ArtSlant - Contemporary Art Network http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/show en-us 40 The Soldier as Artist: Khaled Jarrar Chisels Away at the Wall <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Two boys crouch on either side of the wall that separates the West Bank from Jerusalem. They are smuggling 1,000 loaves of <em>Ka&rsquo;ak Al Quds</em> (&ldquo;bread of Jerusalem&rdquo;) through a hand-bored hole in the concrete. Ramallah-based artist <a href="http://www.ayyamgallery.com/artists/khaled-jarrar" target="_blank">Khaled Jarrar</a> interviews them from behind an unsteady camera. &ldquo;Pull! Pull!&rdquo; urges the older boy. Dust from both the flour and the wall is seen as the younger child collects the bread on the other side in a makeshift production line. The zero-shaped egg loaves, dotted with sesame seeds are a symbol of Palestinian culture, which&mdash;albeit with a degree of casual playfulness in <a href="https://vimeo.com/130186675" target="_blank">this scene</a> from his 2013 documentary <em><a href="http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/14261/defying-the-apartheid-wall_a-conversation-with-pal" target="_blank">Infiltrators</a></em>&mdash;Jarrar doggedly works to protect. He is now known as a multimedia artist and filmmaker, but in the past he was a soldier who served as bodyguard to the late Yasser Arafat for more than eight years. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150629142847-2__Ka_ak_Al_Quds__Khaled_Jarrar._Courtesy_of_the_artist_and_Ayyam_Gallery__2015.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Khaled Jarrar, <em>Ka'ak Al Quds</em>, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Ayyam Gallery, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In <em>Live and Work in Palestine</em>, a project launched in 2011, Jarrar affixed an official-looking State of Palestine stamp to around 650 people&rsquo;s passports in the West Bank and later at a booth at FIAC. His latest sculpture in the ongoing <em><a href="http://www.ayyamgallery.com/exhibitions/khaled-jarrar/images" target="_blank">Whole in the Wall</a></em> series is also titled <em>Ka&rsquo;ak Al Quds</em>. Using a hammer and chisel, the artist exacted jagged pieces from the wall, broke them down into dust and sand, mixed the remnants with fresh concrete, then poured the mixture into a mold. Each sculpture represents an aspect of Palestinian culture that the wall suffocates: from childhood innocence, with a football that is confiscated every time it sails across the wall into Israel, to family gatherings, and the once accessible bread from Jerusalem. In an email he explained the series this way: &ldquo;I made an art object from pieces that I cut from the apartheid wall. I try to make an economy by <em>upcycling</em> the wall, and I hope that every [other] Palestinian will cut some concrete until it is demolished.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150629143044-5._Canvases_resulting_from_Khaled_Jarrar_s_May_performance_at_Art_Bartschi._Courtesy_of_the_artist_and_Art_Bartschi__2015.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150629143100-6._Khaled_Jarrar_shooting_at_paint_at_Art_Bartschi__2015._Image_courtesy_of_the_artist.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(above)&nbsp;Canvases resulting from May performance at Art Bartschi. Courtesy of the artist and Art Bartschi, 2015<br />(below)&nbsp;Khaled Jarrar shooting at paint at Art Bartschi, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While we corresponded, Jarrar was grounded in Geneva under court orders following a controversial performance that took place at the May opening of his solo show at <a href="http://www.bartschi.ch" target="_blank">Art Bartschi &amp; Cie</a>. Surrounded by a buffer of sandbags, he levelled a pistol at a row of paint cans positioned between blank canvases, then shot 21 times in rapid succession, generating spontaneous abstracts. Guns, particularly in connection with the Middle East, have been overused to the point of monotony. In this case, however, Jarrar&mdash;with his military background and a number of bullet fragments still embedded in his thigh&mdash;seems entitled to conjure up something of his past by firing the same number of times that are required to lay a soldier to rest. The number 21 also coincides with the age at which Jarrar joined Arafat&rsquo;s covey with the hopes of paying off art and design school fees.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150629143510-7._A_Soldier_s_helmet_made_of_ice_at_Art_Bartschi._Courtesy_of_the_artist_and_Art_Bartschi.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">A soldier's helmet made of ice at Art Bartschi. Courtesy of the artist and Art Bartschi, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The show&rsquo;s mouthful of a title, <em>That Thou Canst Not Stir A Flower Without Troubling Of A Star</em>, originates in &ldquo;<a href="http://www.bartleby.com/236/240.html" target="_blank">The Mistress of Vision</a>,&rdquo; a verse by the late English poet Francis Thompson that acknowledges the way in which every delicate action in nature triggers a chain of unstoppable reactions. In this case, Jarrar grapples with the notion that good soldiers have no freedom and simply follow orders that can cause destruction, while artists have power&mdash;even in the face of an occupation&mdash;to leverage creation and cohesion. Let&rsquo;s see if the Swiss government, which has confiscated the gun and the shooting station, and demanded that Jarrar remain in Geneva until he is charged with a crime he has not yet been accused of, agrees.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danna Lorch</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Sandbags following Khaled Jarrar's performance at Art Bartschi. Courtesy of Art Bartschi, 2015)</span></p> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 11:32:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Francisco Toledo's Poster Biennial for Mexico's Missing Students <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One of art&rsquo;s most powerful assets is that it can speak on&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">behalf of the silenced; it can express what other media might not be</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;allowed to state publicly; and above all, it can&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">resonate beyond borders or limits.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In September 2014, the entire world became witness to the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">small Mexican town not far from the Pacific Ocean. It was an atrocious&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">act that was linked to the local government and law&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">enforcers. Despite the fact that this event took over global&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">headlines and inspired thousands to march in protest all&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">over the world, Mexico&rsquo;s government has yet to come up&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with a reasonable explanation as to the whereabouts of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">these students. The event has sparked controversy throughout all socio-</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">political sectors in Mexico&rsquo;s ever-shifting society, </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">leading many public figures to manifest their discontent with the government&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and offer support for families of the missing students, who are&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">still fighting for an answer. Sadly, this tragedy is not the first of its&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">nature to take place in Mexico: the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">government and military were also responsible for the 1968 Tlatelolco&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Massacre that took the lives of an unverified number of students and civilians. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This act of retribution on behalf of the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">government has made it clear that impunity is still at large&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">when it comes to facing the consequences of </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">human rights violations in Mexico.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One of Mexico&rsquo;s most renowned artists and activists,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Francisco Toledo, has been hard at work to raise&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">awareness about this unresolved situation. To promote&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the perspective of other countries on this issue, Toledo launched&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the first International Biennial of Posters for Ayotzinapa (A nueve meses de Ayotzinapa),&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">which received more than 700 submissions from across the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">globe.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150627051435-Amir_Khademsharif_Ayotzinapa.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">To everyone&rsquo;s surprise, Iran was the country with the most&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">participants, followed by proposals from Italy, Spain, Costa&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rica, Cuba, Portugal, and Japan, amongst others.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Biennial&rsquo;s first public appearance took place at the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">beginning of 2015 in the Museum of Memory and&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tolerance in Mexico City where 23 selected posters where&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">exhibited along with an installation of 43 kites made by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Toledo to symbolize the students. The next&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">showcase of the selected posters was in the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/IAGOmx" target="_blank">Institute of Graphic Arts of Oaxaca</a>, where they were&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">exhibited until last week. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The plan is for this exhibition to tour&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the world, starting with locations across Europe, in order to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">continue raising awareness and promoting the cause&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of the missing students' relatives, who haven&rsquo;t&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">stopped marching to find an answer (they&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">recently held a protest at the UN headquarters in New&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">York). With a clear focus on alleviating the situation by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">whatever means necessary, the selected posters have&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">been printed into open editions and all proceeds from their&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">sales will go directly to the families of the 43 students.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150627052211-1st_Prize_Ayotzinapa.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The winner of the first International Biennial of Posters&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">for Ayotzinapa is Irving Homero Carre&ntilde;o Garnica, a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">participant from Mexico, who portrayed his country&rsquo;s&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">shape with a bloody skeleton in his work&nbsp;<em>M&eacute;xico fracturado por Ayotzinapa (Mexico fractured by Ayotzinapa)</em>. This powerful juxtposition is&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">not too far from the reality that Mexico is now living.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;With death tolls reaching unsurpassed numbers, there is&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">widespread uncertainty with regards to the role of the government: whether they are the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">jury or the executioner seems to be the question on every Mexican's&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">mind, and it still remains unanswered.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/385949-rodrigo-campuzano?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Rodrigo Campuzano</a></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images:&nbsp;International Biennial of Posters&nbsp;for Ayotzinapa)</span></p> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 08:26:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Andy Warhol's Portrait of Gay Underground Culture <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In celebration of <a href="https://www.nycpride.org/" target="_blank">Pride</a> week, Christie's ran <a href="http://warhol.christies.com/sale/warhol-christies-andys-randy-summer/" target="_blank">a special Warhol auction</a> this week, making some 100 photographs and drawings available to purchase. Beyond the price tags, the works, many in the public eye for the first time, draw a passionate portrait of the underground LGBT scene of the '70s and '80s that was so much a part of the artist's life. They are a historical archive, charting a defining era of sexuality and social politics in American cities like San Francisco and New York City. Though the gay community suffered one the worst decades during the AIDS crisis of the '80s, the works here are on the whole celebratory, an exploration of what excites us, the kind of bodies that arouse us, charting a growing sense of freedom up to this week's triumphant news that <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/27/us/supreme-court-same-sex-marriage.html?_r=0" target="_blank">same-sex marriage is now legal</a> across the United States.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Here are some of our favorite images documenting a unique period in gay history through Andy's eyes.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626181833-41160183_fe08-00002.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626181802-40617343_FL05-03030.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626181649-40438573_top07-012.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626175817-40613710_fl05-00171.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626175623-40368764_fl06-03088.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626175455-40457277_FA16-01558.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626175322-41168035_top263-001.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626175239-40605920_FL08-00340.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626174835-40603162_FL06-03241.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150626172304-40369334_FL05-00383.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">All images: Courtesy Christie's</span></p> Sat, 27 Jun 2015 21:55:36 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Working (it) Out with Gillian Dykeman: Duke & Battersby <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Welcome to the fourth installation of the Artslant podcast series, <em>Working (it) Out</em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My name is Gillian Dykeman, and I'm a visual artist living in Toronto, Ontario. This summer, I am interviewing artists to ask about the role of audience in their practice. Each interview will begin with one question: "Does art require an audience?"</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/212074274&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="450"></iframe></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Working (it) Out </span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Episode Two |&nbsp;<strong>Duke &amp; Battersby: Empathy Symphony</strong></span></p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;YES (2:18)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Careerism and playing to an audience&nbsp;(5:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Letter writing and affective voice (8:35)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Accesibility and art (11:12) &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Art is for empathy (14:30)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Bugs and the universe (16:30)</span><span style="text-align: center;"><br /></span></li> </ul> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This week on Working (it) Out, I interviewed artist duo <a href="https://vimeo.com/dukeandbattersby">Emily Vey Duke and Cooper Battersby</a>. We discuss their new video <em>Dear Lorde</em>&nbsp;which is a portrait of a teenaged girl trying to become a "worthwhile person." The video is narrated by the letters the protagonist writes to various famous people she admires, and peppered with pop songs as well as macro portraits of insects. Duke and Battersby say "YES," art does require an audience, but caution where and when that audience should enter one's process.</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Music: Lorde, "Royals"</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165726-DearLorde.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165751-DEARLORDEWIDE.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165807-dbcat.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165819-dearlordedrawing.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165923-feministasfuck.jpg" alt="" width="600" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626170129-bug.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165935-Karaoke.jpg" alt="" width="600" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150626165952-ladybugs.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dear Lorde, 2015 (27:03) Courtesy of the artists.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman">Gillian Dykeman</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 26 Jun 2015 17:20:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Coney Island's Art Walls: Conversation or Spectacle? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Lying somewhere on the spectrum between an amusement park and seaside resort, Coney Island attracts tourists with its boardwalk, rides, and more. But the visiting spectator might not know so much about the residential community of nearly 60,000 people who live within this area.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hoping to add a cultural currency to the historic tourist spot, this summer&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/coneyartwalls" target="_blank">Coney Art Walls</a>&nbsp;presents more than 20 temporary walls painted by artists like Miss Van, Lady Pink, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Futura, and artist-in-residence Marie Roberts. While it&rsquo;s a veritable visual candy shop for a street art fan, the initiative has also attracted criticism for being a thinly-veiled marketing scheme&mdash;yet the project is more complicated than it appears at first glance.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Following the format of many similar initiatives, Coney Art Walls lends itself to street art&rsquo;s ephemerality. Artists get temporary walls in a prime spot to paint murals, without worrying about legal repercussions. In exchange, locals and visitors experience the work of many talented artists in one place. What could possibly go wrong?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150627035009-CF-PcUtXIAAXbof.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Irak. All images via @<a href="https://twitter.com/coneyartwalls" target="_blank">ConeyArtWalls on Twitter</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Development in Coney Island has always been controversial, since the first structures were built there in the 1900s. One of the biggest criticisms today responds to the fact that Coney Art Walls is largely backed by Thor Equities, the controversial development company which has been buying up and selling off real estate on Coney Island, closing down its amusement parks, since 2003. They enlisted the help of curator and former MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch, himself a divisive figure who continually rouses controversy amongst peers. The financial backing of the project has cynics up in arms, and it raises a fundamental issue that street artists are facing today: they are often used by developers to capitalize on their gentrifying power and push property prices up, forcing local communities out.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The project has also been slammed for the art itself. Stepping into a rare territory for art critics,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://news.artnet.com/art-world/jeffrey-deitchs-coney-art-walls-exploits-artists-real-estate-ploy-307680" target="_blank">Artnet&rsquo;s Christian Viveros-Faun&eacute;</a> argues that &ldquo;to call 'Coney Art Walls' an art exhibition is to commit what philosopher Gilbert Ryle would have termed a category mistake.&rdquo; Viveros-Faun&eacute; goes on to describe the murals as riffs on &ldquo;tame wall art.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The simple patterns and almost garish color palettes of some of the murals lend some credibility the writer&rsquo;s statement: these pieces seem completely disconnected from the area, as if they could exist in any context. So why here?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Starting an outdoor art show at Coney Island is different from staging an art show just anywhere. The area has a complicated cultural history&mdash;specifically when it comes to the manner in which Coney Island became a well-known attraction in the first place. As an attraction, it is a place burdened with stereotypes and myth.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150627035141-CF-G9U2UoAA5nie.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Artist-in-residence Marine Roberts</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Murals like those of iconic graffiti artist Lady Pink&mdash;a bright, eye-catching tableau depicting a snake lady, mermaid, and a devilish figure&mdash;demonstrate the artist&rsquo;s talent for transforming a simple temporary structure into something more dynamic. But the viewer can&rsquo;t help but notice that the images reinforce the perspective of Coney Island as a space for carnies and freaks. Not that there&rsquo;s anything wrong with depicting these alternative subcultures&mdash;it&rsquo;s just that this view reaffirms a clich&eacute;d perspective of Coney's residents and history.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150627035251-CF2sYYfWAAAAig5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Lady Pink</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Perhaps more productive in activating the space&mdash;and engaging with its residents&mdash;is a mural by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh. Framed against a plain white background, her<a href="http://www.tlynnfaz.com/Coney-Island-Portraits" target="_blank"> portraits</a> stand out for their stark simplicity. Fazlalizadeh decided to photograph and interview local residents. While speaking with them, the statement that stuck with her the most became the phrase displayed at the bottom of the six portraits: &ldquo;The day before Easter, and the day after Labor Day&mdash;people still live here. People die here. People love here.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the end, questions still remain about the motives for drawing more visitors to the area: is it for the art, or the location?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If it&rsquo;s for sheer spectacle then viewers might only leave with a surface understanding of the area and a newfound (or re-affirmed) admiration for the artists involved. But when Coney Art Walls comes down, the viewers will have to work hard to remember the area as much more than an attraction&mdash;or an area with real estate opportunities. Fazlalizadeh&rsquo;s mural asks that viewers come face to face with likenesses of Coney Island&rsquo;s citizens&mdash; and the reality that the Coney Island is more than merely a tourist destination.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347546-eva-recinos?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Eva Recinos</a></span><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;Mural by Futura, Via Coney Art Walls Twitter)</span></p> Mon, 29 Jun 2015 08:56:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Sculpture Parks as Art Spaces: 6 of Europe's Best <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Are sculpture parks a thing of the past? Just like Disneyland for the art world, sculpture parks are popular tourist attractions often funded by billionaire art collectors (in the case of more than a few, they are couples with their own foundations). Have these types of elitist locations faded in recent years? And in the broader spectrum, what is their function as art spaces?</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150624205607-Vigeland_PhotoVisitOslo3.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While Europe has some of the coolest&nbsp;sculpture&nbsp;gardens (find a great list of international sculpture&nbsp;gardens <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sculpture_parks" target="_blank">here</a>), they&rsquo;re often only open in the summer and can be in hard-to-reach places. As far as&nbsp;the artist selection process, it's habitually only the established bunch who can really showcase their work here,&nbsp;as the risk of a high-budget production cost is often taken against an artist name, heavyweights like Richard Serra or Anish Kapoor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">With an increasing interest in non-physical or immaterial artworks viewed online, the function of sculpture&nbsp;gardens could be seen as out-moded</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. In some ways, they do feel like a thing of the past, but they also have a future: with new outdoor projects&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">popping up recently in London and Rome, as well as older, established parks opening new digital spaces</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Still, sculpture parks remain an enjoyable seasonal activity, and with that in mind, we've rounded up some of Europe's best gardens, ones we feel still function as relevant art spaces.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150624205637-Vigeland_PhotoVisitOslo1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Vigeland Park</strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oslo, Norway</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The <a href="http://www.vigeland.museum.no/en/vigeland-park" target="_blank">Vigeland Park</a> is one of the few sculpture gardens which is open year round, and costs nothing to get&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">in. It&rsquo;s also the largest sculpture park devoted to a single artist: Gustav Vigeland. Completed in 1949,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">there are over 200 sculptures in the sprawling city park, made of bronze, iron and granite. Like a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">labyrinth, the park is enormous with different sections, including the main fountain, a bridge, the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">monolith, and one of Vigeland's most famous artworks called <em>The Wheel of Life</em>. In terms of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">investigating the artworks of one artist, this sculpture park could be seen as an open air museum, a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">perpetual solo show. It doesn&rsquo;t get any better than this.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150624205731-Ekebergparken_LouiseBourgeouis_TheCouple.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Ekebergparken</strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oslo, Norway</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In contrast to the Vigeland Park, Oslo&rsquo;s second sculpture park is the <a href="http://ekebergparken.com/" target="_blank">Ekebergparken</a>, which is devoted to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">contemporary art. Norway really has the oil cash to buy the most expensive art, including works by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Salvador Dal&iacute;, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Jenny Holzer, and Louise Bourgeois. T</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">here was debate about whether a sculpture park should be in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the Ekeberg Park</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;in the first place, as it is one of Oslo&rsquo;s&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;green lungs.&rdquo; Opened in 2013 by philanthropist Christian Ringnes, the park has put art at <a href="http://ekebergparken.com/en/pakke/22" target="_blank">different&nbsp;</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://ekebergparken.com/en/pakke/22" target="_blank">vantage points</a> that add to the viewing experience, rather than being trapped inside the white box.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Ekeberg Stairs overlook the Oslofjord, famous with hikers, while the Munch Spot is a throwback to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the actual location which inspired Edvard Munch's <em>The Scream</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150624210143-Mercati_di_traiano_press_8.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Museo dei Fori Imperiali</strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rome, Italy</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Uruguayan&nbsp;sculptor&nbsp;Pablo Atchugarry, creator of his own&nbsp;sculpture&nbsp;park&nbsp;and foundation in Uruguay,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">opened a retrospective and a sculpture&nbsp;garden of works on May 22 at the Museo dei Fori Imperiali in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rome, Italy. The show, <em>Eternal city, eternal marbles</em>, features 30 pieces in the museum, 10 outside in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the garden. They're all made from antique Carrara marble found in the Italian mountains, better known&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">as "<a href="http://www.italianways.com/carraras-marble-quarries-setting-beauty-free" target="_blank">Michaelangelo's cave</a>." It includes the first&nbsp;sculpture&nbsp;he ever made in 1979 up to never-seen-before&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">work made of marble, bronze, and steel. </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The artist, whose work bridges the figurative and the abstract&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">said in a Skype interview that he is "in dialogue with 2,000 years of art history with contemporary art," and&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">there is a clear connection between now and then in the materials used, as well as their their resonance when placed in dialogue with an ancient&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">city.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150624210519-CELLS_OF_LIFE_by_Charles_Jencks__image_courtesy_Jupiter_Artland.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Jupiter Artland</strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Edinburgh, Scotland</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.jupiterartland.org/" target="_blank">Jupiter Artland</a> is a magical sculpture garden and gallery space open during the summer months (until&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">September 27). The park is owned by art collectors Robert and Nicky Wilson, who bought the manor house with its&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">100-acre estate in 1999. It was Nicky's dream to build a sculpture park. Their <a href="https://www.jupiterartland.org/artwork" target="_blank">artworks include</a> a circular&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">grass hill with miniature lakes called <em>Cells of Life</em>&nbsp;by cultural theorist Charles Jencks (which you can see&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">from the nearby road), as well Nathan Coley&rsquo;s <em>In Memory</em>, a concrete wall surrounding a family&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">graveyard on the grounds of the estate. This endless group show also has a resident peacock which sits&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">atop of its caf&eacute; or nearby shed, capturing the attention of gallery-goers with its magnificent feathers.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Truly worth seeing if you can get the cab ride out of the city.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7hfD9CHmj3U" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>The Line<br /></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">London, England</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This new sculpture trail, which opened May 23, features public sculptures from blockbuster British&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artists like Damien Hirst, Martin Creed, and Gary Hume. Linking the O2 and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Park, <a href="http://the-line.org/" target="_blank">The Line</a> is curated by Carolyn Miner. Sort of like an art walk along the docks, the artworks were&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">chosen from an open call for submission then chosen by a team of experts. They crowdfunded over &pound;140,000&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">to make it happen, and the artworks are on loan for two years. The point is to bring high quality pieces out&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of the warehouses and out into the public&mdash;specifically to an &ldquo;undiscovered area of the city,&rdquo; according to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">founder Megan Piper. They even had artist Scott McFarnon create a new version of Johnny Cash&rsquo;s <a href="http://bit.ly/WalkTheLineLondon" target="_blank">"I Walk&nbsp;</a></span><a href="http://bit.ly/WalkTheLineLondon" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Line."</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150624210732-ZETTELER_CASS_PiotrLakomy_EveryStep_01-LR.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cass Sculpture Foundation<br /></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">West Sussex, England</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Out in the Sussex countryside, the <a href="http://www.sculpture.org.uk/" target="_blank">Cass Sculpture Foundation</a> is a 26-acre, giant commercial sculpture garden&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with over 400 works by 80 artists (it&rsquo;s all for sale). Founded in 1992 by Wilfred and Jeannette Cass,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">their collection includes works by Anthony Caro, Marc Quinn, and Rachel Whiteread. Dedicated to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">showing art on a monumental scale, they are constantly changing up their outdoor display and adding&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">more. The latest pieces added this season including works by Sara Barker, James Capper, and Alex Hoda</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. The sculpture garden, open only in the summer, includes the foundation&rsquo;s first digital&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">commission, bringing the sculpture garden into the present: a free public, <a href="http://awallproject.net/" target="_blank">online platform</a> with a work by Zheng Bo. Next up, they&rsquo;re working towards&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">an exhibition of commissioned Chinese sculpture in 2016.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;Mark Handforth, <em>Two Old Bananas</em>. Courtesy Cass Sculpture Foundation)</span></p> Thu, 25 Jun 2015 11:42:32 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Making a Memento: Chicago Artists Group Portrait, 2015 <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On Saturday I go to the granite steps of the MCA with several hundred others for&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Chicago Artists Group Portrait, 2015. The weather&rsquo;s kinda perfect: sunny, with big&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">cadillacs of clouds rolling by every couple minutes to keep us cool. Down front Jason&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Lazarus, dressed all in white and holding a megaphone, paces, checks the time.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jason&rsquo;s an artist/educator/proselytizer of collective action, a well-known/liked artist&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">about town. We&rsquo;re all here to become history, to legitimize our self-definitions, to enjoy&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the picnic weather. Really, we&rsquo;re here because Jason asked us.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I take a place standing in the back, on the top step. Lots of smiles, waves. We&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">face out into the city. Backs to the museum doors. The photo will show it differently of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">course. We&rsquo;ll be tiny individuals framed by the stone architecture around us (supporting&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">us? looming over?). Time will go by, we&rsquo;ll look old-fashioned and Historical and no&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">longer breathing and one day people will zoom in on our eyes and think, &ldquo;Hey! Those&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">people saw Kanye!&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jason hopes for more. The final, high-res file will be posted online, copyright free,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">for anyone to use.<a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a> Available for perpetual resurrection. It&rsquo;ll be a memento for Jason too,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">since he&rsquo;ll be leaving Chicago for Florida after so many years. He holds up the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">megaphone, thanks us for coming. So many people from his time here as a student, as&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a teacher! He takes a moment to also remember those who aren&rsquo;t with us anymore.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Who are dead. Okay, he says, just a couple more minutes!&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I suddenly remember Steven King&mdash;at a commencement speech in the late '90s&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he asked us to look around the crowd and imagine it in one hundred years, the seats of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">those who are no longer with us now empty. Maybe three, four seats still filled.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I look around the crowd. Some people are holding sticks with cut-out images of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">others&rsquo; heads stuck on top. A way for non-attendees to be there too.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Down front there&rsquo;s some noise about a bird. Which is in front of us, on the plaza?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I can&rsquo;t see it from the back. The bird is stubborn! Jason says. It won&rsquo;t leave. "Okay!"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jason says. He tells us to get ready. Then the shutter snaps open, several times in a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">row. I&rsquo;d wondered if it would be slow. Like in a story I read about a school portrait in the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">early 20th&nbsp;century. Every year the girl in the story and her sister would run from one side&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of the crowd to the other as the panoramic camera turned, so that they&rsquo;d appear on both&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">sides of the final image. One winter her sister died and in the spring she tried to run for&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">both of them but tripped and didn&rsquo;t make it. Then the final image arrives and her sister&rsquo;s&nbsp;there. Somehow.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We take a break after several shots. Clouds blow by. The crowd chatters. Jason&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">steps up, tells us to get ready for the final shots. And, he says, the bird can stay!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The crowd cheers.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Later I check the event page. A post-mortem. Jason thanks the MCA, his fellow&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">organizers, facilitators, coordinators. All of us. Plus: &ldquo;thank you to the BIRD for bearing&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">symbolic load and providing comic relief!&rdquo; I scroll through the comments, enjoying all the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">well-wishing, down to an exchange at the end of the thread.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;So what happened to the pigeon?&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;a little girl chased it away&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The final version of Chicago Artists Group Portrait will be available online in August.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Apologies to Modest Mouse and Roland Barthes.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;James Pepper Kelly&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a> The full text about use, from the Chicago Artists Group Portrait Facebook event page: &ldquo;The group&nbsp;portrait will be owned by everyone and become part of the public domain! It is my intention to not &lsquo;own&rsquo;&nbsp;this photograph but to put it online for anyone to print, alter, distribute as they see fit (as this seems to&nbsp;happen anyways in our image culture)...in other words, I want to have it in the public domain where I think&nbsp;it belongs and watch it move around, mutate, and engage a greater audience.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Courtesy of the author)</span></p> Thu, 25 Jun 2015 07:40:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Fire and Forget: Artists Respond to Modern Warfare <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Entering </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fire and Forget</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On Violence</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, the viewer passes through two of the four rotating gates in Daniil Galkin&rsquo;s installation </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tourniquet</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. Beyond this eerie passage, a provocative text speculates on the impact of technology on modern warfare. Its thesis can be characterized as follows: since modern technology has largely emancipated warriors from a traditional active sense of duty&mdash;allowing them to literally fire and forget&mdash;does this change in confrontation halt the production and inevitable perception of violence?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At the core of this question is a matter of distance. Distance, spatially speaking, diminishes comprehension of the immensity of war and humanitarian crimes. Coupled with death-producing machinery, spatial distance also removes the affective concept of murder.<a title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a> However, temporal distance also allows us to gain recognition in order to see actions, regardless of how mechanically enhanced they are, against brute reality. Spanning the length of 20th century and stretching into the present, <em>Fire and Forget. On Violence</em> offers up artists&rsquo; questions and responses that weigh in on this non-affective phenomenon. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150624084617-kw_fire_and_forget_photo_timo_ohler_06.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Roy Brand, Ori Scialom, Keren Yeala Golan, <em>The Country Sand Printer</em>, 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">XY-System composed of metal, wood, sand, <br />diverse technical elements, 520 x 290 cm. Courtesy the artists. Photo: Timo Ohler</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibition is separated into themes&mdash;Borders, Affect, Memory/Remembrance, and Event&mdash;with the first section exploring physical border spaces such as the US/Mexican and Israeli/West Bank borders where bodies are policed and patrolled. <em>The Country Sand Printer</em> (2014) by Roy Brand, Ori Scialom, and Keren Yeala Golan traces the evolution of the Israeli state through its settlements. Rather than displaying the violent reality that the settlement project created, the sand cartography machine shows four different maps representing three planning periods: 1949, 1951, and two from 2014. Hash marks in the sand depict these gradual states: stage I, 1949, reflects existing settlements at the time of the founding of Israel; II, 1951, is the Sharon Plan that meant to scatter the influx of Jews around the state rather than in metropolitan areas; III, 2014, shows the failure of the plan and the eventual concentration of people around coasts; and IV shows the year 2014 once again, drawing attention to remaining settlements from 1967. Unlike traditional cartography, <em>The Country Sand Printer</em> uses a mechanic metal needle to lightly press lines in sand. This tactic ensures that traces of previous plans remain in the map&rsquo;s membrane while new lines demarcate new immigration records. <em>The Country Sand Printer </em>also reorders temporal indices so that historical time is confined to five- to ten-minute periods of mapping.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is another violence that this cartography reveals and subtly counters: the systemic violence of historic sequential time that favors origins and linear progressions over communal histories and cyclical experiences. This sequential time can also be conflated with the very fiber of modernity that reorders humanity with technical virulence. Here, the systemic violence of mapping is revealed to be almost more virulent than a period of war because it breeds future conflict rather than resolve. <a title="" href="#_ftn2">[2]</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the same thematic grouping, a fascistic looking Barbara Kruger text proclaims propaganda of a supreme race. This propaganda is not attached to a time or a place but instead characterizes the means where revolutionary fervors are distributed through slogans that favor action over thought. Kruger&rsquo;s text references back to the propaganda characteristic of the Soviet regime or the Third Reich.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150624085245-kruger.png" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Barbara Kruger, <em>Untitled</em>, 1994/2015, Originally for the staircase of Kunsthalle Basel, Vinyl print, 310 x 230 cm. Courtesy Spr&uuml;th Magers</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Many works look back to or reference the past, but&mdash;like Kruger&rsquo;s poster&mdash;most contain a dangling reference to specific historical events. In the case of Amir Yatziv&rsquo;s <em>Antipodes</em>, in which the artist followed military re-enactors in Europe from 2008-10, the camera only identifies the present locality such as Czech Republic or Russia and does not identify the battle sides that the mock warriors take on. Similar abstraction is found in Gillian Wearing&rsquo;s video <em>Sacha and Mum</em> (1996), in which a mother and daughter vacillate between comfort and feuding. The mother is both the source and absolver of psychological pain for the daughter. There is neither a clear victor nor loser within the elaborate dance, which in turn allows the viewer to participate in the event&rsquo;s unfolding.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150624084814-kw_fire_and_forget_photo_timo_ohler_07.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">He Xiangyu, <em>Tank</em>, 2011&ndash;13, Plant-based-tanned leather, 890 x 600 x 150 cm. Courtesy Sammlung Sigg. Photo: Timo Ohler</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The overwhelming motif throughout the exhibition is military, with slight deviations such as Wearing&rsquo;s work and Pipilotti Rist&rsquo;s video <em>Ever is Overall </em>(1997), where a woman prances around a European city smashing car windows with a weapon made to look like a flower. Aesthetic responses to military sites include Jota Castro&rsquo;s <em>Guantanamo</em> (2005)<em>,</em> a heated narrow fenced in area mimicking a detention site, and He Xiangyu&rsquo;s <em>Tank</em> (2011&ndash;2013), a deflated military tank made out of luxury leather. A bullet hole without a gun is featured in Emily Jacir&rsquo;s <em>Bank Mirror, Ramallah, April 22, 2002</em>, a photograph in which traces of performative actions can be sensed through the voided space of trauma.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibition allows viewers to gaze indirectly at and over trauma by allowing their proximity to the events in question to remain abstract. While initially sounding counterintuitive, Slavoj Žižek reminds us his book <em>Violence </em>that a cross gaze or even misplaced gaze can actually be productive for sight: &ldquo;A dispassionate conceptual development of the typology of violence must by definition ignore its traumatic impact.&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn3">[3]</a> </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Žižek advocates a widening of the trench between the event of violence and the impartial gazer rather than the elimination of the caesura that has emerged. Surely, simply pointing to the fact that popular culture suffers from apathy would be futile. <em>Fire and Forget</em> certainly does much more than simply point, but is the revealing of rampant war fetishes and iconography just as paralyzing as staring at images of the ruins of trauma, as Žižek warns? Further probing this question of ruins and distance, contemporary writer and philosopher Ariella Azoulay quotes Heidegger&rsquo;s &ldquo;The Thing&rdquo;:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Man stares at what the explosion of the atom bomb could bring with it. He does not see that the atom bomb and its explosion are the mere final emission of what has long since taken place, has already happened.<a title="" href="#_ftn4">[4]</a></span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Citing this quote, Azoulay too expresses the phenomenon of distance that catastrophic events produce when gazing; however she emphasizes that it is not the catastrophic event itself that makes witnesses not see, but that they looks too late. The moment is simply a fetish. This is the logic that the exhibition misses by often gazing too intently at the spectacle of what comes after, rather than on the actions before the siege, before the climax of the police state, the swaying robot police body.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/429088-vanessa-gravenor" target="_blank">Vanessa Gravenor</a></span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"><br clear="all" /><hr style="line-height: 26px;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a> Adorno famously wrote of the &ldquo;fabrication of corpses&rdquo; that Auschwitz created in <em>Negative Dialectics</em>, which Giorgio Agamben expands and in <em>Remnants of</em> <em>Auschwitz</em>. Agamben, Giorgio. <em>Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive</em>. New York: Zone Books, 2002. 80-81. Print.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref2">[2]</a> Susan Buck-Morss further expanded this sentiment during <a href="http://gallery400.uic.edu/events/voices-susan-buck-morss">a lecture</a> on her book <em>Year One</em>. <em>Year One</em> also attempts to re-write the traditional cartographic and sequential history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict by creating networked times.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref3">[3]</a> Žižek, Slavoj. <em>Violence: Six Sideways Reflections</em>. New York: Picador, 2008. 6. Print.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref4">[4]</a> Azoulay, Ariella. <em>Death's Showcase: The Power of Image in Contemporary Democracy</em>. Cambridge: MIT, 2001. 43. Print.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: Daniil Galkin,&nbsp;<em>Tourniquet</em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">, 2015, Installation, 435 x 310 x 610 cm. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Timo Ohler)</span></span></p> </div> </div> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 09:46:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Indie Book Week: Ten London Art Bookshops to Fall in Love with (and in) <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If you&rsquo;re on the dating circuit and don&rsquo;t know this by now, you should: art&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">bookshops&mdash;for lovers of art and writing&mdash;are pick-up joints.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This fact is verified by a broader selection of friends having met potential dates&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">in bookshops than I can keep track of. If you don&rsquo;t believe me, try browsing by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">yourself in a bookshop on a Friday evening. Even the shyest people seem to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">pluck up the courage to start a conversation about a book.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And I guess this is hardly surprising. Books are conversations in solitary form,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and they come alive a second time when you share them. In an article about&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the Berlin Book Fair in <em>The Paris Review</em> last year, Ben Mauk suggests that an&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">art book&rsquo;s proper function is as an enabler of this conversational exchange&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;<a href="http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2015/01/05/no-sale/" target="_blank">without the art world problem of money</a>.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Joyfully, we can own and covert an</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;artist&rsquo;s book for far less than their original artwork.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Clearly there are many reasons to head to an art bookshop: but another is that&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">this week is <a href="http://independentbooksellersweek.org.uk/" target="_blank">Independent Booksellers</a> week in the UK and Ireland, an initiative celebrating and promoting independent retailers.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Honoring this, what follows is a list of some of the best art-related bookshops in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">London. I mean the term "art-related bookshop" expansively, including&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">independent bookshops that are great for those interested in art and all its&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">issues. The list is London-centric, but do add to it in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the comments if you want to recommend shops not included or ones from your own city.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This is not a conclusive list&mdash;just a top ten among my personal favorites&mdash;but if you are&nbsp;stuck for more shops near you, check out the lovely map created by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thelondonbookshopmap.org/%20">The London&nbsp;</a><a href="http://www.thelondonbookshopmap.org/%20">Bookshop Map</a>.&nbsp;<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;">Best for artists&rsquo; books: </span><a href="http://www.bannerrepeater.org" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;">Banner Repeater</span><br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hackney Downs Network Rail,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Platform 1, Dalston Lane, London E8 1LA</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Banner Repeater is a project space and reading room in what used to be the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">waiting room on the platform of Hackney Downs station. A changeable project&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">space, at the moment it features "</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">To unmap the terrain,"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a curated collection of artists&rsquo; publishing&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">projects in Mexico. Alongside the exhibitions there&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">are usually tables of books created by artists and small presses</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. If you haven&rsquo;t read much artists&rsquo; writing and don&rsquo;t know where to start, I&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">highly recommend getting your hands of a copy of Katrina Palmer&rsquo;s <em>The Dark&nbsp;</em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Object</em> as the kind of book that only an artist could write.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150622182738-Tenderpixel_Tenderbooks2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Tenderbooks shelves. Image courtesy Tenderbooks</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;">Best curated bookshop: </span><a href="http://www.tenderbooks.co.uk/" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;">Tenderbooks</span><br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">6 Cecil Ct, London WC2N 4HE</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I love this place. Partnered with the next door gallery <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/7810-tenderpixel" target="_blank">Tenderpixel</a>, this small&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">bookshop sells artists&rsquo; editions, Tenderpixel&rsquo;s beautifully made Riso-printed&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">catalogues, some more unusual art magazines and artists&rsquo; prints. Every time I go&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I fall in love with a new artist&rsquo;s book. Last time I was there I spent longer than is&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">probably polite poring over John Stezaker&rsquo;s lovely book <em>Crossing Over</em>, a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">collection of minutely cropped and reproduced postcards, mostly featuring&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">representations of women from Victorian times to the post-war period.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">More than just a bookshop, Tenderbooks create a reading list to compliment the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">shows at Tenderpixel and host a series of readings, events and performances.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">They also have a monthly changing exhibition section focusing on an artist or&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">small independent press.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;">Best for making books: </span><a href="http://londonbookarts.bigcartel.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;">London Centre for Book Arts</span><br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Unit 18, Ground Floor&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Britannia Works, Dace Road, London E3 2NQ</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Based in Hackney Wick, London Centre for Book Arts runs book-making and binding&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">workshops, has a membership system for use of their facilities, and of course sells&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">everything artists&rsquo; book related. If you&rsquo;ve ever wanted to turn your book idea&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">into a physical reality, this is the place.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;">Best for never leaving empty handed: </span><a href="https://www.ica.org.uk/shop" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;">ICA bookshop</span><br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Mall, London&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">SW1Y 5AH</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For me, the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/2631-institute-of-contemporary-arts-ica" target="_blank">ICA</a>'s bookshop also ranks really high for best curated. Their collection is so good it&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is almost impossible to walk out without buying something. Organized into&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">sections&mdash;the weirdest of which is simply called "Life and Culture," featuring&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">books like WM Spellman&rsquo;s <em>A Brief History of Death</em>&mdash;the thin shelves always have&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">that exact book someone was telling you about at a party that you remember&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">only now that you&rsquo;ve seen it, and hence have to buy. Big open trays feature small&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">publishing projects, artists&rsquo; books, and low-volume journals; there are always&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">sales tables beckoning to the strapped-for-cash; and there is usually an abundance&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of books relevant to the work in the ICA&rsquo;s exhibitions.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Also, with Tate and Whitechapel, this bookshop scores pretty highly on the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">meeting a potential date front. Contemporary art galleries with bookshops are&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">evidently a heady combination.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150622182421-9554339687_92ea388eb3_z.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: center; font-size: x-small;">Word on the Water. Image via Flickr user&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/38314728@N08/" target="_blank">Joanna Penn</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">The most delightful: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wordonthewater/info?tab=overview" target="_blank">Word on the Water<br /></a></span></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Locations variable</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This second-hand bookshop is in a converted coal barge and moves around&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">London&rsquo;s canals. Most often I see it in Hackney, but you can keep an eye on&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">its location via their facebook page. The collection is&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">idiosyncratic, but the point is clearly to browse, get lost in your curiosity, and find&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">something you never knew you needed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><span style="font-size: large;">The furthest left: </span></strong><a href="http://www.housmans.com/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Housmans</span></strong><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">5 Caledonian Rd, London N1 9DX</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Housmans was founded in 1945 as an outlet for radical publishing, selling books&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and pamphlets which extended the work of the British pacifist movement after&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the war. The topics and subjects of books sold by Housman&rsquo;s today are broad,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">such as a collection of Situationist writing by the likes of Debord and Lefebvre,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and an extensive list of titles covering all aspects of capitalism, debt, gender&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">politics, political fiction etc. All serve the shop&rsquo;s radical function of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">distributing information beneficial for peace, upholding human rights and&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">furthering environmental causes. Well worth browsing is their ultimate bargain&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">basement, with hundreds of second hand books sold for only a pound.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Best for LGBT: </strong></span><a href="http://freespace.virgin.net/gays.theword/index.htm" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Gay&rsquo;s the Word</strong></span><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">66 Marchmont Street, London WC1N 1AB</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Gay&rsquo;s the Word is the only bookshop in London focusing on LGBT writers,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">content, and issues. There are reading groups, great suggestions by their&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">dedicated staff and a website whose basic design tells you immediately how&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">much more they care about their physical presence than web presence&mdash;which these days is actually a really charming thing.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Best for art book collectors: </strong></span><a href="http://www.peterharrington.co.uk" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Peter Harrington</strong></span><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">43 Dover Street &nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mayfair, London W1S 4NU</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If you&rsquo;re the kind of person who needs a first edition, and has money to spend,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Peter Harrington has a rare selection of artists&rsquo; monographs and the occasional&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artists&rsquo; book. You can pick up a first edition, first print copy of Warhol&rsquo;s 1968&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">novel&mdash;an impossible to follow rambling transcription of 24 hours in his&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">life&mdash;for a mere &pound;275, which must be the least expensive Warhol work available.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">His much lovelier and rarer book <em>Holy Cats</em>, from 1954, is a treat to see and hence&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">much more expensive.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Best kept secret: </strong></span><a href="https://www.hatchards.co.uk/" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Hatchards</strong></span><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Piccadilly</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This one almost shouldn&rsquo;t be on this list. It&rsquo;s recently become a secret love of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">mine for killing time, and I&rsquo;m reluctant to share it with everyone, but feel I&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">should. It&rsquo;s London&rsquo;s oldest bookshop, and on the top floor of the original&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Piccadilly Hatchards, opposite the Royal Academy, boasts one of the most surprising&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">selections of big, glossy, full-color art monographs I have ever seen, arranged on&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ornate wooden shelves and with a dedicated and vast photography section.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Among the giant tomes on Giotto&rsquo;s frescos or Rembrandt&rsquo;s rendering of fabrics are&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">everything from books on contemporary artists to obscure paperbacks about the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">relationship between Modernist pattern making and microbiological images. </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(FYI they have exceedingly stiff and glossy carrier bags that make you feel really&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">money despite buying some of the least expensive items available in Mayfair.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Best for books and cake: </strong></span><a href="http://www.londonreviewbookshop.co.uk" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>London Review Bookshop</strong></span><br /></a>14 Bury Place, London WC1A 2JL<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This place always wins for me because their staff are so knowledgeable. They&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">don&rsquo;t have a great art selection, but I don&rsquo;t really know any art enthusiasts who&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">solely own art books anyway. Their poetry selection is great, with a wonderful&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">collection of cultural and literary essays, and their fiction recommendations are&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">spot on. The LRB caf&eacute; has one of the best chocolate Guinness cakes in London,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and you can borrow a copy of the <em>London Review of Books</em> to browse while you sit and&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">eat&mdash;and maybe even fall in love.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;London Review Bookshop. Image via Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/bagelmouse/" target="_blank">RachelH_</a>)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Tue, 23 Jun 2015 09:50:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Google's Psychedelic Art: This Is Your Computer Brain on Drugs <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Interpreting the patterns of light that reach our eyes is a very difficult problem, requiring about a third of our brains&rsquo; information processing capacity. When performed accurately, this process allows us to perceive many features of every object we see: their colors, shapes, identities, orientations, positions, and the spatial relationships between them. This happens so quickly and flawlessly that we don&rsquo;t even notice it happen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the past week, a set of <a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPX0SCl7OzWilt9LnuQliattX4OUCj_8EP65_cTVnBmS1jnYgsGQAieQUc1VQWdgQ?key=aVBxWjhwSzg2RjJWLWRuVFBBZEN1d205bUdEMnhB" target="_blank">trippy images</a> revealed on <a href="http://googleresearch.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/inceptionism-going-deeper-into-neural.html" target="_blank">Google&rsquo;s research blog</a> brought the complexity of the human visual system&mdash;as simulated by an artificial neural network called GoogLeNet, developed by Google software engineers&mdash;to widespread attention. Attempts to match the performance of human vision using computers constitutes a major scientific field, one that uses some of the world&rsquo;s most powerful computers. Right now, the leading efforts come from GoogLeNet, which mimics the visual brain&rsquo;s processing to <a href="http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.4842.pdf" target="_blank">recognize</a> the objects in natural images better than other methods, and with less computing power. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ostensibly, Google wants to do this so users can search the internet&rsquo;s images without a human manually tagging every cat, exposed breast, and selfie-with-brunch. But an interesting side effect of the project is that it shows computers being visually creative, using the stimuli or images they "see" to create new ones in ways that mimick the human imagination. The resulting images recall the hallmarks of artistic movements like Symbolism or Impressionism, the hidden images in Surrealism, or the "cells" of a Chuck Close painting. These are just some of the diverse strategies artists have used to&nbsp;interpret and represent the world around them, filtering what they see through their own neural networks and imaginations. The GoogLeNet images also recall the reported visual effects of psychedelic drugs&mdash;and there's a reason for that.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPX0SCl7OzWilt9LnuQliattX4OUCj_8EP65_cTVnBmS1jnYgsGQAieQUc1VQWdgQ/photo/AF1QipMCs_m03lXX2ZD1lTbU9n9VDsqTgv6I4R8vB94i?key=aVBxWjhwSzg2RjJWLWRuVFBBZEN1d205bUdEMnhB" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150621144017-seurat-layout.png" alt="" /></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(left) Original painting by <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte#/media/File:Georges_Seurat_-_A_Sunday_on_La_Grande_Jatte_--_1884_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg">Georges Seurat</a>&nbsp;(right) processed images by Matthew McNaughton, Software Engineer. Diagram via&nbsp;Google&nbsp;<a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPX0SCl7OzWilt9LnuQliattX4OUCj_8EP65_cTVnBmS1jnYgsGQAieQUc1VQWdgQ?key=aVBxWjhwSzg2RjJWLWRuVFBBZEN1d205bUdEMnhB" target="_blank">Inceptionism Gallery.<br /></a>Click on image for larger view.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">How do these visual distortions occur? In both GoogLeNet and the brain, there are many interacting layers of processing happening at once. The lower layers do really simple calculations: detecting motion, finding edges, analyzing local changes in color. By the later layers, the brain cells and their simulated cousins respond to the presence of specific object classes, like faces, indoor scenes, animals, and tools. This transformation is complicated because two images of cats may look nothing like each other in the early layers: a cat can have any orientation, position, color, or motion.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">To make this problem easier, the brain/computer relies on tricks so that it does not need to process the image completely. Perhaps the most interesting of these relies on feedback from later areas in the visual system to earlier ones. When we recognize an object, we don&rsquo;t need to process all the little details: we can assume our cat is furry, and the details of the fur pattern don&rsquo;t change how we interact with the cat. So when we see a pattern that looks like a cat, later processing stages amplify the patterns they seem to be receiving and send these back to the earlier stages. Now the earlier stages don&rsquo;t need to fill in the basic cat structure, which cuts down on the neural processing required.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150621142924-red-tree-orig.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150621142942-red-tree-small-long.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Original "red tree" image run through an artificial neural network, asking it to recognize images not contained in it. Images via Google <a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPX0SCl7OzWilt9LnuQliattX4OUCj_8EP65_cTVnBmS1jnYgsGQAieQUc1VQWdgQ?key=aVBxWjhwSzg2RjJWLWRuVFBBZEN1d205bUdEMnhB" target="_blank">Inceptionism Gallery</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>Such &ldquo;predictive&rdquo; processing has lead to the understanding that the brain becomes a mirror of the outside world, and our perception of the world is viewed through that mirror. When learning about the world, we see new patterns and classify them into distinct types. This strengthens the connections between brain cells representing the pattern, so that commonly seen patterns get written into the brain&rsquo;s architecture of neural connections. The brain then analyses its visual input through these neural connections: it imposes its architecture, and our previous experience, onto our view of the world.</span><span>&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">GoogLeNet, extrapolating from human-tagged images in a "training set"&mdash;this is a cat, this is a tree, this is a car&mdash;does the same thing. It can recognize and identify objects types based on what it's "seen" before. Google&rsquo;s most recent trick asks what happens when we run an image through a circuit representing a chosen object type not present in the image. This will see the image through the filter of that object type, and impose the chosen object type onto the image anywhere that it might be a valid interpretation of that part of the image. For example, when the system is asked to recognize animals, animal faces are exposed in the random patterns of clouds or tree branches.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150622095637-waterfall-orig.jpg" alt="" width="325" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150622095650-waterfall.jpg" alt="" width="325" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">The original waterfall becomes an enchanted woodland glade. Images via Google&nbsp;<a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPX0SCl7OzWilt9LnuQliattX4OUCj_8EP65_cTVnBmS1jnYgsGQAieQUc1VQWdgQ?key=aVBxWjhwSzg2RjJWLWRuVFBBZEN1d205bUdEMnhB" target="_blank">Inceptionism Gallery</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Many people who have once taken hallucinogenic drugs find that the resulting images look just like things they have seen while tripping, as comments on <a href="http://news.slashdot.org/story/15/06/19/211204/turning-neural-networks-upside-down-produces-psychedelic-visuals">Slashdot </a>and the <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/jun/18/google-image-recognition-neural-network-androids-dream-electric-sheep"><em>Guardian</em></a> show. This is a testament to the accuracy of GoogLeNet in mimicking the human visual brain. Many drugs interfere with our perceptual processing in simple ways, like making the room appear to spin. However, the class of hallucinogens that contains magic mushrooms (psilocybin), LSD, mescaline, and DMT alters perception in this specific way. They impose patterns from things we have seen before onto our visual input, making us see faces in the clouds or intricate Oriental rug patterns on fields of grass and canopies of trees. These patterns are constantly shifting as the brain changes which patterns of feedback are activated. The resulting hallucinations vary from simple distortions of edges and colors at low doses (see the Seurat image, above), to dream-like scenes&nbsp;(at top) with no relationship to the incoming visual image at high doses. GoogLeNet&rsquo;s outputs can mimic either, depending on which layers of the network are activated.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150621165423-Louis_wain_cats.png" alt="" width="200" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150621165550-606px-Van_Gogh_-_Starry_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" alt="" width="450" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(left) Cats by Louis Wain (right) Vincent van Gogh,&nbsp;<em>The Starry Night</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This class of hallucinogen activates the higher levels of our visual processing by activating a type of serotonin receptor. Many of the drugs used to treat schizophrenia act, in part, by blocking the same receptor. It seems that some of schizophrenia&rsquo;s ability to induce hallucinations may work through similar mechanisms to the hallucinogenic drugs. This may help us understand why some of GoogLeNet&rsquo;s output reminds us of the distortions of reality seen in Van Gogh&rsquo;s brushwork in <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=The_Starry_Night#/media/File:Van_Gogh_-_Starry_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg"><em>The Starry Night</em></a> and <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vincent_Van_Gogh_0016.jpg"><em>Cypresses</em></a>, and Louis Wain&rsquo;s later <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Wain#/media/File:Louis_wain_cats.png">drawings of cats</a>. Both artists spent time in mental institutions and diagnoses of&nbsp;schizophrenia&mdash;both during their lives and posthumously&mdash;have been put forward as explanations for the swirling, kaleidoscopic passages in their artwork.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Google&rsquo;s engineers and researchers have developed an excellent tool to classify image content on the internet. But GoogLeNet also offers unexpected insight into the workings of the system it aims to mimic&mdash;the human brain&mdash;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">allowing us to simulate experiments we simply could not perform on humans or animals.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While the psychedelic images released last week might appear novel or gimmicky to some, or like art to others, exercises like these are actually bridging the gap between human and computer visual systems. And it seems that when they mimic the brain closely enough, artificial intelligences not only see like we see, but also trip like we trip.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Ben M. Harvey</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Ben M. Harvey is a researcher in the Department of Psychology and Educational Sciences at the University of Coimbra.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Neural net &ldquo;dream&rdquo;&mdash; generated purely from random noise, using a network trained on places by&nbsp;<a href="http://places.csail.mit.edu/" target="_blank">MIT Computer Science and AI Laboratory</a>.&nbsp;GoogLeNet via&nbsp;Google&nbsp;<a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPX0SCl7OzWilt9LnuQliattX4OUCj_8EP65_cTVnBmS1jnYgsGQAieQUc1VQWdgQ?key=aVBxWjhwSzg2RjJWLWRuVFBBZEN1d205bUdEMnhB" target="_blank">Inceptionism Gallery</a>)</span></p> Mon, 22 Jun 2015 14:52:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Working (it) Out with Gillian Dykeman: Daniel Keller <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Welcome to the third installation of the Artslant podcast series, <em>Working (it) Out</em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My name is Gillian Dykeman, and I'm a visual artist living in Toronto, Ontario. This summer, I am interviewing artists to ask about the role of audience in their practice. Each interview will begin with one question: "Does art require an audience?"</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/211012951&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="450"></iframe></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Working (it) Out </span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Episode Two |&nbsp;<strong>Daniel Keller: Party of Five</strong></span></p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;"Good" art (2:15)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;<a href="http://www.oninstagram.com/cairncollection" target="_blank">Stacking stones</a> and negentropy (4:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Spirulina Spiritual&nbsp;(13:50)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Strategies to indicate significance (15:45) &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Art world elitism, or assuming the populous can think? (17:50)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Environment, Politics, Future thinking (22:00)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Zero Impact technology (25:00)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Party of Five and Inside Jokes&nbsp;(27:00)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> </ul> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My guest today is Daniel Keller, a Berlin-based artist from Detroit. Keller's expected audience is more the traditional gallery goer than was the case with our last two guests. His work strives nonetheless to function on multiple valences, and he is interested in rewarding a deeper engagement with the exhibition. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">His current exhibition (<a href="http://aktnz.com/kai-%E2%9D%A4-dalston-bushwick/" target="_blank"><em>Kai &hearts; <em><span style="text-decoration: line-through;">Dalston</span></em>&nbsp;Bushwick</em></a> at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/venues/show/39851-kraupa-tuskany-zeidler" target="_blank">Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler</a>) and its elements (sculpture, fictional text, growing tanks) function as nodes of a speculative future California populated with celebrity offspring and spirulina. Keller wraps cultural critique with inside jokes and gestures toward negentropy.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Music: New Order, "Bizarre Love Triangle" (Extended Dance Version)<br /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619113616-2_DK_exhibition_view_2.jpg" alt="" width="620" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Exhibition view,&nbsp;<em>Kai &hearts;&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: line-through;">Dalston</span>&nbsp;Bushwick</em>, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin, 2015&nbsp;courtesy Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin photo: Hans-Georg Gaul</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619114632-12_DK_Stack_Relief__Kai_Zuckerberg_Bushwick_Kutcher__2015.jpg" alt="" height="400" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619114659-6_DK_Stack_Relief____Scout__2015.jpg" alt="" height="400" /></span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(left)&nbsp;<em>Stack Relief (Kai Zuckerberg + Bushwick Kutcher)</em>, 2015, CNC milled birch plywood, black anodized aluminum,<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">acrylic glass, Hi-Macs composite, high density PU foam foam, stainless steel 160 x 130 cm<br /></span><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(right) </span><em style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Stack Relief (</em>☆ミ&nbsp;<em>Scout)</em>,</em><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;2015 CNC milled Hi-Macs composite, mdf, cast polyurethane, stainless steel 70 x 50 cm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Both: Courtesy Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin photo: Hans-Georg Gaul</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619115000-4_DK_Kai_Dalston_Bushwick_Banner_2015.jpg" alt="" height="420" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619115035-7_DK_LLCMarriage_Counseling_2015.jpg" alt="" height="420" /></span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(left) <em>Kai &hearts;&nbsp;<span style="text-decoration: line-through;">Dalston</span>&nbsp;Bushwick</em> banner,<em>&nbsp;</em>2015 rendering by Britta Jacobs printed on fabric, chains, carabiners 150 x 100 cm edition of 5 (+ 2AP)&nbsp;<br />(right) <em>LLCMarriage Counseling: You Can Be Right Or You Can Be Married</em>, 2015 glass doors acquired from sofa shop in Kreuzberg <br />vandalized by anti-gentrification protesters and repaired by local glass company, steel 230 x 190 x 110 cm<br />Both: Courtesy Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin photo: Hans-Georg Gaul</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619115442-9_DK_Onanet_Spiruline_1_2015.jpg" alt="" width="620" /></span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>Onanet Spiruline 1</em>, 2015 living Spirulina algae, aqueous nutrient solution, &lsquo;nanocube&rsquo; glass aquariums, power plugs, heaters, airstones, air compressors, <br />LEDs, pumps, tubing, steel, silver, cubic zirconia dimensions variable. Courtesy Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin photo: Hans-Georg Gaul</span></p> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619115613-Daniel_Keller_Spirito_Scala_63rd-77th_STEPS_-_Art_project_Staircase_2.jpg" alt="" height="420" /></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619115627-Daniel_Keller_Spirito_Scala_63rd-77th_STEPS_-_Art_project_Staircase_9.jpg" alt="" height="420" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;">Installation view,&nbsp;<em>Spirito Scala, </em>2014,&nbsp;63rd-77th Steps, Bari (IT)&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman">Gillian Dykeman</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 11:59:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Faith Holland's Cum "Paintings" Aren't Your Usual Cum Paintings <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">First, apologies for the puns to come. It&rsquo;s difficult to talk about sexuality and eroticism without making a bad pun or two. Sexuality has seemingly always been a site of discomfort in our culture: through it, we are laid naked and bare, both literally and via the fetishes that express the darkest sublimations of gendered relations. The advent of a communication tool and platform for largely consequence-free expression&mdash;the internet&mdash;has greatly affected the role pornography and sexuality play in our everyday lives. Faith Holland&rsquo;s exhibition <em>Technophilia</em> at Transfer Gallery explores the crash between human sexuality and the internet in ways that range from funny (there&rsquo;s a tissue box below the exhibition title in the gallery) to thought-provoking, all the while trying to reform the inherent patriarchal nature of pornographic cinema as it currently exists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150618151929-ookie_canvas-flat-mag.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Faith Holland,<em> Ookie Canvas I</em>, 2015. 84"x47.25", Edition of 1 + AP</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The most dominating and visually enticing work in the exhibition is <em>Ookie Canvas I</em>, an abstract expressionist &ldquo;painting&rdquo; printed on canvas, crafted from an interactive project that has grown out of Holland&rsquo;s previous <a href="http://www.redtube.com/asugarhigh/videos" target="_blank">porn interventions</a>&nbsp;[NSFW]&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">on Redtube</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. Earlier this year, Holland placed an open call for &ldquo;sub/emissions,&rdquo; riffing off the idea of cum tributes, a practice where (mostly) men cum on images (or screens) of their favorite porn stars and post the video. Holland asked for &ldquo;anonymous submissions of CUM SHOTS that will be used as part of an artwork. Submissions will be accepted from any and all genders as long as it is fluid emitted as the result of an orgasm.&rdquo; Each shot was then isolated and altered using color saturation values and digitally collaged onto the </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ookie Canvases</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The submission process itself proved insightful. Holland mentioned one individual who submitted his contribution with the following note:</span></p> <blockquote style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 30px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I sent this video to my ex girlfriend when she and I weren&rsquo;t together last November. She was in love with (the beauty of) my cock. On the video I tell her how deep my primal need was to have a baby from her, cumming even after three times in an hour. She did get consciously pregnant from me, first try, one months [sic] after I sent her the video. However, then at 8 weeks pregnant, she got a panic attack, feared the lack of sufficient financials in the future (not an issue in this country, but she was from Hungary, which isn&rsquo;t stable), ran out the house in panic, got an abortion, and went back to Hungary.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The expression of sexuality online often exposes an interesting need to lay bare the personal details of our lives. The act of cumming, even within a (mostly) anonymized space, is still an extremely personal act. Holland&rsquo;s interest in the material, however, is rightfully a political one. When asked what interested her in cum, she responded: &ldquo;The imbalance of visualizing pleasure that happens. The way that porn routinely ends with a man coming on a woman or a man. It indicates male pleasure and not female pleasure.&rdquo; The act of cumming on someone is also an exercise of power: there is a quality of latent potency and an expression of excess virility. The&nbsp;<em>Ookie Cookie&nbsp;</em>series hamstrings this expression of power through aestheticization.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150618152018-rockets.gif" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Animated gif from&nbsp;<em>Visual Orgasms, </em>2013-2015. Variable length, variable dimensions, edition of 5 + AP</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Pornography is a male-dominated domain and the mores and practices it espouses are increasingly at greater odds within a progressive, egalitarian society. There are conflicting reports as to just how deep online pornography penetrates. (A&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/files/old-media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_Online%20Video%202013.pdf" target="_blank">2013 Pew survey</a> suggested that only a meager 12 percent of Americans watch online pornography, yet at the date of publication, the <a href="http://www.alexa.com/topsites/global" target="_blank">44th most popular website</a> in the world is xvideos.com; Netflix sits at 53.) When <a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2013/10/11/pew_online_viewing_study_percentage_of_women_who_watch_online_porn_is_growing.html" target="_blank">Slate</a> wrote about the Pew survey, they called the article &ldquo;How Many Woman Are Not Admitting to Pew That They Watch Porn.&rdquo; The consensus at the time was that women mostly get their kicks from erotic fan fiction and romance novels, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/42829" target="_blank">a world we explored last month</a>. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This is an understandable conclusion. The vast majority of porn online is made by and for a male audience which perpetuates patriarchal attitudes when it comes to sex and sexuality. Why would women watch media that denigrates, belittles, and objectifies their own gender? Cultural production needs to actively address and mitigate the slew of aggressively exploitative, patriarichal porn that is currently influencing every 16-year-old with an internet connection. Not through illegalization, banning, etc. but by investment in and production of alternative forms that actively address these underlying codes of power. If pornography can manifest our subconscious in ways that other media cannot, then it must also be able to change our subconscious attitudes founded in patriarichal power dynamics.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Motion_Picture_Production_Code" target="_blank">Hays Code</a> and the culture wars led by an energized conservative-Christian base that were able to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEA_Four" target="_blank">prevent and censor art to an extreme degree</a> seem like a distant past. Non-hierarchical media (like the web) are mostly to thank for this. The mass availability of pornography online, however, has and will continue to have broader cultural effects. This author would like to think that the&nbsp;broad availability and acceptance of pornography&nbsp;is having an opening effect on how we as a society practice our sexuality, allowing for more varied and inclusive kinks to become acceptable expressions of our relationships with one another. Holland remains skeptical:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 30px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Unfortunately things are becoming more sexualized whereas expressions of sexuality aren&rsquo;t really any more accepted to a certain degree. LGBTQ rights have blossomed, we have gay marriage&ndash;who thought that was going to happen ten years ago? At the same time, there still is a huge culture of shaming, especially for women there is still very much a double bind. &lsquo;We want you to be a sexual object but if you present yourself as having a sexuality that you want to fulfill...&rsquo; It&rsquo;s not simple.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150618151810-technophilia-w-popcorn.gif" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Left to right:&nbsp;<em>It Needs You,&nbsp;</em>2015,&nbsp;<em>Sub/emissions</em>, 2015,&nbsp;<em>Visual Orgasms</em>, 2013-2015,&nbsp;<em>Ookie Canvas I</em>, 2015. Installation view</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Visual Orgasms</em>, a projection piece on the back wall of the gallery cycles through gifs that depict symbolic representations of orgasm: trains coming out of tunnels, champagne corks popping, rockets taking off, fireworks exploding. A nod to Hollywood's restrictive Hays Code, <em>Visual Orgasms</em> explores previous ways in which western visual culture represented ejaculation, not orgasm. These visual representations serve as a medium between the intimate act of sexual intercourse and the technophilia that Holland ultimately comes to investigate. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Matrice</em>, <em>It Needs You</em>, and <em>Centerfold</em> all explore this eroticization of technology that must occur when it becomes the medium for sexual pleasure. <em>It Needs You</em> consists of ethernet wall plates and hundreds of feet of ethernet cables that spill out from the wall, glistening with lubricant supplied by a nearby pump jug. <em>Matrice</em>, a net of ethernet cords that emerges on the floor from a corner of the gallery represents an important confluence for Holland. The term &ldquo;matrix,&rdquo; a common metaphor for digital life,&nbsp;comes from the French &ldquo;<em>matrice</em>&rdquo; meaning &ldquo;womb.&rdquo; Holland's interest in this doubly-bound term is foundational to one of her earlier projects, <em><a href="http://www.vvvvvv.xxx/" target="_blank">VVVVVV</a></em>, which practices new vocabularies for a feminist pornography.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Shifting the aestheticization of patriarchal power within pornography can be a supremely simple act. Holland related a story to me where during a book release for <em><a href="http://www.feministpress.org/books/feminist-porn-book"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Feminist Porn Book</span></a></em>, edited by&nbsp;feminist educator/pornographer/director Tristan Taormino, Holland asked&nbsp;about the formal differences between heteronormative porn and feminist porn. Taormino&nbsp;responded that she once submitted a porn to a production company and got it back with edits. Someone&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">had written in big red letters: &ldquo;<span style="color: #ff0000;">MAN DOES NOT CUM IN THIS SCENE.</span>&rdquo; Taormino answered, &ldquo;I know&hellip;&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/153044-joel-kuennen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Faith Holland,<em>&nbsp;Ookie Canvas I </em>(detail), 2015. 84"x47.25", Edition of 1 + AP. All images: Courtesy of the artist and Transfer Gallery.)</span></p> Mon, 22 Jun 2015 14:19:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Do Words Have Voices: Talking to Martin Boyce's Installations <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Walking to the Museum F&uuml;r Gegenwartkunst is, unavoidably and of itself, a romantic passage. Located just off the Rhine River, the experience of water is embedded into the ethos of building&mdash;both figuratively and practically within the architecture of the space&mdash;as viewable from the glass hallways between the museum&rsquo;s galleries. The river, a fittingly meandering foil to the small path that leads to Martin Boyce&rsquo;s current exhibition, offers an experience of aesthetisized nature.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Few contexts or experiences of an exhibition rely heavily on the transit of the viewer to the institution, though in Basel in June, this context is nearly inseparable; I was stopped along the way by Parcours, with <a href="https://www.artbasel.com/-/media/ArtBasel/Pictures/Press_Images_Basel/2015_PARCOURS_ONSITE/ARTBASEL2015_SSC_08_374.jpg" target="_blank">a piece by Davide Balula</a>&mdash;a cart that offers four flavors of ice cream based on images of paintings: river, dirt, smoke, and burnt wood.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Boyce puts a similar concept of the outdoors into practice: nature&rsquo;s use as a retreat for the Romantics, but also as a source for the installations he presents, and their associated affects. He does not do so in a way that feels contrived or prescriptive&mdash;this is not, after all, an intentional or demanding framework of the show&mdash;but in an intensely imaginative and spiritualized way that is at the same time fundamentally secular. Here, we are not charmed by the power of the work to alter our person, but by our body in relation to physical space, and its subtle imprint on our senses.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I walked into the museum with the white noise sound of water rushing by me. With the taste of <em>river</em> on my tongue. This is an exhibition for synaesthetes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As with Romanticism, when nature talks to you, you talk back. Below is a series of call and answer responses to the installations on view&mdash;correspondences&mdash;marked first by the title of the works.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619091559-cms-image-004621649.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Martin Boyce, <em>Do Words Have Voices</em>, 2011 (left). Installation view. Courtesy of the Museum F&uuml;r Gegenwartkunst, Basel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">1. <em>Do Words Have Voices</em> (2011)</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> There is one painting in the room. The word <em>Songs</em>, placed in rigid letters designed by Boyce in his own font, are inserted into the grey cement-like surface of the canvas, each letter falling across the flat plane&mdash;S-O-N-G-S&mdash;and landing into the viewer&rsquo;s vision, like low somber notes on a grand piano. If sounds are substitutes for visual forms, this exhibition navigates the boundaries of this and other senses with great fluidity. The touch of the details within the space are almost symphonic.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Where the walls meet the floor, designed ventilation grills are installed just above standard height. Camouflaged by the familiar. What air would this installation circulate? I imagine the possibility that the exhaled air in a space could carry emotions if matched by the concerted feelings of a group. Could the breath of a whole room of hopeful people capture anticipative air? Apprehensive air, impatient air, ominous air.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If every word in a library had its voice, the world would go deaf.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619091829-05_1593.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Martin Boyce, <em>A River in the Trees</em>, 2009. Detail. Courtesy of the Museum F&uuml;r Gegenwartkunst, Basel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">2. <em>A River in the Trees</em> (2009)</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You are walking on a pathway of stepping stones across a river with no water. A virtual park of designed objects. Folded paper nets are scattered like leaves that fell from nowhere. Perhaps these leaves will replace ours to simulate the fall when we no longer have seasons. The folds suggest a previous form, now unformed. Formless. Or are these fallen birds? I imagine each piece scattered along the floor folding back into cranes, and lifting off the ground.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If there were no more water, would its architecture still remain? I think of who would visit the great craters of the sea, if ponds would stay hollow in the ground or be leveled, if sailboats would still be docked near long stretches of dry plains.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619092108-images-cms-image-004621648.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Martin Boyce, <em>Our Love is Like the Flowers, the Rain, the Sea and the Hours (Black and Yellow Branches with Trees)</em>. Installation view. Courtesy of the Museum F&uuml;r Gegenwartkunst, Basel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">3. <em>Our Love is Like the Flowers, the Rain, the Sea and the Hours (Black and Yellow Branches with Trees)</em> (2002)</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The saplings are made of white neon. It is a cool light, like the one used to grow real trees when the sun is not an option.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I would under other circumstances criticize or challenge the crutch of lyricism in this piece&mdash;the poetic titles in the exhibition overall could be more congruent to the experience of the work, which is at times quite formal&mdash;but I will not at this moment.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150619092213-boyce.jpg" alt="" width="500" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Martin Boyce, <em>Mobile (For 1056 Endless Heights)</em>. Installation view. Powder coated steel, chain, wire&nbsp;and Jacobsen Series 7 chair parts</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">4. <em>Mobile (For 1056 Endless Heights)</em> and <em>Broken Fall (Wall Mounted Ashtray)</em> (2002)</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I wonder what this piece would look like if Boyce used the furniture of an entire home under the same pretext. If an entire life of lived furniture were to be broken and hung up for purely aesthetic pleasure. Instead, here, the kitchen chair&mdash;where innumerable serious conversations were had&mdash;floats above the heads of the museum public.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Is this chair any more or less domestic than the Calder mobiles sold in museum gift stores?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I leave speculating how Bas Jan Ader would have performed on the river raging just outside these walls, visible through the glass bridge that separates the wings of the museum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/183982-stephanie-cristello?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Stephanie Cristello</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:Martin Boyce, <em>A River in the Trees</em>, 2009. Installation view. Courtesy of the Museum F&uuml;r Gegenwartkunst, Basel)</span></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 09:58:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Basel 2015 Trends: Irony Rules at the New Rhy Art Fair <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the early hours of opening day at Rhypark, a gentle rain falls upon Basel. While the sun tries to break through the overcast clouds, the weather cannot squash the fact that the city is already illuminated by art and global attention.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Rhy Art Fair is the newest addition to the fair circuit, making its Basel debut this year. Presented by the Swiss organizer Contemporary Art International Zurich (founded in 1999 and now celebrating its 17th year) Rhy Art Fair showcases emerging talent in Basel. With a selected roster barely exceeding 30 exhibitors, the fair's curation celebrates young galleries and international/young artists. Showcasing a variety of disciplines, Rhy is a destination off the too-beaten path for burgeoning collectors seeking a dynamic cross section of work and talent. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Given its intimate scale and hand-picked roster, Rhy is certainly a change of pace from the larger satellites currently running in Basel (such as LISTE, Scope, and Volta). It's easily reached from the Messeplatz, the Art Basel fairground, by a 15-minute tram ride, but despite their close proximity the fairs feel worlds apart.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150619022730-becchio-die-Kolonie-300.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Andr&eacute; Becchio,&nbsp;<em>Arctic Friends</em>, 2011,&nbsp;Acrylic on wood, 400 x 600 cm.&nbsp;Courtesy&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Rhy Art Fair, Basel 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This year, irony seems to be a key trend among the works on show. Upon arriving promptly at&nbsp;11am&nbsp;when the doors open, artists and galleries are still tinkering the overhead lights in their booths and fine tuning the wiring and resolutions of video installations. With the Rhine River running alongside the space, the setting is idyllic and tranquil, far removed from the frenzy of the neighboring art spectacle. A whimsical arctic installation by Andr&eacute;&nbsp;Becchio&nbsp;greets visitors at the entrance: a three-tiered snowman with carrot nose, top hat, eyes of coal, and extending arms that resemble found branches guards a family of penguins. While the winter scene is out of season, the snowman and his family of penguins seem to fit their new environment set against the backdrop of the Rhine.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150619023038-harnisch-gerbo-300.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dan Gerbo, <em>The Ferrari Pierced</em>, 2013,&nbsp;Ferrari Testarossa (1989), Mixed Media, 450 x 200 x 202 cm.&nbsp;Courtesy&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Galerie Zum Harnisch and&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Rhy Art Fair, Basel 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Next, conceptual artist Dan Gerbo's installation <em>The Ferrari Pierced</em> is parked right next to the ticket booth. At first, you only notice the rear of the vehicle with vanity plates bearing the artist&rsquo;s name. But once you walk around the front of the car, you discover an oversized wooden stake imaples the bonnet, from the engine through the hood. Piercing the precious Ferrari metal as it were a matchbox, the jagged stake renders the Ferrari inoperable: Garbo&rsquo;s work focuses on our cultural obsession with material goods&mdash;ironic here in situ&mdash;but the stake has been positioned in such a way that the car can be removed and driven.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150619023824-keller-civilised-3296-big.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pete Keller<strong>,&nbsp;</strong><em>Am I civilised?</em>, Acrylic on canvas, 90 x 130 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Rhy Art Fair, Basel 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Basel can often leave the casual or solo visitor feeling somewhat intimidated. Pete Keller&rsquo;s body of acrylic paintings help to initiate a conversation. In the tongue-in-cheek work <em>How to Casually Acknowledge Someone</em>&nbsp;Keller assigns four basic steps to inspire a dialogue. Addressing the vulnerability that so many of us (even seasoned art goers) experience in this work is welcome, even in the relatively relaxed environment of Rhy.</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/65205-a-moret?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">A. Moret</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image at the top:&nbsp;Andrea Freckmann &amp; Theun Govers<strong>,&nbsp;</strong><em>FREMDHAUS</em>, 2014,&nbsp;Mixed media installation, 120 x 340 x 250 cm. Courtesy Rhy Art Fair Basel 2015)</span></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 08:17:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list This Must Be the Place <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/42032" target="_blank">art bar</a> has an amorphous history, beginning perhaps with Cabaret Voltaire and reaching critical mass with those pilot program Starbucks that serve wine and put out incomplete chess sets after sunset. My own baptism into this genre of space was descending into the speakeasy underneath China Art Objects&rsquo; original Chung King Road location seven or eight years ago. Cramped, hot, definitely not up to code&mdash;nonetheless, I felt insanely glamorous, tucked into an odoriferous red-lit corner, sipping warm beer, surrounded by people I considered categorically smarter and more interesting than me.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150618201223-CONTACT_LA-15.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a recent commencement speech, John Waters tells a fresh crop of RISD grads that &ldquo;being truly rich means not having to be surrounded by assholes.&rdquo; This is a good approximation of what I consider glamour: the frisson of being exactly where you want to be, and just slightly unsure that you belong. Los Angeles jealously guards her secrets, which makes them all the more rewarding to discover. Knowing this, real-estate moguls, PR proxies, and other agents of entertainment often collude to erect elaborate decoys known as clubs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150618201249-CONTACT_LA-17.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cayetano Ferrer&rsquo;s <em>Contact</em>, a one-night-only art bar/installation/party made possible by Absolut Vodka alighted upon us earlier this month. Taking place in the Tiffany Ballroom of The Biltmore Hotel, its Hype-Williams-meets-beaux-arts glamour felt less like my gritty, romanticized vision of an "art bar" and more like the clubs I found myself flailing around in while working high-end retail in West Hollywood in my early twenties. Parties with iconic-sounding names, helmed by celebrity DJs, and invariably guarded by a clipboarded woman standing next to a stoic, abundantly-necked bouncer. I breached them only after someone prodded on my behalf. My drinks were never free. Months later I might appear in the background of a reality television show about ambitious young women in L.A., on a special <em>Girls Night Out</em> episode. I was embarrassed by these revelations, but the shaded tone of those who pointed them out to me was not lost. John Berger&rsquo;s version of glamour hinges on &ldquo;personal social envy being a common and widespread emotion,&rdquo; but as I was incapable of envying myself, this glamour felt put upon. Like body glitter.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150618201306-CONTACT_LA-5.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">That Ferrer more or less recreated these conditions for a &ldquo;fantasy party[...]where the artist picks the location, decor, soundscape, and composes cocktails together with a mixologist&rdquo; is apropos considering his interest in space, Los Angeles, and especially his hometown of Las Vegas (whose megaton nightlife makes ours look like a ren fair). It's not about architecture per se, but ornamentation, representation, and the former as the latter. For the Hammer Museum&rsquo;s 2012 <a href="http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2012/made-in-la-2012/" target="_blank"><em>Made in LA</em></a> biennial, Ferrer created <em>Grand Entrance</em>, a chaotic patchwork of different casino carpets entered through an archway depicting displaced architectural elements rendered as light-up signage. Vegas' pitch perfect absurdity made newly visible by folding pastiche onto itself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150618201320-CONTACT_LA-14.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Back at the Biltmore, sipping glow-in-the-dark cocktails laced with B12, I watched Ferrer&rsquo;s candy-colored lights slowly outline crown mouldings, fleur de lis, gargoyles, and portraits of European explorers. The ephemeral gildings of light and sound drew more attention to the room&rsquo;s odd mix of revivalisms than the glare of day ever could. &ldquo;The Tiffany Room at the Biltmore was my first choice from the beginning&rdquo; Ferrer said via email after the party. In retrospect the installation (executed in collaboration with artists TOTAL FREEDOM, Jacqueline K. Gordon, and Nate Hess) worked to chisel loose both the gilding and meaning of The Biltmore. TF&rsquo;s droning soundscape felt like the thumping beat of a club song spread out into a aural tableau of itself. My nerves pooled at my feet. I was on a date, I think, &nbsp;that eventually wound through a private karaoke room in Little Tokyo before heading through another bar&mdash;a regular bar&mdash;and ended on a desolate cliff somewhere in the hills of Elysian Park, the pink rim of sunrise barely coming up from behind the beatific sports lighting of Dodger Stadium. Similar lights are used in film to create day where there is none. They&rsquo;re called god lamps.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;This is one of those nights&hellip; those nights they say you have in Los Angeles.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I don&rsquo;t know how to look at Los Angeles. It takes the work of art, often made by a recent transplant or transient, for me to see her as she might appear to those who haven&rsquo;t grown up between taco stands and movie sets&mdash;the flip-flap of tortilla couples on a grill, a gorgeous mobster leaning on a sun-dappled 1930s chrysler between takes. Her magic is representational, but perhaps buried somewhere in my bones, thumb-wrestling Jesus Christ. It takes a bit of smoke and mirrors to make her visible. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Situated across from Pershing Square, where you can skate tiny circles on a diffident ice rink that gets slapped down every Christmas, The Biltmore hotel is a 1920s mash of Spanish, Mediterranean, Renaissance-revival, and Beaux Arts stylings. Inside, the Greek, Roman, Castilian, and Florentine flourishes make for a cosmic latte of elegance. Designed by a <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schultze_%26_Weaver" target="_blank">New York firm</a>, on the premise of California heritage, the building certainly falls outside the canon of Modernist wonders we generally like to show off, but Ferrer is attuned to this tension, and in fact sought it: &ldquo;I'm more interested in this eclectic period of revivalism, because these buildings sit outside of the canon and distort history in many ways.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">History is written by those who control the lighting.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214407-christina-catherine-martinez?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christina Catherine Martinez</a></span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214407-christina-catherine-martinez?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images:&nbsp;Jasmine Safaeian courtesy of Absolut.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Tue, 23 Jun 2015 20:08:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Why Crowdfunding Is the Most Art Basel Can Do in Terms of Social Responsibility <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When you walk onto Basel&rsquo;s Messeplatz this week you can&rsquo;t miss it: the temporary Gesamtkunstwerk with the rhetorical title <em>Do We Dream Under The Same Sky</em>. It consists of a bamboo structure designed by architects Nicholaus Hirsch and Michel M&uuml;ller. Inside, chef Antto Melasniemi manages his personally designed solar kitchen, working with locally grown spices and herbs. Besides unusual fusion snacks such as fish ice cream and "bastard pad Thai," invented by Melasniemi and artist Rirkrit Tiravanija, the menu contains discussions on sustainability, social design, and the geopolitics of food production. <em>Do We Dream Under The Same Sky</em> is a pilot for a <a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2016983975/the-studio-residency-at-the-land?ref=hhe3pd" target="_blank">long-term project</a> Tiravanija and fellow artist Kamin Lertchaiprasert are planning to realize in Thailand: an artistic utopia, presenting an ecologically and socially sustainable model for future artistic practice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Social engagement is back on the artistic agenda in a big way. Either triggered by the necessity to prove their worth in a world of diminishing subsidies or a genuinely felt need to do good&mdash;it doesn&rsquo;t matter, really&mdash;artists have stepped out of their studios and into the world, armed with the conviction and alternative ways to improve it. <em>Do We Dream Under The Same Sky</em> is only the latest project on an ever-expanding list. As long ago as 1993 Rick Lowe started <a href="http://projectrowhouses.org/" target="_blank">Project Row Houses</a>, in 15 years transforming run-down shotgun houses in a poor African American neighborhood in Houston by starting an artist residency and an educational program that continues today. Photographer David Goldblatt&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.marketphotoworkshop.co.za/" target="_blank">Market Photo Workshop</a> offers down and out kids in Johannesburg a way out of economic and educational poverty by teaching them visual literacy. And Renzo Martens runs a <a href="http://www.humanactivities.org/circulation/" target="_blank">"gentrification project"</a> in the heartland of the Democratic Republic of Congo, aimed at raising the local standard of living through artistic production.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150618102553-ARTBASEL2015_MEG_09_453.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Rirkrit Tiravanija preparing food in&nbsp;<em>Do We Dream Under the Same Sky</em>, 2015, Art Basel in Basel.&nbsp;&copy; Art Basel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">With so many artists taking their social responsibility and acting upon it in concrete ways, the question imposes itself: shouldn&rsquo;t the commercial side of the art world as well? In the corporate world putting on a humane face has become second nature. You&rsquo;ll be hard pressed to find a company without an explicit Corporate Social Responsibility clause in its mission statement. Any commercial enterprise, especially those in the business-to-consumer bracket, that would blatantly state its business aims as just making a profit, would be publicly burned at the stake and blackballed by consumers. So annual reports are enlivened with phrases like "strengthening the community," "nurturing talent," and "improving quality of life." Considerable sums of money are pumped into programs for sports, health, education and&mdash;of course&mdash;the arts.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And that&rsquo;s perhaps the most obvious reason why the question of CSR policy in the art market rarely comes up: the arts traditionally stand on the receiving end of the equation. The status of artists as needy and worthy of financial support has somehow rubbed off on the entire commercial structure around them. For smaller art fairs this might not even be that far off the mark. They have substantial overheads that have to be covered with ever more competitive rates, resulting in slim profit margins, often barely enough to keep on going. But for a giant like Art Basel it&rsquo;s a completely different story. With operations on three continents it&rsquo;s a true multinational, catering to the top-end of the market and in a position to impose hefty rates per square meter and other services. The Art Basel organization isn&rsquo;t exactly strapped for cash.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nIe6StkBZ1Q" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Via Art Basel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A feeling of unease about CSR must have trickled down into the institutional consciousness, though, since last year Art Basel announced that its launch of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artbasel.com/en/Crowdfunding" target="_blank">a crowdfunding program</a> to benefit non-profit art projects. The fair teamed up with platform <a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/pages/artbasel" target="_blank">Kickstarter</a> to promote candidates throughout the year, ranging from residencies and bookstores to a mobile app and a digital archive. And the Art Basel endorsement works: as of this moment all but five of the proposed good causes have been successfully funded. It&rsquo;s doubtful whether these projects would have been able to attract this much public attention and funds without the fair&rsquo;s PR-clout. For Art Basel it&rsquo;s a cheap way to improve its image, an indulgence that doesn&rsquo;t cost a penny. Cheap and risk-free, since the prot&eacute;g&eacute;s have been carefully selected to fit the fair&rsquo;s aura, resulting in a rather partial composition with American initiatives overrepresented and Rirkrit Taravanija&rsquo;s artistic utopia in Thailand being one of only four non-Western projects.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150618102919-49b4630687dcfd3fdc9ffc7ba962c339_original.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Rendering of Nicholaus Hirsch and Michel M&uuml;ller's&nbsp;Studio Building for the land foundation. Rirkrit Tiravanija and Kamin Lertchaiprasert. Via<a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2016983975/the-studio-residency-at-the-land?ref=hhe3pd" target="_blank"> Kickstarter</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Maybe Art Basel should put its money where its mouth is and fund some worthy causes itself instead of asking its visitors to do so. The fair could take its cue from the short-lived Overture, the event that styled itself as "the only art fair during Art Basel Miami Beach with a truly socially responsible mission," including supporting a school art program. But it&rsquo;s unlikely that Art Basel will. The moment the press release about the fair supporting a festival in Nigeria or residency in Uppsala would become public, a storm of protest would arise. Protest by the fair&rsquo;s participants, that is. Gallerists would argue that indirectly it&rsquo;s them footing the bill. Of course, they&nbsp;<em>are</em>&nbsp;paying the bills for fair managers&rsquo; bonuses, for example, but such expenses are much less visible.&nbsp;If the fair has excess funds, gallerists would argue, it should give them a discount on their booths instead of squandering it on pet projects. They are a good cause themselves, after all.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://www.kickstarter.com/pages/artbasel/widget.html" frameborder="0" width="448px" height="311px"></iframe></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This attitude is part of a larger system of norms and beliefs, placing the art market outside the realm of regular economics. In the art market the rules of supply and demand don&rsquo;t apply: works are carefully placed and not sold but <em>granted</em> to a lucky collector. The pricing mechanism is not transparent and often appears downright arbitrary. But most of all, the money side of things is only talked about in hushed voices, as if it doesn&rsquo;t exist (though this week artworks at Art Basel have cumulatively been valued at $3.4 billion, with galleries seeing millions of dollars' worth of sales before the fair had even opened to the general public). Most gallerists present their work not as a commercial enterprise but as a noble cause. Different rules and truths apply to them than to those who sell paint, car batteries, insurance policies, or mortgages. And as long as this extra-economic, holier-than-thou self-image remains in place, crowdfunding at a distance is likely the most Art Basel can do in terms of social responsibility.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>Do We Dream Under the Same Sky</em>, Art Basel in Basel.&nbsp;&copy; Art Basel)</span></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 08:18:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Art Basel 2015: Your Guide to Basel Fairs and Art Institutions <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art Basel turns 46 this year. There&rsquo;s little new to say about the original mega-fair, which had 90 exhibitors at its very first 1970 edition, and 281 exhibitors just three years later. With a maturing satellite scene&mdash;Liste celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, Design Miami hits double digits, and Volta enters its pre-teens&mdash;we know what to expect from much of the week&rsquo;s establishment lineup. </span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But as the art world grows, so too does the number of fairs and events straddling Basel&rsquo;s bend in the Rhine, tributaries of the commercial art world&rsquo;s best known franchise. 2015 sees newcomers Photo Basel and Rhy Art Fair join June&rsquo;s fair flow, and art spaces citywide time their exhibiton cycles to the rhythms of the Art Basel tide.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Luckily, the fairs open early during Basel Week&mdash;some as early as Monday or Tuesday&mdash;so there&rsquo;s time to see it all. We try to be helpful around ArtSlant, so to help you navigate the host city and its flood of fairs, we&rsquo;ve rounded them up, adding in some major art institutions, which have extended their opening hours this week. You'll find all the dates and details you need to know here.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Basel on a budget? Be sure to check out our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43275" target="_blank">guide to free art events</a> across town this week!</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=zD2VcvFDXaZQ.koG6WJqOe4qc" width="640" height="480"></iframe></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616211145-ARTBASEL2015_ACO_02_195.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Galleria Continua |&nbsp;Kader Attia, <em>Arab Spring</em>, 2014.&nbsp;Unlimited in Basel 2015 | Unlimited&nbsp;&copy; Art Basel</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Art Basel | Basel</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Messeplatz 10, CH-4005<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vernissage: Wednesday, June 17, 3&ndash;8pm (invite only)<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 18-21, 11am&ndash;7pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Day Ticket: CHF 48; after 5 pm: CHF 25; Two-Day Ticket: CHF 80; Permanent Ticket: CHF 110</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: large;"><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="https://www.artbasel.com/en/Basel" target="_blank">www.artbasel.com/en/Basel</a></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The Godfather of art fairs. Works by 4,000 different artists from five continents representing every artistic medium there is; curatorial projects; talks; two bookstores; special installations and restaurants serving cuisine from nine different nations. You could spend the week here, but you shouldn't&mdash;there's too much else to see.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616200723-_JRH9683_Design_at_large_3_PS_hires.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></span></p> <div class="img-list-area"> <div class="info-box" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Design at Large exhibition view.<br /></span></div> </div> <div class="img-list-area"><strong style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></strong></div> <div class="img-list-area"><strong style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Design Miami/ Basel</span></strong></div> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hall 1 S&uuml;d, Messe Basel, Messeplatz<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 16&ndash;21<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Monday, June 15, Collectors Preview,noon&ndash;5pm, Vernissage 5&ndash;8pm (invite only)<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 16-17, 10am&ndash;8pm; June 18-19, 10am&ndash;7pm; June 20-21, 11am&ndash;7pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF 25 General admission; CHF 65 Combination ticket with Art Basel</span></p> <p><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://basel2015.designmiami.com/">basel2015.designmiami.com</a></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fuelling the marketplace for collectible design, high-end commerical exhibitors present alongside more cultural concerns, including talks on issues in contemporary design, and a new project, Curio, inviting experts from different areas of the field (including Artsy, MANIERA, and Dzek)&nbsp;to curate cabinets of curiosity, placed throughout the fair.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616201248-LISTE2015_DSC1340.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">LISTE Performance Project.&nbsp;Photo: Daniel Spehr</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">LISTE</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Burgweg 15, CH-4058<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 16&ndash;21<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Monday, June 15, 5&ndash;9pm (open to the public)<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 16-20, 1&ndash;9pm; June 21, 1&ndash;6pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF/EUR 20 General Admission (single entry)</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.liste.ch/" target="_blank">www.liste.ch</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">LISTE hasn't really be able to claim it's "young art" epithet for a while&mdash;the fair was once an edgy foil to Art Basel&mdash;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">but it remains a commercial platform for some younger galleries and artists who are probably still cutting their teeth.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One of our reporters attended Monday's preview and wasn't charmed by LISTE, but it's been going for 20 years, so something must be going right.&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616201901-v11_kristofkintera.jpg" alt="" /></p> <div class="page" title="Page 5"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="csc-textpic csc-textpic-intext-right-nowrap"> <div class="csc-textpic-text"> <div class="page" title="Page 5"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 5"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Krištof Kintera,&nbsp;<em>Nervous Trees</em>, 2013, Electromechanical sculpture, 320 x 185 x 150 cm. Image courtesy Ron Mandos (Amsterdam)</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Volta 11</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Markthalle | Viaduktstrasse 10, CH-4051<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 15&ndash;20<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vernissage: Monday, June 15, 2&ndash;5pm (free and open to the public)<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 15, 2&ndash;7pm; June 16-20, 10am&ndash;7pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Basel Nacht: Thursday, June 18, 5&ndash;7pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF 17 General Admission</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://voltashow.com/index.php" target="_blank">voltashow.com</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Also dedicated to younger art, Volta is aimed at those looking for art that occupies a kind of middle ground between Basel and LISTE. Their defining feature is a focus on international solo presentations, giving a balance between artist and gallery.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616202308-Seoshin-Gallery_Lim-Hyun-Chae_The-Place-Paradise_162x130-original-1068x735.jpeg" alt="" /></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Hyun-Chae Lim,&nbsp;<em>The Place Paradise</em>, 2014,&nbsp;Acrylic on Canvas,&nbsp;162 &times; 130.3 cm. Presented by Sheoshin Gallery in Feature Korea</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Scope Basel</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Uferstrasse 40, CH-4057<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 16&ndash;21</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 16, 4&ndash;8pm; June 17-21, 11am&ndash;8pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF 30 General Admission</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://scope-art.com/shows/basel-2015/about/" target="_blank">scope-art.com/shows/basel-2015</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Scope's trump card is their Juxtapoz Presents series. The influential San Francisco-based visual culture magazine brings in galleries and artworks that are still widely excluded from other art fairs around the world. The magazine will also be publishing a special edition newspaper available at the event. Meanwhile, this year's Focus section is dedicated to Korean art trends.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616202531-photobasel.png" alt="" /></span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Photo Basel</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ackermannshof Basel | St. Johanns-Vorstadt 19-21, CH-4056<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 17&ndash;20<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 17-19, 11am&ndash;10pm; June 20, 11am&ndash;6pm</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">General Admission: Day pass: CHF 12; Multi-day pass: CHF 18</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.photo-basel.com/" target="_blank">www.photo-basel.com</a></span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Inside a complex of medieval building, budding Photo Basel does exactly what it says on the tin: it reasserts the imporance of an autonomous space for art photography while also highlighting the city of Basel as hub of world culture.</span></p> <p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616203758-POST-Anna-Leonhardt-.-Untitled-1-2015-oil-on-canvas-50-x-60-cm-960x809.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Anna Leonhardt, <em>Untitled (1)</em>, 2015, oil on canvas, 50 x 60 cm. Exhibited by Emmanuel Post, Berlin</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">The-Solo-Project</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">St. Jakobshalle | Br&uuml;glingerstrasse 19-21<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 17&ndash;21<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Wednesday, June 17, 10am&ndash;noon (invite only)<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 17, noon&ndash;8pm; June 18-20, 10am&ndash;7pm; June 21, 10am&ndash;5pm</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.the-solo-project.com/" target="_blank">www.the-solo-project.com</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paul Kusseneers gallery from Brussels thinks there a certain kind of art missing from the international market, so they set up this fair to address that. Emphasis is on the spatial organization of this fair: expect a more gallery-like experience, where art works have "room to breathe."</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616204207-kerstan-schmidt_muller-P3170009B-300.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Joey Schmidt-Muller,&nbsp;Installation<em>&nbsp;Frau Schweizer,&nbsp;</em>Basel 2015.&nbsp;Pesented by Contemporary Fine Arts</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Rhy Art Fair</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Saalbau Rhypark am Rhein | Muelhauserstrasse 17, CH-4056<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 18&ndash;21<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Wednesday, June 17, 5&ndash;10pm (CHF 30 entrance fee)<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 18-21, 11am&ndash;8pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF/EUR 15 General Admission; Free Admission for ticket holders of Art Basel, LISTE, Scope and Volta, and pass holders for Swiss museums</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://rhy-art.com/" target="_blank">rhy-art.com</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Complementing other Basel events, the new Rhy Art wants to bring artists and audiences closer together. It's an international affair, but with a strong representation of galleries from South Korea and Switzerland.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Selection Art Fair</strong></span><br /></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Basel Art Center | Riehentorstrasse 31 / Corner Claragraben CH-4058<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 15&ndash;21<br />Public hours: June 15&ndash;20, noon&ndash;9pm; June 21, noon&ndash;7pm<br />CHF 7 General Admission</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.selection-art.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">www.selection-art.com</span></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Selection (en route to LISTE, if you're headed there) presents a manageable eight galleries mainly from Poland and Germany, but they are also partnered with Beijing's Museum of Contemporary Art, who bring the relaxed atmosphere for experiencing art they promote in China.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">I Never Read, Art Book Fair Basel</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kaserne Basel | Klybeckstrasse 1b, CH-4057<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 17&ndash;20<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Wednesday, June 17, 6&ndash;10pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: June 17, 6&ndash;10pm; June 18-19, 4&ndash;10pm; June 20, 4&ndash;6pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Free Admission</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.ineverread.com/" target="_blank">www.ineverread.com<br /></a></span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.kaserne-basel.ch/en/extra/I_Never_Read__Art_Bo" target="_blank">www.kaserne-basel.ch</a></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hooray! Something that is not pictures on walls. I Never Read is Basel's art publishing fair gathering all kinds of printed matter from the international scene. You can also give your eyes a rest and listen in to their radio station, broadcast from the spot.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Museums and Art Spaces:</span></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Schaulager</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>FUTURE PRESENT: Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, Contemporary Art from Classic Modernism to the Present Day</em>, June 13, 2015&ndash;January 31, 2016</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ruchfeldstrasse 19, CH-4142<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening hours during Art Basel: June 15-16, 10am&ndash;&thinsp;8pm;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 17, 12&ndash;&thinsp;8pm; June 18-20, 10am&ndash;8pm; June 21, 10am&ndash;6pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF 18 General Admission</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.schaulager.org/index.php" target="_blank">www.schaulager.org</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While you're in town, Schaulager's 5000-square meter space will be taken over by works from the Emanuel Hoffman Foundation (founded in 1933) that will also spill out into Basel.&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Museum f&uuml;r Gegenwartskunst</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Frank Stella: Paintings &amp; Drawings, May 9&ndash;August 30, 2015<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Martin Boyce, April 25&ndash;August 16, 2015<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">C&eacute;zanne to Richter: Masterpieces of the Kunstmuseum Basel, February 14, 2015&ndash;February 21, 2016<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Joseph Beuys: Installationen, Aktionen &amp; Vitrinen, December 19, 2014&ndash;January 31, 2016</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">St. Alban-Rheinweg 60, CH-4010<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening hours during Art Basel: June 15, 10am&ndash;6pm; June 16, 10am&ndash;5pm; June 17, 10am&ndash;8pm (public </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/ausstellungen/aktuell/martin-boyce/" target="_blank">reception for Martin Boyce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> starting at 6pm); June 18, 11am&ndash;6pm; June 19&ndash;21, 10am&ndash;6pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch/en/home/" target="_blank">www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Though the main building is currently closed for renovations (check back in April 2016), you could still visit <em>C&eacute;zanne to Richter&ndash;Masterpieces from the Kunstmuseum Basel, </em>works from the permanent collection<em>,&nbsp;</em>giving a Swiss perspective on the major developments of European art from the '70s onwards.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616205251-VF_Untitled_2015_KHB_011-1400x1049.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Vincent Fecteau,&nbsp;<em>Untitled</em>, 2015.&nbsp;Courtesy the artist, Galerie Buchholz, greengrassi, Matthew Marks Gallery</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Kunsthalle Basel</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Anicka Yi: <em>7,070,430K of Digital Spit</em>, June 12&ndash;August 16, 2015<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nevin Aladağ: <em>Marsch</em>, June 15&ndash;21, 2015<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vincent Fecteau: <em>You Have Did the Right Thing When You Put That Skylight In</em>, June 18&ndash;August 23, 2015 (Opening Wednesday, June 17, 7pm)</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Steinenberg 7, CH-4051<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening hours during Art Basel: June 15&ndash;21, 10am&ndash;8pm; Wednesday, June 17, 10am&ndash;10pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF 12 General Admission</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.kunsthallebasel.ch/en/" target="_blank">www.kunsthallebasel.ch</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Two new shows are up at the Kunsthalle Basel: check out "techno-sensual" Anicka Yi's exhibition, with works made out of potato chips, deep-fried flowers, recalled powdered milk and... snail poo.&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616204516-dumas_teacher_940.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Marlene Dumas,<em> The Teacher (Sub A)</em>, 1987, private collection, &copy; Marlene Dumas, Photo: Peter Cox, &copy; 2015, ProLitteris, Z&uuml;rich</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Fondation Beyeler</span></strong></span></p> <p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Marlene Dumas, May 31&ndash;September 6, 2014<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paul Gauguin, February 8&ndash;June 28, 2015<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Alexander Calder Gallery III, September 27, 2014&ndash;September 6, 2015</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Baselstrasse 101, CH-4125<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening hours during Art Basel: June 13&ndash;21, 9am&ndash;7pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF/EUR 28 General Admission</span></p> <p><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.fondationbeyeler.ch/en/Home" target="_blank">www.fondationbeyeler.ch</a></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Listen to playlists by art world personalities compiled to accompany your viewing of Fondation Beyeler's current exhibition of Paul Gaugin, or else, you could see a Marlene Dumas retrospective or a presentation of Alexander Calder, arranged into an 'Alexander Calder Gallery' concentrating on the artist's lesser known early paintings.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617081041-csm_12_Making_Africa_Diop2_01_a5f836309e.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Vitra Design Museum</strong></span><br /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><em>Making Africa: A Continent of Contemporary Design</em>, March 14&ndash;September 13, 2015<br /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: medium;">Charles-Eames-Str. 2,&nbsp;D-79576 Weil am Rhein, Germany<br /></span><span style="font-size: medium;">Opening hours: Daily, 10am&ndash;6pm<br />10 euro General Admission</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: medium;">Across the Swiss border into Germany you'll find the Vitra Design Museum. To round off Art Basel Salon talks about collecting contemporary African art, check out&nbsp;<em>Making Africa</em>, an expansive show celebrating&nbsp;fine arts, graphic design, illustration, film, photography, architecture, and urban planning from across the African continent.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616204658-csm_Christopher-Baker_01_a935208e0c.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Christopher Baker, <em>HELLO WORLD! OR: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP LISTENING AND LOVE THE NOISE</em>, 2008</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">House of Electronic Arts (HeK)</span></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Poetics and Politics of Data</em>, May 29&ndash;August 30, 2015</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Freilager-Platz 9, CH&ndash;4142<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening hours during Art Basel: June 16, noon&ndash;8pm; June 17, 10am&ndash;8pm; June 17-21, noon&ndash;8pm</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CHF 9 General Admission</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.hek.ch/en.html#c1">www.hek.ch</a></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">HeK is the spot for digital age art, displaying work that responds to and encompasses new media technologies and electronic art forms. On show during Basel is a group exhibition,&nbsp;<em>Poetics and Politics of Data, </em>approaching the phenomena of Big Data.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Galleria dello Scudo |&nbsp;Emilio Vedova | <em>&hellip; in continuum</em>, 1987/88.&nbsp;Unlimited in Basel 2015&nbsp;&copy; Art Basel)</span></p> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 11:07:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Best of Basel's Free Events <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It's said that there is &ldquo;no free lunch,&rdquo;&mdash;but what about some free art events in Basel?&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Yes, it's June, and it's time for Art Basel again. It may not as exotic a location as Miami or Hong Kong, but the old European continent offers a deep-rooted history and relatively compact scale of events (at least compared to its Miami mega-offshoot) in the cozy Swiss town at the corner of three nations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Audiences are increasingly interested in attending openings, museum shows, and art fairs and it sometimes seems that the art world must straddle two extremes as a consequence: on one hand it should appeal to the general public (art is for everyone, after all) on the other hand, it has to cater for that desire of exclusivity, particularly in an art fair environment, where rarity is often equated with value.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As a natural response to the multiple VIP card policies issued by art fair organizers, and the art world&rsquo;s prized exclusivity, for the purpose of this guide, we&rsquo;re concentrating our attention on events where the public will be awaited with open doors&mdash;and no fees.</span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616174247-Louise_Bourgeois_The_Couple.jpg" alt="" width="400" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">"Remembering Louise Bourgeois"&nbsp;Salon: Artist Talk | Remembering Louise Bourgeois.&nbsp;<em>The Couple</em>, 2003.&nbsp;<br />Photo: Christopher Burke &copy;The Easton Foundation / Licensed by VEGAP, Madrid, 2015&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Art Basel Conversations &amp; Salon</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.artbasel.com/en/Basel/About-the-Show/Talks/Conversations">Conversations:</a> Daily from&nbsp;Wednesday, June 17&mdash;Sunday, June, 10&ndash;11am, followed by 30 minutes of questions from the audience.<br /></span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="https://www.artbasel.com/en/Basel/About-the-Show/Talks/Salon">Salon:</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> Daily from&nbsp;Thursday, June 18,&nbsp;to&nbsp;Sunday, June 21,&nbsp;1&ndash;7pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hall 1 of Art Basel</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An art fair marathon usually entails long hours of walking and intense art viewing, so why not meet some of the key players in the contemporary art market at the <a href="https://www.artbasel.com/basel/salon">Art Basel Salon</a> and Conversation talks program and rest your feet for a bit? The talk series&mdash;where museum directors, artists, and curators will cover a wide range of topics&mdash;is free and open to the public.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danh Vō kicks off Conversations with an artist talk on Wednesday morning. Artist-focused talks in the Salon series range from the topical &ldquo;Unlimited Talk&rdquo; (June 18, 3&ndash;4pm) with Unlimited curator Gianni Jetzer in conversation with several key contemporary artists, to the commemorative &ldquo;Remembering Louise Bourgeois&rdquo; (June 20, 1&ndash;2pm), and finish up Sunday with Marina Abramovic's ex-artistic partner Ulay speaking with Kunsthaus Z&uuml;rich curator Cath&eacute;rine Hug (2&ndash;3pm).</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This year the collector-centered talks will move to Eastern and Central Europe (&ldquo;Key Collections from Eastern Central Europe: The New Era,&rdquo; June 18, 2&ndash;3pm)&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">as well as Africa (&ldquo;Collecting Africa,&rdquo; June 19, 5&ndash;6pm), with additional insights from art collectors coming from the finance world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The panel discussions, though, look even more enticing, tackling topics such as: &ldquo;The Myth of a Global Art Market,&rdquo; &ldquo;The Caribbean is the Future of Art&rdquo; (June 19, 2&ndash;3pm), &ldquo;Works in Progress: Building New Art Institutions&nbsp;in Africa&rdquo; (June 18, 10&ndash;11am). There is even room for an Architect Talk discussing anti-capitalist utopian dream of self-fulfillment within Constant's <em>New Babylon</em> (June 18, 6&ndash;7pm).</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For bonus free content: videos of the talks will be also uploaded to the Art Basel website following the show.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616173422-K1_PP_HolzingerRiebeek_NEU.jpg.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">LISTE Performance Project: Florentina Holzinger/ Vincent Riebeek,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Nils Amadeus Lange, Annina Machaz, Manuel Scheiwiller,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">GONZO</span></div> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>LISTE&rsquo;s Performance Project 2015</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Monday, June 15&ndash;Saturday, June 20<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Various locations</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This year </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.liste.ch/programme/performance-project/">LISTE</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, celebrating its 20-year anniversary, introduces a new curator for the 11th edition of its acclaimed Performance Project, this year titled &ldquo;Passing Peaks. A Series of Performative Individuations.&rdquo; </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Eva Birkenstock succeeds Fabian Sch&ouml;neich, now a curator at Portikus, Frankfurt. The performance program takes place at several locations and it is usually scheduled in the early evening, starting anywhere from 3&ndash;8 pm&mdash;another welcome opportunity to relax at the end of the day. You can find more information and the full schedule </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.liste.ch/programme/performance-project/">here</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Further events with free public access:</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616214626-260afc7301b0052cda4c96560cbc2587_XL.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Opera: <em>Victory over the Sun</em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.theater-basel.ch/" target="_blank">Theater Basel</a>, Foyer Grosse B&uuml;hne<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wednesday, June 17, from 11:30pm&ndash;12:30am</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A new production of the legendary Futurist opera performed for he first time in 1913 in St. Petersburg. The music is based on the original Mikhail Matyushin score, with costumes, set design, and lighting adapted from the drawings of pioneer Suprematist-Kazimir Malevich. The event is produced in collaboration with Basel&rsquo;s Fondation Beyeler, Moscow's Stas Namin Theatre, Theater Basel and Art Basel, and AVC Charity Foundation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616175550-HiddenConference3_QT_ProRes4444_Mute_Final0000767.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Rosa Barba,&nbsp;<em>The Hidden Conference</em>, 2010-2015.&nbsp;Courtesy the artist</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Parcours Night</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.artbasel.com/-/media/ArtBasel/Documents/Event_documents/ABBL15_Parcours_Map.pdf" target="_blank">Different locations</a>&nbsp;across Basel.<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Saturday, June 20, 6pm&ndash;midnight</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An Art Basel must!&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This year Art Basel&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artbasel.com/basel/parcours" target="_blank">Parcours sector</a> invites 23 artists to make site-specific artworks around Basel&rsquo;s M&uuml;nsterplatz. Parcours Night is an evening of&nbsp;special performances around town.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tip: be sure to check out Rosa Barba&rsquo;s&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Hidden Conference</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(also shown at the Venice Biennale)</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">investigating museum storage and the status of art when it&rsquo;s not on display. See the f</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ull Parcours Night</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="https://www.artbasel.com/en/Basel/About-the-Show/Event-Calendar?show=all&amp;event=ED0397CF69BC455585F09C6B2991579B#content_0_maincontent_0_monthEventList_monthDayEventList_6_eventItem_10" target="_blank">program here</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Other free outdoor Art Basel events include <em>Do We Dream Under the Same Sky</em>&nbsp;a large-scale, interactive Messeplatz installation by&nbsp;Rirkrit Tiravanija, Nikolaus Hirsch, Michel M&uuml;ller and Antto Melasniemi. The public project explores hospitality and employs sustainable energy models to produce food and drink in a solar kitchen.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617085254-yves_scherer-1024x672.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Yves Scherer, <em>Mermaid Lagoon</em>, 2015. At the Swiss Art Awards</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Swiss Art Awards &amp; Swiss Design Awards</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hall 4, Congress Center Basel |&nbsp;Messeplatz 21, CH-4058<br />June 16&ndash;21, 10am&ndash;7pm</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These long-lived awards (organized since 1899 and 1918 respectively) celebrate the latest in Swiss <a href="http://www.swissartawards.ch/~journal/" target="_blank">art</a>, architecture, and <a href="http://www.swissdesignawards.ch/" target="_blank">design</a>. Right around the corner from the Art Basel madness, the award expo is a great spot to stop in and awe at the best in local innovation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em>WLGTDWI</em> (What&rsquo;s Love Gotta Do With It)</strong></span></p> <p><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.salts.ch/#/en" target="_blank">Salts<br /></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">June 18, 6&ndash;11pm, with performances on the hour.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>WLGTDWI </em>is an evening of performances during which&nbsp;13 artists have developed new performances with their romantic partners. These coincide with Salts openings of Nicholas Party's&nbsp;<em>Panorama</em> and the group show&nbsp;<em>The Printed Room - Poems 1990&ndash;2001</em>, presenting group poems written using digital technologies and the internet during that period.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616180258-bonne_chance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Simon Boudvin,&nbsp;<em>COFFRE 01 (Beaucouz&eacute;)</em>, 2012.&nbsp;Copyright of the artist</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Garden Party and exhibition opening&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><a href="http://cracalsace.com/en/index.html" target="_blank">Good Luck with your Natural, Combined, Attractive and Truthful Attempts in Two Exhibitions<br /></a></em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CRAC Alsace<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Thursday, June 18<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Shuttle bus available at 7pm from Art&nbsp;Basel (on Isteinerstrasse), returning at 10:30pm<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Reservations recommended</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cocktail reception and exhibition</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jorge M&eacute;ndez Blake:&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://kunsthallemulhouse.com/" target="_blank">Projets pour une Possible Litt&eacute;rature</a><br /></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Le Kunsthalle Mulhouse</span><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Friday, June 19, from 7pm</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Go!C!Art@Cargo Festival</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">St. Johanns-Rheinweg 46<br />June 13&ndash;21, June 13&ndash;17, 4pm&ndash;1am; June 18&ndash;21; 4pm&ndash;2:30am</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The <a href="http://www.cargobar.ch/cargobar/kunst/installationen.html" target="_blank">Cargo Bar</a> hosts its third annual&nbsp;Go!C!Art Festival during Art Basel. Expect a mixed bag of performances and DJ sets for free&mdash;you'll just have to pay for drinks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>I Never Read, Art Book Fair Basel</strong><br /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This publishing fair is totally free (that is, if you've got the self-restraint not to buy all the enticing art books). Find more details in our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43276" target="_blank">Art Basel Fair Guide</a>. &nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280904-teodora-kotseva?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Teodora Kotseva</a></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Do We Dream Under the Same SkyRendering</em>, 2015. Courtesy Rirkrit Tiravanija, Nikolaus Hirsch, Michel M&uuml;ller and Antto Melasniemi)</span></span></p> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 11:49:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Can Critical Moving Images Exist in the Art Fair Model? In Conversation with Maxa Zoller <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="float: left;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616141531-MAXA201435f.jpg" alt="" width="250" /><strong><em>Basel, June 2015:</em>&nbsp;</strong>Maxa Zoller is the new curator of this year&rsquo;s Film Sector at Art Basel. Leading up to her film programme this week, Olga Stefan spoke with the Cairo-based curator and lecturer about the blurred lines between film and video art and their implications on modes of viewing; how film can be commodified; political films and their impact at art fairs; and the spaces of free expression in Cairo.</span></p> <hr /> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Olga Stefan: Could you describe for us what this all-encompassing category of "moving image" refers to? What are the differences in form between video art, traditional and experimental film, and other forms of moving image.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Maxa Zoller:</strong> The answer is very simple; the term &ldquo;moving image&rdquo; refers to all of the above: video, analogue, and digital film art. It is simply an umbrella term that came about in the last decade or so when the production of experimental artists&rsquo; films increased dramatically. Up to the 1980s it was still relatively easy to distinguish between the analogue filmmaking tradition, that is 8mm and 16mm film, and video art, the former coming from the avant-garde tradition and cinematic modes of filmmaking including notions like montage and suture, still frames, chemical processes, a critique of the studio system etc. The latter, video art, was associated with TV; it was durational, often performative, it had a live feedback system and was electronic. Sometimes artists would work in both fields, but most of the time they were loyal to a specific form and its respective philosophies, politics, and aesthetics. On top of that digital film opened a whole new chapter in the history of moving image art in the 1990s and 2000s. So not to step on each others&rsquo; toes the term &ldquo;moving image&rdquo; is used simply as a practical (maybe not very elegant) way to talk about all these forms together.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: Yes, moving image does refer to everything, including computer art like gifs and video games. Besides the technical differences you mentioned above, which seem to have dissolved with the advent of digital technologies, can we speak of differences in language that might still preserve certain distinctions between terms? &nbsp;For example between an experimental film shot digitally and video art?</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> When it comes to digital media the situation becomes more complicated. It is not that digital technologies have dissolved any technological differences, they have just added another new visual mode or representation. Digital post-production can easily mimic the celluloid and video &ldquo;look,&rdquo; but that&rsquo;s only on the surface. If an artist working with digital technology today claims to be either a video artist or a filmmaker, then this means that she aligns herself with a certain art movement or school, rather than a medium-specific discourse. Since digital technology can easily hide its own conditions and instead assume the aesthetic of other media, it is particularly difficult to be aware of and work with the specificities of the digital form. The concepts of time and materiality are completely different from older moving image media. Also the notion of spectatorship has radically changed. Personally, I think that the aspect of animation is still very much underdeveloped; digital technology&nbsp;<em>is</em>&nbsp;animation!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616141448-KatieArmstrongOnceMoreOnceMoreEigenArt.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Katie Armstrong, <em>Once More, Once More</em>, 2011, 4'30''. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Eigen + Art</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: Your curatorial practice has focused on film and video from marginal geographic areas, but also experimental filmic forms from the 60s until today. Do you see the moving image as an artistic medium with more transformative potential than others?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> I think that film and video art is one of the most exciting art forms of the 20th and 21st centuries. It&rsquo;s entangled in so many experiences, sensitivities, aesthetics, and narratives. The moving image originated in the world of toys, fairs, and the vaudeville theatre! Nobody is afraid to go to the cinema, whereas the sterile atmosphere of the white cube immediately signals a certain social framing. Since moving image culture is so entrenched in everyday life, the potential of transforming the conventional structures, codes, and language of the medium is vaster than say that of painting. As an organism, film and video art has a very high metabolism! One aspect I am trying to explore in the programme &ldquo;Morph my Mind!&rdquo; at Art Basel for instance, is that of digital animation, an area with huge potential.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I consider myself lucky to be of that generation that has one foot in classical analogue filmmaking and one in digital media. Witnessing the effect of that shift in the art scene, that is seeing the art of film (projection) move from the cinema tradition to a much wider, open, and also somehow &ldquo;anything-goes&rdquo; visual culture, has given me a sense of artistic depth that I see in the work not only by established filmmakers, but also very much in the practices beyond the mainstream. In my capacity as film curator I work hard to capture and present that breadth in my programming. In the programme &ldquo;Food (in) Chains&rdquo; the grand nouvelle vague master of filmmaking Ang&egrave;s Varda is shown alongside a short film by the young artists Will Benedict and David Leonard and I am looking forward to discussing with the artists the way in which these films might echo each other.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616142543-WillBenedictDavidLeonardToiletsNotTemples.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Will Benedict &amp; David Leonard, <em>Toilets Not Temples</em>, 2014, 25'. Courtesy of the artists and Gi&oacute; Marconi, Bortolami</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: This anything-goes culture has also impacted the way we relate to the moving image, while the pervasiveness of images in turn incite the anything-goes culture, a continuous cycle. In the realm of moving image, this has decreased our attention spans, and artists maybe respond to this change with works that are shorter in length and encourage a fractured viewing&mdash;for a long time it was an unwritten guideline that moving image works presented in the art gallery should be about 8-10 minutes in length. How do you see this development in the way we &ldquo;consume&rdquo; moving image work? Is it all positive and full of potential? Or have we also lost something?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> We have to make the distinction here between popular culture and consumerism on the one hand and art and the art spectatorship on the other. You are right, the fast-paced images of advertising for instance decrease our attention span. Yet, there are as many artists who pick up that quick editing style as there are artists who work with a reverse attitude. Take the &ldquo;Voices from the Off&rdquo; programme for instance, where the breathless <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/rackroom/86303-laure-prouvost">Laure Prouvost</a> shows next to the &ldquo;slow foodies&rdquo; Mounira Al Solh and Kan Xuan. In &ldquo;Lines of Beauty&rdquo; I show Kimsooja&rsquo;s wonderfully meditative <em>Thread Routes</em> next to Hassan Hajjaj&rsquo;s upbeat <em>Karima, a Day in the Life of a Henna Girl</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And one last thing, we should make sure that we don&rsquo;t &ldquo;consume&rdquo; moving image art, nor any form of art for that matter. Unfortunately, the conditions of high capitalist consumerism controls the way we look at images, but in an art context, we should be aware of that and resist it.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: In the last 20 years or so, moving image works have been integrated in the art market by way of the art institution that has managed to commodify them by transforming them into objects. How did this come about?&nbsp;And how can a film be an auratic object that is sold by a dealer to a collector? What does a collector buy actually?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> First of all, I don&rsquo;t think that it was the art institution (museums and non-commercial galleries) that turned film projection into &ldquo;objects&rdquo; (sculptures and installations) but actually it was the pressure of the market on these and other institutions that is at the core of the commodification process.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The increasing process of privatization under neo-liberalism means that institutions&mdash;museums and universities included&mdash;receive less state support and are more dependent on overtly commercial strategies. This is especially the case of Anglo-Saxon and North American, less so in German and French museums, for instance. From tickets to latte sales, museums such as Tate Modern have to think of commercial ways to survive. Often a visit to the Tate feels a bit like a prime example of what is called &ldquo;experience economy.&rdquo; If you visit any art graduation show you will see that most students have a pile of business cards next to their work. Art magazines, formally known for their independent, critical approach, now organize art fairs. The artist names cover the front page like brand names. These and many other examples show us the way in which economy, &ldquo;business,&rdquo; has replaced social politics. This is not news, but the way in which the process of commercialization of the arts has become accelerated since 1989 is pretty breathtaking.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Secondly, you are asking how this came about? The commodification of a new art form is a normal process, look at what happened with &ldquo;immaterial&rdquo; concept art. It is important not to forget that the world of moving image art is vast and the work represented by a commercial gallery presents only a fraction. We also need to appreciate the hundreds and thousands of films, installations, projections and clips that are&nbsp;<em>not</em>&nbsp;commodified. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS:&nbsp;But just because they are not actually sold, does not mean that they don't have the potential to be, and thus are a commodity, due to the pre-existing pattern. Every video art piece can potentially be commodified, just like a painting is a potential commodity until a buyer is found.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> In the case of a commercial(ized) filmmaker, let&rsquo;s take Isaac Julien as a classic example: a collector buys the limited edition of a work on, say, DVD. With that he buys the rights for presentation of the film. In addition to the film or video the gallery often offers film stills or production photographs for sale.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As for your question about the auratic object&mdash;I assume that you are referring to Benjamin&rsquo;s concept of the aura of the artwork here&mdash;the answer is a bit more complicated. In his famous essay &ldquo;The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction&rdquo; Walter Benjamin announces that with cinema a new democratization of the arts is coming to the fore. Cinema has&nbsp;<em>no</em>&nbsp;aura (bear in mind that he compared cinema primarily to the theatre, and not exclusively to art objects).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What started to happen from the 1970s onwards is a reverse process in which the market seeks to re-inscribe the &ldquo;democratic&rdquo; reproducible medium of film with an &ldquo;aura&rdquo; that was originally reserved for the exclusive, unique work of art. There is a kind of perversion here, technically speaking, but on the level of labor, the sweat and blood of many filmmakers deserves the kind of commercial recognition the art market can offer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616143055-Kan_Xuan_Object.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Kan Xuan, <em>Object</em>, 2003, 6'25''. Courtesy the artist and Galleria Continua</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: So how does the idea of the democratization of art through cinema reconcile itself with the limited edition sale?&nbsp;Or does the deserved commercial recognition supplant the democratization aspect?</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> That is exactly the point; there is no reconciliation between Benjamin&rsquo;s vision of a democratic medium, which he developed in the early 1930s in a very different context, and the limited edition sale of artists&rsquo; moving images&mdash;especially those made digitally. (I wonder what would Benjamin have said about that?)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: How has this transition towards objecthood in cinema&nbsp;impacted the production and distribution of these works? Before, films were produced either by the state or production studios and were distributed widely in cinemas and at film festivals. Now, as the distinctions between art (house) films and artist films blur and disappear even more, as your program at Art Basel itself demonstrates, how are films produced and disseminated and how do galleries play a role? We see now this cross-pollination, with <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/41809" target="_blank">artist films entering film festivals</a> and more traditional films the museum/art space.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> You are, it seems, referring mainly to mainstream film canon&mdash;that means to those works that were produced by, say, state TV or big commercial studios. Yet since the invention of the medium in 1890s there have been streams of all kinds of modes of production and distribution, some of which have made into the history books and others that have not. And again, the transition towards objecthood that involves, as you have outlined above, processes of commodification and commercialization, are also only one story amongst a thousand tales.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You are right to ask those questions in the context of a film programme at an art fair, but I think that the Film Sector cinema programme at Art Basel stands out from the rest of the programmes because art films operate on a different financial level than, say, sculpture. The film screenings have been chosen from a pool of films submitted by the galleries. That is how the film programme at Art Basel works. But the films I am presenting do not exclusively &ldquo;live&rdquo; in the mainstream art world. I took the freedom to include films that have no commercial representation, for example <em>Anfangsszene</em> by Karolin Meunir, an excellent, subtle video and performance artist from Berlin. Yes, galleries help to bring film into the collections of major (and minor) art institutions, but often these films also have a life of their own outside of the mainstream art world. Take for instance Akraam Zatari&rsquo;s new work <em>21 Nights and a Poem</em>, which I would have liked to show but which is on a fixed film festival touring programme and so it was not possible for me to show it at Art Basel this year. By the way, the relationship between film festivals and the art world is becoming really interesting. This year, for instance, we are collaborating with the Locarno film festival, which presents a Duncan Campbell screening. What I like about the film programme is that it gathers all these different formats; its like a big muesli ball full of all kinds of crunchy works that float about in white cubes, black boxes, cinemas, DVDs, and vimeo.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616142325-Duncan_Campbell_It_for_Others.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Duncan Campbell, <em>It For Others</em>, 2008, 54'. Courtesy the artist and Rodeo</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: Do you feel that commercial galleries and fairs, the culmination of capitalism in the art world, can also be platforms for real political criticism?&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> This is a very tricky question but I won&rsquo;t hesitate to answer it with a clear &ldquo;no.&rdquo; The languages and desires of an art fair do not run in parallel with those of say regime criticism, I mean&nbsp;<em>real</em>&nbsp;criticism. It is impossible! It has never been that way, so why should it be different now? There is a tendency in the mainstream art world to think of itself as all-encompassing, all-knowing, expansive. Real political criticism, however, happens elsewhere and it is often close to very difficult life-changing decisions. What can happen, of course, is that very critical works are presented at an art fair, but their effect would always be compromised, if not smothered, by the context.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: The program you are showing at Art Basel steers away from the overtly political.&nbsp;Why so, despite &ldquo;taking the freedom to include films with no commercial representation?&rdquo;</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> What do you mean by &ldquo;overtly political&rdquo; films? What would that be? A film by activists? The kind of radical filmmakers that make direct, political work are not represented by commercial galleries, so unless I make an exception, the conditions for the Film Sector are not particularly conducive to activist filmmaking.&nbsp;I think, however, that the programme clearly displays ethical values (you might want to call them political with a minor &ldquo;p&rdquo;) by the inclusion of certain films, and the exclusion of others. The programmes &ldquo;Voices from the Off&rdquo; focuses on films by female filmmakers and raises feminist issues of self and language. &ldquo;Lines of Beauty&rdquo; presents the work of Kimsooja and Hassan Hajjaj, both of which invite the viewer to rethink conventional values attached to traditional women hand crafts. &ldquo;Food (in) Chains&rdquo; shows one of the most subtle, political filmmakers still alive, Agn&egrave;s Varda, whose <em>Les Glaneurs and la Glaneuse</em> is a film of extremely deep ethical work. Our opening film, Takashi Murakami&rsquo;s <em>Jellyfish Eyes</em>, might entertain, yet it takes a very hard look at Japan&rsquo;s politics around the 2011 tsunami disaster.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150616142229-AgnsVardaLesGlaneursetlaGlaneuse.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Agn&egrave;s Varda, <em>Les Glaneurs et la Glaneuse</em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">, 2000, 82'; Courtesy of the artist and Cin&eacute; Tamaris and Galerie Nathalie Obadia</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>OS: Tell us about operating in Cairo as a freelance curator. &nbsp;What are the limits on critical expression and how do you sense them? &nbsp;How do you navigate the complex codes and secure malleable spaces of freedom?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MZ:</strong> I moved to Cairo over two years ago to be with my husband, who is Egyptian. My motives of moving there were entirely personal. I cannot hide that I arrived full of enthusiasm which was dampened real quick when I realized how complicated the situation in the country was and still is. That realization made me decide to withdraw from any form of active curatorial or academic work for a while. Instead I have spent two years listening, putting my ears on the tracks of history and trying to make sense of it. In the last three years Cairo has seen many foreign curators and academics come and leave again very quickly. I cannot afford to be one of them so I focus on learning the local language, literally and metaphorically speaking.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For me the key problem of the Egyptian art scene is not the government, whose limitations in the cultural field have been exaggerated in the Western media. The real problem, for me, is the Egyptian class system, which plays a very important role in the Cairo art scene. Some of these issues Aleya Hamza and I will address in the talk &ldquo;Beyond Austerity: New Models of Support for Art in Crisis.&rdquo; Having said that, I will help organize a small exhibition by a Sudanese artist called Fadlabi at an artist-run space Sunset Nile Annexe later in the year. This will be my first curatorial gesture since I moved to Cairo,&nbsp;<em>inshaallah</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/51287-olga-stefan?tab=REVIEWS">Olga Stefan</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Olga Stefan&nbsp;is an independent curator, writer, and lecturer born in Bucharest, raised in Chicago and since 2009, based in Zurich.&nbsp;She contributes regularly to </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ArtReview</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Frieze</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> Magazine, </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art in America</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Flash Art</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sculpture Magazine</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, ArtSlant, and </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Artmargins</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. Her upcoming exhibition, Laughter and Forgetting, takes place October 9-16, 2015&nbsp;in the frame of <a href="http://www.bucharestartweek.eu/" target="_blank">Bucharest Art Week</a>.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">(Image at top: Hassan Hajjaj,&nbsp;<em>Karima: a day in the life of a henna girl</em>, 2015, 71'. Courtesy the artist and&nbsp;The Third Line)</span></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 08:09:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Basel Statements: Mathieu K. Abonnenc Explores the French West Indies' Colonial Past <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mathieu K. Abonnenc has a complicated relationship with his past. For his solo presentation in the&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/382344-art-basel-2015---sector-statements" target="_blank">Statements section of Art Basel</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, which kicks off this week, Abonnenc, an artist born in French Guiana who now lives in Paris, digs into the history and effects of colonialism and its representations within society.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You might have seen Abonnenc's work in the&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.fondation-entreprise-ricard.com/en/Events/view/137-Biennale-de-Venise-2015-Celeste-Boursier-Mougenot-Boris-Achour-Mathieu-K-Abonnenc" target="_blank">Belgian Pavilion</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;as part of Vincent Meessen&rsquo;s project at the Venice Biennale. His most recent works, such as&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Forever Weak and Ungrateful</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;(2015) or&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Forever, Without You</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;(2015) are based on a bronze statue in Cayenne, French Guiana, by&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis-Ernest_Barrias" target="_blank">Louis Ernest Barrias</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">,&nbsp;who has been likened to Rembrandt. The realist sculptor depicted&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Sch%C5%93lcher" target="_blank">Victor Sch&oelig;lcher</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, a French statesman and writer who worked to abolish slavery in French colonies. Sculptures of Sch&oelig;lcher are all over the French West Indies, symbolizing freedom through portraiture and honoring the slavery abolition society Sch&oelig;lcher founded&nbsp;in 1834.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Abonnenc waxes on the transcendental implications of this history&mdash;through Foucault, broken chains, power, history, and exploitation depicted through a prism of symbolist sublimation. He connects the dots between videos, photos, drawings, and archival material drawn mostly from his grandfather's collection. Before installing at Basel, Abonnenc took some time to answer a few questions for ArtSlant.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150615202121-FOR_EVER_12.jpg" alt="" width="325" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617100414-FOR_EVER_24.jpg" alt="" width="325" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mathieu K.Abonnenc,&nbsp;<em>Forever Weak and Ungrateful (6 &amp; 24)</em>, 2015, heliogravure, wooden frame, glass</span></p> <hr /> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Nadja Sayej: In the past, you've used history in your work (especially in&nbsp;<em>Forever Weak and&nbsp;</em><em>Ungrateful</em>). Where does that influence come from?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Mathieu K. Abonnenc:</strong>&nbsp;I'm glad that you mentioned this work, because the project I'll show in Basel is the end of this series. The work itself is a group of&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photogravure" target="_blank">photogravures</a>&nbsp;of a public sculpture that shows two men caught in strange moment. You'll have to decipher by yourself the dynamic of this moment. The ones in Basel are less elusive than the previous one, but they work as a whole. I have tried to create a connection with some other works that twist even more the content of the series. I'll say that I am more shaped by history than influenced by it, so it's not really history in itself, but more the effects it carries. The effects that persist in ourselves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>NS: Is it better to challenge history or preserve it?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>MKA:</strong> It's a never-ending process that goes from one point to the other.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617100149-mathieu_k_abonnenc_marcelle_alix_790.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617100045-FOR_EVER_02.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mathieu K.Abonnenc,&nbsp;<em>Forever Weak and Ungrateful (2 &amp; 5)</em>, 2015, heliogravure, wooden frame, glass</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>NS: You had access to a collection from&nbsp;&Eacute;mile Abonnenc (a family member?) of African masks. Are they all from Gabon? Why did you decide to use these?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>MKA:</strong> This collection was gathered by my grandfather, when he was in Gabon as a health officer in the 1930s. He gathered these objects as a hobby, but he used scientific tools to name and classify them. He was a contemporary of the famous Dakar-Djibouti mission, the first major French anthropological mission that constituted the objects collection that are now in the Quai Branly Museum in Paris. To work with this collection was a way to connect a real private process to a more collective one, all this in a colonial context. A way to locate the exercise of power and domination within myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>NS: What else are you working on at the moment?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>MKA:</strong> A project I have worked on for years is <em>French-Guyana</em>, about an old goldwasher village, up the Maroni River called Wacapou. It's close to Brazil and Suriname. My mother had a cabin there, and I used to go there as a child. But as the gold went scarce, the villagers abandoned the village. It's now just forest with the ruins of the village. I am working on a new film there.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617100744-MKA_SECTOR_11.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150617100824-MKA_SECTOR_31.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mathieu K. Abonnenc, <em>Secteur IX B</em>, 2015, Film HD, 16:9, 42mn. Coproduction Centre Pompidou Metz, CAC Brétigny. En partenariat avec le Muséum national d'histoire naturelle (site du Jardin des Plantes et Musée de l&rsquo;Homme), le Musée du quai Branly, et l'IFAN Dakar; Courtesy et coproduction de la galerie Marcelle Alix, Paris; Production red shoes/SOME SHOES</span></p> </div> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: Mathieu K.Abonnenc,&nbsp;<em>Forever Weak and Ungrateful (11)</em>, 2015, heliogravure, wooden frame, glass.&nbsp;All images: Courtesy Marcelle Alix, Paris)</span></p> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 10:10:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Momentum 8: The Narcissist Biennial? <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While all eyes are on Basel, there&rsquo;s a different crowd who are skipping the annual summer commercial art fair route altogether. Some of them might have been at the opening of the Nordic Biennial of Contemporary Art this weekend,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.momentum.no/" target="_blank">Momentum</a>.&nbsp;The 8th</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;edition opened its doors with live video of a performance from a Kurdish-Swedish pop songstress, Oculus Goggles, and an installation made of synthetic hair.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150615192356-Shoplifter_s_installation_Neverscape_NSayej.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Shoplifter's hair sculpture, Installation View. Photo: Nadja Sayej</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Such things are always a curatorial clusterfuck. Even though some curators claim&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">not&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">to be cultural diplomats, they have no choice in the Biennial format but to represent their nation's artists, or at least, to pull international work that describes or adheres in this case to a certain Nordic art-ness.</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">The Biennial is a strange concept that brings together a handful of curators who have never worked together before and that sometimes turns out disastrously. In the case of Momentum, they say they tried to &ldquo;learn from others' mistakes.&rdquo; The concept this year is &ldquo;Tunnel Vision,&rdquo; which the curators describe as &ldquo;looking within.&rdquo; So I guess we could call this the Narcissist Biennial&mdash;although there were no selfies here, except in front of Shoplifter&rsquo;s monstrous sculpture crafted from florescent synthetic hair (her work will also be at Frieze London in October).</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150615193411-Shoplifter-Zhala-NSayej.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Shoplifter's installation. Image: Nadja Sayej</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;"><br /></span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In true art world style, it is an incredibly complicated show. Layer upon layer, topics in the show include the esoteric, conspiracy theories, Nordic seclusion, digital isolation and &ldquo;the you loop&rdquo;&mdash;described by curators as the &ldquo;algorithms and cookies [that] customize our life and work online and thus risk leaving internet users spinning in &lsquo;you loops,&rsquo;&rdquo; as taken from Eli Pariser&rsquo;s book <em>The Filter Bubble</em>&mdash;and&nbsp;modern paranoia, via the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.paranoiapp.net" target="_blank">Paranoia App</a>, which allows you to follow other app users, as they follow you, created by Valia Fetisov, Nicolay Spesivtsev and Dzina Zhuk.</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Another aspect to this year's edition was the conscious inclusion of senior and experienced artists, including&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya, who created the fog artwork in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the Momentum Kunsthalle's entryway, pioneering Icelandic media artist Steina (founder of The Kitchen in New York), and Norwegian artist Sissel Tolaas, who creates portraits of cities, peoples, and events through chemical scents, which are placed throughout to give &ldquo;a biennial scent.&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150615193332-r0010233300dpi-1__1280x960_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Fog Garden Murasaki</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;(2010) Fujiko Nakaya, Courtesy Momentum</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Another fascinating artist in this category is Bjarni H. Th&oacute;rarinsson, from Iceland, who made a series of esoteric pencil drawings using symbols that lend themselves to the mystical arts. Known for his "Visiology," this visually poetic language is a complex universe. They look a bit like mandalas.</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Nordic art scene is always up against cultural seclusion, not least because of geography but probably in part because of the fact that the countries are prohibitively expensive&mdash;so a lot of Nordic artists scrape by in Berlin. That being said, there is an incredible amount of talent coming from the region in the past few years, such Norwegian electronic musician Sandra Kolstad, Finnish comic artist Tommi Musturi and Icelandic band FM Belfast, who have all received international recognition. But the Nordic scene still remains reclusive and exclusionary. </span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Thankfully they had Zhala&mdash;the aforementioned Swedish pop singer with Kurdish roots&mdash;to&nbsp;perform. Her songs, which play with the political (her first single was called "Prophet"), are like energetic rave anthems. She brought a refreshing and uninhibited touch to an otherwise typical art opening armed with a dry press conference and speeches from local politicians. The mayor of Moss rolled up with his political bling. He claimed he only wears it to &ldquo;official&rdquo; events, so you know this must mean something to Norway.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150615195122-Zhala_live3-Nsayej.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Zhala performing live. Photo: Nadja Sayej</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On Saturday night, the public opening party had the curators in cahoots&mdash;there was a positive review published in a national Norwegian newspaper. &ldquo;This art writer is known as &lsquo;the butcher&rsquo; because he butchers every art show he writes about,&rdquo; they said. &ldquo;He was sentimental about it and said this could potentially be the best show of the summer.&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150615194303-evalofdahlfive-fold-300-1__850x638_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Eva L&ouml;fdahl,&nbsp;<em>Five-Fold Hurrah</em>, 2009. Courtesy Momentum</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It was somewhat symbolic of the whole biennial. Referring to art critics as &ldquo;butchers,&rdquo; then sharing the story with other critics like myself as if it were innocent gossip, was an amateur move that also revealed the insider nature of micro-cultures. A review shouldn&rsquo;t determine the success of a show, butchered or otherwise.</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241816-nadja-sayej" target="_blank">Nadja Sayej</a></span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="NoSpacing" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: M&auml;rta Thisner, <em>Zhala</em>. Courtesy Momentum)</span></p> Tue, 16 Jun 2015 14:02:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Working (it) Out with Gillian Dykeman: Chris Lloyd <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Welcome to the second installation of the Artslant podcast series, <em>Working (it) Out</em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My name is Gillian Dykeman, and I'm a visual artist living in Toronto, Ontario. This summer, I am interviewing artists to ask about the role of audience in their practice. Each interview will begin with one question: "Does art require an audience?"</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209996644&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="450"></iframe></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Working (it) Out </span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Episode Two |&nbsp;<strong>Chris Lloyd: Canuck Amok</strong></span></p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;An audience of "Mom" (7:10)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;On unaware audiences (11:35)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;<em>The Everyday Goalie</em> and crowd-sourcing for art (13:50)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Identity in the landscape (17:10) &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;On accountability with public grants (18:02)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Ken Dandy (15:30)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Mother Canada memorial (21:53)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> </ul> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My guest for this episode is Chris Lloyd. Recently Lloyd made <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/chris-lloyd-conservative-candidate-messing-with-party-1.3069653" target="_blank">big news in Canada</a> when an investigative journalist broke the story that his campaign running for the Conservative Party of Canada (a right-wing party currently in power) was an extension of an ongoing art project Llyod had begun in&nbsp; 2001: <em><a href="http://dearpm.blogspot.ca" target="_blank">Dear PM</a></em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We discuss the evolution of audience coinciding with the various forms of <em>Dear PM</em>. Initially, when he ran for Conservative MP, Lloyd engaged an unknowing audience, but as this work migrated to national headlines, it brought a broad public into dialogue with both the spectacle of politics and contemporary art. Like Vincent Trasov's <a href="http://vincenttrasov.ca/index.cfm?pg=menu&amp;filter=Mr.%20Peanut" target="_blank">Mr. Peanut campaign</a> (1974), Lloyd isn't really expecting to win, but the artist is using his platform as a political candidate (although no longer from within the Conservative party) to speak to his real political concerns. In particular, Lloyd is critiquing the country's flawed and undemocratic first-past-the-post electoral system. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We catch up about how that project is evolving, and discuss Lloyd's recent work <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/chrislloydprojects/the-goalie" target="_blank"><em>The Everyday Goalie</em></a><em>, </em>where the artist plays out some of the myths constructing identity in Canada.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Music: The Kinks, "David Watts"</span></p> <table style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="600px"> <tbody style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <tr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;" colspan="2"> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612113708-Screen_Shot_2015-06-11_at_4.48.23_PM.png" alt="" width="630" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">The story breaks that Chris Lloyd's conservative candidacy is a work of art.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612113908-chris-lloyd_thumbs_up.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">Chris Lloyd and PM Harper</span></span></p> </td> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612113951-Chris_and_PM_Harper.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">Chris Lloyd and PM Harper</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612114330-05stanley-park-sit-vancouver.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><em style="font-size: x-small; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">The Everyday Goalie</span></em></span></p> </td> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612114736-09CL2014LAKELOUISE.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><em style="font-size: x-small; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">The Everyday Goalie</span></em></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;" colspan="2"> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/64281678" frameborder="0" width="600" height="338"></iframe></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/64281678" target="_blank">EVERYDAY GOALIE HAS A REST</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user3770508" target="_blank">DEAR PM</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612114523-mother-canada.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Rendering of the Mother Canada&nbsp;war memorial proposed for Cape Breton Highlands National Park</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612130103-Campaign_VincentTrasov_Peanut_Courthouse.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mr. Peanut at Vancouver Court House.&nbsp;Photo by Bob Strazicich for Vincent Trasov's 1974 Mayoral Campaign, Vancouver</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman">Gillian Dykeman</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 12 Jun 2015 13:02:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list One Body Part at a Time: ASHES/ASHES Summer Video Series <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Video is an exceedingly difficult medium to wrangle into a gallery space: Do you serve it up movie theater-style, with chairs and set screening times? Do you play it on a loop and allow people to walk in and out? Headphones or no headphones?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Video demands long looking, but it rarely gets it. How many times have you watched mere seconds of a work of video art before turning to something else? Actually maybe a better question, how many times have you actually watched a work of video art from beginning to end?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Los Angeles gallery ASHES/ASHES is making you look. Their current exhibition <em>BODY PARTS I &ndash; V</em> showcases five early video works from Knut &Aring;sdam, Nayland Blake, Patty Chang, Cheryl Donegan, and Bob Flanagan, Sheree Rose and Mike Kelley. But rather than showing all these works at once, they&rsquo;re doling them out one at a time. One week, one video. The works range from under 60 seconds to one hour long, each focusing on parts of the body: mouth, buttocks, penis, vagina.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612101235-Mike_Kelley__100_Reasons_-_2.png" alt="" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Bob Flanagan &amp; Sheree Rose &amp; Mike Kelley,&nbsp;<em>100 Reasons</em>, 1991, Color, &nbsp;Sound, 6:41 min</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&copy; Bob Flanagan, Mike Kelley &amp; Sheree Rose, courtesy The Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts and Electronic Arts Intermix</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On now is <em>100 Reasons </em>by legendary Bob Flanagan, Sheree Rose, and Mike Kelley, which shows 100 paddlings of a man&rsquo;s buttocks delivered by an off-screen mistress. Next week you can watch a man piss himself. You&rsquo;ll watch these videos in a dark wooden box constructed inside the gallery. It&rsquo;s very hard to turn away. You&rsquo;re almost forced to consume the entirety of the work, subject to a mild kind of restraint and forced consumption, echoed in the subject matter of the videos.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150612101929-Cheryl_Donegan__Gag_-_2.png" alt="" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Cheryl Donegan, &nbsp;<em>Gag</em>, 1991, Color, Sound, 8:57 min&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&copy; Cheryl Donegan, courtesy the artist and Electronic Arts Intermix</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The final week of the exhibition, July 7-11, you can see all the videos at once, for those of you who want to binge watch the series.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/11505-natalie-hegert?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Natalie Hegert</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Patty Chang /&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Shaved (At A Loss)</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;/ 1998 / color / sound / 5:18 min&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&copy; Patty Chang, courtesy the artist)</span></p> Fri, 12 Jun 2015 10:20:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Living Images, Digital Decay <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A recent study conducted by psychologist Linda Henkel at Fairfield University demonstrated an unexpected relationship between memory and taking photographs. In the study, participants were lead around an art museum and directed to take photographs of various works. They were then tested on their recollection of said works. The results showed that the act of taking pictures of a scene actually inhibits our ability to remember it.</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" title="" href="#_ftn1">[1]</a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While the photo-taking process today isn&rsquo;t inherently different than it was in the past, our ability to take innumerable shots has changed the way our brain responds to photography. With film photography, exposures were limited&mdash;we had fewer opportunities to record a moment. The physical form of the resulting image was also different: they were prints, objects which engaged multiple senses and therefore increased our ability to associate them with a memory. We&rsquo;re less likely to look at digital images after taking them, and when we do, we&rsquo;re less likely to remember the real life event. Says Henkel, we &ldquo;<a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/02/using-technology-to-outsource-human-memory/385955/" target="_blank">outsource our memory</a>.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Our unprecedented ability to record the scenes in front of us has, ironically, hurt our ability to remember them. And what&rsquo;s more, the pictures being produced have never been more disparate from the scenes in front of the lens while the shutter releases.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Digital Detritus</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Today, photos are taken, edited, and shared with the world in seconds. Where once conversations about photography addressed its indexical relationship to reality, its ability to accurately represent the world around us, today we are more concerned with the medium&rsquo;s relationship to time, an issue that has seen a renewed interest in the ideas of theorists like Benjamin and Berger.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But now, we&rsquo;re no longer in the age of mechanical image reproduction; we&rsquo;re in &ldquo;the age of digital replication.&rdquo; In their essay, &ldquo;Revolutions of Resolution,&rdquo; Paula Cardoso Pereira and Joaqu&iacute;n Zeren&eacute; Harcha write:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Digital images are no longer to be seen as ritual objects or as objects of mass consumption but rather as &ldquo;fragments of information that circulate in the high-speed networks now ringing the globe and that can be received, transformed, and recombined like DNA to produce new intellectual structures having their own dynamics and value&rdquo; (qtd. in Mitchell, William J. T. 1992. The Reconfigured Eye. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.).<a title="" href="#_ftn2">[2]</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150611063730-4._Photoshop.png" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 15px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">The interface of one of the earliest versions of Photoshop. The first version of Photoshop available commercially was hacked and shared illegally just months after it was released in 1989. By the time peer-to-peer file sharing came to prominence in the early 2000s, the program was one of the most pirated and illegally-downloaded. It remains that way today. The most recent version of the program was pirated and distributed hours after its release.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What does this shift mean for art? Berger tells us that it means less focus on the experiential aspect of viewing. You can see countless images of artworks on your computer at any time; what these images lack in tactility they make up for in accessibility. It lessens the importance placed on objecthood and the notion that the original thing, crafted by the hands of the artist, is superior to a facsimile thereof.<a title="" href="#_ftn3">[3]</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Regardless of the purpose of copies&mdash;be they for documentation, commerce, or theft&mdash;in the economy of images, the copy is no longer considered to be as inferior to the original as it once was. Sven L&uuml;tticken considers this in his essay, &ldquo;<a href="http://www.e-flux.com/journal/viewing-copies-on-the-mobility-of-moving-images/" target="_blank">Viewing Copies: On the Mobility of Moving Images</a>,&rdquo; suggesting that perhaps the quality that most levels the playing field is that the copy can be changed: it can be manipulated, taken apart and rearranged, added to or subtracted from. The copy can be copied. It can be distributed. It can be destroyed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Atrophy and the Living Image</strong></span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Whereas physical photographs or images have always been vulnerable and subject to external, physical alteration, the digitization of images introduces an entirely new set of issues: digital images are subject to internal changes. In a sense, images now are living: they degenerate. They are predisposed to atrophy and decay. And like any living thing, the more it is used, the more it is used up.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the name of making photography more accessible and accelerating the processes by which it&rsquo;s shared, cameras and lenses have become smaller and cheaper, resulting in a loss of image quality. When a digital image is generated, a file is created. Within the DNA of that file lies the structural data and metadata that allow the image to be rendered on a screen: the file is not an image itself, but more like instructions on how to create (or recreate) it.<a title="" href="#_ftn4">[4]</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cameras don&rsquo;t so much record images as they do information, and with sub-par lenses and small image sensors, about half of the information recorded is actually noise. To make up for this, cameras now rely on computational photography, using algorithms to clean up the noise and render higher-quality images. They scan a digital image to find a recognizable pattern of pixels, compare it to the patterns of other images in a vast bank of images, and create a new image based on the old ones. In other words, by looking at other images, computational photography essentially <a href="http://www.e-flux.com/journal/proxy-politics/">creates what it thinks we want to see</a>.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In between the time the shutter fires and a picture appears on screen for review, several manipulations have already occurred to the image file, most of which people are unaware of. Programs inside cameras apply sharpening, noise reduction, and color enhancement. Then, as an image is shared, it's subject to even more manipulations unbeknownst to most viewers: downsampling, color loss, cropping. Our screens also alter the appearance of images: supporting limited resolution, they retain a small level of detail and color.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In order to increase the speed of image-making and storing, and to create room for the huge amount of images created as a result of this speed, files sizes have to be small, and most digital images are stored in a compressed file format. Jpeg, by far the most common, features a lossy compression algorithm. This means that each time a jpeg is compressed, it loses quality. When a jpeg is edited or saved, for example if it is resized or rotated, it&rsquo;s recompressed. The jpeg image is subject to a perpetual degradation of quality.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150611063638-3.Hito_Steyerl.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 15px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">Hito Steyerl.&nbsp;<em>How Not to Be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .Mov File</em>&nbsp;(2013). Still image, single screen 1080p .mov file, 14min.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">In this film, Steyerl shows us how to&nbsp;"disappear" by becoming smaller than a pixel or blending into chroma key backgrounds</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The more the jpeg shared, the more it decays: with each subsequent version of a file, the lines of the original image become a little blurrier, its colors duller, its size reduced. It moves away from its original, becoming a visual shell of its original self. Hito Steyerl calls this a &ldquo;poor image,&rdquo; its name referring to both its quality and its capital in a world in which the supply of images so outweighs the demand.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Steyerl writes in her essay &ldquo;<a href="http://www.e-flux.com/journal/in-defense-of-the-poor-image/">In Defense of the Poor Image</a>&rdquo;:</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 60px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The poor image is a copy in motion. Its quality is bad, its resolution substandard. As it accelerates, it deteriorates. It is a ghost of an image, a preview, a thumbnail, an errant idea, an itinerant image distributed for free, squeezed through slow digital connections, compressed, reproduced, ripped, remixed, as well as copied and pasted into other channels of distribution.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>The More We Use, the More We Lose</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If the digital image is akin to a living thing, its closest model might be the human brain. Like the jpeg, the brain has a finite amount of data (neurons or &ldquo;brain cells&rdquo;). The way the muscle of the brain works means that the more brain activity we exercise, the more neurons we lose. It systematically removes cells in order to remain healthy. The process, called &ldquo;programmed cell death,&rdquo; or &ldquo;apoptosis,&rdquo; occurs when the brain forces extraneous cells to &ldquo;commit suicide by activating an intracellular death program.&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn5">[5]</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For both the image and the brain, a certain amount of self-shedding is healthy. Space needs to be conserved. Moreover, the degeneration of digital images is similar to that of human memories. <a href="http://www.wired.com/2012/02/ff_forgettingpill/all/1" target="_blank">Recent studies</a> have shown that the recollection of memory may not require us to reach back into our brain to grab an old memory and bring it to the forefront; instead, memory is an active, generative process. Called the reconsolidation theory, it suggests that we don&rsquo;t access memories; we actually create or unpack them.<a title="" href="#_ftn6">[6]</a> Rather than calling up an old file, stored in an archive of memories, we create a new version of a memory each time we remember it.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is no archive; w</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ith each memory, a new file.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Each new memory created is slightly different in genetic makeup than the one that preceded it; just like photographic representation, or the Proustian concept of time, it is always a step removed. Surprisingly, the memories we might recall most often&mdash;such our first sexual experiences, a family event, or a success at work&mdash;may be the least accurate. Our most cherished images, the ones that circulate the most, might also be the furthest from the truth. Theoretically, the memories we exercise the least that might be the most accurate. But which memory holds more value?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150611063802-2._Dali.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Salvador Dali's <em>The Persistence of Memory</em> commoditized for a t-shirt&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Circulation vs. Representation</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The same question plagues the image: What is more valuable, accuracy or propagation?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An image, after all, is meant to be seen; that&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s created. The more it&rsquo;s shared, the more it&rsquo;s seen; the more it&rsquo;s seen and the more it&rsquo;s successful in achieving the goals behind its creation. Yet, photographs are typically meant to be mimetic. In our system of communicative capitalism, an economy of circulating images, it can&rsquo;t be both. The technologies and circulatory systems that enable the rapid creation and dissemination of images are the very things that make them most unstable, and perhaps the most like us.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/425651-taylor-dafoe?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Taylor Dafoe</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"><hr style="line-height: 26px;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a> Linda A. Henkel, &ldquo;Point-and-Shoot Memories: The Influence of Taking Photos on Memory for a Museum Tour.&rdquo; <em>Psychological Science</em>,&nbsp;February 2014, vol. 25&nbsp;no. 2&nbsp;396-402.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref2">[2]</a> Paula Cardoso Pereira and Joaqu&iacute;n Zeren&eacute; Harcha, "Revolutions of Resolution: About the Fluxes of Poor Images in Visual Capitalism" (2014). Triple-C, Volume 12, No. 1.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref3">[3]</a> John Berger, <em>Ways of Seeing</em>, (1972). London: British Broadcasting Corp.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref4">[4]</a> Rubinstein, Daniel and Sluis, Katrina, &ldquo;Notes on the Margins of Metadata; Concerning the Undecidability of the Digital Image.&rdquo; <em>Photographies</em>, 6. 2013. pp. 151-158.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref5">[5]</a> Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 4th edition. New York: Garland Science; 2002.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref6">[6]</a> Tronson, Natalie C, and Jane R Taylor. 2007. "Molecular mechanisms of memory reconsolidation." Nature Reviews. Neuroscience 8, no. 4: 262-275.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: Christopher Williams, (Kodak Three Point Reflection Guide / &copy; 1968, Eastman Kodak Company, 1968/(Meiko laughing)/Vancouver, B.C./April 6, 2005" (2005). Chromogenic color print)</span></p> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 14:56:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Systems: Issue 4 of Editions <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Table of Contents:</strong></span></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; line-height: 16px; text-align: justify;"><a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43212" target="_blank">Arte de Sistemas</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Ionit Behar</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; line-height: 16px; text-align: justify;"><a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43233" target="_blank">Map Art: Systems Unite</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; line-height: 16px; text-align: justify;"><a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/43234" target="_blank">Activating the Archive</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Jessica Lynne</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; line-height: 16px; text-align: justify;"><a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43239" target="_blank">Living Images, Digital Decay</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Taylor Dafoe</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; line-height: 16px; text-align: justify;"><a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/43237" target="_blank">Systems for a Downer: on Artistic Failure</a>&nbsp;|&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Philippa Snow</span></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif;"><a style="text-align: center;" href="https://instagram.com/eddfornieles/"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150526172626-Ed_fornieles.gif" alt="" width="600" /></a></p> <p style="color: #000000; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; font-family: helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: small; line-height: 12px;"><a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="https://instagram.com/eddfornieles/">Ed Fornieles</a>,&nbsp;<em>installing pole for ami</em>, 2015. Part of a new body of work that documents the artist's apartment using a live webcam.&nbsp;At the same time, a cartoon dimension will be layered over the top, unfolding its own narrative.</span><br /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><strong>All Systems Are Go</strong><br /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">It could be said that contemporary life has never been as systematic as it is now. Billions of systems run concurrently, sometimes cooperatively, sometimes at cross-purposes. We often think of an individual as a system unto itself, </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and however porous and schizophrenic (a la F&eacute;lix Guattari), we think of a system as whole and complete.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"> We even put great faith in our ability to apprehend systems in their entirety&mdash;a point of view once reserved for deities and royalty. Systems are viewed as a state of grace and perfection, our salvation from the chaos. Even the greatest threat to our civilization&mdash;humanity&rsquo;s effect on Earth systems&mdash;is thought to be overcome by interventions in a system (geoengineering) that we do not fully understand. The stakes are incredibly high when we conceptualize systems: they have come to represent our most audacious ambitions. Systems promise stasis though they often err. To err, however, is what ultimately allows systems to be reassessed, reconfigured and redetermined.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The assertion that society is more entrenched in systems than ever is most apparent in our digital life:&nbsp;<a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm" target="_blank">87% of North Americans </a>and 42% of the world have access to the internet. <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21647957-number-companies-have-bold-ambitions-use-satellites-drones-and-balloons" target="_blank">Initiatives from Facebook, Google, and others</a> are attempting to expand that to 100% saturation, realizing that these companies&rsquo; raw materials are people,&nbsp;or rather, the data that their activity produces. The representations of our identity that we self-produce online, in collaboration with millions of other individuals, are mined for meaning, and assigned meaning&mdash;even if that meaning is disconnected and misleading. Once it has been accepted by whichever quantifying system, it enters into a stage of meaningful and actionable simulacrum. We rebuild ourselves according to the mirror of our self-representation (though it is a representation no longer of our own creation, but in collaboration with and within the systems in which we operate).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Systems that are currently in states of flux and rupture include gender, class, race, and a host of others relating to identity and society. This is a very good thing.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As much as who we are is based on the integrity of systems, we are also dependent on the failure of these systems because it is in that moment of failure&mdash;the moment of systemic rupture&mdash;that humanity allows itself to act creatively.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ionit Behar kicks off the issue with a look at Argentina&rsquo;s <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43212" target="_blank">Arte de Sistemas</a>, a pioneering movement that took systems as the object of artistic activity as social and political critique. Zooming forward in time, Gillian Dykeman considers artists and geographers today whose practices demonstrate <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43233" target="_blank">the interconnectedness of Earth systems, politics, and ethics</a>. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Taking on systems of knowledge, Jessica Lynne profiles artist Kameelah Janan Rasheed, who <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/43234" target="_blank">activates archival material to rupture linear histories</a>. Taylor Dafoe asks whether <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43239" target="_blank">the activities of digital images</a>&mdash;their use and decay&mdash;make them like one of humans&rsquo; most complicated systems: memory. Turning inward, Philippa Snow muses on the <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/43237" target="_blank">coping mechanisms</a> struggling artists and creatives develop to get by in a challenging and sometimes cruel profession. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The .gif at top is part of a <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="https://instagram.com/eddfornieles/">new project</a> by Ed Fornieles that explores systems of surveillance and the state of the self within visual culture via a cartoon fox.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="http://www.artslant.com/website/joel-kuennen" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Image at top: The <a style="text-decoration: none; color: #ff0000;" href="https://youtu.be/SKf--ZY4qfA?t=2m52s" target="_blank">first utterance</a> of "all systems are go," by astronaut Allen Shephard during the NASA Mercury III mission, 1961.</span></p> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 15:22:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Systems for a Downer: on Artistic Failure, Bath Bombs, and Embracing Shortcomings <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Earlier this week, I came across a somewhat striking quotation from a 2007 edition of Tracey Emin's <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/columnists/tracey-emin/tracey-emin-my-life-in-a-column-396061.html" target="_blank">now-defunct column</a> for the </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Independent</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> newspaper: "faced with the daily prospects of failure and self-loathing,&rdquo; the artist suggests, &ldquo;a numb chrysalis starts to develop around you, and if you are not careful you wake up one morning to find yourself not awake, but in a semi-comatose state, baked into a hardened shell, breathless and mind-numbing. You have to poke your finger through the hardened crispy shell, and after you&rsquo;ve pushed it through you have to wiggle it about until eventually the hole is big enough to smash a whole fist through."</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It&rsquo;s an evocative image, certainly; more importantly, it also started me thinking about the ways in which &ldquo;artistic&rdquo; people adapt their behaviors and modes of thinking in order to cope with what they perceive as failures. I believe that there are systems&mdash;mechanisms, of sorts&mdash;that one can put in place in order to survive an existence in the arts, or in any creative endeavor for that matter: owing to the typically fragile nature of the artist/writer/whatever; however, these systems can often be very similar to survival tips aimed at the mentally-ill.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610155726-7600158688_7b64143902_b.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Tracey Emin, <em>She Lay Down Deep Beneath The Sea</em>, Neon, Installation view at Turner Contemporary. Photo via Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisjohnbeckett/7600158688/in/photolist-czANoL-54pxw7-4Qvp3V-5Er2He-5XPw4s-bZQAdy-bexhez-btt1TY-caJWFy-bcHuRi-bomvgi-bcATCt-PYWu7-ojtSsy-oCJbNa-ojtKKX-oAGBTK-ojtqe3-oALf97-dK84F2-dFGYUm-53qSNE-avvFqx-9TJv8A-bDiHTh-2ZcZqZ-2tRM6z-5aKjFq-bZQUcL-bZQUoN-bZQUiu-bokeLT-bZQU2J-bUsWhB-dtzKth-dyskWz-819oEK-8KwLAH-73ZiMS-9Wp4tC-9Wp4s7-5Evjd3-9WmdP2-9Wp4qw-5Er2Ga-5EvjeN-5Evjgo-7ZK77G-T3F3S-5aKw1J" target="_blank">Chris Beckett</a></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is a great deal of conversation online about "self help" for the vaguely, moderately or terminally depressed. These solutions&rsquo; central locus often lies in the realm of the linen bed sheet or the bath bomb, whose temporary reminders of softness and comfort and civilized humanity have the power to offer some fleeting relief.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It's a small concession to putting one's energy into something other than self-loathing&mdash;I know, <em>why bother?</em>&mdash;but the very smallness of it is the thing which assures a greater chance of success. Reading Emin's quotation, I wondered which failures in particular she was grappling with on October the 5th, 2007, especially as I first encountered the blurb in the self-care tag of a sad but savvy writer's personal blog. This was the year, after all, that she represented Great Britain at the Venice Biennale and was made a member of the Royal Academy; the following year, a retrospective at the Scottish National Gallery would become its most visited show by any living artist.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610160432-3153048981_fbe5704ec7_o.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Tracey Emin, <em>My Bed</em> (1998), Exhibition <em>Tracey Emin</em>, Centro de Arte Contempor&aacute;neo de M&Aacute;LAGA , Malaga, SpainPhoto via Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/truusbobjantoo/3153048981/in/photolist-5NCcBt-Pt7XY-dqeWLC-dtVpQM-Pt7Yd-dAm653-i8DJ6s-yRKVy-saU8P3-aQByj2-qwQuBq-dCFFGe-dvLg28-bBnTvg-7YUemt-qrQh2z-5YTsTm-brsKwj-o4LA3M-ajCWmN-5aF8E4-ajA9Jr-9ZwJGC-9ZtSWi-9Yi77e-9Yi4AM-9ZrcH9-55arvY-ckLD5W-4siZRD-aiecLK-9zD1hc-biMHEX-aVsQL8-3y8WZS-dNqvM8-SrTw2-SrQTe-9W9yRz-bsbnxN-a69Xb8-9Wcogj-66yh23-c5swVU-pCQ39u-oJ51o3-bZQU7q-ohbRCn-2NWwnG-qeCi6f" target="_blank">Truus, Bob &amp; Jan too!</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Any talk of self-loathing and failure in the face of such achievements is both legitimizing, and terrifying&mdash;on the one hand, the reader is far from likely to be as accomplished as Emin, but on the other, their own discomfort seems suddenly universal, rational, even. There is a special shape&mdash;a distinctive silhouette, as insignificant and dense and spiky as an un-peeled lychee fruit&mdash;for feelings of true creative and artistic failure: one which distinguishes them from failures of almost every other kind, perhaps because in art, the failure is always personal; not the result of some vague mathematical miscalculation, or evil kismet, but your actual, personal vision. It is the failure of <em>your</em> taste, <em>your</em> intellect, and&mdash;the cruellest of all the kickers&mdash;your <em>Self</em>. How does anyone working in the arts ever get up in the morning, with this in mind? No wonder black coffee is so <em>de rigeur </em>in these circles (to say nothing of the industry's similar passion for cocaine). Ersatz energy; ersatz ego: fuel for big empty talk and big blabbermouthed thinking. Self-medication and self-regard are legitimate forms of self-care, after a fashion.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Artistic failure is also, often, a wipe-out in financial terms&mdash;a culture which prizes both youth and wealth above all else, as the art world has for the last few years or so, is a culture in which all of those who are not either multimillionaires or <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/42823">Thirty Under Thirty wunderkinds</a> find themselves lacking the necessary tools. Whether financial failure or general psychic, personal failure hurts the sufferer most, I cannot say: I have been a financial failure for all of my adult life, and where once there might have resided some sharp awareness of my own abject poverty there lives, by now, only something&nbsp;slow and parasitic whose radiating ache I hardly notice. As for the personal failure, I decline to comment&mdash;though all depressives believe themselves to be failures for at least three days of the week, so there's your answer by default.</span><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610150436-2511177062_7240c2ccbf_b.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Bath bombs coming soon to a writer near you. Photo via Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/hippie/2511177062/in/photolist-4PUrsf-88yQbB-5VpiXL-896iVi-896q3g-899ExA-896nZF-896kFg-899yGj-899BPo-899JKm-899Bk7-899Ef9-896kRP-896ioi-896qPt-899D3G-899ybb-899An9-896iLM-899yno-899ASG-899EHw-896nx4-899DeN-899Dqf-896pvH-4PUurN-4PUuBj-4PUtC9-4PUu2Q-4PQetX-4PUtQm-4PUvSj-4PQdGa-4PUvpm-4PUtqb-4PUvCG-fdNPm2-4PQbvM-4PUt1U-b1LuBB-4PUshE-4PQbjH-4PUsw3-4PQb6k-4PUtdo-c6uBvL-j7kLYT-4tGP6V" target="_blank">Philippa Willitts</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(I have not yet purchased a bath bomb&mdash;not since the age of thirteen or so, which is the oldest age that one can pass the threshold of a Lush store without inducing epistaxis&mdash;but I feel the moment drawing closer. The breath I feel on the back of my neck is lavender these days, I&rsquo;m certain.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Much like Emin, I find on my travels that all creatives and artists and writers are pretty much <em>fucked</em>, if you&rsquo;ll pardon my YBA terminology&mdash;all of us gently vibrating around in our own neurotic, David-Vetter-esque bubbles of pointless self-loathing and self-obsession. What, under these gloomy circumstances, is to be done? Should we each smash our way through the eggshell walls of our insecurities like Tracey Emin's phantom fists or, if one prefers, like the Kool Aid jug, or should we choose self-care, clean sheets, and ever-decreasing circles of contact? This mania for collecting inspirational quotes about the formerly-sad becomes almost cultish in its weird ubiquity, especially as there are, I would argue, more effective systems for success than repeating mantras. More effective, even, than actively fighting one&rsquo;s demons into temporary submission is to make exotic pets of them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><a href="http://www.fashionpirate.net/2014/04/most-important-ugly_22.html"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610145855-tumblr_n4emomBUQH1spvdvyo4_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Hari, from <em>Most Important Ugly</em>. Photo <a href="http://not.taylersmith.com/" target="_blank">Tayler Smith</a>. Courtesy <a href="http://www.fashionpirate.net/2014/04/most-important-ugly_22.html" target="_blank">Arabelle Sicardi</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Strangeness becomes less concerning when one begins to let one&rsquo;s output and one&rsquo;s public persona revolve around it, naturally and organically. One of almost six thousand people to have shared the aforementioned Emin quotation on their sites is the writer and make up theorist Arabelle Sicardi, whose photography project <em><a href="http://www.autostraddle.com/tag/most-important-ugly/">Most Important Ugly</a></em> and personal Tumblr tag #girlmonstering suggestion their own solutions to these creeping personal anxieties: ones which hardly recommend overcoming or disguising anything at all, but instead offer something closer to padding a hunchback, or dashing lipstick on a boil.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">From my own perspective, I happen to like Tracey Emin&rsquo;s monster incarnation far more than her present-day RA Grande Dame; she has always been at her most interesting not simply engaged in battle with her issues, but thrusting them, bloodily, into our faces. What is <em>My Bed</em>, after all, if not a trophy-like display of the very thing which kept her &ldquo;semi-comatose&rdquo; and &ldquo;mind-numbed&rdquo; in the first place? What were the fourteen days she spent living in a gallery back in 1996, if not an absolute unabashed desire to show herself warts and all? I hope she keeps, somewhere, the pieces of every mental shell she&rsquo;s ever smashed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/265136-philippa-snow" target="_blank">Philippa Snow</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Tracey Emin,&nbsp;<em>I Know I Know I Know</em>, Neon, Installation view at British Pavilion, Venice Biennale, 2007. Photo: Andrea Alessi)</span></p> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 12:29:14 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Activating the Archive: Kameelah Rasheed Untidies History <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;You&rsquo;re going to get me started on a rant,&rdquo; Kameelah Janan Rasheed says in between laughs as I begin to ask her about America&rsquo;s obsession with neat and tidy histories. &ldquo;America loves a linear history and a linear history wants us to think about things as discrete events. We should instead be thinking about history as sets of logic and systems that preserve power.&rdquo; It is a week before the opening of Rasheed&rsquo;s latest solo exhibition, <em>Future Perfect/indices &amp; marginalia</em> at <a href="http://www.weeksvillesociety.org/" target="_blank">The Weeksville Heritage Center </a>in Brooklyn and it is evident that she intends the show to be one full of historical disruptions. &ldquo;Funny enough, I actually hated history as a kid,&rdquo; Rasheed says with another laugh.</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is difficult to find a trace of that youthful disdain in Rasheed&rsquo;s work now. History is so intimately connected to her praxis. Although it is perhaps more accurate to say that it is the <em>reconstruction</em> of history, particularly histories outside of a white-capitalist-patriarchal framework, that most interests Rasheed. What has resulted is a body of work that is as physically confronting as it is intellectually gripping. A self-described research-based conceptual artist, Rasheed&mdash;whose artistic mediums include photography, printmaking, and installation&mdash;is painstakingly deliberate about her approach to the building of alternative canonical spaces through her art. And she is reticent to shy away from the centering of blackness in such an approach.</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610161427-NIFA_VII-1.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Kameelah Janan Rasheed, Installation Shot (detail) from <em>No Instructions for Assembly, Activation VII</em> at Vox Populi in Philadelphia, 2015</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I first encountered Rasheed&rsquo;s work last summer when she was part of the site-specific group exhibition <em>If You Build It</em>, curated by the non-profit organization, <a href="http://www.nolongerempty.org/" target="_blank">No Longer Empty</a>. On view was her installation <em>No Instructions for Assembly, Activation IV </em>(2014), which served as a portable archive documenting the period of time when, as a child, Rasheed and her family were homeless. Using family photographs, texts, and other found objects, Rasheed catalogued a specific moment in her childhood, yet also asked those of us who wandered about the installation to leave behind our own ephemera. In this way, she invited multiple, disparate stories of home to exist alongside one another. This elasticity, indeed multiplicity of the archive as an artistic conceit is central to Rasheed&rsquo;s historical negotiations with consequences that extend far beyond the art itself. &ldquo;For marginalized communities, the archive is not merely about an artistic gesture, in many ways it is about survival,&rdquo; she argues, &ldquo;the question for me is always: what <em>isn&rsquo;t</em> being documented?&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610111722-howtosufferpolitely.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Kameelah Janan Rasheed, <em>How to Suffer: LTP</em> (2014-)</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In her series <em>How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat) </em>(2014&ndash;), Rasheed targets dominant discourse more explicitly. Consisting of seven bright yellow digital chromogenic prints, the project is a tongue in cheek commentary on the failures of master narratives of racial progress. One print reads: Paddling Upstream Builds Character. Another: Purchase the Proper Boots with which to Pull Yourself Up By the Bootstraps. In their simplicity lies their effectiveness&mdash;the edicts of history never favor the poor and disenfranchised.</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Thus, Rasheed charts and re-charts new maps that propose new pathways towards a black utopia. But how are these new pathways made public? What strategies must be employed in order to activate the archive? In each iteration of <em>No Instructions&hellip;</em> (appropriately referred to as activations), as she re-uses and re-fashions materials left by viewers while also including new objects, Rasheed builds a conduit and frees the archival material for multiple publics. The animation lives in the invitation&mdash;the invitation to contribute to the atemporality of histories, to reject the erasures of the linear. At the time of our call, the magnitude of continuing this intellectual project with the Weeksville community is not at all lost on Rasheed. &ldquo;I do worry that I have overthought it to the point of inaccessibility,&rdquo; she tells me.</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610113213-RasheedInstallationShot1.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="line-height: 10px;">Kameelah Janan Rasheed,&nbsp;</span><em style="line-height: 10px;">Future Perfect/indices &amp; marginalia</em><span style="line-height: 10px;">, 2015, Installation view (found photographs, vintage Ebony magazines, transparency paper, stretched canvas, excerpts from Weeksville archive) at The Weeksville Heritage Center, Brooklyn. Photo: Dyani Douze</span></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Still, Rasheed&rsquo;s ideological framework is exactly why Weeksville curator Ali Rosa-Salas chose to work with her when conceptualizing a project that would make public the center&rsquo;s rich archives. For those who have long debated what black liberation might look like, historic Weeksville offers some glimpses of potentiality. The heritage center now exists to connect the immediate neighborhood and wider New York City community to the largely under-told story of the vibrant free black community of 19th century Weeksville, Brooklyn. However, the task has not been an easy one. With her invitation to Rasheed, Rosa-Salas is hoping to create an intervention. She told me via email:</span></p> <blockquote> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kameelah's tactile manipulation of archival material (ripping, cutting, highlighting, photocopying) is to me, an act of resistance to the institutional structures that alienate the public from history that is rightfully theirs. She thinks expansively about archival sources, seeing the world she inhabits as a library in and of itself.</span></p> </blockquote> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610113107-RasheedInstallationShot3.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Kameelah Janan Rasheed, <em>Future Perfect/indices &amp; marginalia,</em> 2015, Installation view (magazine text excerpts, excerpt from William H. Pease's "Black Utopia: Negro Communal Experiments in America"- 1963, and Elizabeth Alexader's, "Can You be BLACK and Look at This?: Reading the Rodney King Video(s)" - 1994) at The Weeksville Heritage Center, Brooklyn. Photo: Dyani Douze</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When I find Rasheed at the exhibition opening, she is readying herself for a few opening night photographs. At her back is the cognitive sprawl, as Salas refers to it, of archival material&mdash;from the Weeksville library, the internet, and other institutional collections&mdash;that comprises the largely text-based installation. It is a dense, scholarly, excavation with writings from Hortense Spillers and William H. Pease, among others, that requires me to walk through three times before fully feeling satisfied. &ldquo;How do I create a black utopia?&rdquo; asks Rasheed when we finally get a moment to speak. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t have the exact answer to that but I see my work as a space for me to think through that inquiry taking advantage of the stimuli of the world, building relationships between systems of thoughts.&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/417193-jessica-lynne?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lynne</a></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.weeksvillesociety.org/exhibitions/" target="_blank">Future Perfect/ indices &amp; marginalia</a><em> is on view at The Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, NY, until June 24th.</em></span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Kameelah Janan Rasheed, <em>Future Perfect/indices &amp; marginalia,</em> 2015, Installation view, (found photographs, vintage Ebony magazines, monoprints, Glenn Ligon's "Hands" -1996, excerpts from Thomas Sayer Ellis' "Skin Inc.", excerpts from Jan Von&nbsp;Brevern's, "The Islands of Beno&icirc;t Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking", excerpts from 1928 "Crisis" magazine, excerpts from Weeksville archive, handwritten notes, found paper) at The Weeksville Heritage Center, Brooklyn. Photo: Dyani Douze)</span></p> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 15:01:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Map Art: Systems Unite <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Ecology and economy (and its politics) are concurrent, intersectional systems. To consider both together fully requires an interdisciplinary approach to which art and geography (and cultural geographers or geographer-artists) are potentially well-equipped to perform. Artwork coming out of this union is often in response to research scrutinizing information pulled out of social demographics, seen from outer space, or embedded in landscapes. Both disciplines are usually nested in the humanities, but practitioners also engage and collaborate with the sciences, adopting a fluidity necessary to deal with the connectivity of the systems they investigate</span>. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There was a time during my forays into a Bachelor of Arts (before coming to my senses and pursuing a BFA) where I became incredibly enamored with the term <em>ecofeminism</em>. &ldquo;Finally,&rdquo; I thought, &ldquo;an <em>ism</em> for me!&rdquo; An incompletely informed feminist with my heart in the right place, I thought I needed a special feminism to include my environmental concerns, and not &ldquo;just&rdquo; the social justice concerns of Feminism proper. As my relationship with feminism grew in breadth and depth through reading, discussing, and engaging with radical feminists in Halifax, Nova Scotia, I came to realize there was no need for ecofeminism. It merely described in a little more detail the same concerns as feminism itself: <em>of course</em> social justice is connected with environmental justice; both demand the undermining and elimination of patriarchal/colonial/capitalistic power to such an extent that everything must change. There isn&rsquo;t a need for a special sphere just for ecofeminism with its own special philosophy; politics and ecology are overlapping, entangled systems that feminism straight up can handle just fine.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Naomi Klein&rsquo;s new book <a href="http://thischangeseverything.org/" target="_blank"><em>This Changes Everything</em></a> lives and breathes this intersectionality: she methodically delineates the imbrication of ecological, political-economic systems, demonstrating their tied fates and making a clear case for replacing current economic structures. Klein&rsquo;s book is interdisciplinary, and also not. Just as ecofeminist concerns can easily be nested within feminism, the politics of economy are nested within ecology&mdash;there is literally nowhere else for them to go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Klein&rsquo;s work reflects the contemporary moment in academia: there is a palpable fluidity between many once distinct and siloed fields. Comparative literature departments, for example, are nothing but. Similarly, the discipline of geography went through a radical split in the 1970s between traditional concerns, and a new branch: human geography (and from that followed cultural geography). Human geographers <em>interpreted</em> the data, embracing social demographics and the dynamic interplay of individuals, culture, populations, environment, biology, politics, and economy. This work observes embedded politics in relation to a broader ecological context as described by Klein.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610103049-9728401797_1012efccc2_k.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Hans Haacke, <em>Shapolsky et al Manhattan Real Estate Holdings... </em>Installation view at MACBA.<em>&nbsp;</em>Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/macba/9728401797">Gemma Planell / MACBA</a>, 2013</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art practices such as Hans Haacke&rsquo;s would now fit comfortably within a geographer&rsquo;s research purview. Early works such as <em>Shapolsky et al Manhattan Real Estate Holdings, A Real Time Social System as of May 1, 1971&nbsp;</em>engaged the materials of a cultural geographer, and presaged the infographics with which we are all so familiar today. Haacke&rsquo;s conceptual practice was described at the time as &ldquo;information&rdquo; or <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43212" target="_blank">&ldquo;systems&rdquo; art</a>. He used government records, social demographics, and field photography (of the properties in question) in order to produce a just critique and to unveil the power systems at play.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It makes sense via this lineage that artists have started to find their way into geography departments. Trevor Paglen did as much when he completed his PhD at UC Berkeley. The artist&rsquo;s work finds, tracks, and reveals surveillance infrastructures whereby governments spy on their own citizens. Paglen deploys fieldwork photography, publically available documents, amateur satellite enthusiast websites, and observation of landscape to make work about the way information moves across, is controlled, and is grafted onto the landscape (<a href="http://www.paglen.com/?l=work&amp;s=nonfunctional" target="_blank">or, indeed, the <em>exosphere</em></a>)<em>.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610103120-Paglen__1_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Trevor Paglen, <em>Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 4)[</em>, 2013, Mixed media, 16 x 16 x 16 feet. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Artist Gwen MacGregor is taking a similar path, and is currently pursuing her PhD in geography at the University of Toronto. MacGregor was already an established artist when she decided to return to school after the 2008 recession. She had long created work packed with obsessive detail, environmental concern, colonial critique, and had begun working with personal GPS technology. Her interest in GPS came out of the desire to create something site-specific while holding a six-month residency in New York. She later took some undergraduate classes in geography, and found it was an uncannily good fit for her practice and interests. As she has advanced through her academic career, she has found her geography professors supportive and open-minded about the forms her research may take. The discipline has taken a &ldquo;cultural turn,&rdquo; so much so that it meshes with the conceptual concerns and site specificity so present in MacGregor&rsquo;s work. <a href="http://www.gwenmacgregor.com/research_flow_charts_and_data_banks.html"><em>Research, Flow Charts, and Databanks</em></a> is an installation in which the artist combined the experiential with data in video, sculpture, and animation to critique the colonial legacy of the watershed, while also considering the positioning of self to nature.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150611122515-research_flow_charts_and_data_banks_03_lg.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;Gwen MacGregor, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Research, Flow Charts and Data Banks</em>, Kitchener&ndash;Waterloo Art Gallery,&nbsp;2010</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/38001606" frameborder="0" width="600" height="330"></iframe></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/38001606" target="_blank">Shed</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user3474481" target="_blank">gwenmacgregor</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">This approach (a bit of dilettantism, without which we wouldn&rsquo;t have Da Vinci&rsquo;s flying machines or art punk) echoes of early western empiricism &agrave; la Francis Bacon. The philosopher / scientist / author wasn&rsquo;t so much post-human as pre-humanities; the silos of academia which recently have become more soft around the edges were at that time fluid&mdash;more the continuum described by Rosi Braidotti in <em>The Posthuman. </em>Braidotti&rsquo;s book formalizes the interdisciplinary tendency described in the art practices above posthumanism, and echoes Klein&rsquo;s call to actually change <em>everything</em> in accord with truly recognizing the entanglement systems of ecology-economy-everything.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman" target="_blank">Gillian Dykeman</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Gwen MacGregor, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Research, Flow Charts and Data Banks</em>, Kitchener&ndash;Waterloo Art Gallery,&nbsp;2010)</span></p> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 12:25:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Art Meets Sustainability at an Urban Pop-up Campsite <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Roughly one sixth of the Netherlands was once covered by water and has over the centuries been reclaimed with dikes and windmills. The latest addition to this growing mass of new land is the so-called Centrumeiland (Center Island), a slender strip attached to Haveneiland (Harbor Island) of Amsterdam's new IJburg housing estate. Some 800,000 cubic meters of sand were deposited, layer upon layer, to create space for much needed homes to accommodate the city's rapidly increasing population. Construction will not commence until 2017 and the place currently looks desolate: weeds grow on the white sand, litter provides some color, a brand new bicycle path seems to go nowhere. But at the tip of the mini-peninsula stands a gate with a sign: Urban Campsite.</span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610092011-20b4ef84_original.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Frank Bloem, Kite Cabin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.urbancampsiteamsterdam.com/en/" target="_blank">Urban Campsite</a> is an exhibition, conversation piece, and statement rolled into one&mdash;and yes, you can also spend the night. Two years ago the first edition of Urban Campsite, an initiative of economist Annette van Driel and designer Francis Nijenhuis, took place at the Vliegenbos campsite in the emerging neighborhood of Amsterdam North. Some of the 12 artists, designers, and architects participating in the 2015 edition were included in that 2013 debut as well&mdash;like Frank Bloem, who then submitted a fully functional kitchen with sleeping space in the lower cabinets&mdash;a tongue-in-cheek comment on the absence of household luxuries at most campsites. Taking his cue from the windy new location, this year he has constructed the Kite Cabin. The beautifully sculptural construction is made from lightweight nylon stretched across a diagonals-only metal frame. A kite serves as a shutter for the overhead window and can be detached and taken out for a run.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the frame Bloem used what was previously a hanging system for a projection screen and after this show it will probably be transformed again.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Recycling and durability is a big deal at Urban Campsite, which prides itself on an ecological footprint of nearly zero. A lot of the artworks have been constructed with waste material or DIY-basics. Bedbug by Franka te Lintel Hekkert and Ronnie Kommene, a cross between a mutant insect and a spaceship, combines pieces of discarded wood and insulation material; Studio Plots made a cube out of ordinary slats, creating a wonderful domed interior on the inside; Refunc used industrial metal baskets and shrink wrap; and architectural studio Venividimultiplex transformed an old silo into a rocket-like bedroom. The space is heated with piped water running from a campfire to the floor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610092453-franka_te_lintel_hekkert_Ronnie_Kommene.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Franka te Lintel Hekkert and Ronnie Kommene, Bedbug</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610091340-Atelier_van_Lieshout.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Atelier Van Lieshout, Tribal Toilet Tower</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the middle of the campsite stands the massive and slightly intimidating Tribal Toilet Tower. It&rsquo;s got <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/rackroom/150165-joep-van-lieshout">Atelier Van Lieshout</a> written all over it. The studio, with its philosophy of autarkic living, developed a fully self-sufficient sanitary unit especially for Urban Campsite. The toilets are outfitted with mangers filled with straw in order to facilitate composting in the tanks below. Water for the shower is pumped from the lake and after use is filtered in a huge box filled with sand, shells, and reeds. With doors taken from discarded ships and a rough, no frills finish this functional sculpture instills a sense of pioneering and adventure.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Not every aspect of Urban Campsite is that stark, though. Reservations (&euro;85 per night for two people) can be made simply through Airbnb. Staying overnight at the site&mdash;the gate closes at 10 pm for visitors&mdash;is an extraordinary experience. You get to sleep in artworks, but guests are also invited to reflect on urban planning and the future of this newly created terra nullius. Urban Campsite thus operates as place maker of sorts. Surrounded by IJburg, Amsterdam&rsquo;s latest large-scale expansion where the use of durable materials, solar power, and greywater systems has been an integral part of the construction process, the exhibition aims to translate ecological concerns into more hands-on terms. Here, the distinction between useful and useless blurs and upcycling is the general modus operandi. Local architectural center Arcam organizes campfire talks to provide theoretical background. In workshops guests learn how to turn two pallets into a couch or make a shelter out of sandbags.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610093455-maakwinkel.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Maakwinkel workshops</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150610091640-arjen_boerstra.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Arjen Boerstra, Zolderkamer</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A three-meter high earthen rampart has been constructed around the campsite. It lends the place a certain intimacy, encouraging interaction between guests and intensifying a sense of location. For the moment of being there, life is reduced to this sandy bowl colonized by artworks/unusual living quarters. Some of these habitats do offer a peek at the world beyond, however. When jumping up and down on the roof of their dwelling inhabitants of the Trampotent&mdash;a trampoline-cum-cabin&mdash;briefly get to see the IJsselmeer. The aptly named Upside Down You Turn Me, which looks like a bird watching hut gone awry, has two windows, one looking down, one looking up. Zolderkamer (Attic) is even more limiting. This tiny house on stilts is topped with a telescope-like extension, the only transparent part of the entire construction. Guests can look at the stars until they&rsquo;re completely disconnected from the earth, or dream of a virgin paradise.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Urban Campsite runs from June 1&ndash;August 31, 2015 on Centrumeiland IJburg in Amsterdam.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">(Image at top: Venividimultiplex, Superfire Camp.&nbsp;All images courtesy of Urban Campsite)</span></p> Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:00:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list #BlackLifeBlackProtest Event to Promote Social Justice at LA Film Festival <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The LA Film Festival&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(June 10&ndash;18)&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">kicks off tomorrow, and social justice will be central to one of the week's diverse film programming events.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On June 11, the festival hosts the short film program <a href="https://tickets.lafilmfest.com/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=black&amp;BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::context_id=">#BlackLifeBlackProtest</a>,&nbsp;curated by Jai Tiggett (who also presents her satirical short film&nbsp;<em>Protect &amp; Serve</em>). This free event will screen seven short films made in 2014 and 2015 by filmmakers who have been inspired to tackle the issues of police brutality, black identity, and inequality in America today and to examine the importance of community in seeking social justice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150609044249-LaunchFilmAsProtest.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Two of the films screening at the event on Thursday&mdash;dream hampton's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dreamhampton.com/we-demand-justice-for-renisha-mcbride/" target="_blank"><em>We Demand Justice for Renisha McBride </em></a>(2015)<em>&nbsp;</em>and&nbsp;Nate Parker's <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=27&amp;v=5HtCfm7SKbU" target="_blank">#<em>AmeriCAN </em></a>(2014), written en route to a protest over the death of Michael Brown&mdash;are direct reactions to the murders of young African Americans.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The films highlight the explicit and particular importance of independent media in activism now, where digital and visual content becomes a public witness and proof that empowers, with the opportunity to sidestep mass media outlets and snowball a protest movement. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Other films, such as the historical short&nbsp;<em>Counter</em>&nbsp;(2015) and&nbsp;<em>Wade in the Water: Movement Talk </em>(2015), featuring civil rights leader Congressman John Lewis,<em>&nbsp;</em>look back at the Civil Rights Movement to analyze the present situation, with crucial messages of hope for younger generations. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although the films focus on the struggle for African American rights and equality, their impetus ultimately addresses human rights, with the deep-cutting reprecussions when police turn against citizens. As the producer of #<em>AmeriCAN,&nbsp;</em>James Lopez, told the Tiggett in the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jai-tiggett/social-justice-at-the-forefront-of-la-films-fest-_b_7530002.html" target="_blank">Huffington Post</a>: "You had people on one side saying that police are bad, and on the other side they're saying African American males are criminals and deserve to be shot. So I wanted to make something that both sides would listen and relate to."<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">#BlackLifeBlackProtest will take place at Regal Cinemas L.A. LIVE 11, at 6pm, on June 11. The screening is followed by a panel discussion between five activists, filmmakers, and educators on the subject of how content creation can be used to serve social change.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Images courtesy of LA Film Festival)</span></p> Tue, 09 Jun 2015 12:07:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Arte de Sistemas: Conceptual Art and Politics in Argentina <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 60px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">The word system, like any other technical word taken from colloquial speech, has many meanings; it is imprecise. Though this lack of precision in a technical word might initially seem dangerous, it is, in fact, often useful because it allows ideas to flourish while they are still vague; it allows connections to be made between ideas yet to be explored; and it allows those ideas to be extended and broadened instead of circumscribed and confined by a premature definition and precision.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 150px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://proa.org/eng/exhibition-iman-nueva-york-documentos.php" target="_blank">Alejandro Puente, 1968</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Argentine artist Alejandro Puente (La Plata, 1933-2013) was interested in two (of the many) definitions of the word system: &ldquo;system as totality&rdquo; and &ldquo;generating system.&rdquo; According to <a href="http://proa.org/eng/exhibition-iman-nueva-york-documentos.php" target="_blank">Puente</a>, &ldquo;in the first case, the word system makes reference to a holistic consideration of a given thing. In the second, the word system makes no reference whatsoever to things, but rather to the interplay of parts and rules of combination capable of generating many things.&rdquo;&nbsp;Puente&rsquo;s distinction of system is directly on point. Another way to refer to these two aspects of a system could be: openness and closedness, autonomy and dependency, outwards and inwards.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608205132-Image2_Zabala.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 10px;">Horacio Zabala, <em>Este papel es una c&aacute;rcel,</em>&nbsp;1972/2007, Photograph, 23.2 x 30 cm, Copyright: The artist, Courtesy Daros Latinamerica Collection, Z&uuml;rich. Photo: Peter Sch&auml;lchli, Z&uuml;rich&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the 1960s and 1970s, the use of new technologies&mdash;early computers, video art, cybernetics&mdash;by artists was a way to transform the traditional object-based artistic practices into new, system-based ones. In 1968, the American critic Jack Burnham identified a shift: &ldquo;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.virose.pt/vector/b_12/rampley.html" target="_blank">the cultural obsession with the art object</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&rdquo; is being supplanted by an awareness of systems and the functional relationships between art objects.&nbsp;He continues, &ldquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These new systems prompt us not to look at the skin of objects, but at those meaningful relations within and between their visible boundaries</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is not pure coincidence that these ideas emerged during the Vietnam War and during the worldwide protests of 1968. With more intensity than other times in history, artists were questioning their own practice:&shy; how does art serve society? How to blur the boundaries between elite art, popular art, and art of the masses? What emerges is a sense of a moment in history when artists&mdash;working with and without high technology&mdash;were engaged in a post-representational, post-object practice concerned with provoking an awareness of the real as an extensive, relational, dynamic network of processes. In other words, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">systems </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">referred to the art that is not only concerned with itself, but rather interested in social and political issues.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The art object (or at least the term &ldquo;art object&rdquo;) was not sufficient to convey the production of art, its context and discourse. The distinction between the individual, the institution, and the status of the artwork became blurry with hope that the &ldquo;system&rdquo; would draw boundaries within a more complex field. Although &ldquo;systems art&rdquo; moved towards the interdisciplinary and informational, the question that seems pertinent to me here is whether systems demand a turn outwards or inwards. According to media scholar <a href="http://diss.anat.org.au/mwhitelaw.html" target="_blank">Mitchell Whitelaw</a>, a systems approach &ldquo;demands a turn outwards [that] raises questions about the intervention of art in the world of agency [that] threatens to spill out into everyday life, beyond culturally sanctioned and government funded forms, and so to evaporate completely, or rather to become imperceptible.&rdquo;&nbsp;However, I would argue that systems move both outward and inward. The openness of systems is apparent but there is also a self-protective mechanism of the system, a sense of retreat and defensiveness, an armoring of the subject and a desire for a safe space.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608205158-Image3_artedestemis.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Arte de Sistemas, Catalogue, 1971<strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In Argentina, &ldquo;arte de sistemas&rdquo; (&ldquo;systems art&rdquo;) was first associated with conceptual art developed in an international context. If systems were to draw boundaries within a complex field, then the Argentine businessman, author, and curator Jorge Glusberg had a major role in doing so. He institutionalized the arte de sistemas by first articulating a communication network among Latin American artists and critics and their Argentine counterparts, and also by presenting this &ldquo;new&rdquo; art from Argentina globally, to consolidate and legitimize this regional art to international tendencies. Already in Glusberg&rsquo;s actions there is a movement outward (internationally) and inward (regionally). The case study of arte de sistemas in Argentina gives a sense of the complexity of the notion of systems in general. Although somewhat autonomous, systems always relate to another&shy;&mdash;more established&mdash;system. Glusberg wanted to define the avant-garde art in Argentina; but to do so he needed the rest of the world&mdash;or, the art world,&nbsp;at least.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608205225-Image4__grupo-de-los-trece.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Grupo de los Trece, 1972</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the late 1960s in Argentina the dictatorial censorship was rampant and violence increased. One of the main art institutions, the Instituto Di Tella in Buenos Aires, closed as a consequence, leaving a sense of emptiness in the city that needed to be filled. It was in this context that the Centro de Arte y Comunicacion CAYC in Buenos Aires was born, under the leadership of Glusberg, who remained the director of the institution until his death in 2012. It was presented as an interdisciplinary space favoring not only the relationship between arts, but also between art, science, and social studies. The CAYC formed an artist collective called &ldquo;Grupo de los Trece&rdquo; (Group of Thirteen) then called &ldquo;Grupo CAYC&rdquo; made up of Jacques Bedel, Luis Fernando Benedit, Gregorio Dujovny, Carlos Guinzburg, V&iacute;ctor Grippo, Jorge Gonz&aacute;lez Mir, Vicente Marotta, Luis Pazos, Alfredo Portillos, Juan Carlos Romero, Julio Teicha and Horacio Zabala. Glusberg declaimed that the artists in this group were invested in their social context, leaving behind painting&mdash;which was already &ldquo;dead&rdquo;&mdash;and instead working with new and dynamic media. Although the group intended to define itself under a common denominator, the notion of arte de sistemas seems to harbor too many species under its name. Perhaps the very word "system" was more useful in an international context: in other words, to export and import art from and to Argentina.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150611080438-20150608205310-Image5_Juan_Carlos_Romero.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Juan Carlos Romero, <em>Segmento de linea recta</em>, 1972. Ink on photography 18 9/10 &times; 22 4/5 in.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The terms "ideology" and "systems" were so predominant in the CAYC discourses that the artists themselves adopted these terms for the titles of their works. In 1966, the Argentine chemist and artist V&iacute;ctor Grippo (Buenos Aires, 1936&ndash;2002) wrote a short text under the title &ldquo;Sistema&rdquo; outlining the circuit of artistic production where there is a re-contextualization of daily life fragments or portions. Grippo wrote this text in terms of the TRANSMITTER&mdash;the artist with his/her surrounding; CHANNEL, &ldquo;the artwork as a fulfillment from everyday objects that by modifying certain variables create another meaning"; and RECEIVER, the audience, the one that gives his/her support to the artwork as a &ldquo;valid recipient.&rdquo;<a title="" href="#_ftn6">[1]</a> In <em>Segmento de l&iacute;nea recta</em>, Juan Carlos Romero presented the fragment of a map of Buenos Aires, on which he had drawn a straight line linking four points identified by the letters A, B, C and D. He accompanied this work with a text that served as a key to decode the body of the documents produced.<a title="" href="#_ftn7">[2]</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608205409-Image6_Benedit_1971hormigas.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Luis F. Benedit, <em>Laberinto para hormigas</em>, 1972, Ink on vellum, 6 1/4 x 15 x 6 in.Courtesy Henrique Faria, New York and Buenos Aires.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In July 1971, the exhibition <em>Arte de sistemas</em> opened at the Museum of Modern Art in Buenos Aires, organized by Glusberg and CAYC. The show included works by Vito Acconci, Luis F. Benedit, Mel Bochner, Christian Boltanski, Don Celender, Dan Graham, Victor Grippo, Hans Haacke, Allan Kaprow, On Kawara, Dusan Kilmes, Joseph Kosuth, David Lamelas, and many more. The inclusion of many American artists demonstrated that arte de sistemas looked outward for international recognition as much as it addressed any local politics and concerns. The re-reading of conceptual art, transforming it into an art of systems that can operate not only as a system in itself, but as a factor of change in the prevailing social and ideological structures, remains an ambitious desire,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43233" target="_blank">as pertinent today</a> as it was for a group of artists in Argentina in the '70s.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/171869-ionit-behar?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Ionit Behar</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px;"><br clear="all" /><hr style="line-height: 26px;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" title="" href="#_ftnref6">[1]</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"> Victor Grippo, &ldquo;Investigaci&oacute;n sobre el proceso de la creaci&oacute;n,&rdquo; in Marcelo Pacheco <em>Grippo. Una retrospectiva. Obras 1871&ndash;2001&nbsp;</em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Buenos Aires, MALBA, 2004). Translation of quotation by the author.</span></span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref7">[2]</a> See Fernando Davis, &ldquo;Los sistemas gr&aacute;ficos de Juan Carlos Romero&rdquo; in <em>Juan Carlos Romero. Sistemas gr&aacute;ficos, cartograf&iacute;as cr&iacute;ticas</em> (Buenos Aires: Document-Art, 2012).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Alejandro Puente,&nbsp;<em>Sistema Cromatico - Primarios, 1</em>968, Graphite and acrylic on paper, 19 x 24 in. Courtesy Henrique Faria, New York and Buenos Aires)</span></p> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 15:23:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Karen Kilimnik: The Distant Admirer <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Karen Kilimnik's third exhibition at Spr&uuml;th Magers London is suspiciously restrained. There are no added period furnishings or colored walls&mdash;just two rooms of carefully sequenced paintings, with a pair of photographs (blue poppies and aging white roses) arranged either side of the doorway as a sort of parting flourish. A closer look reveals that the artist's trademark theatricality is still present, though subdued: the show is peppered with duplications, paintings masquerading as plates, and odd conflicts of scale (the paintings are small with cramped compositions, while the photographs are blown-up macro shots, large and breezy). It's a neat little cabinet of curiosities that should have the usual polarizing effect on its audience&mdash;Kilimnik's paintings tend to inspire equal parts love and despair.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kilimnik's own excessive affections are always center-stage, in lieu of the artist herself, who is content to remain a distant admirer. She loves things that are popular, evoke sentimentality or adoration, or openly declare their attachment to eras or periods, genres or fashions. Her fondness for the mawkish is both embarrassing and infectious. Recurring motifs in her paintings include: celebrity waifs, pets and wild animals, picturesque views, Gothic mansions, ships, ballet, ornaments, flowers, and hundreds of other small fixations&mdash;each rendered with disconcerting intensity in Kilimnik's amateurish technique, so that it's difficult to tell whether her silky dogs and wide-eyed girls are sweet, menacing, or indifferent.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608044342-Screen_shot_2015-06-07_at_21.49.50.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Karen Kilimnik, <em>Fox With Winter Cache of Food in the Winter Cave Fox Den</em>, 2013, C-print &copy; Karen Kilimnik, Courtesy Sprüth Magers</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Her source materials are photographs and pictures in books and magazines&mdash;often images that are heavily staged (fashion shoots, publicity stills, theatre) or reproductions of reproductions (oil paintings, "authentically restored" period interiors, tapestries, collectables). Images that are popular or valuable enough to have been copied before appeal to Kilimnik. Not the cheap replications of branding, or consumer products&mdash;she prefers to appropriate images of things with an "aura," things that people revere for their originality or rarity, whether a painting by Degas or a supermodel. At the same time, her own thrift-shop painting skills and rejection of "tasteful" discrimination deflate the value systems that allow such hierarchies to evolve.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Recent fascinations on display at Spr&uuml;th Magers are Europhilic (where better to find old and rare things than in the Old Country?), Leonardo da Vinci, medieval tapestries, heraldry, World War II, and Delftware&mdash;a blue-and-white Dutch ceramic clumsier than porcelain, and with a history characterized by appropriation, translation, and reinvention. There is whole room dedicated to Kilimnik's Delftware-inspired landscapes of bridged canals and tree-lined paths, but any pretence of a "collector's set" is superficial: palettes of blue and lilac are not-quite-matching from one canvas to the next, and a tree is never painted the same way twice. Many of the wistful illustrations featured on Delftware plates and tiles are themselves based on works by Dutch landscape painters: a few strokes with Karen's magic brush and they are transformed back to paintings again, rescued from beneath the glaze.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608045203-KKI_24304_hiding_out_in_the_cold_winter_polish_countryside__the_old_country.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Karen Kilimnik, <em>hiding out in the cold winter polish countryside, the old country</em>,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">2013,&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">Water soluble oil color on canvas&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">25,5 cm diameter&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">&copy; Karen Kilimnik&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">Courtesy Sprüth Magers</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kilimnik's long-standing interest in theatrical scenery, props, and backdrops is extended to the odd pictorial space of tapestries, and the touristic tableaux of stately homes, in which fashions and tools of diverse centuries are bricolaged together as "the past." This sort of compression is reflected in Kilimnik's claustrophobic compositions, in which even the air seems heavy with matter. A pair of paintings depict a hall in the Ch&acirc;teau du Clos Luc&eacute; in France, in which Leonardo da Vinci undertook his final "artist's residency": <em>Leonardo da Vinci's last home&mdash;the dining hall</em> (2014) and <em>Leonardo Da Vinci's living room, Amboise 1500 </em>(2014). Seeing these duplicate versions side-by-side, one is lured into a game of spot-the-difference&mdash;which soon turns into a game of spot-the-similarity, as Kilimnik's approach is fundamentally unstable.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nearby is another double act&mdash;two close-ups of a woodland cottage scene cropped from a tapestry: <em>the medieval cottage tapestry </em>(2014) and <em>the green fairie's cottage in the tapestry </em>(2015). The latter includes a couple of lumpy fairies, doused in glitter; it's hard not to cringe. But it's also hard to look away: this conflation of the woven phantasmagorias of the Middle Ages, and the glitter-and-glue fairy paintings that adorn little children's bedroom walls, somehow makes perfect visual sense.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608044612-KKI_24315_the_medieval_cottage_tapestry.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Karen Kilimnik&nbsp;<em>the medieval cottage tapestry</em>, 2014,&nbsp;Water soluble oil color on canvas,&nbsp;41,3 x 51,4 cm,&nbsp;&copy; Karen Kilimnik,&nbsp;Courtesy Sprüth Magers</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibition's theme of domestic display is most clearly and cleverly distilled in <em>the Fairy cleaning the copper pot with Fairy Dish Soap </em>(2014), a still-life-with-fairy derived from Chardin's <em>Still Life With Herrings </em>(c. 1731). Proust wrote in a letter that &ldquo;Before having seen some Chardins, I had never realised what was beautiful, in my parents' home, the table disarrayed, a corner of a napkin turned back, a knife against an empty oyster shell....&rdquo; For Kilimnik, the discovery of a brand of washing-up liquid called Fairy conjures up a similar glamorous transformation of everyday life&mdash;a veil (of cooking grease?) is lifted from the eyes to reveal a shining new table-top world. Art and advertising are traced back to a moment of shared history in the still life, a genre in which material fragments bear witness to immaterial forces.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150608044656-Spruth_Magers._Karen_Kilimnik___the_Fairy_cleaning_the_copper_pot_with_Fairy_Dish_Soap___2014__1_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Karen Kilimnik,&nbsp;<em>the Fairy cleaning the copper pot with Fairy&nbsp;</em><em>Dish Soap</em>, 2014,&nbsp;Water soluble oil colour on canvas,&nbsp;41,3 x 50,8 cm</span><span style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&copy; Karen Kilimnik, &nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Courtesy Sprüth Magers</span><span style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For Kilimnik, color reproductions and photographs are portals; clues to be interpreted; summoning rituals to be transcribed; trapped things to be rescued and set free. They are lenses through which history, fiction and autobiographical memory are concentrated into temporary narratives that overwhelm the source image&mdash;a Dutch cottage beside a frozen lake becomes a secret hideout in Poland during World War II; a fishing boat becomes a ghost ship. Her paintings are highly performative: in "copying" an image, Kilimnik is actually fleshing out the imagined narrative that she projects onto that image during her painting process. These thin films of preoccupation overlaying her paintings help to create the tension between distance and closeness that pervades her work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kilimnik's realm is the personal bubble, the daydream, the distracted train of thought, the private fantasy. The stories she enacts through her paintings are never put into words, only hinted at through the scraps of language that form her titles. Image-makers hope we will construct narratives around their images&mdash;stories reach out, build a personal investment, and hook consumers. Kilimnik's constructions are excessive, warped over-identifications that hjiack whatever vision is being sold and smother it with drama and cheap oil paints.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kilimnik admires characters who know exactly what they like. She, too, knows what she likes; whereas the ambiguity and unevenness of her work keeps us second-guessing our own judgements. Her fulfilment leaves us feeling incomplete.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/229458-marianne-templeton?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Marianne Templeton</a></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;Karen Kilimnik, <em>Leonardo da Vinci's last home - the dining hall</em>,&nbsp;2014,&nbsp;Water soluble oil color on canvas,&nbsp;41,3 x 51,4 cm&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&copy; Karen Kilimnik&nbsp;Courtesy Sprüth Magers)</span></span></p> Mon, 08 Jun 2015 08:32:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Loop Barcelona 2015: Poetry, Politics, and Personal Stories <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The camera floats through a slap-dash architectural model, following a trickle of water originating from a fountain stuck through a passport picture, gargoyle-style, flowing past miniature cities consisting of slabs of transparent plastic, slipping into a next scene. Garishly colored deserts are bombarded with Jell-O and chocolate sprinkles. Fruit is hooked up to seriously scientific machines&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with electric cables.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;And TV-commercials from the eighties spin out of control. In the meantime the swinging soundtrack gets louder, whipping the visual weirdness into a frenzy, only to be cut short from time to time by a disembodied voice-over pretending to explain the scenes but actually adding to the overwhelming sense of alienation. </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Floating Chain</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> by Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe is a trip. You can easily get sucked into the half hour video and forget you&rsquo;re in a hotel room in downtown Barcelona.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150604194604-Frame2.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Freeman &amp; Lowe,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">The Floating Chain</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">, 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Video still. Presented by Marlborough Barcelona</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Because that&rsquo;s where Marlborough Barcelona is screening the video&rsquo;s European premiere: the 2015 edition of <a href="http://loop-barcelona.com/" target="_blank">Loop</a>. For three days the Hotel Catalonia Ramblas is hosting the art fair that, 13 years ago, was the first to be exclusively dedicated to video art. This year 49 galleries are participating, of which three are in a separate sound art section. The hotel rooms have been transformed into miniature cinemas, offering the kind of concentrated viewing experience you&rsquo;ll never have in a regular fair or even a gallery. It helps, of course, that the selection on offer is of excellent quality.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150604195354-Room_27_Lu_Chunsheng_Vitamin_Creative_Space__Guangzhou.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Room 27, Lu Chunsheng, <em>The History of Chemestry II</em>, 2006. Presented by&nbsp;Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">That said, Loop is far from complete. Some strands of contemporary video art are missing from the roster, most notably post-internet art, and London and Berlin galleries are underrepresented in the list of participants. Possibly because gallerists choose to present works fitting the intimate setting, a lot of works are small and personal. Politics is not strongly featured, Fernando S&aacute;nchez Castillo&rsquo;s <em>Azor/Guernica Syndrome</em> (Art B&auml;rtschi &amp; Cie) being one of the few exceptions. In this work the artist has Franco&rsquo;s former pleasure yacht demolished, which after the generalissimo&rsquo;s death was discarded by the Spanish government and served as a restaurant stranded on a parking lot somewhere in the Iberian heartland. From the debris S&aacute;nchez Castillo&mdash;always interested in the relationship between art and the representation of power&mdash;produced a modernist abstract sculpture. It now sits in room 31, reminding the locals of a not so distant past.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Quite a few works at Loop have a documentary slant to them, threading a thin line between cinema and video art. Clarisse Hahn (Jousse Enterprise gallery) focuses on landless peasants in Mexico, and Cyrus Kabiru (SMAC Gallery) tells us about the history of fixed-gear bicycles from Kenya, nicknamed Black Mamba. Their approach is rather traditional compared to Chien-Chi Chang&rsquo;s (Chi-Wen Gallery) who beautifully paces his tale about Chinese worker migrants in New York by mixing black and white stills, film clips in color, short intermittent texts, and a sometimes disconnected audio track. But it takes someone like Dragos Alexandrescu (Gallery Taik Persons) to take a big subject&mdash;in this case the impact of technology on the human capacity to connect physically&mdash;to a more abstract, even poetic level. In little over two minutes a choreography of swiping and typing hands accompanies an absurdly disconnected dialogue between a man and a woman.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150604194846-Tacet_video_stills_63.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Jo&atilde;o Onofre,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Tacet,&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">2014, Video still.&nbsp;Presented by Marlborough Contemporary</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Video as a means to reflect on, add to, or transform other media and art forms seems to be a dominant trend this year. Fran&ccedil;ois Bucher (Alarcon Criado) refers to a little-known work by French author Jean Genet in his reconstruction of a staged kidnapping at a university in Medell&iacute;n. Michal Helfman (Sommer Contemporary Art) collaborated with choreographers Noa Zuk and Ohad Fishof to create a dance reminiscent of an assembly line. And Jacco Olivier (Galerie Ron Mandos) animates abstract paintings. But the absolute best in this bracket is Jo&atilde;o Onofre (Marlborough Contemporary). In&nbsp;<em>Tacet</em>&nbsp;he gives John Cage a run for his money by having his iconic composition <em>4&rsquo;33&rsquo;&rsquo;</em>, the so-called "silent piece," performed by a pianist who, before sitting down for four and half minutes of not touching the keys, sets his grand piano on fire. This is a prepared piano if there ever was one.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Installing video art in a rather small hotel room is an art form in itself. If done well, it really adds to the work. Emma van der Put&rsquo;s <em>Rinc&eacute; Alien</em> (tegenboschvanvreden), a coolly objective but at the same time loving peek at vagrants in the Brussels underground, gains a sculptural quality because of its billboard-like presentation. True multi-screen installations are rare at Loop. <em>Being Seen Trying</em> by Fabien Charuau (Chatterjee &amp; Lal) is a notable exception, consisting of five screens showing Indian devotees at prayer overlaid with face-detection software.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150604195459-_DSF0483.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Room 49. Basma Alsharif. Presented by Galerie Imane Far&egrave;s</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Charuau is amongst a select group of artists venturing into medium-specific experiments. Of the animations on show Jonathan Monaghan&rsquo;s <em>Escape Pod</em> (Bitforms Gallery) is the absolute best. It's a dystopic science fiction short featuring a golden reindeer, a UFO with hairy buttocks, luxury goods, and levitating phalluses. Less outrageous but quietly exiting is Puck Verkade&rsquo;s <em>Solitary Company</em> (D&uuml;rst Britt &amp; Mayhew). Her portrait of a small Icelandic community is framed in a constantly moving circle, invoking associations of binoculars, a globe, a crystal ball, a wheel, and a kaleidoscope.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150604194138-unnamed.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Jonathan Monaghan,&nbsp;<em>Escape Pod</em>, 2015&nbsp;animated HD film,&nbsp;20 minutes, seamless loop. Presented by Bitforms Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Seeing all these wonderful works in such a conducive environment makes you almost forget they&rsquo;re for sale as well&mdash;it&rsquo;s a fair after all. And video art proves to be a reasonably priced medium, with even works by big names available for reasonable prices. The average price at Loop is around 3000-4000 euro for works in low editions (usually 3). Susan Philipsz doing Ziggy Stardust (Ellen de Bruijne Projects) for merely 500 euro is a downright steal, but a work by Mel O&rsquo;Callaghan (Galerie Allen) for 3,500 euro is not bad either. Some acquisitions, however, require a heftier wallet. Whoever wants to take home <em>The Floating Chain</em> will have to shell out 75,000 dollars. But that sum buys you a truly exceptional work.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 26px;">Loop Barcelona 2015 takes place at Hotel Catalonia Ramblas,&nbsp;Carrer de Pelai 28, Barcelona, June 4&ndash;6, 2015.</span></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;Freeman &amp; Lowe,&nbsp;<em>The Floating Chain</em>, 2014,&nbsp;Video still. Presented by Marlborough Barcelona)</span></p> Fri, 05 Jun 2015 16:35:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Physical Graffiti: War and Paint Collide in <em>Leon Golub: Riot</em> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I think of myself as a kind of reporter; I report on the nature of certain events. I think of art as a report on civilization at a certain time.<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 120px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Leon Golub</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Leon Golub: Riot </em>at Hauser &amp; Wirth, in New York, presents a long overdue opportunity to see Golub&rsquo;s paintings gathered together from several different bodies of work spanning a four-decade period. Showing <em>Napalm I</em> (1969) and <em>Riot V</em> (1987), Vietnam-era paintings, and several fine examples from his late <em>Mercenaries</em> series, this exhibition offers a chance to view Golub's rough-hewn, infinitely tactile, and large-scale works the way the artist intended: full-on, confrontational, and unmediated.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Encountering <em>Napalm I</em>, which fills the first gallery, T.S. Eliot comes to mind: &ldquo;Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;/Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,/The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere/The ceremony of innocence is drowned./The best lack all conviction, while the worst/Are full of passionate intensity.&rdquo; Yes, of course mere anarchy is always loose in the world, but if one might select an artist of passionate intensity, that might be Golub&mdash;and if there was ever an example of a twentieth-century artist of conviction, Golub was the very definition of it. Why does this work evoke such paradox? Perhaps it is Golub&rsquo;s subject matter and painterly method colliding on the canvas before us.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150604121905-napalm_i.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Leon Golub, <em>Napalm I</em>, 1969, Acrylic on linen, 117 1/4 x 213 in</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Created between 1968 and 1969, the <em>Napalm</em> series represented a pivotal moment when Golub's subject matter shifted from the mythological to the political, advancing its relevance and urgency in relation to contemporary life. These paintings are the first to reference the Vietnam War and are part of what Golub himself described as an "overt political effort." In <em>Napalm I</em>, he depicts the sheer vulnerability of the human body. Two figures are entangled in a rust-stained landscape. As one fights to extricate himself, the other lies mortally wounded with an open, blood-encrusted chest. Golub&rsquo;s treatment of this wound in paint reminds one of de Kooning's wrinkly-skin paint skeins in his <em>Clamdigger</em> series of the 60s; paint no longer depicted desiccated flesh, it <em>became</em> it. In a repetitive process that required weeks of demanding physical work, Golub dissolved his pigments, soaked the canvas in solvents, scraped away paint with a meat cleaver, and rendered surfaces as eviscerated, porous, and raw as the violence that a human body suffers in scenarios of duress and agony. Our unease is a result of seeing this process&mdash;bodies created then eroded, laid out before us. Their faces, death-mask rictuses, evoke no emotion from us; rather, our response comes from the tortured figures wrestling in front of us.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Interestingly, another artist who comes to mind when viewing these pieces is Francis Bacon, roughly Golub&rsquo;s contemporary for a time. Bacon freely appropriated T.S. Eliot&rsquo;s highly theatrical poetry for his own highly theatric orgies of flayed flesh. Like Bacon, Golub&rsquo;s attacks on the figure were clumsy, physical, inelegant&mdash;and most of all sincere. Both drew on the Classical, conflict, and, possibly, underneath it all, an attempt to resurrect a type of religious painting, via Gr&uuml;newald, which both vociferously denied.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Golub struggled through his early Classical phase, his Vietnam period, and (not in this exhibition) a series of head studies of political leaders in the &lsquo;70s before recognition for his work finally caught up with him. From the late 1970s through the mid-1980s, Golub created his most celebrated works, with the series </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mercenaries</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Interrogations</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">White Squads</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, and </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Riots</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. Depicting scenes of coercion, torture, terrorism, and urban unrest, these paintings portray the aggressors as men who perhaps are not so different from ourselves. In these years Golub focused on power and its abuses, giving particular attention to American military activity in such places as Latin America. It is at this point that Golub turned his painting into a kind of </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">reportage</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, distancing his process in favor of a kind of Christopher Isherwood-like </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://hyperallergic.com/197274/leon-golubs-never-ending-fight-against-the-war-machine/" target="_blank">objectivity</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I think of myself as a kind of reporter; I report on the nature of certain events. I think of art as a report on civilization at a certain time. It tells about the confidence of hierarchies, how hierarchy is expressed: who is included and who is not&hellip;Perhaps for the first time in history, with the exception of Goya and a few others, there is an art that does not celebrate state and church power. If I paint mercenaries, whatever else I am doing, I am not praising state power and the success of arms. I am reporting on the state of our society, how we use force, and how men act out their roles.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150604122004-riot_v.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Leon Golub, <em>Riot V</em>, 1987, Acrylic on linen, 120 x 155 in</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Riot V</em> shows a gang of men in paramilitary garb, caught in mid-action&mdash;cheering, attacking, recoiling. The image retains an element of ambiguity. We become the focus of the gesticulating, leering group, and, for a moment, become either victims or complicit in the action. These works, though strong, seem mediated&mdash;mediated through the source material that Golub collected, mediated through period clothes and weapons, mediated through our own exposure to the same imagery. In some ways, through all this mediation, some of Golub&rsquo;s uncanny ability to depict power dissipates. Not to say that these are lesser painterly achievements, but rather, they are to depictions of power and struggle what a drone strike is to a boots-on-the-ground soldier. Equally lethal, emotionally distant.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150604122035-loveinartschool.jpg" alt="" width="450" /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Leon Golub, <em>Love in Art School III</em>, 2004, Oil stick and ink on vellum, 10 x 8 in</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibition also includes a selection of monoprints that Golub began in 2000 and continued to create through the last four year of his life. Intimate in scale, these works employ the technique of oil transfer and revisit earlier themes, referencing mythology, eroticism, and violence. They call to mind the monoprints of Eric Fischl, the modern master of the medium. In some ways their lightness and humor provide a tonic for the heaviness of the paintings. The symbol of the sphinx returns in <em>Alerted</em> (2003). Part man and part beast, the sphinx is an ideal metaphor for the struggles of humankind seeking both gratification and civilization. A Satyr (<em>3 Legged Satyr</em>, 2004) and a sketch of a Centaur (<em>The Wounded Centaur</em>, 2004) are a sly nod to Matthew Barney; and two standing figures fucking (<em>Love in Art School</em> <em>III</em>, 2004) parodies late-period Picasso &agrave; la Tracey Emin.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150604122130-fallen_warrior.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Leon Golub, <em>Fallen Warrior</em>, 1968, Acrylic on linen, 65 1/2 x 83 1/2 in</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The painting <em>Fallen Warrior</em> (1968) is the masterpiece of this exhibition. Its fallen, broken figure is echoed in the cut and abraded scrap of canvas it barely inhabits. Approximately life-sized, this image combines Golub's early affinity to the Classical with the news of the moment circa 1969. It is timeless, nevertheless, as we see today with ISIS torture and African atrocities. Golub, like Courbet or Delacroix or Goya, managed to create an image of man, who despite centuries of civilization, is still slouching toward Bethlehem.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216789-bradley-rubenstein?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Bradley Rubenstein</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Leon Golub, <em>Riot</em>, Installation view at Hauser &amp; Wirth, New York)</span>&nbsp;</span></p> Fri, 05 Jun 2015 11:33:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Penis Envy: Sturtevant in Los Angeles <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Oh God, it's coming up now, I recognize the sound... I mean, I don't need to see this when I'm at work!"&nbsp;We looked on fearfully as a large-scale penis enters stage left, in profile, and decants a trickle of urine onto an unsuspecting potted plant.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This was&nbsp;<em>Dark Threat of Absence</em>&nbsp;(2002) a two channel projection at the center (physically and thematically) of the&nbsp;only comprehensive institutional presentation of Elaine Sturtevant's work in America since the '70s (the show has traveled to L.A. after it's New York debut at the MoMA).&nbsp;She is resurfacing in Western institutions now (also see&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/articles/show/43172" target="_blank">our review</a>&nbsp;on her concurrent Hamburger Bahnof exhibition in Berlin) because of her perfect anticipation of the way we would behave and create in the "cybernetic mode" and the conversations in and about art as a result of those behavioral shifts in society, where the&nbsp;machine of the internet could upturn hierarchies and appropriation could be an autonomous art form. This makes her perfect museum material for the moment, since her intact copies and repetitions of the art world's great men restore the vitality of talk about digital art, authorship, and visual culture as it begins to go stale.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150603175026-Sturtevant_Beuys_La_rivoluzione_siamo_noi.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">Sturtevant, Beuys La rivoluzione siamo noi, 1988, screenprint on paper, Collection Thaddaeus Ropac,&nbsp;Paris&ndash;Salzburg. Photo: Arpad Dobriban &copy; Estate Sturtevant</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But there's another aspect to Sturtevant that still feels ahead of her time and that seems more interesting than viewing her ability to identify the zeitgeist as a retrospective mirror to what is being made now: her trope of penises. Her career, after all, was pervaded by five decades of penis envy, usurping her male peers from Warhol to McCarthy, often doing their work better than they did. I have never seen a museum show so full of phalluses: real (projected on the wall), simulated (the dick shaped mask and gloves she wears), dismembered (her Robert Gober&nbsp;<em>Male and Female Genital Wallpaper</em>), emulated (when she dresses up as Dillinger and reenacts his death). It's an exhausting overload of male genitalia.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150603214039-20150603175354-Sturtevant_Install_17.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Sturtevant: Double Trouble</em>&nbsp;March&nbsp;20&ndash;July 27, 2015 at MOCA. Courtesy of MOCA, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">This penis problematic in&nbsp;<em>Double Trouble</em>&nbsp;can't be read as just feminist or Freudian. By shoving so much cock and balls in our faces Sturtevant is really preoccupied with how obsessed art (and by now, all culture) is with the physical surface. Our identity is shaped so much by how we relate to our own bodies and each others'. It is quite an absurd phenomenon and it is just as ubiquitous now; take the recent debate centering on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.newsweek.com/selfie-art-one-gallery-thinks-so-445" target="_blank">selfies in art</a>&nbsp;as a case in point. Sturtevant surely knew how to exploit this because she was a master of mass psychology. With her inexhaustible focus on blown-up body parts, base functions, and desires depicted by those male artists she handles&mdash;the pissing penis, a woman chomping down on a ham sandwich, paint oozing like&nbsp;diarrhea&mdash;she captures the extreme brutality of contemporary pop culture. Just like the museum attendant, we wince instinctively.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150603213251-20150603175615-Sturtevant_Install_30.jpg" alt="" /></p> <div style="text-align: center;" data-canvas-width="81.81871694117646"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Sturtevant: Double Trouble</em>&nbsp;March&nbsp;20&ndash;July 27, 2015 at MOCA. Courtesy of MOCA, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But Sturtevant's penis is perfunctory, it isn't presented as a weapon, it is never erect or threatening but performs the functions and acts on the commands of the invisible interior self. The artist really says it best herself in a text on her Gober Wallpaper piece, where her sociosexual commentary is most lucid:</span>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote style="line-height: 26px;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art's obsession with body parts indicates the fragmentation of subjectivity. Without an inner core of "certainty" of self, there is identification with mass culture: its reassuring consensus, used for choices, decisions, judgements and behavioral modes. A thunderous tidal wave to search for identity that has been pushed to the exterior.</span>&nbsp;</p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ultimately, it's our inability to get past the changeable surface of ourselves, to transcend the boundaries of the body politic, that destablizes us continuously, and this is what Sturtevant presents with brilliant irony in this incisive show.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: Sturtevant,&nbsp;<em>Working Drawing Wesselmann Great American Nude&nbsp;Lichtenstein Hot Dog</em>, 1966, pencil, felt pen, and collage on paper, 23 7/8&nbsp;x 18 in. (60.6 x 45.7 cm), courtesy of lender Lonti Ebers, photo by Adam&nbsp;Reich, &copy; Estate Sturtevant, Paris)</span></p> Thu, 04 Jun 2015 15:47:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Working (it) Out with Gillian Dykeman: Maryse Larivière <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Welcome to the first installation of the Artslant podcast series, <em>Working (it) Out</em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My name is Gillian Dykeman, and I'm a visual artist living in Toronto, Ontario. This summer, I am interviewing artists to ask about the role of <em>audience</em> in their practice. Each interview will begin with one question: "Does art require an audience?" </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This question came up in the <em>Fieldwork</em> seminar I took this year in the Masters of Visual Studies program at the University of Toronto. Initially, the answer seemed like a no-brainer "yes" to me, but then, one has to define audience, and further, what counts as art (must it enter discourse to "count"?).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If audience </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> considered in the making of work, where does this consideration enter one's process? If it demands an audience, then what are reasonable demands? Must it serve its audience in some way? How do didactic panels enter into this relationship? I've asked many artists whether art requires an audience, and the answers have been surprising and in many ways offer insight into their feelings about their own work.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Meaning tends to dissipate with repetition: say any noun 20 times in a row and it ceases to correlate with the object it describes; it starts to sound nonsensical, but keep saying it, and the word begins to take on a new texture, to create a pattern, a refrain, and to inhabit deeper meaning. Deleuze and Guattari describe the territorializing phenomenon of birdsong in their chapter "Of The Refrain"&nbsp;from&nbsp;<em>A Thousand Plateaus</em>. Through calling out a repeated sound, rhythm develops, and this rhythm transforms empty air into a territory, a&nbsp;<em>place</em>. Asking the same question at the beginning of every podcast is a heuristic approach, but perhaps patterns will emerge, order from some chaos, and poetry through discussion.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/208526998%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-3lQzi&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="600"></iframe></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Working (it) Out </span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Episode One |&nbsp;<strong>Maryse Larivi&egrave;re: One isn&rsquo;t a lonely number</strong></span></p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Making art for an audience of one (4:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Talking to imaginary art elders and the appropriation of voice (6:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Writing fiction in art practice (10:25) / (26:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Parrots and Smoking (11:49) &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&nbsp;Small and experimental art spaces (14:54)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> </ul> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My first guest is Maryse&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Larivi&egrave;re, a PhD candidate in Art and Visual Culture art at the University of Western Ontario, and was a co-founder of Pavillion Projects in Montreal. Larivi&egrave;re has just had two shows in Toronto simultaneously, one at an experimental artist-run space called 8-11, and another with Kunsteverien, a nomadic gallery project. Larivi&egrave;re's practice includes fictive and experimental writing; often employing conversations between herself and an imaginary interlocutor. These writings typically accompany installations filled with colorful sculptures and repeated motifs of parrots, oversized bird toys, deconstructed furniture on extended legs, textiles, and at times sound. For her show <em>Love, Sex, Dreams (L.S.D.)</em> at 8-11 gallery, she created a book based on a conversation between herself and Jeff K00ns, appropriating a voice she may not have otherwise been able to access. A second book, <em>Where Wild Flowers Grow</em>, was released with her eponymous exhibition with Kunsteverien. Larivi&egrave;re's approach to creating work is wrapped up in the idea of a very specific and well considered audience.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <table style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="600px"> <tbody style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <tr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;" colspan="2"> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150603154704-Storefront.jpg" alt="" width="630" /></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150603154652-peepholeyellow.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> </td> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150603154721-magic_carpet.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150603154730-branch.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> </td> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150603154746-book.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><br /></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;" colspan="2"> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation views,&nbsp;<em>LSD: Love Sex Dreams, your delusion, my reality,</em>&nbsp;at 8-11 Gallery. Images courtesy of&nbsp;<a href="http://benivuula.com/" target="_blank">Yuula Benivolski</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman">Gillian Dykeman</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 12 Jun 2015 10:54:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Very Last of Youth Subcultures <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In early 2012 Icelandic post-rock band Sigur R&oacute;s challenged filmmakers to create videos for their album <em>Valtari</em>. Photographer Ryan McGinley chose the song &ldquo;Var&uacute;&eth;,&rdquo; an eight-minute dream narrated by a raspy head voice over an unsteady piano and transparent strings. In his video a barefoot girl in a glittery gold wig and a washed-out blue nightie skips through the streets of New York City in slow motion. She passes trucks, taxicabs, construction workers, and business men, moves along highways and park lanes, sometimes with the world around her caught in freeze frame.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">McGinley called his video &ldquo;a poem to the city&rdquo; and stated that he wanted &ldquo;to bring a childhood innocence to the streets.&rdquo; For someone a couple of years older than McGinley (he was born in 1977) it&rsquo;s hard to connect with this image of New York. For me the city evolved from a succession of no go areas affected by the urban exodus of the seventies and the crack epidemic of the eighties to the Disneyfied Giuliani-territory it is today. Of course, this greatest of great cities has many other faces as well. Pastoral fairyland, however, is not one of them.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/46501170?color=d8c288&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" frameborder="0" width="500" height="281"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/46501170">Sigur R&oacute;s: Var&uacute;&eth;</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/valtarifilmexperiment">Sigur R&oacute;s Valtari Mystery Films</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But that&rsquo;s probably just me being cynical. McGinley isn&rsquo;t cynical and never has been. When studying at the Parsons School of Design he started photographing the skateboarders, graffiti artists, musicians, and other creative characters he was hanging out with in the East Village. The pictures are grainy and slightly rough, but the book McGinley first published them in carries the affirmative title <em>The kids are alright </em>(1999). Almost 35 years after Roger Daltrey sang these exact words, McGinley tried to rekindle the Summer of Love.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150602164736-RM_07-08_Highway_30x40-large.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Ryan McGinley, Highway, 2007-2008. Particuliere collectie. Courtesy: Ryan McGinley/ Team Gallery</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The solo show presently at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.kunsthalkade.nl/">KaDE</a> includes a few of those early Manhattan pictures but focuses mostly on the work McGinley has done during the road trips he has taken since 2003. He would put a bunch of his friends on a bus and drive off to Idaho or Vermont, somewhere with rugged mountains, unspoiled caves, clear streams, and endless fields of wheat. They would all get undressed, like Adam and Eve except for their sensible hiking shoes and fashionable tattoos, and McGinley would start snapping. The result looks like the visual report of a nudist school trip: guys jumping off cliffs, girls rolling off sand dunes, spitting mouthfuls of apple at the camera, doing an impressive backflip from a barn, floating half-submerged in muddy water like a cross between Ophelia and the Venus de Milo. There is no aggression or pain, and no one ever cries. Sexual desire seems non-existent in this universe filled with angelic twenty-somethings. These are shiny happy people from the organic/PC-mold, hipsters before the label even existed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150602164838-RM_07_ann__slingshot__45x30.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Ryan McGinley, Ann (slingshot), 2007. Particuliere collectie. Courtesy: Ryan McGinley/ Team Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">McGinley portrays a youth subculture, possibly the very last of youth subcultures. Unlike punks, rockabillies, goths or skinheads, hipsters lack a unifying political orientation or choice of music. Their sense of togetherness is diffuse and largely dependent on external traits: the right kind of dorky clothes, caf&eacute; latte, and facial hair. In McGinley&rsquo;s photographs the subjects are mostly stripped of these attributes but somehow their identity feels enlarged. His subjects are all young, mostly white, have great teeth and spotless skin. No one is blind or missing a limb. Among the portraits stickered on the wall, in an installation titled <em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/41065" target="_blank">Yearbook</a></em>, there is only one token fat girl and even she is &uuml;berhip.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In McGinley&rsquo;s photographs there is none of the self-destructiveness <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/39892" target="_blank">captured by Larry Clark</a> in <em>Tulsa</em> (1971): young people succumbing to amphetamine, boredom and lack of a future. There is none of the fuck you-attitude that colors Wolfgang Tillmans&rsquo; early photographs of his friends pissing on chairs and climbing trees while wearing nothing but trench coats. Neither is irony part of the package. A work like Amalia Ulman&rsquo;s hipster-dialogue-turns-hardcore-porn-video <a href="https://youtu.be/V50RJ16sW-M"><em>International House of Cozy</em></a> (presently on show at Showroom Mama in Rotterdam) would be unthinkable in McGinley&rsquo;s world of fuzzy love and peace.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150602165453-RM_09_Jack__White_Sides__26x40.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Ryan McGinley, Jack (white sides), 2009, 66x101cm. Collection agn&egrave;s b. Courtesy: Ryan McGinley/ Team Gallery</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Over time McGinley&rsquo;s work has become increasingly stylized. His subjects are still very mobile, lending the images a snapshot-like quality, but the large format prints and warm color palette make for aesthetically pleasing pictures. Sunlight turns into fireworks. A supermarket aisle where a girl high-fives a sign-board is submerged in a mysterious mist. In caves flooded with green or blue light naked bodies look like they&rsquo;ve been hewn in marble&mdash;Mapplethorpe without the homoerotic undertone.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Both market and museums were quick to embrace McGinley. At 25 he became the youngest artist ever to get a solo at the Whitney Museum of American Art. But that was 2002 and the show had probably been in the making long before 9/11 started corroding the optimism built up during the prosperous and relatively carefree Clinton years. Since then the world has seen multiple financial crises, fundamentalist beheadings, refugees drowning in the Mediterranean, and a quiet world war in Central Africa resulting in millions of deaths. The show at KaDE begs the question: can one still get away with producing or even showing this kind of feel good art?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150602165242-RM_02_Fireworks_40x30_1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Ryan McGinley, Fireworks, 2002, 100x70cm. Collection agn&egrave;s b. Courtesy: Ryan McGinley/ Galerie Perrotin, Paris</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After some hesitation, I&rsquo;m inclined to say yes. McGinley&rsquo;s world is a fantasy world, carefully constructed, as show the &ldquo;behind the scene&rdquo; pictures of his sets. This is art as an escape valve from daily misery and the artist does not pretend it to be anything else. True, in some photographs the big bad world shines through&mdash;a girl with a black eye, another with legs covered in cuts&mdash;but we don&rsquo;t get to see the relational violence or auto-mutilation that may have caused these blemishes. McGinley&rsquo;s world is a happy paradise where no one ever dies or even grows old, everybody loves each other, and summer lasts forever.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image at the top:&nbsp;Ryan McGinley, Jake (Cannes), 2005, 122x183cm. Collectie agn&egrave;s b. Courtesy:&nbsp; Galerie Perrotin, Paris</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Tue, 02 Jun 2015 17:20:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Systematic Materiality: The Artists Challenging Painting and Drawing with Textiles <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sabine Reckewell and Samantha Bittman are two artists that are each working with textiles in the contemporary moment. Using rigorous systems that require a tremendous amount of planning before making and building can begin, both artists have an acute respect for order that enables their work to conjure awe bordering on the inconceivable.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Each studied textiles in undergrad, though several generations apart; Reckewell received a BS at UC Davis in 1976, and Bittman a BFA from RISD in 2004. Reckewell was drawn to textiles after studying industrial design in Kassel, Germany, in a program that modeled its curriculum after the Bauhaus, later choosing UC Davis for its progressive faculty that pushed the boundaries of the medium from traditional into the contemporary. Many of the UC Davis faculty formed the Fiberworks Center for the Textile Arts in Berkeley, where Reckewell received an MFA as well as Lone Mountain College in 1978 (now the University of San Francisco). Bittman found herself immediately drawn to textiles at RISD and later worked in the commercial textile industry before receiving an MFA in painting in 2010 at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601233306-7Bittman.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Samantha Bittman,<em>&nbsp;Untitled (yellow)</em>, acrylic on handwoven textile, 20" x 16", 2015.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image courtesy of the artist and Johansson Projects</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Both artists consider painting and drawing synonymous with the craft techniques that they employ. Bittman refers to her weavings as &ldquo;support&rdquo; for the paintings. In this way, the hierarchy of painting is upended, and the weavings not only act as the substrate where normally canvas would reside, but they also comprise the painted patterns that Bittman chooses to either trace or to paint a solid color. &ldquo;Using the handwoven textile as the painting support changes how the weaving is read&mdash;or what the weaving is,&rdquo; she explained in an email conversation. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Moving the weaving from a three dimensional to a two dimensional object bound in stretcher bars shifts the construction of the textile back onto itself as &ldquo;the subject of the painting.&rdquo; Rendering a weaving as a subject of a painting creates a reciprocal exchange between the materials and their ultimate form. The optical confusion created by painting over the weavings creates an uncanny dissonance&ndash;the eye shifts from viewing a two-tone, seemingly flat pattern to a single, color raised pattern. It is as if the weavings have a hidden dimensionality. The historical context of weavings with the paintings over them creates further symbiotic tension between the formal qualities of each medium.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Likewise, Reckewell has long considered her <em>Linear</em> installations as drawings. She uses ribbons, string or nylon bands as a means to 'draw' so that the installations she creates are subsumed by the materials, creating further dimensionality with shadow and activating space. Here, the desire to shift perception is plain&mdash;not in the traditional sense by attempting to draw perspective with pencil on a two-dimensional plane&mdash;but rather to pull perspective toward the viewer, into the space that they physically inhabit.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Similarly, Bittman has been working with murals recently: the patterns are digital wallpaper derived from weavings and made to-scale and sometimes appointed with contrasting paintings. Unlike Reckewell who uses the wall as an armature to hold the dimensionality of the protruding lines, Bittman&rsquo;s murals maintain flatness while achieving an optical effect on the eye. Bittman, much like the Op-Artist Bridget Riley, is interested in the ways that space is perceived rather than optical illusion.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601234127-2_Bittman_JP_Wallpaper_Install_view.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Samantha Bittman,&nbsp;<em>Interlacements</em>, 2015, installation view at Johansson Projects, Oakland for&nbsp;<em>Material Data&nbsp;</em>solo exhibition, Image courtesy of the artist and Johansson Projects</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although textiles, particularly weaving, are quite commonly considered for their soft qualities, complex structured mathematics plays an important role in achieving desired outcomes. However, within their applied systems is an element that allows the materials to just &ldquo;be,&rdquo; working in tandem with their calculations. For example, when Bittman paints there is &ldquo;an intuitive response to the support, which may have a particular invented logic or be pattern-based,&rdquo; but the painting is &ldquo;not quite systematic per se,&rdquo; she continues. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In other words, the weaving dictates the painting rather than both being predetermined. In comparison, Reckewell allows gravity and site-specificity to play a part in her <em>Linear</em> installations: &ldquo;My approach is to think of some math problem that I can transform into a large three-dimensional format in the most straightforward way I can think of. The materials and colors, the repetition and a certain hand-made quality give the installations their character.&rdquo; However, for both of them, there is no preconceived notion of perfection despite all of the planning&mdash;miniscule flaws are allowed and are inherent in the hand-making. For example, when Bittman&rsquo;s weavings are stretched on canvas stretcher bars, the edges and sides become slightly wavered as they are pulled tight and attached to the wood. Reckewell&rsquo;s pieces often utilize hand-tied knots at the ends of each ribbon or string which is then looped onto a nail in the wall.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601232831-1._Reckewell_Factor_of_Five__2014_The_Summit_at_Lantana__Austin_tx.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Sabine Reckewell,&nbsp;<em>Factor of Five</em>, installation at the Summit at Lantana, Austin TX, 1" nylon webbing, aluminum channel, 17' x 32' x 32', 2014. Image courtesy of the artist and Chandra Cerrito Contemporary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Reckewell&rsquo;s <em>Linear</em> installations were first created between 1979 to 1981. In 2010 she began revisiting the work and creating new installations that still follow the ideology and systems of the previous work. Prior to the <em>Linear</em> installations, Reckewell had created large crochet squares. The series included 23 squares, mostly created with thin wire, monofilament or plastic strips. The pieces are large&mdash;ranging from 42&rdquo; to 66&rdquo;&mdash;encompassing the viewer&rsquo;s full gaze when facing them. In 2013 Reckewell revisited the crochet square series, this time with slightly softer materials, such as leather cord. <em>Linear</em>&nbsp;seems to untangle the concepts in the square crochet work and deal more directly with space as opposed to the wall. The squares require long sessions of sitting, holding the piece on the lap whereas the ribbon installations are made away from the body, engaging the maker entirely with the space that it is contingent upon to hold its structure in place. The site-specific works take on special configurations that are only privy to their surroundings. They are immobile, and once removed cannot be exactly duplicated again&mdash;in fact, in some instances Reckewell literally cuts all of the strings during deinstallation. In this way, the squares are autonomous objects, while the <em>Linear</em> installations are ephemeral and therefore are a conceptual collaboration between the objects and the architecture of the space. So too, do Bittman&rsquo;s murals activate space with site specificity and ephemerality.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601232920-5_Bittman.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Samantha Bittman,<em>&nbsp;Untitled (blue2)</em>, acrylic on handwoven textile, 30" x 24", 2015.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image courtesy of the artist and Johansson Projects</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Reckewell and Bittman are continuing to bridge the conversational divide that incessantly plagues crafts. But, as Reckewell shared in an email: &ldquo;This is a great time for artists working with textiles because the divides between fine art and craft are really disappearing.&rdquo; Having been immersed in the textile surge of the 1970s to its recent resurgence in the last ten years, Reckewell is testimony to the changing visual and contextual dialog of contemporary art that uses textiles. &ldquo;Younger artists see textiles as a rich medium to use, conceptually as well as in terms of process,&rdquo; she notes with excitement, knowing that her long-studied and executed work can be seen in contemporary context alongside newer generations. But more importantly, both generational and material stereotypes are broken apart in their work, focusing on conceptual ideas and how the embedded history of materials makes for a timely conversation about new directions in painting and drawing and the various forms they inhabit.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sabine Reckewell&rsquo;s work was featured in a two person show at <a href="http://sabinereckewell.com/sabinereckewell.com/Recent_Exhibitions__2010-2015.html" target="_blank">Chandra Cerrito Contemporary</a> from April 3 to May 28, and <a href="http://johanssonprojects.com/shows/bittman_show.html" target="_blank">Samantha Bittman</a>&rsquo;s work is on view for her solo show, <em>Material Data</em> at Johansson Projects until July 4, 2015. Both galleries are located in the Koreatown/Northgate neighborhood of Oakland.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/1872-leora-lutz" target="_blank">Leora Lutz&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image at the top:&nbsp;Sabine Reckewell,&nbsp;<em>Blue Canopy,</em>&nbsp;installation view at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist and Chandra Cerrito Contemporary</span></p> Sun, 14 Jun 2015 11:13:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Post-human: Gender Identities And Cyberspace <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Transgender identities are coming of age with a global platform and widening acceptance. Gender fluidity is not yet accepted in all countries and cultures and therein lies the latest challenge of the multi-faceted identity of being transgender, implying a journey from birth to re-assigned identity and a dual cultural heritage inherited as a consequence. Trans identities are becoming more culturally accepted in the West and new neuro-biological research is also contributing to the debate and suggesting a more varied approach to discovering not only the causation but also the multiple variations of non-binary gender manifestations.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Some of these debates are still nascent; others have found their way via art and film into mainstream art institutions, film festivals, and television. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is commonly agreed that community is key to breaking the taboo surrounding some of the more complex debates on transgender identities from offering a &ldquo;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://whitney.org/Exhibitions/2012Biennial/WuTsang" target="_blank">safespace</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&rdquo;&nbsp;and to reach beyond to a new &ldquo;self-articulation enabled by </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://dismagazine.com/dystopia/72978/andrea-crespo-sis-parabiosis/" target="_blank">information technology</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&rdquo;, a cybertransgenderism if you will.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This suggests that social media can be an effective community space for people with non-binary identities. In art, this at least seems to be the premise for the current exhibition at the ICA:&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/seasons/looks" target="_blank"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Looks</em></a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, featuring Juliette Bonneviot, Andrea Crespo, Morag Keil, Wu Tsang and Stewart Uoo.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150602185018-Mark-Blower-150420-Looks-ICA-0164.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation view of <em>Looks</em>,&nbsp;22 April 2015 &ntilde; 21 June 2015,&nbsp;Institute of Contemporary Arts London (ICA)&nbsp;Photo: Mark Blower</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This 2015 exhibition scans the rising transgender debate as it manifests itself right now in digital and multimedia art, as online subculture. Being digital brings its own conventions of how you curate your peers, your scene, your likes and dislikes from your Who is IP to your instagram filter. It is a debate art must have&mdash;and yet, the digital platform brings its own demands and structures without necessarily radicalising the artistic format. <em>Looks</em> is a timely comment on the transgender debate currently raging in the media but specifically its articulation within the technological space of the internet.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/115944923?color=ffffff&amp;title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" frameborder="0" width="600" height="337"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/115944923">parabiosis: neurolibidinal induction complex</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user12061539">Andrea Crespo</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Standing in the midst of the upper floor installation at the ICA, I experience Wu Tsang&rsquo;s <a href="https://vimeo.com/100686105" target="_blank"><em>A Day In The Life of BLIS</em></a>, a story following BLIS (played by performance artist Boychild) who lives in a world where an artificial intelligence called the LOOKS controls humans through a panoptical social media platform known as "PRSM". It is a beautifully shot, multi-screen film documenting body performance and iridescent gender identities. It is placed across from Andrea Crespo&rsquo;s <em>Parabiosis</em>, which champions Sis, a fictional character born from interactions between visceral, nervous, and algorithmic operations. The video, embedded into the wall shows a scanning lightbeam which creates an arrhythmic pattern, dissolving and revealing imagery and text. Crespo&rsquo;s relationship with technology for self-articulation is essential, played out in a dialogue between an increasingly nihilistic body presence and an emotional immersion with the online self. Complex trans identities, such as <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otherkin" target="_blank">otherkin</a> and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_gender" target="_blank">multiple system</a>&nbsp;crossed with gender neutral conditions such as autism or multiple personality disorder, form the basis of a practice that makes use of avatars to expand non-binary options.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150602185215-b6186_apr10_diverse_img.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Wu Tsang, <em>A day in the life of bliss</em> (still), 2014. 2-channel HD video, 20 minutes. Courtesy the artist and DiverseWorks&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Roll back to 1991: cue Donna Haraway&rsquo;s <em>Cyborg Manifesto,</em>&nbsp;public one year after the release of Jennie Livingston&rsquo;s <em>Paris is Burning</em> when a first wave of mainly female-led transgender and post-human proposals was unleashed on an unsuspecting art audience under the heading <em>cyberfeminism</em>. Artists and activists who supported, expressed and founded a visual language around mostly female to male transgender identity and early post-human digital identities included DeLa Grace Volcano (*1957, US), Catherine Opie (1961 US), Hans Scheirl (1956, Austria), Lola Flash (US) and Shu Lea Cheang (1954, Taiwan/ US). They regularly met, partied and lived in London before the community dispersed internationally.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150603173842-iku12.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Shu lea Cheang, <em>I.K.U</em>., 2001, film release, 90mins, still</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It was then in 2001 that the Taiwanese-American artist Shu Lea Chang created I.K.U, an experimental film derived from performance art and/or a radical porn film about "I.K.U. Chip", developed in 2030 to allow consumers to download and experience orgasms from the I.K.U. server without need of physical contact. In the film, the Genom corporation sends their cybernetic shapeshifter Reiko, known as an I.K.U. coder or replicant, to collect orgasm-related information catering to various <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_orientation" target="_blank">sexual orientations</a>. In 1998/9&nbsp; Cheang created <em>Brandon,</em> an interactive piece dealing with the murder of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brandon_Teena" target="_blank">Brandon Teena</a>, as a commission for the Guggenheim. It was the first ever web-based commission for the museum. Over the course of a year, the collaborative, dynamic piece would look at the complexity of gender, sexuality, and identity through the life and death of Brandon Teena/Teena Brandon, a Nebraska youth who was raped and murdered after his biological sex as a woman came to light <a href="http://rhizome.org/editorial/2012/may/10/shu-lea-cheang-on-brandon/" target="_blank">in 1993</a><em>.</em>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; text-align: center;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601225418-2005.44_web.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Shu Lea Chang,<em> Brandon,</em> 1998-9,&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Commissioned by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and produced in association with the Waag Society for Old and New Media, The Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue at Harvard Univeristy, and The Banff Centre, with additional funding from The Bohen Foundation, The Rockefeller Foundation, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Mondriaan Foundation, copyright Shu Lea Chang</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The ICA exhibition quite rightly details the <em>now</em>, but for me it is impossible not to link to nearly twenty years earlier when the first encounter of gender determinism within cyberspace took place. Using live performance and analogue techniques like photography to document the transformation of one&rsquo;s own or a communities&rsquo; gender identity in the works of Grace, Opie and Flash encouraged the first forays into digital space as a new platform for community building and representation. Cheang began working in the digital realm early. New feminist, gender-bending and trans-identities were proposed via digital means or by using digital aesthestics. The latter is the case in Hans Scheirl&rsquo;s parodic and anarchic <a href="http://hansscheirl.jimdo.com/dandy-dust/" target="_blank"><em>Dandy Dust</em></a>&nbsp;(1998), a theatrical film which unapologetically mashes up gender definitions and digital aesthetics all from within his own transgender community.&nbsp;<em>Dandy Dust</em>&rsquo;s inventive protagonists such as &lsquo;SpiderCuntBoy&rsquo; retain cult status to this day.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601225030-tumblr_mibmoqFvHW1rpw23do1_1280.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Hans Scheirl,&nbsp;<em>Svar Simpson als Spider-cuntboy</em>, still from the film&nbsp;<em>Dandy Dust (</em>94 min,&nbsp;1998, Dandy Dust Productions)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It seems timely to have a more fundamental debate on the post-human condition as Google Inc and competitors are pressing ahead with research projects which make all-pervading surveillance and cybernetic shape-shifting a reality to contend with even for the most binary of humans&mdash;and certainly no longer only within the confines of art institutions and alternative labs. This debate is just beginning to come to a head in the world of <a href="http://lavernecox.tumblr.com/post/120503412651/on-may-29-2014-the-issue-of-timemagazine" target="_blank">American pop culture</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Our reliance on technology today has possibly eradicated the ironic distance to the digital world hedonistically played out by Scheirl. It feels right however to remind audiences that gender and cyberspace have convened before. These works and others were of seminal influence to the field of artistic queer activism&nbsp;in the 90s, and possibly the earliest foray into cyborg identity/digital queer culture. Even though the divergent experiences of the transgender coming-into being are subjective, each time gender determinism encounters cyberspace, it yields a plethora of possibilites for self-articulation&mdash;artistic and otherwise.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409489-bea-de-sousa?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Bea de Sousa</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Wu Tsang,&nbsp;<em>A day in the life of bliss</em>&nbsp;(still), 2014,&nbsp;two channel video installation. Courtesy&nbsp;of the artist and GALERIE ISABELLA&nbsp;BORTOLOZZI)</span></p> Tue, 09 Jun 2015 03:01:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list The Prescient Plagiarist: Sturtevant’s Works on Paper <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It&rsquo;s often said that originality is simply undetected plagiarism. In the past couple of years, several major art institutions and museums have revisited the work of American artist Elaine Frances Sturtevant (1924&ndash;2014), known simply as Sturtevant, who was both as original as they come, but also a well-known plagiarist. Recent exhibitions include <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/43189" target="_blank"><em>Double Trouble</em></a> at the MoMA, New York City, and MOCA, Los Angeles (2014&ndash;2015), <em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/35693" target="_blank">Leaps Jumps and Bumps</a> </em>at the Serpentine Gallery (2013)<em>, </em>and<em> Image Over Image, </em>at the Moderna Museet, Stockholm, and Kunsthalle Z&uuml;rich (2012). And now Berlin&rsquo;s Hamburger Bahnhof has opened an exhibition dedicated to Sturtevant&rsquo;s graphic works on paper.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150601132517-01_Elaine_Sturtevant_Flowers_working_Drawing.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Elaine Sturtevant, <em>Working Drawing</em>&nbsp;<em>Warhol Flowers Lichtenstein Pointed Finger</em>, 1966. &copy; Collection Paul Maenz, Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A predecessor of many contemporary artists who employ appropriation and repetition in their practice&mdash;e.g. Richard Prince, Jeff Koons&mdash;Sturtevant questioned the very notions of originality, authenticity, and authorship in an image-based economy. With a growing number of high profile <a href="http://99designs.com/designer-blog/2013/04/19/5-famous-copyright-infringement-cases/" target="_blank">copyright cases</a>, fair use in art remains a blurry concept in our digitally-based world of re-makes and image saturation. Well ahead of today's copyright and appropriation polemics, Sturtevant made her name as a fine duplicator of works by her mostly male contemporaries&mdash;Warhol, Johns, Oldenburg, Lichtenstein&mdash;oftentimes before these artists had achieved their stardom status. Showing how truly prescient her practice was, the Hamburger Bahnhof exhibition focuses exclusively on Sturtevant&rsquo;s graphic oeuvre. With some 100 works on paper, the exhibition sheds light on her meticulous drawing methods. She employed no forms of mechanical reproduction, no photographic or digital processes&mdash;the very tools that have made copyright and ownership discussions particularly challenging today.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Even though the exhibition is purposely devoted to her graphic works, examples of Sturtevant's installation works, as well as her film and video, are missed. Inclusion of works in additional media would have created a broader context and reflection on her complex practice, particularly since Sturtevant worked mainly in video and new media art after 2000. Without the additional context the show feels, at times, rather dry. Nevertheless, it offers a complete overview of her graphic work and reaffirms the position of pop icons like American flag and the hotdog in the contemporary arts image book and popular imagination.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150601132652-03_Elaine_Sturtevant_Johns_Flag.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Elaine Sturtevant,&nbsp;<em>Johns Flag</em>, 1991. &copy; Estate Sturtevant, Paris, Courtesy Galerie Thaddeus Ropac, Paris/Salzburg</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The recent interest in Sturtevant&mdash;better late than never&mdash;questions the hierarchies and power in the art world, which prevented her from having notable recognition in the early years of her career. In addition to the growing institutional attention, in 2011 she was awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the Venice Biennale. Sturtevant might have been a fine imitator, but history is starting to better portray her as a distinguished actor who insightfully critiqued consumption and production in the ever-expanding commercialized art world&mdash;a woman who began to probe the concept of repetition before her contemporaries, male theorists like Barthes, Foucault, and Deleuze, had published on the subject.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280904-teodora-kotseva?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Teodora Kotseva</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Elaine Sturtevant, <em>Lichtenstein Laughing Cat</em>, 1987. &copy; Estate Sturtevant, Paris, Courtesy Galerie Thaddeus Ropac, Paris/Salzburg)</span></p> Thu, 04 Jun 2015 09:10:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Photo Report: UCLA Spring Open Studios <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Walking through UCLA's graduate studios in Culver City one Saturday evening is a like walking through a giant sprawling work in process, something artists rarely make in public, because it's messy, untuned, revealing in its imperfection, and of course, just incomplete. All the shabby studentness of the event contributed to the rawness of the works: half names scrawled on doors, crates of beers, some cheese and crackers warming on the floor of an installation. Compared to the professional patina of parallel graduate events at schools in London, for example, there was a looseness and liberialism about this that was good to see&mdash;especially with all the attention L.A.'s art scene is getting right now.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">There were things happening that piqued our interest, and from some of these boxy studios will emerge the next major creators. Hope is a fine thing.</span><span style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601164144-image.jpeg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: 12px;"><br /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Loved this marshmallowy Californian colored sculpture piece by Ravi Jackson.<br /></span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601164238-image.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ana Juarez' brilliantly funny sculptures.</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601210607-image__1_.jpeg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: left;">Brittany Mojo's beautiful craftsmanship.</span></span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601164528-image__2_.jpeg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Sarah Sarchin's striking take on the corporeal canvas.</span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601165412-image__5_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The presentation of Paul Mpagi Sepuya's large-scale photography was cleaner than most.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601165536-image__6_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Part of&nbsp;Jonathan Fields'&nbsp;installation that pranked everyone&mdash;warm beers in a bucket, and a fake $100 bill on the floor. Reminded us of Ryan Gander.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601165852-image__9_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601211215-image__8_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Delightful designs by&nbsp;Catharine Ahearn.</span><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601170416-image__11_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">We couldn't get in the room for the performance by Audra Wist as Joan Rabid, but we could definitely hear it: eardrum-splittingly loud.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601170949-image__10_.jpeg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">A cabinesque installation filling all of Yuji Hotta's studio, with questionably safe stairs up to a second floor.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601170726-image__14_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Inspiration pinned to the door of a studio. Just got a subscription.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601210110-image__12_.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601175244-photo.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Pubes, of course.&nbsp;It's a student thing. Both images part of Mitsuko Brooks' wood-scented installation.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150601210845-image__3_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Michael Cataldi's video projection was shot at the vacant Whitney Museum. He also made the bench the viewers are sitting on.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> Tue, 02 Jun 2015 17:01:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list Exposing Visual Rhymes: An Interview with Mario Ybarra Jr. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><em><strong>This interview was <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/450" target="_blank">originally published</a> way back on ArtSlant Chicago, in May, 2008, on the occasion of&nbsp; Mario Ybarra Jr.'s exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The LA-based artist is known for his installations drawing from pop and street culture, including a recent solo show examining the mythos of Scarface at LA's Honor Fraser Gallery. Right now his work can be found <a href="http://nomadicdivision.org/exhibition/mario-ybarra-jr/" target="_blank">on a billboard in Mobile, AL</a>, part of Los Angeles Nomadic Division's Manifest Destiny Project.</strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"> Mario Ybarra, Jr. is a LA-based visual and performance artist who has created room-sized installations all over the world and most recently right here in Chicago for the Art Institute of Chicago. This year Ybarra was also selected to participate in the Whitney Biennial. Beneath Ybarra's friendly demeanor lies a keen observer who is quick to expose visual rhymes in seemingly unrelated sources and to expand and build upon those connections until a cohesion is reached, or as he might say, a story. Ybarra graciously met with ArtSlant's Abraham Ritchie while putting the finishing touches on his installation at the Art Institute. Ever the raconteur, Ybarra talked about his native LA, baseball and King Arthur. Below is an excerpt of our conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px auto; vertical-align: middle; display: block;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0018.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Abraham Richie: I think a lot of Chicagoans, and everyone, might want to know what the connection is between Southern Los Angeles, Catalina Island and Wrigley Field? It&rsquo;s kind of funny to think that Wrigley Field had a &ldquo;secret brother&rdquo; or something like that on the West Coast, because I am not sure that many people remember or know about this other Wrigley Field.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>Mario Ybarra, Jr.:</strong> Well that&rsquo;s where this whole project started for me. About a year ago Lisa Dorin, the Assistant Curator in the Contemporary Art Department, asked me if I wanted to come up with a proposal to do a Focus project here at the Art Institute of Chicago, and I said I would think about it a little bit. The way that I try to work is that I try to make some kind of relationship between a personal experience, or my personal understanding or knowledge and the place that I show. I don&rsquo;t like the idea of coming in and claiming an expertise on a place that I know nothing about. I&rsquo;ve found that doing something that starts in the realm of the personal and then taking it out to another place and trying to make relationships between those two places is the most successful tactic for me. . . I try to make bridges, so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a kid we would take trips out to Catalina Island, which is part of the Channel Islands, about 26 miles off the coast of Los Angeles. I remember part of the tour was the local history. They&rsquo;d always tell us that William Wrigley, Jr. owned Catalina Island and he had famous movie stars of the time going out there, like Clark Gable. His Chicago Cubs would go out and have their spring training there. The main town there is called Avalon and it gets its name from [Wrigley&rsquo;s] niece, who told [Wrigley] to name it that after the Avalon of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and those stories. So it has this mythological side of it too. It has real histories, the local histories, of it being owned by Wrigley, and it has this mythological history through the King Arthur association. My studio back in LA is on Avalon Boulevard and they named [the street] that because that&rsquo;s where the boats used to take people out to Avalon Harbor on the island. I started doing research about that, I&rsquo;m like a de facto historian, and I found that Wrigley, along with owning the island, owned this other Wrigley Field that was in South Central Los Angeles on Avalon and 66th street. So we had the Avalon Harbor on Catalina Island, my studio on Avalon, this field that Wrigley owned was also on Avalon, I just kept following the line. I thought I could take this story from Avalon, to Avalon Boulevard, to my studio, to Avalon were the stadium was, to all the way down Highway 66 to Chicago and the Art Institute.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I&rsquo;m figuring out ways to make these relationships between historical figures like William Wrigley, who was important to historical cities like Los Angeles and Chicago, and bring these stories together somehow, make bridges between the stories. Between what I know and my experiences and the places that I go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Sports are the site of an obvious physical conflict and throughout the exhibit are interesting juxtapositions: the Mexican flag and the U.S. flag, the sword and the baseball bat, the fist of the Revolution and an image of a capitalist&rsquo;s private island. The history of the island reflects conflict as well, in the seventies it was occupied by the Brown Berets. How are sports, especially baseball, viewed both literally and metaphorically for this project, and the issues it raises?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Well I have always thought of the history of baseball as particularly related to the United States. It&rsquo;s billed as &ldquo;the American Game;&rdquo; it&rsquo;s not really played around the world at all other than some Latin American countries, like the Dominican Republic where all these new players are coming from and where young people are specifically groomed to be ball players. But in relation to the United States, and this comes from the different things that I have watched or read, the developments of social movements in the United States almost always came ten years later than in the ball game itself. Baseball has been very slow to change, and it hasn&rsquo;t changed really over the few centuries its been played here. But it still has these kind of leading edges. Let&rsquo;s take for example the story of integration and civil rights. Jackie Robinson starts playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950's and certain places, like schools, weren&rsquo;t integrated until the early sixties or late sixties. Baseball reflects a little bit in advance the kind of social movements that will happen in the United States.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another thing that I think is very interesting in terms of conflict and it being a spectator sport, even though there are rival teams and most big cities have their own team, [there is a sense of unity]. Before professional baseball, each little town would have a team, even though there was a sense of rivalry or competition, the people were brought together as spectators to cheer on their team. So even though there was a site of conflict, it wasn&rsquo;t like it was Rome and gladiators were getting fed to lions [laughter]. There is a sense of sportsmanship [. . .]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Related to issues of capitalism and revolution, or acts of civil disobedience, there is a sense of teams. I play off that with the posters, we have here a baseball with two bats crossed, but instead of a regular team you have the Brown Beret guys who tried to occupy the island in 1972 so they&rsquo;re like &ldquo;the team.&rdquo; The idea of &ldquo;the team&rdquo; is important too and the metaphor of a team. The idea that everyone has their positions but also act as a unit is very important and is a metaphor for myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="/userimages/3151/PICT0019.JPG" alt="" width="338" height="443" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: The idea of teams is also apparent in this wall of flags you have installed. What are the flags we have here?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> This is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag. The flags are also stadium-esque, they always have them. The other thing, again about making relationships, is this is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag, which has an eagle perched on a rock holding a shield and in his mouth is a banner. I thought that is very interesting, because over here is the Mexican flag, and again we have the eagle, this time perched on the cactus, and the snake in his mouth pretty much mimics the banner in the Illinois flag. Those kinds of aesthetic relationships and symbolic choices are very interesting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px; vertical-align: middle;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0015.JPG" alt="" width="430" height="328" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Even looking at the Illinois flag, that&rsquo;s more of an Aztec style eagle than a typical American-style eagle.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Yeah. Those are the kinds of things I noticed in my visits to Chicago to prepare for this show, last year and earlier this year. I started seeing these kinds of relationships, like the Illinois flag&rsquo;s similarity to the flag of Mexico.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This row of flags will start off with the U.S. flag, the state of Illinois flag, Chicago flag, Los Angeles flag, state of California flag, and the Mexican flag. We have these different relationships between these two places starting with the cities and then going to the states. We have the state of Mexico flag, even though California is not part of Mexico, it used to be part of Mexico, but it&rsquo;s related to the histories that we have here. Catalina Island was occupied by the Brown Berets because in the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which separated the Southwest from Mexico after the Mexican-American War, the island wasn&rsquo;t specifically mentioned. This is why the Brown Berets tried to occupy it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There are interrelationships between the two places [Chicago and LA]. I thought that was another kind of metaphor for the show, in terms of Wrigley being this character and starting with him, saying no man is an island, or no city, or no country or land is an island. They&rsquo;re all in relationship, in context, to their neighbors. Imagine if we thought that we could do everything, under our own power, we&rsquo;d get ourselves in trouble. We can talk about it in relationship to land, in relationship to people. Or no island is a man, we could even switch it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I wanted to draw these kinds of relationships together, one between Los Angeles and Chicago, two between Mexico and the States, three between baseball and mythology. Different symbolic orders, things like ships or bubble gum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Mario Ybarra, Jr., Jenny Gheith and Lisa Dorin for their assistance in making this interview possible. Additional thanks to the Anna Helwing Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">-<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16747-abraham-ritchie?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #000000;"> Abraham Ritchie</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Top image: <strong>Mario Ybarra Jr</strong>, Manifest Destiny Project billboard, 2014; Courtesy of LAND. All other images are installation views of <em>Take Me Out. . . No Man Is an Island</em>, 2008; Courtesy of the Artist)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:52:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my &ldquo;tag&rdquo;: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my mark in muscle memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140558-me_tagging.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Yours truly, tagging the graffiti wall, <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>; Photo: Ben Harvey.</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> <br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I was in Eindhoven attending the Free Art and Technology (F.A.T.) Lab&rsquo;s exhibition <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>&nbsp;at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/" target="_blank">MU</a>, which ended in January. The show, which also took place in April last year at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/335-eyebeam?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a> in New York, was a sort of five-year anniversary round up of the Internet collective&rsquo;s practice. (F.A.T. Lab has now entered its seventh year, but the originally scheduled retrospective was put on hiatus in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.) But back to the incident at hand. Why, at an exhibition dedicated to a network ostensibly operating online, was I contributing my meager tag to a sanctioned graffiti wall?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140845-installation_view1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The connection isn&rsquo;t so far fetched. Some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s twenty-five <a href="http://fffff.at/people/" target="_blank">members</a>&mdash;an international network of artists, engineers, scientists, lawyers, and musicians&mdash;are themselves graffiti artists. Their core values, which include &ldquo;spreading open source and free ideals into popular culture&rdquo; through DIY entrepreneurship, open source, and activism, have more than a few intersections with street art. On the one hand, art on the Internet can be viewed through a street lens: it can bypass normal distribution channels, appealing directly to viewers. Turning the comparison on its head, street art can be seen as a form of &ldquo;hack&rdquo;&mdash;an unendorsed appropriation of space, medium, or idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302135918-ideas_worth_spreading.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Evan Roth</strong><em>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank">Ideas Worth Spreading</a> (TED Talks)</em></em>, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In his recent book, <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/" target="_blank"><em>Viral Art</em></a>, <a href="http://blog.vandalog.com/" target="_blank">Vandalog</a> blogger RJ Rushmore looks at how the future of street art, with its focus on &ldquo;unmediated distribution,&rdquo; might find a natural home in the digital domain. He uses the term &ldquo;Viral Art&rdquo; to describe both shareable and invasive online practices that have an affinity, if not a direct evolutionary line, to street art (n.b. &ldquo;Viral&rdquo; here implies a level of approachability that excludes some older forms of Internet Art. The pioneering duo JODI, for example, have a great exhibition at <a href="http://www.showroommama.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Showroom MAMA</a> in Rotterdam right now that isn&rsquo;t particularly accessible or viral). F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">projects</a> don&rsquo;t always fall within the categories Rushmore outlines either&mdash;viewers may seek out content rather than encounter it serendipitously&mdash;yet they do open onto notions of self-dissemination, egalitarianism, activism, and anonymity. In fact, there are examples at MU of some of the <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/google-bombs/" target="_blank">very</a> <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/katsu-getting-up-in-digital-space/" target="_blank">works</a> discussed in Rushmore&rsquo;s text&mdash;namely, <a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank"><em>Ideas Worth Spreading</em></a>, a mock-up TED Talk stage where visitors can record images of their own &ldquo;talk&rdquo; to share online, and <em>40,000 GML Tags</em>, a massive screen showcasing graffiti gestures in <a href="http://fffff.at/tag/gml/" target="_blank">GML</a>, or Graffiti Markup Language, &ldquo;a file format designed to be a universal structure for storing digitized graffiti motion data.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140719-kopyfamo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Geraldine Juarez, <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://fffff.at/kopyfamo-free-copyright/" target="_blank">Kopyfamo'</a>, watermark on mirror, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Some F.A.T. Lab projects exist in the real world, others are strictly manifest online, and many straddle the two&mdash;that is, projects shaped in the real world and shared online. The MU exhibition, curated by <a href="http://www.lindsayhoward.net/" target="_blank">Lindsay Howard</a>, highlighted them all, offering documentation, online viewing stations, and even physical objects and artworks. Where <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> differed from the typical exhibition was that most works were not autonomous objects, but rather reproducible examples of a wider practice. Motivated viewers could (and can) recreate many of these works on the web or at home*, and the materials for some projects, like an <a href="http://fffff.at/obama-google-glass-prism-mask/" target="_blank">Obama PRISM mask</a>, were even available at the exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140049-free_universal_construction_kit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view with&nbsp;<a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank"><em>Free Universal Construction Kit</em></a>, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Good fun is always on the menu: in <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> there was a sub-genre of works touting the douchiness of Google Glass and its adopters, and a presentation of Greg Leuch&rsquo;s viral Add-on <a href="http://fffff.at/shaved-bieber/" target="_blank"><em>Shaved Bieber</em></a>, which censors all mentions of Justin Bieber online (earning Leuch more than a little hate mail from teenage fans). But some of the best and most shareable projects are greater than their capacity for the lulz. The <a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank">Free Universal Construction Kit</a> is a set of adapters that makes ten brands of children&rsquo;s construction sets, like Lego and K&rsquo;Nex, interoperable. It&rsquo;s eminently cool/novel/clever, but it also visualizes the ways in which childhood playthings ostensibly meant to spark creativity are limited by proprietary measures. The F.U.C.K. undermines these protective implements, removing barriers to cross-trademark creativity. The exhibition featured a complete set of adapters, a construction/play station, and a 3D printer that staff members kindly set to printing new pieces whenever visitors turned up. (3D models of the adapters in .STL format are available online for <a href="http://www.thingiverse.com/uck/designs" target="_blank">free download</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140151-facebook_id_card.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/tag/fb-bureau/" target="_blank">Facebook Identity Card</a></em>, video presentation of ARTE Creative, <em><a href="http://fbbureau.com/" target="_blank">Social ID Bureau</a></em>, 2012,&nbsp;portrait of Mark Zuckerberg,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s perspective seems carefully poised between an irreverent techno-optimism (&ldquo;look at these cool things we can do!&rdquo;) and deep skepticism at the ways in which technologies can be regulated, marketed, and used for power and control. Given these positions, in which use of certain technologies seems self-evident, it&rsquo;s easy to forget that not everyone has access to the distributional paradigm shift that is the digital domain. Rushmore&rsquo;s account also overstates viral art&rsquo;s present accessibility: an encounter with this type of work is more likely to be spread within specific enclaves of Internet activity, with limiting factors being not geography, but usage. The case for &ldquo;unmediated&rdquo; distribution is further undermined by the cryptic algorithms used by Facebook and Google for post placement and search results&mdash;the very systems F.A.T. Lab exploits when images of their fake TED Talks turn up in search results. In a destabilizing twist, F.A.T. Lab often coopts the very technologies and systems it protests (or defends).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140313-skatekeyboard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/skatekeyboard/" target="_blank">Skatekeyboard</a></em>, keyboard attached to skateboard deck,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In a way, that&rsquo;s why it was such a treat to see some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s works in physical form, Away From Keyboard as it were. <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> did a great job of making works and ideas accessible to people who might not be tech-savvy or know what terms like &ldquo;net neutrality&rdquo; and &ldquo;Open Web&rdquo; mean. Or those who aren&rsquo;t necessarily ready to accept or understand this sort of practice as &ldquo;art.&rdquo; The exhibition was forward looking, but also rooted in the past and present&mdash;a thought-provoking bridge between time, technologies, and disciplines. Be it in a subway tunnel or on a homepage, a mark on the wall is a sign of presence; it can be a declaration of ego, of resistance. Or like my clumsy signature, it can be an affirmation, a &ldquo;Like&rdquo; or an &ldquo;upvote&rdquo;: I was here, with so many others, and I want to be counted.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140303002936-compubody_interface.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Becky Stern</strong>,&nbsp;<em><em><a href="http://fffff.at/knitted-compubody-interface/" target="_blank">Knitted Compubody Interface</a>&nbsp;</em>(<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop-Compubody-Sock/" target="_blank">knit one</a> yourself!), at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; </em>&copy; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">*The MU exhibition ended on January 26th, but interested readers can see the projects <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">online</a> or in the new <a href="http://fffff.at/the-fat-manual/" target="_blank"><em>F.A.T. Manual</em></a> (available for purchase or <a href="http://www.lulu.com/shop/domenico-quaranta-and-geraldine-ju%C3%A1rez/the-fat-manual/ebook/product-21251172.html" target="_blank">free download</a>), released on the occasion of the exhibition and the collective&rsquo;s five-year anniversary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302141000-installation_view3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">Image on top: <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.<span style="color: #000000;">]</span></span></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Articles/list