STREET now open! Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
Santa Fe

Santa Fe Clay

Exhibition Detail
Group Show
545 Camino de la Familia
Santa Fe, NM 87501


June 7th, 2013 - August 10th, 2013
Opening: 
June 7th, 2013 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
,
© Courtesy of Santa Fe Clay
 Large Bowl , Adam FieldAdam Field, Large Bowl ,
Porcelain, Reduction Fired , 6 x 14 x 14"
© Courtesy of Santa Fe Clay
Plate, Ben KrupkaBen Krupka, Plate,
Porcelain, 1.5 x 9"
© Courtesy of Santa Fe Clay
< || >
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Fe-C...
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Guadalupe, Railyard
EMAIL:  
sfc@santafeclay.com
PHONE:  
(505) 984-1122
OPEN HOURS:  
Monday - Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
TAGS:  
porcelain, sculpture
> DESCRIPTION

From the gallery at Santa Fe Clay to your kitchen cabinets! These three functional potters make work that is visually appealing and invites use. Each artist works with porcelain, the stongest and whitest of clays. They achieve their unique styles through exquisite forms and surface treatments that reference fabric, history and pure imagination.

Adam Field, of Colorado, meticulously carves the surfaces of his work. He has traveled the world collecting a vast knowledge of pattern language. The carvings incorporate historical influences from baskets and fabrics, and also mimic natural motifs. Clean and sophisticated, no detail is over looked; even the small foot on every mug is rich with carved detail.

Ben Krupka, from Massachusetts, brings a soft approach to traditionally crisp porcelain. His pieces are painted and carved, incorporating designs that invoke narrative. Clouds float across the surfaces of his pots, creating fields of color, and doodle-like sketches cut through the color with nostalgic images.

Lorna Meaden, also from Colorado, throws, stretches, alters and reassembles her functional wares. She scribes tiny black lines on the surfaces creating patterns that follow the flowing forms. Surface inspiration comes from medieval costumes and  everyday repeats, such as the bricks on her kiln.


Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.