling Mexico City has embraced the international art scene while continuing to develop its own independent arts agenda through multiple platforms and outreach. This week&nbsp;<a href="http://zonamaco.com/" target="_blank">Zona MACO</a>, Central America's most important art fair, brings it all together, garnering major works of art from around the world to its 13th&nbsp;edition.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The overall vibe of this year's fair&mdash;which opened Wednesday and continues throughout this weekend&mdash;was very laid-back, with an evident rise of painting and sculpture works at galleries.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I had the chance to hit up the fair and present to you here my top 10 works showcased at Zona MACO 2015:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>1. </strong>&nbsp;<em>the stillness </em>(2014) by Ugo Rondinone at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/363-gladstone-gallery---24-st?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Barbara Gladstone Gallery</a>, New York and Brussels</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206114531-Ugo_Rondinone.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>2. &nbsp;</strong><em>Marine </em>(2014) by Minerva Cuevas at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/38089-kurimanzutto-gallery" target="_blank">Kurimanzutto</a>, Mexico City</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206123146-Minerva_Cuevas.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>3. &nbsp;</strong><em>Mexico City Shakedown </em>(2014-2015) by Eddie Martinez at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/venues/show/73-kohn-gallery" target="_blank">Kohn Gallery</a>, Los Angeles</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206114702-Eddie_Martinez.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>4. &nbsp;</strong><em>15.04 </em>(2015) by Secundino Hernandez, at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/33753-galeria-heinrich-ehrhardt" target="_blank">Galeria Heinrich Ehrhardt</a>, Madrid</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206114726-Secundino_Hernandez.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>5. &nbsp;</strong><em>Esfuerzo Com&uacute;n </em>(2014) by Jose D&aacute;vila at <a href="http://www.galeriaomr.com/" target="_blank">OMR Gallery</a>, Mexico City</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206123052-Jose_D_vila.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>6. &nbsp;</strong></span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cercle Series </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(2011) by Manuel M&eacute;rida at <a href="http://rgrart.com/" target="_blank">RGR Art</a>, Valencia, Venezuela</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206115010-Manuel_M_rida.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>7. &nbsp;</strong><em>100% Pure </em>(2014) by Oscar Murillo at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/218-david-zwirner--525-w-19th" target="_blank">David Zwirner</a>, New York and London</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150206125842-20150206115056-Oscar_Murillo.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>8. &nbsp;</strong><em>GUERNISLAM </em>(2015) by Ray Smith at <a href="http://gegaleria.com/site/" target="_blank">GE Galeria</a>,&nbsp;Nuevo Le&oacute;n, Mexico</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150206130326-20150206115133-Ray_Smith.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>9.</strong> &nbsp;<em>Ayotzinapa Diorama </em>by Marcel Dzama at <a href="http://www.travesiacuatro.com/" target="_blank">Traves&iacute;a Cuatro</a>, Madrid and Guadalajara, Mexico</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206115206-Marcel_Dzama.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>10.</strong> &nbsp;<em>A Grand Swamp Ass</em> (2014) by Torey Thornton at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/venues/show/23332-ohwow-los-angeles" target="_blank">OHWOW Gallery</a>, Los Angeles</span></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206115224-Torey_Thornton.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/385949-rodrigo-campuzano?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Rodrigo Campuzano</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Fri, 06 Feb 2015 13:09:11 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Yes, Selfies Can Be Feminist. But... <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I was naively unprepared for the wave of vitriol I woke up to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">on Twitter</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;from Caitlin Stasey, the 24-year-old former </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Neighbours</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> actress and founder of herself.com, following my article last week which attempted to discuss several interesting new art exhibitions and platforms&nbsp;that deal with female self-image online:&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/41960" target="_blank">"Can Selfies Be Feminist?"&nbsp;</a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/onaartist">@onaartist</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/ArtSlant">@ArtSlant</a> this article declares tht self expressions of nudity r countr productive 2 feminist agenda w no real explanation as 2 y</p> &mdash; caitlin stasey (@caitlinstasey) <a href="https://twitter.com/caitlinstasey/status/563418562493440003">February 5, 2015</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/ArtSlant">@ArtSlant</a> C. You are condemning women for participating in projects they deem necessary and important D. What contradictions?</p> &mdash; caitlin stasey (@caitlinstasey) <a href="https://twitter.com/caitlinstasey/status/563229879382970368">February 5, 2015</a></blockquote> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/ArtSlant">@ArtSlant</a> then learn to write</p> &mdash; caitlin stasey (@caitlinstasey) <a href="https://twitter.com/caitlinstasey/status/563233590226350080">February 5, 2015</a></blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The fundamental thing is we (both women and men) all</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;want freedom in terms of our own bodies. We don't want to be persecuted for expressing ourselves (in images, or in words). And, given the values of the western world, these are freedoms we are in many ways lucky to be able to discuss.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Some, like Stasey, would argue that the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">confident&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">dissemination of body positive images on the web is revolutionary enough for these representations to overcome sexist readings online: the only way to desexualize an image is to propogate the signifiers of sexuality in a non-sexual context. But is the&nbsp;<em>only</em> way to challenge the view of female bodies as sexual objects to normalize a non-sexualized view of them?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There's no one way to consider this complicated issue.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/ArtSlant">@ArtSlant</a> BODY POSITIVITY IMAGES ARE NOT SEXUALIZED BY ANYONE BUT THE VIEWER. man it must hurt to be so wrong. Bye.</p> &mdash; Lucas Neff (@RealLucasNeff) <a href="https://twitter.com/RealLucasNeff/status/563230722467446784">February 5, 2015</a></blockquote> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I accept Stasey and her cohorts&rsquo; ideas as part of the same idealism for a better world that I share: to forward the agenda of body positivity, to create a safe space for women online and in the real world, to stamp out&nbsp;rape culture.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Confident photographs of one's body can be inspiring and empowering, both for the creator and for the viewer. Selfies can indeed be a tool for artists to create, and to use their own likenesses as a way to open dialogue on the way we project ourselves online. Sharable selfies in the digital domain&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">may</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;be an empowering paradigm.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But it's undeniable that the internet has produced a new range of challenges for </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artists, female </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">male</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;not only for feminists&mdash;and primary among these challenges is the issue of context and audience.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Our actions and conversations don't take place in a vaccum&mdash;indeed, the horror vacui of the internet is effectively the opposite of a vacuum</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150208100406-slide_399170_4922164_free.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">London-based photographer Nadia Lee Cohen, <a href="http://nadialeecohen.com/"><em>100 Naked Women</em></a>, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sharability, likeability, and virality can place creator's images out of their control.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When you share an image&mdash;just as if I write a text that can be misunderstood&mdash;you have to accept that it can be misused.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;And t</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he issue is not only about how the artist or subject of an image feels about their artwork being apprehended and used improperly. It's also about the effect produced in viewers, and how it educates other prosumers. As an example of the way art work can be appropriated into the very context they are critiquing, artist Ivonne Thein, told&nbsp;<a target="_blank">ArtSlant&nbsp;</a>in an interview last year, of her reaction when her anti-anorexia images appeared on "pro-ana" websites for girls looking for anorexia inspiration:</span></p> <div id=":hm.co" class="JL"> <div id=":hr.ma" class="Mu SP"> <blockquote> <div id=":hr.co" style="padding-left: 30px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">I have struggled to find my work on pro-ana websites. If I do, than I contact VG Bildkunst, which is a German union who covers my copyright, to have them deleted. I don&rsquo;t want them promoting anorexia but seeing them on the sites shows me the big impact that images have in Western society. We have a responsibility when we create images and bring them to the internet. Of course I don&rsquo;t feel guilty about my images being appropriated because I explain how this work is an unambiguous statement and it was never my aim to change society. I see this work more as a visual and critical statement on social currents.</span></div> </blockquote> <div>&nbsp;</div> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This doesn&rsquo;t mean censorship of body/image is the answer. But the more these issues are discussed&mdash;as is being done by the many artists I covered in my previous article, as well as below&mdash;the closer we might be to finding some progressive strategies for self-production online. Or at the very least, ways of circumnavigating the difficulties artists face in using bodies and images of themselves.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In one of the many Twitter conversations spurred from my original article, Jennifer Chan,&nbsp;co-curator of the online exhibition&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.bodyanxiety.com">Body Anxiety</a></em>, wrote:&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/carrieriehl">@carrieriehl</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/artwerk6666">@artwerk6666</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/onaartist">@onaartist</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/caitlinstasey">@caitlinstasey</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/ArtSlant">@ArtSlant</a> I think we can act out and exist ways men don't only find appeasing</p> &mdash; jennifer chan (@jenninat0r) <a href="https://twitter.com/jenninat0r/status/564912813462663168">February 9, 2015</a></blockquote> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; background-color: #ffffff;">There are many platforms online that promote a critical engagment with images of female bodies&mdash;and there are young female artists out there who are also pushing towards this new language: among them, <a href="http://amaliaulman.eu/" target="_blank">Amalia Ulman</a>, <a href="http://www.dafyhagai.com/" target="_blank">Dafy Hagai</a>, and projects such as <a href="http://girlsgetbusyzine.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Girls Get Busy</a> and <a href="http://illuminatigirlgang.com/" target="_blank">Girl Gang Illuminati</a>.&nbsp;While most of these address women, they invite a united and proactive discussion of the problems we have to face as humans.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In terms of the arts, it seems an entirely new visual language is being produced&mdash;one that uses humor, like Nadia Lee Cohen's&nbsp;<em><a href="http://nadialeecohen.com/" target="_blank">100 Naked Women</a>&nbsp;</em>(above), for example&mdash;that might sever the historical link of the aesthetic to sexism.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206110305-Screen-Shot-2015-01-17-at-2.08.34-PM.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Faith Holland. Screengrab via <em>Body Anxiety</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One artist who suggests new, subversive ways of creating art and using the body online is cyberfeminist Faith Holland, whose&nbsp;<a href="http://bodyanxiety.com/gallery/faith-holland/" target="_blank">work</a>&nbsp;is included in&nbsp;<em>Body Anxiety</em>. Holland's work plays with the visual language of porn&mdash;without nudity&mdash;as well as her own image. She explains her method&mdash;and the unwanted contradictions sometimes revealed by audience reactions to her work:</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 60px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I&rsquo;ve worked with pornography and sexuality for the last few years, but I had been (purposefully) avoiding bodies altogether and worked solely in abstraction and metaphor.&nbsp;<em>Porn Interventions</em>&nbsp;is a divergence from this, in which I try to throw a wrench (and some humor), into the free flow of porn on RedTube. Despite the fact that there&rsquo;s a proliferation of porn on the internet, a vast majority of it looks exactly the same&mdash;same flow, conventions, poses, camera angles, etc. (I can attest to this as I am currently gathering cum shots for another project and it&rsquo;s quite monotonous.) I wanted to inject something different into that flow, something that would function asymptotically to pornography. So the videos try to invoke porn codes (BBW, solo play, licking, sucking, whip cream), but without actually being porn itself. Importantly, there is no &ldquo;real&rdquo; nudity in the videos. Despite those intentions, I have received a &ldquo;fan video&rdquo; from a man jerking off to my work, which is also included in&nbsp;<em>Body Anxiety</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 60px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Humor is important to me and my work because it opens up avenues to talk about issues that could otherwise be didactic. It also creates the possibility of capturing the attention of &ldquo;the fapping public,&rdquo; who are not getting the T&amp;A they&rsquo;re looking for when they click on my video. The selfie, however, is not something I think of much in relation to my work. Using my own image/body in this work is partially a matter of convenience for a lo-fi zero dollar practice, partially gets rid of the issue of casting and the responsibility of putting someone else&rsquo;s likeness on a porn site (particularly since I circulate those images inside AND outside the porn context), and finally functions as a challenge to use my chubby, not "porn-ready" body. There is a rich history of artists who use their own bodies and are influential to my practice like Carolee Schneemann, VALIE EXPORT, Eleanor Antin, etc. (all pre-&ldquo;selfie&rdquo;).</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; background-color: #ffffff;">Women everywhere are actively grappling with this issue. Another witness to its complexities&mdash;and the explosive reactions that can exacerbate them&mdash;is BBC Radio One presenter Jameela Jamil, who spoke to the <em>Guardian</em> last year about the criticism she received after voicing her opinions on Miley Cyrus' recent behavior:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; background-color: #ffffff;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/media/video/2014/apr/02/miley-cyrus-criticism-reaction-terrifying-jameela-jamil" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When I spoke to Jennifer Chan<em>&nbsp;</em>in an interview last week, she highlighted what are for me some of the key struggles of online feminism:<br /></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 60px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I know my feminism might be different from other womens' feminisms, and not all women who have feminist beliefs may identify as feminist and that's fine... we can still do feminist things, and have feminist conversations without mentioning the F word. It is definitely anti-feminist to shit on feminism and other women's attempts to help women. I think growing up with the internet, we're indirectly influenced or aware of raunchy behaviour in porn that is mostly targeted at men, hopefully people become aware of that.&nbsp;I'm weary and sad about women treating each other as sexual competition when they use the terms "bitch" or "slut" on each other. I also wonder if I'm antifeminist for critiquing women who participate in mainstream representation that appeases straight men (Beyonce). The pornstar Stoya has said she is a feminist, but she doesn't think it can be considered a feminist thing to be having sex on camera where some episodes show her being slapped/degraded, but she enjoys exploring her sexuality on camera so that's her thing.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 60px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I just think popular representations are problematic for all other women who face lived realities of sexual harassment/assault/sexist comments, but maybe at the end of the day it's because I believe there is a way&mdash;whether one is considered conventionally attractive or not&mdash;to actively push back against those types of objectifying representations, it even comes down to how you pose. And artists might have a responsibility to analyze that... or we're just perpetuating what the entertainment industry delivers. So, artists aren't required to use their body, but to be aware and critical of these regimes of representation whether by remix (Hannah Black), transformation of body types and parts (Andrea Crespo) or poetic response (Aurorae Parker) is just as powerful... sometimes just being present as different is.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 60px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Dana Boulos, via Girlfriends)</span></p> Tue, 10 Feb 2015 19:33:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list A Cross Section of Intersections: 1646, Hotel Maria Kapel, and A Tale of a Tub <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rotterdam&rsquo;s Van Nellefabriek&mdash;once a factory for processing coffee, tea, and tobacco&mdash;is one of the Netherlands&rsquo; most impressive modernist monuments. This concrete and steel colossus, with its imposing glass fa&ccedil;ade, was progressive in its use of light, air, and space, and in its attention to working conditions. Art Rotterdam moved to this UNESCO World Heritage Site and event complex in 2014. This year, the fair&rsquo;s 16th edition does justice to the site&rsquo;s legacy of innovation with the introduction of Intersections: an exhibition sector devoted to non-profit spaces and artist initiatives. Leading up to Intersections&rsquo; debut, we spoke with three of its inaugural participants: 1646 from The Hague, Hotel Maria Kapel from Hoorn, and A Tale of a Tub from Rotterdam. <em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since its conception Art Rotterdam has grown into a fair with a compelling concept. Of course the majority of the fair consists of commercial galleries, with 70 veterans in the Main section and 25 younger ones in the New Art section&mdash;it is an art fair after all. This core is supplemented for the third year by Projections, a separate space where 12 galleries show video artworks on big screens. But Art Rotterdam does more than represent the contemporary art world as seen through commercial glasses. It&rsquo;s almost grown into an art festival of sorts, with additional exhibitions and programming in the fair and on the Van Nellefabriek premises.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Examples are this year&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/41959">DordtYart</a> presentation and 2014&rsquo;s <em>Concepts &amp; Prospects</em>, both held on the Van Nellefabriek grounds during the fair. The latter was a presentation of the work by thirteen artists who had received financial support by the Mondriaan Fund in the previous year. It showed more experimentation and less &ldquo;sellable&rdquo; art than fairs are usually prone to.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Intersections, a section for non-profits, project spaces, and artists&rsquo; initiatives, is the latest promising addition. Here, 15 non-commercial art spaces will show a combination of video, installation, and performance art in the former workshops of the Van Nellefabriek. According to Samuel Saelemakers, an Intersections curator, it is &ldquo;a perfect way for a broad audience to get acquainted with an alternative scene with lots of room for experiment.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205095845-OVB201506-0036.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Artun Alaska Arasli,&nbsp;<em>How to Disappear in America (Recollection)</em>, 2015. Photo: Olivier van Breugel.&nbsp;Courtesy of Hotel Maria Kapel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">From an independent art space point of view, Intersections has other assets. According to Nico Feragnoli and Clara Pall&iacute; Monguilod, two of 1646's directors, &ldquo;it also promotes exchange between organizations in both fields (the independent and the commercial one), expanding and strengthening connections that would otherwise not easily happen.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A Tale of a Tub&rsquo;s Suzanne Wallinga notes: &ldquo;The projects selected for Intersectionswill inform a discursive program during the fair&mdash;<em>Reflections</em>, in order to stimulate dialogue between the participating spaces and amongst the invited international professionals from different backgrounds within the art world.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Irene de Craen, the artistic director of Hotel Maria Kapel, is optimistic about the initiative too: &ldquo;In my opinion this closes the gap that sometimes seems to exist in the different corners of the art world; showing that we are all part of the same thing, albeit with different approaches.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">So, who are these initiatives and what are they up to at Art Rotterdam?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>1646</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205100059-BLOEMFONTEIN20.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Jos de Gruyter and Harald Thys, <em>Die Aap van Bloemfontein</em>, 2014, Video, color, sountrack, 23 min.&nbsp;Courtesy 1646, the artists and galleries, Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin, and&nbsp;Micheline Szwajcer, Brussels</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://1646.nl/">1646</a> is a project-space based in The Hague with a strong focus on artists&rsquo; practices. 1646 has worked with artists in different phases of their careers, from young artists that have only quite recently left the academy to more established artists. &ldquo;We choose artists we find fascinating, and give them complete freedom and support to produce new work and to present their practice in a solo exhibition,&rdquo; say Nico Feragnoli and Clara Pall&iacute; Monguilod, two of the space's directors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The project space prefers to encourage artists to realize new projects on location and 1646&rsquo;s Art Rotterdam presentation has grown from a similar origin. They&rsquo;ll be showing the videowork <em>Die Aap van Bloemfontein</em> by Jos de Gruyter &amp; Harald Thys, which was produced in collaboration with 1646 for the artists&rsquo; show there last September. &ldquo;At that time the work was still in production stage, though, so there have been some small changes made to the work.&rdquo; Besides the fact that Intersections allows a wide audience to see a &ldquo;very good work&rdquo; by De Gruyter and Thys, &ldquo;their generous collaboration helps stress the role independent spaces like 1646 play, in the art context, in the production of new experimental work.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205100154-BLOEMFONTEIN13.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Jos de Gruyter and Harald Thys,&nbsp;<em>Die Aap van Bloemfontein</em>, 2014, Video, color, sountrack, 23 min.&nbsp;Courtesy 1646, the artists and galleries, Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin, and&nbsp;Micheline Szwajcer, Brussels</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since the late 1980s, Belgian artists <a href="http://www.artslant.com/brx/articles/show/34207">Jos de Gruyter and Harald Thys</a> have been working together to produce photographs, drawings, and objects which often star as props or protagonists in their expanding series of filmic works. Their style is often quite ramshackle, amateurish and almost childish, full of humor, but at the same time quite grim. They often deal with inter-human tensions and psychological issues. <em>Die Aap van Bloemfontein</em> is &ldquo;a single channel video with a voiceover; those familiar with De Gruyter &amp; Thys' work will recognize many of the elements present in early works: still close-ups, a dilated, abstracted tempo through which an eerie tension ensues.&ldquo; On 1646&rsquo;s website <a href="http://1646.nl/news/art-rotterdam">the work is introduced</a> by an excerpt from a 1727 pedagogical treatise on the torment of human sin, which gives the first intimation that the work might be a bit on the dark side.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hotel Maria Kapel</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205100536-OVB201506-0020.JPG" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;Artun Alaska Arasli,&nbsp;<em>How to Disappear in America (Recollection)</em>, 2015. Photo: Olivier van Breugel.&nbsp;Courtesy of Hotel Maria Kapel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://hotelmariakapel.nl/wp/">Hotel Maria Kapel</a> is situated in the town of Hoorn, about a 30 minute train ride from Amsterdam. The setting is perfect for their residency program, but it can also be a bit isolated. It&rsquo;s hard to compete with Amsterdam&rsquo;s&mdash;or Rotterdam&rsquo;s&mdash; packed cultural scenes and lure visitors to Hoorn. That&rsquo;s a real shame though because HMK&rsquo;s programming in a 15th century chapel functioning as both a studio and exhibition space makes a visit worthwhile. The exposure they&rsquo;ll get at Intersections is a welcome opportunity to reach a new audience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Art Rotterdam presentation is a first glimpse of HMK&rsquo;s new artistic director Irene de Craen&rsquo;s programming. According to her, Intersections acknowledges the value of non-commercial spaces. &ldquo;It is precisely <em>because</em> we are not a gallery or a museum that we can do what we do. The curatorial concept behind Intersections underlines this, and I hope the final result of all the places together will do this too.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205100650-OVB201506-0005.JPG" alt="" width="325" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205100704-OVB201506-0029.JPG" alt="" width="325" /><em><br /> </em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;Artun Alaska Arasli,&nbsp;<em>How to Disappear in America (Recollection)</em>, 2015. Photos: Olivier van Breugel.&nbsp;Courtesy of Hotel Maria Kapel</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">HMK will present a new work by Artun Alaska Arasli, a Turkish born artist who graduated from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam in 2011. His installation for Intersections,</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">...links the idea of the hidden to the dialectics of the house as an (occasionally) unsafe place. The works combined in the presentation are indirectly connected to the public spectacle of Sharon Tate&rsquo;s murder in 1969, and through this event relate to the general concept of home invasion and random acts of violence. Furthermore, it refers to the newly published book <em>Recollection</em> by Debra Tate, Sharon Tate's sister, which is about things other than Tate's murder, and represents an effort to create a moment that vainly tries to efface a tragedy that is ineffaceable.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For de Craen, this sense of the home as an unsafe place is also a critical nod to the art fair setting. &ldquo;Art fairs are really very artificial, even unheimlich at times. So to address feelings of safety, of hiding or wanting to disappear in this context makes sense to me.&rdquo; HMK employees are even hidden inside of the installation themselves. &ldquo;It both critiques the whole fair business as well as make fun of us a bit. These fairs can be quite the carnival, so the subtle mocking element helps to keep us grounded.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>A Tale of a Tub</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150205100337-David_Helbich.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">David Helbich<em>, KEINE-MUSIK: Ohrst&uuml;cke / NO-MUSIC: earpieces,&nbsp;</em>Compositions for ears, 2010-ongoing.Image: conducted version at Kunsthalle for the Darmstadt Summer Course 2014 &copy;IMD, Daniel Pufe</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rotterdam&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.a-tub.org/" target="_blank">A Tale of a Tub</a> is, in fact, a Van Nellefabriek neighbor. The young organization opened in August last year and is situated in a former bathhouse, designed by a member of the Brinkman family, one of the Van Nellefabriek&rsquo;s architects&mdash;a connection they wish to evoke in their show at Art Rotterdam. A Tale of a Tub aims to present and advance contemporary fine art practices, emphasizing autonomy, dialogue, and exchange. &ldquo;Ideas, questions, discussion, and presentations are of equal importance.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">They also stress the importance of dialogue and their addition to Intersections, titled</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> Modern Elevations</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, should form an incentive for discussion. They&rsquo;re presenting two artists: Nicoline Timmer and David Helbich. Both work with choreography and sound composition in relation to ethics, space, and experience. Suzanne Wallinga, one of the founding curators notes: &ldquo;On the one hand, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Modern Elevations</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> literally investigates the spatial boundaries of the art fair, highlighting the architectural features whilst bringing forward the acoustic qualities of the Van Nelle Factory.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">German artist&nbsp;David Helbich&nbsp;composes, makes installations, organizes experimental city walks, and photographs absurd scenes in daily life, often inviting visitor participation. He presents a &ldquo;composition for ears,&rdquo; says Wallinga, &ldquo;which finds its form depending on the occasion. It consists of a set of instructions that invites the visitors to perform several actions at specific locations on the outside walls of the factory. Every day, Helbich gives a conducted tour as well, in which the audience becomes the orchestra.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nicoline Timmer has been working with the structure of the opera in order to create a world that is able to generate its own coherence. She has a thing for beginnings: &ldquo;the moment when movements are on the verge of becoming a dance, sentences are about to be sung, questions are asked without being solidified in philosophy. The moment when a language, a genre, a symbol emerges for the first time.&rdquo; At Intersections Timmer continues her opera series. According to Wallinga, &ldquo;the artist traced the original manuscript of Ludwig Wittgenstein&rsquo;s &lsquo;Lecture on Ethics&rsquo; (1929). His personal remarks served as material for a visual motif and formed the starting point for a constellation of drawings, tapestries, two &lsquo;polyphonic&rsquo; vases and a photo.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/248299-manus-groenen?tab=REVIEWS">Manus Groenen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Nicoline Timmer, <em>Making waves instead #3 (woven blanket)</em>, 2013. Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Courtesy of the artist and A Tale of a Tub)</span></p> Thu, 05 Feb 2015 13:04:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list If the films are the walls, what are the windows? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It&rsquo;s laid out like an obstacle course of sensory imagination&mdash;works mindfully scattered throughout the space, hung on walls, towering like disembodied limbs amidst the void, protruding from their designated places threatening to shape shift.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In conjunction with the German premiere of British filmmaker Emily Wardill&rsquo;s <em>When You Fall into a Trance</em> at carlier | gebauer, the artist has curated an adjacent group show in conversation with curator Jesi Khadivi, who joined carlier | gebauer late last year. <em>I hear your voice reflected in a glass and it sounds like it is inside of me </em>responds to and draws thematically from the film, incorporating works that gesture at the topic of proprioceptive disorder, the inability of bodily stimuli to register with the brain. Wardill&rsquo;s film is the exhibition&rsquo;s point of origin and, borrowing the very technique it so frequently employs, the exhibition acts somewhat as a distorted reflection or extension of it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204181905-EW_2013_When_you_fall_into_a_trance_STILL_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Emily Wardill,<em>&nbsp;When You Fall into a Trance</em>, 2013, video still, 72 min. &copy; Courtesy of the artist &amp; carlier | gebauer<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At 72 minutes, <em>When You Fall into a Trance </em>examines the correlation between body and mind in both concretized and visceral ways. At its surface, it&rsquo;s an examination of the complex relationship between neuroscientist Dominique and her patient Simon. Simon has been diagnosed with impaired proprioception, a condition that has crippled his neuro-motor ability to perceive the position of his own body. In practical terms, he lacks the ability to move the parts of him that he cannot see&mdash;if the lights were to go out, he would collapse. The feelings of uncertainty implicit in the condition are amplified across the film. Characters experience moments of clarity, only to be consumed by a fog once again.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although the artist has presented the film in a dimmed room with viewing chairs and a large projection screen&mdash;the typical atmosphere for a convincing theater experience&mdash;it is not all engrossing. Wardill has paid particular attention to the stagecraft of her film, pairing intimate moments with methods of acting that remind viewers of their active watching of the film and the construction of its narrative through interpretation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204181200-EW_2013_When_you_fall_into_a_trance_STILL_10.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Emily Wardill,<em>&nbsp;When You Fall into a Trance</em>, 2013, video still, 72 min. &copy; Courtesy of the artist &amp; carlier | gebauer</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Then there are the distorted visuals. At once a filmic reference for Simon&rsquo;s condition&mdash;or the alienating sensation produced as a result of it&mdash;the distorted biomorphic images lend the film a tinge of distrust. The film's warped images, necessitating a double-take, are key visuals echoed in two black and white photographs by Hungarian-born photographer Andr&eacute; Kert&eacute;sz, who is included in the group repertoire. The two images from his <em>Distortions series</em> (1933) depict female figures reflected in distorted mirrors&mdash;a significant detail that points directly back to the film and to Kert&eacute;sz as a historical influence on Wardill and her own use of undulating distortion mirrors in the production of her film. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The initial link from <em>When You Fall Into a Trance</em> to the greater exhibition, explains Kahdivi in an interview with ArtSlant, stems from a question Wardill herself had posed to the late Ian White in the title of an artist book they made together in 2010:&nbsp;<em>If the films are the walls, what are the windows?&nbsp;</em>While meditating on this thesis and reviewing works by carlier | gebauer&rsquo;s artists, the exhibition began to emerge piece by piece, &ldquo;taking on a life of its own, beyond framing the film,&rdquo; Khadivi explains.</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mood was an important element of the installation. We didn&rsquo;t want it to be too polite or beautiful, instead we hoped that it would read as slightly off-kilter. The placement of Tomasz Kowalski&rsquo;s sculpture with the disembodied prosthetic holding the cane and the never-ending scale in Peter Coffin&rsquo;s video&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Shepard Risset Glissando Shirt)</em>&nbsp;was intended to immediately make the viewer aware of their own body&mdash;in a way that is not necessarily comfortable&mdash;and to strike a kind of perceptual shift upon entering the threshold of the exhibition.&nbsp;</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204182025-Groupshow_5.jpg" alt="" width="325" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204182038-Groupshow_2_Schinwald_Hughes_Wardill.jpg" alt="" width="325" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>I hear your voice reflected in a glass and it sounds like it is inside of me</em>, 2015, exhibition view. @ Courtesy of the artists &amp; carlier | gebauer</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">With both the group exhibition and the full film there is a profound sense of investigation&mdash;not a call to learn, but a provocation to remember something so inherent in all of us.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This nagging questioning, a poking-prodding sensation, leads a viewer to drown in rhizomatic thinking where you find a connection and lose it again&mdash;a constant picking up and dropping that lends the project a strong sense of honest credibility. It&rsquo;s a feeling imbued by the investigation between both Wardill and Khadivi, that if audible would sound like &ldquo;trailing sentences, long pauses, ideas pilling atop one another,&rdquo; as Khadivi put it.</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One thing that came up a lot in my reading and my conversations with Emily regarding the exhibition is how neurological disturbances not only upset the balance of perception, but also shake the very foundations of one&rsquo;s identity. What then differentiates a man from a machine? Or a human from an object? In light of these questions, see Tomasz&rsquo;s sculpture as a sort of absurd conductor of a gang of misfit toys&mdash;animating biomorphic objects and romantic machines.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Possible mind-body relationships triangulate in the exhibition: what is a head without a body? A body without a head? These are simple, almost goofy questions that strike at the core of how Cartesian thought proposes that the essence of our identity lies in thought&mdash;thus privileging the mind over the body. Other thinkers, like Michel Serres, claim that the body has an intelligence proper to itself&mdash;its own way of knowing, storing memories, solving problems&mdash;and that the body will also &ldquo;know&rdquo; before the mind.&nbsp;</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204183345-Groupshow_4b.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>I hear your voice reflected in a glass and it sounds like it is inside of me</em>, 2015, exhibition view. @ Courtesy of the artists &amp; carlier | gebauer</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wardill&rsquo;s film may have been the exhibition&rsquo;s genesis, but upon completion of its tandem collection, the film&rsquo;s primacy is called into question. The two elements become symbiotic. To quote Khadivi once more, &ldquo;If we were to take one work out of the constellation, the entire installation would fall flat, I think.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s intentionally constructed to feel like a scenario on its last legs&mdash;but it&rsquo;s also meant to be funny.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/147418-nicole-rodr%C3%ADguez?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Nicole Rodriguez</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>I hear your voice reflected in a glass and it sounds like it is inside of me</em>, 2015, exhibition view. @ Courtesy of the artists &amp; carlier | gebauer)</span></p> Tue, 10 Feb 2015 09:56:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Ancient Monuments: The New Erogenous Zone <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At first I assumed it was a deer. But then the tinny ring of a mobile phone and a shiny pinstriped suit taught me otherwise. As I gaze around the grounds of the now inoperative Bara Gumbad mosque in central Delhi I&rsquo;m dazzled, not by the 14th&nbsp;century architecture, but by the scores of entwined couples, pushed up against trees, bent over benches, and nuzzled into doorways.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Later on in the day, at Safdarjung&rsquo;s Tomb&mdash;an exquisite walled mausoleum to the late Mughal statesman&mdash;I mistakenly pick out the sound of a hammer chipping away at 18th&nbsp;century stone. After turning the corner, I am stunned to realize that it is the sound of a pair of (clothed) buttocks gyrating against sandstone.</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206091836-item1-2.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Sunil Gupta,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;"><em>Untitled,</em>&nbsp;from <em>Tales of a City-Delhi</em>, 2004</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the west, we are often taught that India has an inhibited sexual culture. We hear about the censorship and forced exile of provocative artists such as M.F. Husain; we read fictional narratives built upon doomed inter-caste relationships; we recoil at the reports of violent gang rapes on busy streets which have earned Delhi the worst of monikers as "rape capital of the world."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Yet, to tour the famous architectural sites of Delhi is to witness some of the most overt displays of public coupling that are&nbsp;possible within penal code. To wander through each heritage building invokes a feeling of persistent intrusion; I cautiously peer around corners of tributes to great Muslim rulers like a mother teetering outside a teenager&rsquo;s bedroom.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Oh my god, I&rsquo;m so sorry," I bluster as I interrupt yet another amorous embrace and feebly jump down from the wrong end of the tomb like a useless skateboarder.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But I am defiantly ignored; the man&rsquo;s hand continues roaming far beneath the girl&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>dupatta,</em>&nbsp;his legs buckled. He has assumed invisibility and I&rsquo;m a fool not to play along. It is a curiously eerie feeling.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This guy looks like a slurpy snogger; his hips are tenaciously carving the girl into the crevice of the&nbsp;<em>iwan</em>&nbsp;like a goddess image, yet there is no issue over female consent here. In Lodhi Gardens, the site of many stately 15th&nbsp;century tombs, it is just as common to see women straddling their partners or clasping their necks against doorways.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150205153507-lodi-gardens-tomb-new-delhi.jpg" alt="" /><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Lodhi Garden, Muhammad Shah's Tomb via&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.bugbog.com/" target="_blank">www.bugbog.com</a></em></span></div> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It was not an un-lonely sensation to be the single boffin-tourist among such carnal recklessness. I felt square, I became slightly cross. Didn&rsquo;t I have the right to absorb some culture without feeling like a third-wheel? Wasn&rsquo;t there somewhere else for couples to go?&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;A large reason for this is simply because unmarried couples can&rsquo;t frolic in this way at home,&rdquo; a friend explains, humoring my prudishness. But there is something beyond convenience at play here. Men and women travel across the city to seek refuge in these heritage sites, which are often far more exposed than nearby cafes or bus stops. The migration of these couples speaks volumes about their sense of safety in the ancient monuments&mdash;a poignant idea given Delhi&rsquo;s recent bloody history. What&rsquo;s more, these great tombs continually remind us of death&rsquo;s certainty, of eventual physical decay. This, of course, is sexy and must be a persuasive tool if you want to get down. Carpe diem all, seize the day.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150205153606-pict23171.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Carvings at the temples of Khajuraho, via<em>&nbsp;<a href="http://humidfruit.files.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">humidfruit.files.wordpress.com</a></em></span></div> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></div> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Though many tombs are now jewel-less and pock-marked, stripped of their original finery: these couples are etching their own histories into the bare walls. The sight of their writhing bodies breathes fresh, nubile life into the buildings, giving a distinct depth to the way we experience the Islamic architecture in India&rsquo;s capital. As I explored, I was reminded of the tantric carvings on the Hindu temples at Khajuraho which caused tremors in the consciences of even the fruitiest of Raj-era colonists. It became clear to me that in India, sex and monuments are old friends, as familiar and easy as lovers.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sunil Gupta, arguably India&rsquo;s best-known photographer, has spent great chunks of his career documenting the relationship between Delhi&rsquo;s great ruins and sexual freedom. His first staged documentary series <a href="http://www.sunilgupta.net/Exiles/exilesfront.html" target="_blank"><em>Exiles</em></a> (1986) was a landmark visual representation of public gay life in the capital. In dialogue with the same timidity I felt as I trod the tombs, Gupta&rsquo;s images welcome us as voyeurs of tender, though fractured, homosexual encounters.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150206091758-thepartyb.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Sunil Gupta,&nbsp;<em>The Party,</em>&nbsp;from <em>Exiles</em>, 1986</span></div> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="gmail_default" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Many of the figures in Gupta&rsquo;s photographs are anonymous: one image shows two men lying on a grassy knoll near Delhi&rsquo;s Jamali-Kamali mosque and tomb complex, one&rsquo;s head half-buried in the other&rsquo;s chest, their faces invisible. The <a href="http://www.sunilgupta.net/Exiles/exiles6.html" target="_blank">next image</a> features Humayun&rsquo;s Tomb: one figure stands with his back to the lens, open-chested, his hands on his hips in a gesture of openness to the blurred figure who approaches. Both men are flanked by the glorious domed tomb above them; their relationship is straddled, perhaps even embraced, by the architecture of once-great dynasties.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Three months later I was no longer an exile in Delhi. I&rsquo;d grown used to diverting my glances as I jogged around Lodhi Gardens and one day decided to take a Hindi lesson with a friend in the afternoon shadow of Muhammad Shah&rsquo;s tomb. He listened patiently to me as I struggled with a new consonant before suddenly he grabbed my tongue to show me how to make the sound.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For a moment the fog of inhibition was lifted. A daring line of drool fell out of my mouth into the dusty earth, soaking a nearby line of marching ants. It was still daylight; crowds of visitors were everywhere.&nbsp;It was then, among the ancient buildings, that&nbsp;I learned how quickly taboos can slacken for us all.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Philly Malicka</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Sunil Gupta,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.sunilgupta.net/Exiles/exiles7.html" target="_blank"><em>India Gate</em>&nbsp;</a>from <em>Exile</em>, 1986)</span></p> Fri, 06 Feb 2015 11:00:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Can Selfies Be Feminist? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Selfie culture makes me a bit queasy: they've become an easy tool for anyone to use to get validation from an image-biased society. They exacerbate a myriad of social problems and can often come from a sad place, rather than one of empowerment, posing a real dilemma: should we exploit our looks to promote ourselves? As a consequence, selfies are surfacing in a new way in the work of young digital artists. Selfies are being wilfully dragged into feminist discourse.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A lot of artists are readily applying the term "feminist" to their work</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;it's one of the most over-used labels flying around at the moment.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;And because it's <em>so hot right now</em>, feminism is perhaps getting a bit stuck. As Petra Cortright incisively told <a href="http://www.sleek-mag.com/print-features/2015/02/petra-cortright-on-selfies-and-the-feminist-question/" target="_blank"><em>Sleek</em> magazine</a>&nbsp;in an interview published yesterday, "discussions about women&rsquo;s work always has to mention femininity." The problem is, attaching a feminist label to self-portraiture can mask a lack of concept. How can selfies really contribute to the progress of a harmonious relationship between men and women?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Back in the 60s in Paris, there were truly radical feminists, writers like H&eacute;l&egrave;ne Cixous and Annie Leclerc. They demanded we address "tampaxification" in mass media (the concealment of menstrual blood in tampon advertising) and there was talk of finding a completely new language of artistic expression; Cixous said that the pen was like a penis and therefore we needed to rethink the whole way we write if we really want to be liberated from male domination. If the pen is a penis extension, then the camera is... also a penis. There are unfortunately few apparatuses that really resemble boobs or vaginas.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nowadays, internet feminism or "digifeminism" is an important art agenda, since the internet is where misogyny can live most freely, and noxiously. Feminists have had some victories within mass media (the most recent success, the dismantling of Page 3 in the UK tabloid <em>The Sun</em>), but the internet is still a sea of sexism.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204102136-Betty_Hirst_by_Heide_Hatry.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Betty Hirst by Heide Hatry, 2005<br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Being the key medium of the internet, photographers are naturally on the frontlines in confronting some of the feminist stereotypes with their art. At this weekend's LA Art Book Fair, Dafy Hagai presented her curatorial project&nbsp;<em><a href="http://girlfriendszines.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Girlfriends</a>,</em>&nbsp;bringing together a collection of all-girl zines from the photography field. Hagai's most recent zine, <em>No Life,</em> explores the "feminine outlook on 3d, 2d and virtual realities," underlining the importance of the prescence of feminist voices in the infinity of the internet. Meta-selfies merge with manufactured visions of feminity. Next to Hagai are other artists such as Montreal-based Rebecca Storm, whose juxtapositions send-up the objectification and sexualization of all manner of things in today's twisted world.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204101749-tumblr_nbs4myDzfJ1tfozz1o1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dafy Hagai, from her zine "<a href="http://girlfriendszines.tumblr.com/tagged/nl"><em>No Life"</em></a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Selfies are problematic for feminism. There shouldn't be an inherent problem with the beautification of women, but what about the point at which it becomes harmful? Can we identify that moment, or is it different for everyone?&nbsp;And indeed, is that difference not at the very cornerstones of feminism itself? <a href="http://bodyanxiety.com/gallery/landing/" target="_blank"><em>Body Anxiety</em></a>, an innovative new online exhibition curated by Leah Schrager and Jennifer Chan, focuses on female artists who use their own image in their art. The resulting photography and video works are a surprising mix of self-deprecating satire, dynamic and diverse in approach&mdash;and unravel some of the issues related to selfie culture.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204101934-Screen-Shot-2015-01-07-at-3.45.28-PM.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Saoirse Wall, Video still, via Body Anxiety&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204101952-Screen-Shot-2015-01-17-at-2.08.43-PM.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Faith Holland, via Body Anxiety&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But aren't all these images just adding more fodder to the collective "wank bank"? And just as artist Faith Holland (Body Anxiety) uses porn out of its context in her art&mdash;these images can be mispropriated and absued as soon as they're released onto the net.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Caitlin Stasey, the Australian actress and founder of a new feminist initiative&nbsp;<a href="http://herself.com/" target="_blank">Herself</a>, told <a href="http://i-d.vice.com/en_gb/article/caitlin-stasey-is-reclaiming-the-female-body-by-publishing-her-own-naked-photos-on-the-internet?utm_source=idtwitter" target="_blank">i-D in an interview</a> this week that, on the contrary, producing these kind of images is a way of reclaiming the body: </span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Women are objectified regardless of their dress or actions, a woman only need be existing for a man to sexualize her, for the world to assume they know her intentions and desires. To state that appearing nude publicly feeds back into systemic oppression is not only incorrect but dangerous, it implies that women are responsible for the actions against them, that women must be mindful of how we are perceived for fear of inciting violence against us. This attitude is called rape culture and it's far more subtle and insidious than we realize.</span></p> </blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204104332-S.herself-MAG-4-1100x733.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Herself.com</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">While Stasey's point is valid, women do have a certain responsibility in how they choose to interact with the sexist systems that exist on the net. Not everyone's intentions are genuine, and a lot of women&mdash;consciously or not&mdash;are contributing to a system replete with sexism, one that affects our pysche and has multiple repercussions, especially on younger people who might not fully comprehend the context in which images are being made, and used.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Jennifer Chan told me:</span></p> <blockquote> <p class="p1" style="text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">"S</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">elf-sexualization in a way that appeases men is problematic in my world because it can make the world worse for other women because the internet allows these images to be aggregated and shared to sexist audiences. But beauty-shaming is also a shame... in women seeing other women as beauty enemies I think we forget that there are difficulties every kind of body type and race encounter in lived experiences by dint of being a woman or intersex/transgender. I think some women (and men) enjoy looking/performing feminine and hyperfeminine... let them do that!"</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> </blockquote> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">And so in the infinity of internet, the paradox lives on: while artistic platforms like Herself, <em>Girlfriends,</em> and <em>Body Anxiety</em>&nbsp;give a context to these emerging female artists, they are not exempt from the exact problems they're trying to untangle. Somewhere between an individual's free choice and mass-ingrained malevolent forces, t</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he anonymity of the web throws up new contradictions for us all to resolve.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p><br /><br /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <a href="http://www.rebecca-storm.com/">Rebecca Storm</a>, via <em>Girlfriends</em></span>)&nbsp;</p> Sun, 08 Feb 2015 07:03:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Spotlight on DordtYart, an Arts Organization Where Synergy Is the Gospel <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://dordtyart.nl/" target="_blank">DordtYart</a> is not part of Art Rotterdam&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/41980" target="_blank">Intersections</a> program&mdash;and with good reason. DordtYart could never be squeezed into the box labeled &ldquo;artists&rsquo; initiative or non-profit space.&rdquo; The organization from Dordrecht does stage exhibitions, which are often enriched with lectures and guided tours, but it does a lot more: it functions as an artists&rsquo; residency, a community workplace, a mirror for local history, an educational center, and a laboratory for crossbreeding science and art. DordtYart is the perfect amalgam of artistic, social, and economic ambitions that funding organizations dream of, and this week visitors to Art Rotterdam will have the opportunity to see some of what it does, as artists working with DordtYart present a series of installations on site at the Van Nellefabriek during the art fair.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204110329-Karen_Sargsyan_-_Temple_of_Science.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Karen Sargsyan,&nbsp;<em>Temple of Science</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">DordtYart is housed in the Biesboschhal, a former machine factory and shipyard dating back to the early twentieth century. After the termination of all industrial activities in 2000, the city of Dordrecht started converting the slice of land on which the buildings stand into a housing area. For a period of eight years, ending in 2020, the Biesboschhal was granted a cultural allocation. Renovation started four year ago with 2012 Architects transforming the interior using second-hand materials only. The walls came from De Kunsthal in Rotterdam, cupboards and doors are hand-me-downs from the Erasmus Medical Center, and the kitchen previously stood in restaurant Pasta Genova. This makes DordtYart not only a prime example of sustainable architecture and design but also of cultural recycling of real estate&mdash;a hot topic in this era of deindustrialization and massive vacancy in office buildings. Like <a href="http://www.trouwamsterdam.nl/en/" target="_blank">Club Trouw</a> in Amsterdam or <a href="http://www.schieblock.com/" target="_blank">Schieblock</a> in Rotterdam, DordtYart is temporary and that lends it the dynamic lightness of a pop-up initiative.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Despite this lightness, DordtYart has some heavyweight backers. It comes as no surprise that <a href="http://www.bouwfondscultuurfonds.nl/" target="_blank">Bouwfonds</a> is a partner in the project. Revitalization of old, written-off buildings through giving them a cultural function is right up the alley of this real estate giant&mdash;it even sponsored a recent issue of the <a href="http://www.boekman.nl/tijdschrift-boekman" target="_blank">Boekmancahier</a> exclusively dedicated to this subject. Bouwfonds fully financed the project Brug op de Stadswerven, which consists of a bridge and some pavilions in the DordtYart construction area, acting like pioneering posts.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204110619-St_phane_Cauchy_-_untitled.JPG" alt="" height="250" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204110659-St_phane_Cauchy_-_detail.JPG" alt="" height="250" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">St&eacute;phane Cauchy,&nbsp;<em>Untitled</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The <a href="http://www.mondriaanfonds.nl/en/" target="_blank">Mondriaan Fund</a> probably supports DordtYart for other reasons. Just recently the country&rsquo;s most important arts fund launched The Art of Impact, a program focusing on art&rsquo;s potential as a tool for social improvement. And DordtYart scores well in this respect too. The organization was set up as a cooperation between KunstZin, a local art fund, and DordtMij, an organization teaching educationally challenged teenagers practical skills. This type of crosspollination has won DordtYart not only the support of the Mondriaan Fund but also of Stichting Doen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nevertheless, the core of DordtYart is the art. And this is where the fourth partner enters the picture: the <a href="https://www.dordrechtsmuseum.nl/" target="_blank">Dordrechts Museum</a>. While this underappreciated but excellent regional museum mostly focuses on painting, DordtYart is dedicated to installations, sculpture, and other three-dimensional art forms. Artists of international repute are given commissions to make work related to the location.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204111006-Zoro_Feigl_Lightwaves.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Zoro Feigl,&nbsp;<em>Lightwaves</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This usually results in large monumental pieces, sometimes noisily echoing a century of industrial activity. The diversity is impressive, as can be seen in the Art Rotterdam presentation this week. Zoro Feigl, the up-and-coming man of kinetic art, has worked at DordtYart, but also light artist Giny Vos, paper-cutting king Karen Sargsyan, and Dr&eacute; Wapenaar, who is known for his innovative and sometimes insane tent designs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">DordtYart is the ultimate cultural-social-economic hybrid, connecting everything with everyone. Here synergy is not just a buzzword, it&rsquo;s the gospel. And you&rsquo;ll be hard pressed to find an art initiative this dedicated to making a difference.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204111051-Giny_Vos_-_Hope.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Giny Vos, <em>Hope</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Still, when flicking through reviews of DordtYart shows it is striking how often these are lukewarm. Critics applaud DordtYart&rsquo;s sympathetic set-up and innovative slant but hardly ever appreciate it with more than three out of five stars. It probably has to do with the wide range of artists DordtYart&rsquo;s residency attracts and the fact that their group shows have little coherence beyond the communal reflection on the location. But maybe critics have not yet developed sufficient tools of their own to fully analyze and judge the wondrous combination of functions that make up DordtYart as a whole. Fortunately for both parties, there&rsquo;s another five years to work on that.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Edwin van der Heide,&nbsp;<em>Fog Sound Environment II in Riga</em>. All images: Courtesy of DordtYart)</span><br /></span></p> Thu, 05 Feb 2015 10:36:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Before the Zeitgeist There Was... <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The other night I had some friends over and we were playing the game "Pick a Tune." (For anyone unfamiliar with the rules of "Pick a Tune" you have to pick a tune based on a theme you&rsquo;re given, so kind of like rocket science, but with music) I was given the clue "Musical Firsts."&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And I had nothing.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Then a flash of inspiration: I remembered a while ago, while washing up, I had realized The Beatles had invented the remix (you know, besides all those variations composers were banging out on their pianos back in the 14th century). I had realized this incredible thing, and then internalized it (forgotten about it) for over a year.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Now, having finally released this information and witnessing its effect on its audience&ndash;one of pleasure admiration and gratitude&ndash;IT WAS A BIG MOMENT&ndash;it got me thinking, what other cultural firsts have passed by without being picked up?&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Beatles Remix&ndash;<em>Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band</em></span></strong></p> <p class="ListParagraph" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This only needs a listen by way of explanation:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Xj2bmQ4P4cM" frameborder="0" width="420" height="315"></iframe></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Evolution and Hieronymus Bosch</strong>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204101848-1280px-The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_by_Bosch_High_Resolution_2.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Hieronymous Bosch,&nbsp;<em>The Garden of earthly delights</em>, 1480&ndash;1505</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Did Hieronymus Bosch understand evolution 500 years before Darwin? Well according to this picture he certainly imagined the evolution scene in <em>Fantasia</em>&nbsp;well before Disney.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And as far as evolution is concerned, he is certainly on the right lines. In fact, for a man in 15th&nbsp;century he is <em>remarkably</em> on the right lines.*</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I also believe Bosch to have been the first surrealist&mdash;but that&rsquo;s a whole other article.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-size: small;">* Please note I am aware the Blue Cone-head Puffball Mouse is not necessary biologically correct</span>.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Breaking Bad</em>&mdash;the First Shakespearian tragedy since, Shakespeare</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204093715-Breaking-Bad-Pilot-1024x576.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;<em>Breaking Bad</em> Pilot</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>Like Shakespeare, BB tells a truth, like Shakespeare it highlights what is wrong with society; like Shakespeare it knows never to be too dark for too long with out a glimmer of humor; like a every great Shakepsearian tragedy (almost) everyone has died by the end. And, reportedly like Shakespeare, it was a combined human effort of dozens of writers.&nbsp;</span><span>The work is more than genius, it is true; it is an honest portrayal of human emotions and egos, whether right, wrong, or unflattering, it is true, and maybe that is what genius is: finding truth.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cubism and Braque</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150204094059-Georges_Braque__1908__Maisons_et_arbre__oil_on_canvas__40.5_x_32.5_cm__Lille_M_tropole_Museum_of_Modern__Contemporary_and_Outsider_Art.jpg" alt="" /><span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Georges Braque,&nbsp;<em>Maisons et Arbre, </em>1908. Courtesy Lille Métropole Museum of Modern, Contemporary and Outsider Art&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cubism: when we think of Cubism we all think of Picasso, but there was a man just before him:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Georges Braque. He's the man who was a whisker in front of Picasso. In 1908 his oil painting&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Houses L&rsquo;Estaque</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;was the first cubist landscape (Picasso may have just nudged in front but in portraiture, a year earlier). But it was this painting in 1908 that prompted Louis Vauxcelles to ridicule it as being &ldquo;composed of cubes&rdquo;&mdash;which led to the name of the movement.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Queen of selfies before us all, but this one&rsquo;s got soul</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150204103219-cindy_sherman.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">Cindy Sherman, <em>Untitled Film Still #3</em>, 1977</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cindy Sherman has been taking self portraits for the last 40 years. Difference being, she was using her "selfies" to say something about<em> everyone</em>, while we use them to say something about ourselves&mdash;which is probably why we&rsquo;re not really getting anywhere at the moment. Bring more Shermans!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; </span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Before long, ideas and inspiration become a movement, then movements become the zeitgeist and then it's sucked up by the masses and it becomes a fashion and its essence is squeezed, its origin forgotten.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When you see something you think you&rsquo;ve never seen before, try and remember that moment. Maybe you&rsquo;ll be one of few appreciating the beginning of a movement&mdash;before the person who&rsquo;s done it even knows what it is.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Jade Angeles Fitton</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <em>Breaking Bad</em>, Pilot Episode )</span></p> Wed, 04 Feb 2015 10:36:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Transmediale Festival's 2015 Exhibitions Bring Artist Labor and Bodies into Focus <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;There is a lot of freedom to being a freelancer,&rdquo; once said journalist Don Gibb. &ldquo;You get to work any 13 hours of the day you like.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The same can be said for any self-employed entrepreneur&mdash;including artists. Much is to be learned from this year&rsquo;s &ldquo;Capture All" edition of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.transmediale.de/" target="_blank">Transmediale</a>, the annual digital art festival famous for its screenings, performances, exhibitions, and conference that hash out media art every year in Berlin. This year the festival's main exhibitions, held over the past four days in the Haus der Kulturen der Welt,&nbsp;included artists whose work deals with alter egos and privacy, but also offered a smart take on the endless stream of internet-based work culture, a subject close to this author's own heart.<a href="plug"><br /></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150202115528-15774223134_7092f8158f_k.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Heather Dewey-Hagborg,&nbsp;Invisible, 2014.</span></span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;Courtesy of Transmediale Festival exhibition CAPTURE ALL. Photo&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&copy; Paco Neumann</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Heather Dewey-Hagborg presented one of the smartest pieces in the show with <em>Invisible</em>&nbsp;(2014). Fashioned as an infomercial, she created a kit for protection against biological privacy. &ldquo;The Erase Spray&rdquo; allows one to remove their DNA from a wine glass, while &ldquo;The Replace&rdquo; adds DNA noise. At Transmediale, she revealed the recipe and instructions for her piece, which is open source and is launching a <a href="biononymous.me" target="_blank">new website</a> for community research into bio privacy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150202115834-16215307759_e4375b83e6_z.jpg" alt="" height="350" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150202115933-16210461189_a0d54f8486_z.jpg" alt="" height="350" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 8px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(left) Zach Blas,&nbsp;<em>Face Cages</em>, 2013&ndash;2015. Photo: &copy; Julien Paul.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 8px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(right) LaTurbo Avedon<em>, Commons</em>, 2015.&nbsp;Photo&nbsp;&copy; Paco Neumann. Both:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Courtesy of Transmediale Festival exhibition CAPTURE ALL</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 8px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 8px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Two visually stunning pieces included&nbsp;<em>Face Cages</em>&nbsp;by Zach Blas (2013&ndash;2015), which takes medieval torture devices and fashions them as metal masks, and the avatar-persona LaTurbo Avedon&rsquo;s video <em>Commons</em>&nbsp;(2015), which is a curated collection of video clips from the artist's friends and followers.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jennifer Lyn Morone&rsquo;s <em><a href="http://jenniferlynmorone.com/" target="_blank">Jennifer Lyn Morone Inc</a></em>&nbsp;(2014) transforms the artist into an imperfect corporation, spouting out motivational videos and business-speak. If she were actually selling a product in the videos, including clear links for downloading and fee information, she might well be successful with such a branding mechanism.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150202121137-16210448239_1205f4c85d_k.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Time and Motion: Redefining Working Life</em>, Installation view, 2015.&nbsp;Courtesy of Transmediale Festival. Photo&nbsp;&copy; Paco Neumann</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Speaking of selling, HKW's lower level featured a <a href="http://www.transmediale.de/content/time-and-motion-redefining-working-life-exhibition" target="_blank">guest Transmediale exhibition</a> entitled <em>Time and Motion: Redefining Working Life</em>, which really hit a nerve. It looked into labor in the digital era, though to me, it showed how technology can make people broke. With home offices, we spend so much time online, but how much of that time is actually productive or profitable? A few examples spell it out, starting with the pioneering piece by Taiwanese artist Teching Hsieh,&nbsp;<em>One Year Performances 1978-1986</em>, including the durational <em>Time Clock Piece</em>&nbsp;daily selfie.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150202125217-16371544272_64b811d714_z.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Tehching Hsieh, <em>One Year Performance 1980-1981, Punching the Time Clock</em>. Photo: Michael Shen. &copy; Tehching Hsieh. Courtesy the artist and Sean Kelly Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oliver Walker showed&nbsp;<em>One Euro</em>&nbsp;(2014), a multi-channel video that documents how long it takes several people in places all over the world to make one euro. Some videos are one second; others go on for an hour. It puts the world economy into perspective, including the wage of the artist&mdash;how much did he receive to exhibit this video?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Our lives are no longer the standard eight hours of work, eight hours of rest, and eight hours of play, as Sam Meech points out in <em><a href="http://punchcardeconomy.co.uk/" target="_blank">Punchcard Economy</a>&nbsp;</em>(shown at top). He used data collected from people&rsquo;s working hours in the digital and creative industries to create a knitted banner with a design made from digital glitches fused with old school punchcard systems.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150202122415-16394931621_bcf59c6024_k.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Ellie Harrison,&nbsp;<em>Timelines</em>, 2006,&nbsp;at&nbsp;<em>Time and Motion: Redefining Working Life</em>.&nbsp;Courtesy of Transmediale Festival. Photo&nbsp;&copy; Paco Neumann</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The wizard-behind-the-curtain piece was <em>Timelines</em>&nbsp;(2006) by Glasgow-based artist Ellie Harrison, who color-codes her productivity, showing how much time she spends on pitching projects and writing proposals versus actually making art. This is a stark contrast to the romantic image of the artist we hold so high, but what can be done? This show is the first step in recognizing one of the art world&rsquo;s biggest problems: the financial independence of artists. The answer lies in increasing our financial education, spending time learning more about personal finance. But also, to speak up as these artists have, and continue to do something about it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nadja Sayej from&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://artstarsbooks.bigcartel.com/" target="_blank">ArtStars* Books</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;writes about the business side of Art and how Artists can&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://artstarsbooks.bigcartel.com/product/the-artstars-guide-to-getting-your-shit-together" target="_blank">get their shit together</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Sam Meech,&nbsp;<em>Punchcard Economy</em>, at&nbsp;<em>Time and Motion: Redefining Working Life</em>.&nbsp;Courtesy of Transmediale Festival. Photo&nbsp;&copy; Paco Neumann)</span></p> Tue, 03 Feb 2015 17:39:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list 5 Women Tattoo Artists Who Are Definitely Not a Result of Rihanna <p class="p1" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">We wanted to write about some of the tattoo artists we like who also happen to be vaginally endowed. Why? Just for aesthetic inspiration on a default Monday. And also because it was bugging us that the rise in recent years of female tattoo artists has been put down to <em>Miami Ink</em> or Rihanna. Here is a non-exhaustive list of the people whose art has caught our eye lately as we've been traveling in the real and virtual worlds...</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Slower Black</span></strong></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201141505-tumblr_nhidl9kFXJ1s4d5yqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p class="p1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201141530-tumblr_nh6jk8AGfw1qb8ybao1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201141730-tumblr_mr334mDSve1s4d5yqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">All images, Slower Black via Slower Black Tumblr&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">It's hard to put a finger on what it is about Slower Black's work: it's somewhere in that sweet spot between bare minimalism and detail, not indie melancholy or twee fun, but classic and fresh at the same time. Originating from Alberta, Canada, but based out of nowhere and everywhere, the "stick and poke" artist uses traditional techniques to apply her designs; no electricity, just pressure to break the skin&mdash;which also adds something hardcore. For good art and some sharp quips in response to some of those embarrassing questions people ask on the internet, check her great&nbsp;<a href="http://slowerblack.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">tumblr</a>.&nbsp;Style.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">Lesley Chan</span></strong></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201214012-flashrat" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201210618-175525-30b60de61e3b47e0b284602f39a3b888.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201210644-175525-c488f184fd6140a3b14dcdb68b40d593.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Top Image: Rat Flash by Lesley Chan, Bottom images: Silk Scarves, Lore of Shangri La, All Courtesy Lesley Chan</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://lesleychantattoo.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Lesley Chan</a> is somewhat of a London tat legend, and is owner of the Shangri La in East London. Her studio still keeps the intimidating fuck you vibe a real tat place should have&mdash;especially hard to get in Dalston&mdash;courtesy the in-house artists&nbsp;Liam, Caleb, Ryan, and Rafael. Lesley learned her trade over two decades in London, and she's still tattooing, but she's also been putting her designs on silk for&nbsp;<a href="http://loreofshangrila.tictail.com/" target="_blank">Lore of Shangri-La</a>&nbsp;(a collaboration with Ann O'Toole). Gangster.<br /></span></p> <p class="p2"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">Whang Od</span></strong></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201152432-_MG_8651.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201152406-_MG_8633.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201152451-_MG_8724.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">All images, Melissa Peritore</span></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Holy fuck I wish this woman was my third Grandma. 95-year-old Whang Od is the last surviving tattoo artist&nbsp;of the Kalinga tribe, in Buscalan village, the Philippines. Since she was part of a <em>National Geographic</em> report, a lot of people have made the long journey from Manila to travel to her remote mountain village&mdash;where customers often stay at her home&mdash;where she uses traditional methods (a thorn as a needle, joined to a bamboo stick) to put her art into their skin. Photographer Melissa Peritore was one such customer and described it as a once-in-a-lifetime experience. True icon.</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Yuta Itskevich</span></strong></p> <p class="p1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201142017-1800402_545684322234105_4499802310323903738_n.jpg" alt="" /><img style="text-align: center; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201142046-10897826_574154866053717_7530293273532161982_n.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150201142549-1922020_428797700589435_1754454765_n.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">All images via&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Yuta-art-Tattoo-Cats/261893087279898" target="_blank">Yuta Art &amp; Tattoos</a></span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Yuta began practicing her chosen trade tattooing at Jerusalem's <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bizzart-studios/218618381485119?pnref=lhc" target="_blank">Bizzart</a>. Last year she opened up her own studio&nbsp;in <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Yuta-art-Tattoo-Cats/261893087279898">Haifa</a>. Old botanical illustrations are one of the inspirations for her lines, which are meticulously fine and immaculate. She's also friendly, which is reassuring when someone's making you bleed. We also appreciate her working mantra: "surround yourself with good people and cats."</span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center;">Nicole Lourinho</span></strong></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150130104637-5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150130104655-3.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150130104715-Nicole.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">All images courtesy Nicole Lourinho</span></span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">It's really cool to see people working hard at what they love to do and getting somewhere. 25-year-old Nicole started out as a very young apprentice at Lisbon's most respected studio, the </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;" href="http://queentattoos.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Queen of Hearts</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">,&nbsp;where she is now a tattooist with a growing following worldwide. She's got her own take on the American traditional style that tat superstars like Angelique Houtkamp have popularized. Probably because she also looks around a lot "to my co-workers and the tattooers whose work I admire... the vintage and ethnical universe, books, postcards or different kind of objects, artistic, or not." Follow her </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;" href="http://instagram.com/nicolelourinho" target="_blank">Insta</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;for new stuff and appointments. Young blood.</span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> Mon, 02 Feb 2015 10:36:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Exposing Visual Rhymes: An Interview with Mario Ybarra Jr. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><em><strong>This interview was <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/450" target="_blank">originally published</a> way back on ArtSlant Chicago, in May, 2008, on the occasion of&nbsp; Mario Ybarra Jr.'s exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The LA-based artist is known for his installations drawing from pop and street culture, including a recent solo show examining the mythos of Scarface at LA's Honor Fraser Gallery. Right now his work can be found <a href="http://nomadicdivision.org/exhibition/mario-ybarra-jr/" target="_blank">on a billboard in Mobile, AL</a>, part of Los Angeles Nomadic Division's Manifest Destiny Project.</strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"> Mario Ybarra, Jr. is a LA-based visual and performance artist who has created room-sized installations all over the world and most recently right here in Chicago for the Art Institute of Chicago. This year Ybarra was also selected to participate in the Whitney Biennial. Beneath Ybarra's friendly demeanor lies a keen observer who is quick to expose visual rhymes in seemingly unrelated sources and to expand and build upon those connections until a cohesion is reached, or as he might say, a story. Ybarra graciously met with ArtSlant's Abraham Ritchie while putting the finishing touches on his installation at the Art Institute. Ever the raconteur, Ybarra talked about his native LA, baseball and King Arthur. Below is an excerpt of our conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px auto; vertical-align: middle; display: block;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0018.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Abraham Richie: I think a lot of Chicagoans, and everyone, might want to know what the connection is between Southern Los Angeles, Catalina Island and Wrigley Field? It&rsquo;s kind of funny to think that Wrigley Field had a &ldquo;secret brother&rdquo; or something like that on the West Coast, because I am not sure that many people remember or know about this other Wrigley Field.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>Mario Ybarra, Jr.:</strong> Well that&rsquo;s where this whole project started for me. About a year ago Lisa Dorin, the Assistant Curator in the Contemporary Art Department, asked me if I wanted to come up with a proposal to do a Focus project here at the Art Institute of Chicago, and I said I would think about it a little bit. The way that I try to work is that I try to make some kind of relationship between a personal experience, or my personal understanding or knowledge and the place that I show. I don&rsquo;t like the idea of coming in and claiming an expertise on a place that I know nothing about. I&rsquo;ve found that doing something that starts in the realm of the personal and then taking it out to another place and trying to make relationships between those two places is the most successful tactic for me. . . I try to make bridges, so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a kid we would take trips out to Catalina Island, which is part of the Channel Islands, about 26 miles off the coast of Los Angeles. I remember part of the tour was the local history. They&rsquo;d always tell us that William Wrigley, Jr. owned Catalina Island and he had famous movie stars of the time going out there, like Clark Gable. His Chicago Cubs would go out and have their spring training there. The main town there is called Avalon and it gets its name from [Wrigley&rsquo;s] niece, who told [Wrigley] to name it that after the Avalon of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and those stories. So it has this mythological side of it too. It has real histories, the local histories, of it being owned by Wrigley, and it has this mythological history through the King Arthur association. My studio back in LA is on Avalon Boulevard and they named [the street] that because that&rsquo;s where the boats used to take people out to Avalon Harbor on the island. I started doing research about that, I&rsquo;m like a de facto historian, and I found that Wrigley, along with owning the island, owned this other Wrigley Field that was in South Central Los Angeles on Avalon and 66th street. So we had the Avalon Harbor on Catalina Island, my studio on Avalon, this field that Wrigley owned was also on Avalon, I just kept following the line. I thought I could take this story from Avalon, to Avalon Boulevard, to my studio, to Avalon were the stadium was, to all the way down Highway 66 to Chicago and the Art Institute.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I&rsquo;m figuring out ways to make these relationships between historical figures like William Wrigley, who was important to historical cities like Los Angeles and Chicago, and bring these stories together somehow, make bridges between the stories. Between what I know and my experiences and the places that I go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Sports are the site of an obvious physical conflict and throughout the exhibit are interesting juxtapositions: the Mexican flag and the U.S. flag, the sword and the baseball bat, the fist of the Revolution and an image of a capitalist&rsquo;s private island. The history of the island reflects conflict as well, in the seventies it was occupied by the Brown Berets. How are sports, especially baseball, viewed both literally and metaphorically for this project, and the issues it raises?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Well I have always thought of the history of baseball as particularly related to the United States. It&rsquo;s billed as &ldquo;the American Game;&rdquo; it&rsquo;s not really played around the world at all other than some Latin American countries, like the Dominican Republic where all these new players are coming from and where young people are specifically groomed to be ball players. But in relation to the United States, and this comes from the different things that I have watched or read, the developments of social movements in the United States almost always came ten years later than in the ball game itself. Baseball has been very slow to change, and it hasn&rsquo;t changed really over the few centuries its been played here. But it still has these kind of leading edges. Let&rsquo;s take for example the story of integration and civil rights. Jackie Robinson starts playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950's and certain places, like schools, weren&rsquo;t integrated until the early sixties or late sixties. Baseball reflects a little bit in advance the kind of social movements that will happen in the United States.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another thing that I think is very interesting in terms of conflict and it being a spectator sport, even though there are rival teams and most big cities have their own team, [there is a sense of unity]. Before professional baseball, each little town would have a team, even though there was a sense of rivalry or competition, the people were brought together as spectators to cheer on their team. So even though there was a site of conflict, it wasn&rsquo;t like it was Rome and gladiators were getting fed to lions [laughter]. There is a sense of sportsmanship [. . .]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Related to issues of capitalism and revolution, or acts of civil disobedience, there is a sense of teams. I play off that with the posters, we have here a baseball with two bats crossed, but instead of a regular team you have the Brown Beret guys who tried to occupy the island in 1972 so they&rsquo;re like &ldquo;the team.&rdquo; The idea of &ldquo;the team&rdquo; is important too and the metaphor of a team. The idea that everyone has their positions but also act as a unit is very important and is a metaphor for myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="/userimages/3151/PICT0019.JPG" alt="" width="338" height="443" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: The idea of teams is also apparent in this wall of flags you have installed. What are the flags we have here?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> This is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag. The flags are also stadium-esque, they always have them. The other thing, again about making relationships, is this is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag, which has an eagle perched on a rock holding a shield and in his mouth is a banner. I thought that is very interesting, because over here is the Mexican flag, and again we have the eagle, this time perched on the cactus, and the snake in his mouth pretty much mimics the banner in the Illinois flag. Those kinds of aesthetic relationships and symbolic choices are very interesting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px; vertical-align: middle;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0015.JPG" alt="" width="430" height="328" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Even looking at the Illinois flag, that&rsquo;s more of an Aztec style eagle than a typical American-style eagle.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Yeah. Those are the kinds of things I noticed in my visits to Chicago to prepare for this show, last year and earlier this year. I started seeing these kinds of relationships, like the Illinois flag&rsquo;s similarity to the flag of Mexico.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This row of flags will start off with the U.S. flag, the state of Illinois flag, Chicago flag, Los Angeles flag, state of California flag, and the Mexican flag. We have these different relationships between these two places starting with the cities and then going to the states. We have the state of Mexico flag, even though California is not part of Mexico, it used to be part of Mexico, but it&rsquo;s related to the histories that we have here. Catalina Island was occupied by the Brown Berets because in the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which separated the Southwest from Mexico after the Mexican-American War, the island wasn&rsquo;t specifically mentioned. This is why the Brown Berets tried to occupy it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There are interrelationships between the two places [Chicago and LA]. I thought that was another kind of metaphor for the show, in terms of Wrigley being this character and starting with him, saying no man is an island, or no city, or no country or land is an island. They&rsquo;re all in relationship, in context, to their neighbors. Imagine if we thought that we could do everything, under our own power, we&rsquo;d get ourselves in trouble. We can talk about it in relationship to land, in relationship to people. Or no island is a man, we could even switch it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I wanted to draw these kinds of relationships together, one between Los Angeles and Chicago, two between Mexico and the States, three between baseball and mythology. Different symbolic orders, things like ships or bubble gum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Mario Ybarra, Jr., Jenny Gheith and Lisa Dorin for their assistance in making this interview possible. Additional thanks to the Anna Helwing Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">-<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16747-abraham-ritchie?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #000000;"> Abraham Ritchie</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Top image: <strong>Mario Ybarra Jr</strong>, Manifest Destiny Project billboard, 2014; Courtesy of LAND. All other images are installation views of <em>Take Me Out. . . No Man Is an Island</em>, 2008; Courtesy of the Artist)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:52:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my &ldquo;tag&rdquo;: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my mark in muscle memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140558-me_tagging.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Yours truly, tagging the graffiti wall, <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>; Photo: Ben Harvey.</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> <br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I was in Eindhoven attending the Free Art and Technology (F.A.T.) Lab&rsquo;s exhibition <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>&nbsp;at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/" target="_blank">MU</a>, which ended in January. The show, which also took place in April last year at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/335-eyebeam?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a> in New York, was a sort of five-year anniversary round up of the Internet collective&rsquo;s practice. (F.A.T. Lab has now entered its seventh year, but the originally scheduled retrospective was put on hiatus in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.) But back to the incident at hand. Why, at an exhibition dedicated to a network ostensibly operating online, was I contributing my meager tag to a sanctioned graffiti wall?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140845-installation_view1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The connection isn&rsquo;t so far fetched. Some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s twenty-five <a href="http://fffff.at/people/" target="_blank">members</a>&mdash;an international network of artists, engineers, scientists, lawyers, and musicians&mdash;are themselves graffiti artists. Their core values, which include &ldquo;spreading open source and free ideals into popular culture&rdquo; through DIY entrepreneurship, open source, and activism, have more than a few intersections with street art. On the one hand, art on the Internet can be viewed through a street lens: it can bypass normal distribution channels, appealing directly to viewers. Turning the comparison on its head, street art can be seen as a form of &ldquo;hack&rdquo;&mdash;an unendorsed appropriation of space, medium, or idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302135918-ideas_worth_spreading.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Evan Roth</strong><em>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank">Ideas Worth Spreading</a> (TED Talks)</em></em>, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In his recent book, <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/" target="_blank"><em>Viral Art</em></a>, <a href="http://blog.vandalog.com/" target="_blank">Vandalog</a> blogger RJ Rushmore looks at how the future of street art, with its focus on &ldquo;unmediated distribution,&rdquo; might find a natural home in the digital domain. He uses the term &ldquo;Viral Art&rdquo; to describe both shareable and invasive online practices that have an affinity, if not a direct evolutionary line, to street art (n.b. &ldquo;Viral&rdquo; here implies a level of approachability that excludes some older forms of Internet Art. The pioneering duo JODI, for example, have a great exhibition at <a href="http://www.showroommama.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Showroom MAMA</a> in Rotterdam right now that isn&rsquo;t particularly accessible or viral). F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">projects</a> don&rsquo;t always fall within the categories Rushmore outlines either&mdash;viewers may seek out content rather than encounter it serendipitously&mdash;yet they do open onto notions of self-dissemination, egalitarianism, activism, and anonymity. In fact, there are examples at MU of some of the <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/google-bombs/" target="_blank">very</a> <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/katsu-getting-up-in-digital-space/" target="_blank">works</a> discussed in Rushmore&rsquo;s text&mdash;namely, <a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank"><em>Ideas Worth Spreading</em></a>, a mock-up TED Talk stage where visitors can record images of their own &ldquo;talk&rdquo; to share online, and <em>40,000 GML Tags</em>, a massive screen showcasing graffiti gestures in <a href="http://fffff.at/tag/gml/" target="_blank">GML</a>, or Graffiti Markup Language, &ldquo;a file format designed to be a universal structure for storing digitized graffiti motion data.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140719-kopyfamo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Geraldine Juarez, <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://fffff.at/kopyfamo-free-copyright/" target="_blank">Kopyfamo'</a>, watermark on mirror, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Some F.A.T. Lab projects exist in the real world, others are strictly manifest online, and many straddle the two&mdash;that is, projects shaped in the real world and shared online. The MU exhibition, curated by <a href="http://www.lindsayhoward.net/" target="_blank">Lindsay Howard</a>, highlighted them all, offering documentation, online viewing stations, and even physical objects and artworks. Where <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> differed from the typical exhibition was that most works were not autonomous objects, but rather reproducible examples of a wider practice. Motivated viewers could (and can) recreate many of these works on the web or at home*, and the materials for some projects, like an <a href="http://fffff.at/obama-google-glass-prism-mask/" target="_blank">Obama PRISM mask</a>, were even available at the exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140049-free_universal_construction_kit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view with&nbsp;<a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank"><em>Free Universal Construction Kit</em></a>, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Good fun is always on the menu: in <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> there was a sub-genre of works touting the douchiness of Google Glass and its adopters, and a presentation of Greg Leuch&rsquo;s viral Add-on <a href="http://fffff.at/shaved-bieber/" target="_blank"><em>Shaved Bieber</em></a>, which censors all mentions of Justin Bieber online (earning Leuch more than a little hate mail from teenage fans). But some of the best and most shareable projects are greater than their capacity for the lulz. The <a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank">Free Universal Construction Kit</a> is a set of adapters that makes ten brands of children&rsquo;s construction sets, like Lego and K&rsquo;Nex, interoperable. It&rsquo;s eminently cool/novel/clever, but it also visualizes the ways in which childhood playthings ostensibly meant to spark creativity are limited by proprietary measures. The F.U.C.K. undermines these protective implements, removing barriers to cross-trademark creativity. The exhibition featured a complete set of adapters, a construction/play station, and a 3D printer that staff members kindly set to printing new pieces whenever visitors turned up. (3D models of the adapters in .STL format are available online for <a href="http://www.thingiverse.com/uck/designs" target="_blank">free download</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140151-facebook_id_card.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/tag/fb-bureau/" target="_blank">Facebook Identity Card</a></em>, video presentation of ARTE Creative, <em><a href="http://fbbureau.com/" target="_blank">Social ID Bureau</a></em>, 2012,&nbsp;portrait of Mark Zuckerberg,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s perspective seems carefully poised between an irreverent techno-optimism (&ldquo;look at these cool things we can do!&rdquo;) and deep skepticism at the ways in which technologies can be regulated, marketed, and used for power and control. Given these positions, in which use of certain technologies seems self-evident, it&rsquo;s easy to forget that not everyone has access to the distributional paradigm shift that is the digital domain. Rushmore&rsquo;s account also overstates viral art&rsquo;s present accessibility: an encounter with this type of work is more likely to be spread within specific enclaves of Internet activity, with limiting factors being not geography, but usage. The case for &ldquo;unmediated&rdquo; distribution is further undermined by the cryptic algorithms used by Facebook and Google for post placement and search results&mdash;the very systems F.A.T. Lab exploits when images of their fake TED Talks turn up in search results. In a destabilizing twist, F.A.T. Lab often coopts the very technologies and systems it protests (or defends).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140313-skatekeyboard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/skatekeyboard/" target="_blank">Skatekeyboard</a></em>, keyboard attached to skateboard deck,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In a way, that&rsquo;s why it was such a treat to see some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s works in physical form, Away From Keyboard as it were. <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> did a great job of making works and ideas accessible to people who might not be tech-savvy or know what terms like &ldquo;net neutrality&rdquo; and &ldquo;Open Web&rdquo; mean. Or those who aren&rsquo;t necessarily ready to accept or understand this sort of practice as &ldquo;art.&rdquo; The exhibition was forward looking, but also rooted in the past and present&mdash;a thought-provoking bridge between time, technologies, and disciplines. Be it in a subway tunnel or on a homepage, a mark on the wall is a sign of presence; it can be a declaration of ego, of resistance. Or like my clumsy signature, it can be an affirmation, a &ldquo;Like&rdquo; or an &ldquo;upvote&rdquo;: I was here, with so many others, and I want to be counted.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140303002936-compubody_interface.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Becky Stern</strong>,&nbsp;<em><em><a href="http://fffff.at/knitted-compubody-interface/" target="_blank">Knitted Compubody Interface</a>&nbsp;</em>(<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop-Compubody-Sock/" target="_blank">knit one</a> yourself!), at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; </em>&copy; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">*The MU exhibition ended on January 26th, but interested readers can see the projects <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">online</a> or in the new <a href="http://fffff.at/the-fat-manual/" target="_blank"><em>F.A.T. Manual</em></a> (available for purchase or <a href="http://www.lulu.com/shop/domenico-quaranta-and-geraldine-ju%C3%A1rez/the-fat-manual/ebook/product-21251172.html" target="_blank">free download</a>), released on the occasion of the exhibition and the collective&rsquo;s five-year anniversary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302141000-installation_view3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">Image on top: <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.<span style="color: #000000;">]</span></span></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list