BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 CALSCALE:GREGORIAN PRODID:iCalendar-Ruby VERSION:2.0 BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20130531 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130501 GEO:35.688967;-105.938461 LOCATION:Blue Rain Gallery\,130 Lincoln Avenue Suite C \nSanta Fe\, NM 8750 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:neo traditional:15 years in bronze\, Tammy Garcia UID:274110 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130503T190000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503T170000 GEO:35.688967;-105.938461 LOCATION:Blue Rain Gallery\,130 Lincoln Avenue Suite C \nSanta Fe\, NM 8750 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:neo traditional:15 years in bronze\, Tammy Garcia UID:274111 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Albuquerque-based artists Larry Bob Phillips and David Leigh collaborat e on an exhibition of fantastic and slightly grotesque drawings that aim to overwhelm the audience with comedic images of power. These giant drawings create a space of cartoon horror\, featuring comedic landscapes of birds\, death\, politics\, gingerbread houses and more. The Big Hoot provi des the setting for an experimental\, interactive performance by the New Yo rk-based collective\, Cheryl\, on May 4.

DTEND:20130505 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130418 GEO:35.673356;-105.936476 LOCATION:Center for Contemporary Art\,1050 Old Pecos Trail \nSanta Fe\, NM 87505 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Big Hoot: an architectural phantasmagoric comix intervention\, Larry Bob Phillips\, David Leigh UID:268911 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130418T170000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130418T120000 GEO:35.673356;-105.936476 LOCATION:Center for Contemporary Art\,1050 Old Pecos Trail \nSanta Fe\, NM 87505 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Big Hoot: an architectural phantasmagoric comix intervention\, David Leigh\, Larry Bob Phillips UID:268912 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

In its 13th iteration\, Collec t 10 invites artists to get lucky. 81 New Mexico artists have contributed a re work for exhibition that fits within a 10" x 10" x 10" space with more t han 130 pieces on display. On opening night a People's Choice award of $300 goes to a lucky artist. A solo show in the spector ripps project space is the prize for the Curator's Choice. All works are for sale\, benef itting CCA and the artists!

DTEND:20130519 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130426 GEO:35.673356;-105.936476 LOCATION:Center for Contemporary Art\,1050 Old Pecos Trail \nSanta Fe\, NM 87505 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collect 10/Lucky 13 UID:274112 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Charlotte Jackson Fine Art is proud to present an exh ibition of new works\, Flux\, by Clark Walding\ , running from May 3 through May 31.  An Opening Reception with the artist will be held on Friday\, May 3 fr om 5-7 p.m.  The gallery is located in the Railyard Arts District at 554 South Guadalupe Street.   

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Black murmurs\, a molten seep-line of red.  Smoke.  Blue sea ice.  The seam of gold that runs through a dark cave.  The solid faces of these paintings\, predominantly dark-hued\, gleaming like b lack ice\, hide fathomless depths.  Step forward and the small details\, mi nute shifts\, color flux\, begin to come into focus.  What seemed to be a s olid plane of black is complexified by currents\, an undertow of colors cha nging monochrome into myriad.

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The plane of the canvas is interrupted (in some cases erupted) by geometry: a line\, a square\, th e etched outline of a rectangle\, a quarter circle.  The intersection of th ese shapes and color planes is volatile.  Colors seep up from deep below th e surface.  Contrasts tug at the eye and mind.  Some of the geometric shape s suggest architecture\, scaffolding—but in a way that bypasses the literal and runs straight to metaphor.  The seeming architecture of a piece like < i>Dark Intervals speaks to the essence of what architecture is and does \, how it gives shape not only to the world\, but to the mind.  In the pain tings in Flux the viewer is confronted by form and forced to see it\, to recognize its imposition against the undifferentiated ground of being (the color plane). 

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What rises up from the depths of these p aintings by Clark Walding is the evidence of time and of process.  Color is not an end result but the record of a history rising up through layers to reveal itself\, finally\, just below the surface of the canvas.  This physi cal effect is mirrored by the methods that Walding uses to create the piece s\, each of which is the result of months (if not years) of work.  Walding uses Japanese knifes to put down a layer of oil paint and wax (in some of t he earlier pieces he also used alkyd).  Each layer varies—some nearly trans parent while others are nearly opaque.  The lines and geometric shapes are made with graphite sticks or pencil.  As Walding builds the layers up\, he also revises and strips away—going back to scrape the canvases or apply che mical wipes which remove layers and alter surface texture.  He calls this m ethod of revision “repentances.”  Repentance is an apt word as it points to ward not only the physical process which becomes so apparent in the final p ieces\, but toward the visceral effect of the works on the viewer.  Walding is always looking again\, changing\, altering.  The paintings are always i n flux.  The viewer has this same experience\, seeing first the ice-face of these pieces\, then revising their view on closer inspection\, revising ag ain as detail and depths inspire an emotional response.  It is a paradox of these pieces that they can present such an elemental and solid presence\, and yet simultaneously an inherent mutability. 

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But meaning cannot be imposed.  Just like the color in these pieces is itself emergent\, rathe r than superimposed\, the stirring of emotion and meaning within the viewer while looking at one of these paintings does not come from the top down.  It bubbles slowly up in layers.  It is not\, as one reviewer has said\, so much that these paintings get “under your skin.”  Rather the experie nce is more like the discovery that these paintings have always been there\ , just under the skin\, all along\, only the viewer didn’t realize it befor e.  This is how close these paintings\, repentance after repentance\, come to the viewer.  There is recognition\, a sense of familiarity and yet of ch allenge.  And of change.

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Clark Walding is always asking a question: of the painting\, of the world\, of the viewer.  The paintings in the exhi bition\, Flux\, will challenge the viewer to engage in this process of questioning and recognition.

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For More Information:

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Press

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Charlotte Jackson Fine Art

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554 South Guadalupe

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Santa Fe\, NM   87501

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press@charlottejackson.com

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505-989-8688

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fax 505-989-989 8

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DTEND:20130603 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503 GEO:35.6869752;-105.937799 LOCATION:Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (Railyard)\,554 S. Guadalupe Railyard A rt District\nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Flux\, Clark Walding UID:271105 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130503T190000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503T170000 GEO:35.6869752;-105.937799 LOCATION:Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (Railyard)\,554 S. Guadalupe Railyard A rt District\nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Flux\, Clark Walding UID:271106 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Spatial Order is a cu lmination of sorts\, distilling ideas and techniques Krimmer has been developing for years. Put simply\, it all comes together here: repetition\, collage\, color\, paint-handling\, scale and content. Krimmer has spent the better part of 2 years working towards this exhibition\, which will include a dozen medium to large scale paintings\, a nd wall installations of numerous small scale works. The paintings all cont ain an element of discovery. As you approach the work\, the surface transfo rms from a riot of abstract marks into a formal structure forming a hypnoti c rhythm of collage elements. The white-on-white and black-on-black pieces appear minimal from a great distance\, then open up as you step closer.  \n

 

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Santa Fe-based Krimmer enjoys a long and productive pain ting career\, first in Chicago and then Santa Fe since the early 90's. Krimmer has shown extensively in New Mexico\, Illinois and Cal ifornia. Recent awards include a Merit of Excellence for the Miniature Exhi bition\, Roswell Museum\, Roswell\, NM\, and a scholarship at Santa Fe Art Institute. This is Krimmer's second solo show with Chiaros curo.

DTEND:20130601 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503 GEO:35.6783389;-105.9105307 LOCATION:Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art\,702 ½ Canyon Road \nSanta Fe\, NM 87 501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Spatial Order\, Bebe Kimmer UID:272696 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130503T190000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503T170000 GEO:35.6783389;-105.9105307 LOCATION:Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art\,702 ½ Canyon Road \nSanta Fe\, NM 87 501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Spatial Order\, Bebe Kimmer UID:272697 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

In two sizes\, on paper\, Brice explores thick layers of paint\, meticulously applied an d burnished to a fine sheen. This color field work\, more complex than it i nitially appears\, records the tension and release of color and form in a m odest rectangular playing field. But what puts this work "over the top" is the indescribable quality of paint on paper -it's different from canvas\, s ofter and more intimate\, and the colors sing.

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This small show features just over a dozen recent works on paper from this Los Angeles based artist. Nationally recognized and exhibited\, t his is Brice's third solo show at Chiaroscuro.

DTEND:20130601 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503 GEO:35.6783389;-105.9105307 LOCATION:Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art\,702 ½ Canyon Road \nSanta Fe\, NM 87 501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Works on Paper\, Deniel Brice UID:272698 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130503T190000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503T170000 GEO:35.6783389;-105.9105307 LOCATION:Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art\,702 ½ Canyon Road \nSanta Fe\, NM 87 501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Works on Paper\, Deniel Brice UID:272699 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Eight Modern is pleased to ann ounce its upcoming exhibition\, Nancy Youdelman: Dogs Are Forever.\n

Youdelman’s third solo show at Eight M odern reflects the continued refinement of her unique\, highly memorable me thod and style. Youdelman’s mixed media sculptures and reliefs use vintage clothing as the foundation for sculptures incorporating vintage snapshots\,   love letters\, buttons\, pins\, and organic elements such as leaves\, twi gs and flowers. The artist continues to add depth to her already significan t legacy as a pioneering feminist artist through her accessible\, honest ex ploration of the personal objects that interconnect touchstone themes like love\, mortality and femininity.

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Some of the work in Youdelman’s latest exhibition was inspired by a collection of 300 vintage photos the artist bought on eBay in 2007\, after receiving a Gottlieb Foundation grant. Tuffy is the [One] I Love–a small dress embedded with multicolored buttons and faded images of a girl and her dog—w as inspired by some of these photos: “Taken in the early 1950s\, they are o f a young girl\, Sally (written on the back) and her dog Tuffy. On the back of a photo of her dog\, she wrote\, “Tuffy is the I love”\, forgetting to add the word “one”.  So poignant\, this really grabbed me.  I n my mind’s eye\, I could see dearly loved dogs from my own childhood. … Tuffy and Dogs Are Forever give homage to all my beloved pets.”

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The artist has long been fascinated by  anonymous subjects whose letters\, pictures and other artifacts inspire her art. In describing her fascination with these relics\, Youdelman refer ences a quote from Diane Arbus on photographs: “They are proof that somethi ng was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is b oggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there lo oking at you.”

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Youdelman is an art le cturer at Fresno State\, where in 1970 she was one of the 15 founding stude nts in the nation’s first feminist art program\, which was led by Judy Chic ago and continues to be recognized as a formative moment in American art hi story. Thereafter\, Youdelman participated in other leading-edge feminist a rt collectives such as Womanhouse\, Double X and The Woman’s Building\, thr ough which she honed her skills in “female technologies” such as sewing\, f ashion and performance.

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“Throughout ( Youdelman’s work)\, the cumulative debris of lived experience – buttons\, j ewelry\, photos\, letters\, dried flowers\, among an assortment of other me mentos – reflect the contingencies of recollection and desire\,” Alex Ross of Visual Art Source writes. “Operating at the intersections between precio usness and potency\, beauty and banality\, individual experience and cultur al memory\, Youdelman’s assemblages assert points at which the weathered an d degraded emerge as the foundations for a strikingly expressive and contin uously singular artistic practice.”

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Y oudelman studied Theatrical Costume &\; Make-up\, Art and English Litera ture at Fresno State before earning a B.F.A. from Cal Arts and an M.F.A. fr om UCLA. She has taught at colleges throughout California\, has written for and edited art magazines and books\, been a mainstay in the Southern Calif ornia art scene and even served as artistic consultant for a Rolling Stones concert. She has been honored with numerous awards\, including grants from the Pollock-Krasner and Gottlieb Foundations.

DTEND:20130518 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130412 GEO:35.683162;-105.930986 LOCATION:Eight Modern\,231 Delgado Street \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Dogs Are Forever\, Nancy Youdelman UID:268664 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130412T190000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130412T170000 GEO:35.683162;-105.930986 LOCATION:Eight Modern\,231 Delgado Street \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Dogs Are Forever\, Nancy Youdelman UID:269069 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20130531 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503 GEO:35.6821747;-105.9486721 LOCATION:EVOKE Contemporary\,550 South Guadalupe St. \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:LEE PRICE + SEAN CHEETHAM\, Lee Price\, Sean Cheetham UID:272770 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130503T190000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130503T170000 GEO:35.6821747;-105.9486721 LOCATION:EVOKE Contemporary\,550 South Guadalupe St. \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:LEE PRICE + SEAN CHEETHAM\, Sean Cheetham\, Lee Price UID:272771 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

“When I got to New Mexico that was mine. As soon as I saw it\, that was my country. It fitted to me exact ly.”
- Georgia O’Keeffe 1977

The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum i s delighted to present “Georgia O’Keeffe and The Faraway: Nature and
I mage\,” which opens on May 11\, 2012. This exhibition is the first to demon strate how the beauty and elegance of O’Keeffe’s paintings were prompted by the intimacy of her ongoing experiences with the Southwest’s natural forms \, especially because of the camping trips she made to remote areas.
< br />The exhibition will be on view until May 5\, 2013\, and includes drawi ngs and paintings inspired by the beauty of the painted desert surrounding O’Keeffe’s house at Ghost Ranch\, which she purchased in 1940\, and by the camping and rafting trips she made. Highlights of the exhibition include O’ Keeffe’s paintings\, photographs made by others of places she camped\, and a recently made photographic panorama of the “Black Place” that establishes a context for the exhibition’s reconstruction of a site where O’Keeffe and her friend Maria Chabot camped in 1944. This includes the tent the two pit ched\, their lanterns\, camping stools\, and cooking equipment from the cam ping gear Chabot bequeathed to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum at her death\, i n 2001.

“O’Keeffe had been passionate about nature since childho od\, but living amidst the astonishing beauty of the Ghost Ranch landscape\ , and making camping and rafting trips in the Southwest allowed her to form an immediate and personal relationship with the area through which she rea lized her independent spirit and sense of adventure\,” said Barbara Buhler Lynes\, Curator\, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.

As O’Keeffe herself p ointed out\, in 1943\, “Such a beautiful–untouched lonely feeling place – s uch a fine part of what I call the ‘faraway.’ It is a place I have painted before but I wanted to do again - and even now I must do again.”


DTEND:20130505 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20120511 GEO:35.689178;-105.941254 LOCATION:Georgia O'Keeffe Museum\,217 Johnson Street \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Georgia O'Keeffe and the Faraway: Nature and Image\, Georgia O'Keef fe UID:215142 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20120511T200000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20120511T180000 GEO:35.689178;-105.941254 LOCATION:Georgia O'Keeffe Museum\,217 Johnson Street \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Georgia O'Keeffe and the Faraway: Nature and Image\, Georgia O'Keef fe UID:215143 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Organized by the Smithsonian A merican Art Museum\, this exhibition charts a new direction for one of Amer ica’s best-known living photographers\; unlike her staged and carefully lit portraits made on assignment for magazines and advertising clients\, the p hotographs in this exhibition were taken simply because Leibovitz was moved by the subject. She made two separate trips to New Mexico to photograph O’ Keeffe’s home in Abiquiu\, the landscape at The Ghost Ranch and the “Black Place\,” and in the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum vault.

The photogra phs\, while not containing people\, are in a certain sense portraits of sub jects that have shaped Leibovitz’s distinctly American view of her cultural inheritance. Visiting the homes of iconic figures\, including O’Keeffe\, E leanor Roosevelt\, Ralph Waldo Emerson\, Pete Seeger and Elvis Presley\, as well as places such as Niagara Falls\, Walden Pond\, Old Faithful and the Yosemite Valley\, she let her instincts and intuitions guide her to related subjects—hence the title “Pilgrimage.” The images speak in a commonplace l anguage to the photographer’s curiosity about the world she inherited\, spa nning landscapes both dramatic and quiet\, interiors of living rooms and be drooms\, and objects that are talismans of past lives.

The exh ibition\, which includes photographs taken between April 2009 and May 2011\ , is making a national tour to 8 museums (a full list and dates can be foun d here)\, which opened in January 2012 at the Smithsonian America n Art Museum.

“Annie Leibovitz’s Pilgrimage is much l ike Georgia O’Keeffe’s work in that it captures a place in time with such e vocative power and emotion that you cannot help but feel the connection\, t he deep sense of place\,” said Rob Kret\, Director of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. “We are honored to have her work here and feel that it truly commem orates and compliments the ongoing ‘Georgia O’Keeffe and the Faraway: Natur e and Image’ exhibition with paintings and photographs of O’Keeffe’s most b eloved and inspiring locations in the Southwest.”

“From the beg inning\, when I was watching my children stand mesmerized over Niagara Fall s\, this project was an exercise in renewal\,” said Leibovitz. “It taught m e to see again.”

 “Pilgrimage” is an evocative and deeply perso nal statement by a photographer whose career now spans more than 40 years\, encompassing a broad range of subject matter\, history and stylistic influ ences. Together the pictures show Leibovitz at the height of her powers\, u nfettered by the demands of her career and pondering how photographs\, incl uding her own\, shape a narrative of history that informs the present.


THE LECTURE: Leibovitz will discuss her work Tues day\, February 12\, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in downtown Santa Fe. Tickets will be available at www.lensic.com or

THE BOOK: The accompanying book\, published by Random House\, which includes phot ographs\, also includes an introduction by noted historian Doris Kearns Goo dwin. Pilgrimage is available for purchase ($50) at bookstores nat ionwide and the museum’s store.
 

DTEND:20130505 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130215 GEO:35.689178;-105.941254 LOCATION:Georgia O'Keeffe Museum\,217 Johnson Street \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pilgrimage\, Annie Leibovitz UID:258745 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130215T200000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130215T100000 GEO:35.689178;-105.941254 LOCATION:Georgia O'Keeffe Museum\,217 Johnson Street \nSanta Fe\, NM 87501 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pilgrimage\, Annie Leibovitz UID:258746 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Michelle Cooke\, one of the most important young contemporar y Taos artists&rsquo\; will be featured on the Harwood Museum of Art Curato r&rsquo\;s Wall. The Curator&rsquo\;s wall features work selected by the cu rator based on the based on the artist&rsquo\;s promise and the import of t he work.

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Ms. Cooke lives and works in Arroyo Seco\, NM and New York City\, NY. She holds an MFA in Sculpture from Claremont Graduate Universit y and a BFA from the Art Institute of Southern California. Her glass instal lations have been included in numerous museum and gallery exhibitions in th e United States and Europe\, with dozens of solo and group shows in New Mex ico.

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Cooke&rsquo\;s body of work comprises poetic\, Minimalist draw ings\, avant - garde fashion\, and found object sculpture\, along with her signature glass installations. Cooke has moved gracefully through incarnati ons of a unique installation process\, which has led to an unusual viewing experience. Carefully inserting each 2 x 2 thin\, delicate\, square piece o f transparent glass\, Cooke creates a combination of illusion\, tension\, d anger\, poetry and beauty. \; &ldquo\;I find the recurring themes in my work to be those of fragility\, transparency\, balance\, weightlessness\, and gravity\,&rdquo\; she writes. &ldquo\;Each work yields its meaning thro ugh the handling of the material. I prefer fragile materials used in unconv entional ways. In my work with glass I&rsquo\;ve focused on the inherent te nsion between its transparency as a light medium and its aggressiveness as a projecting grid.&rdquo\;

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The year 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the development of studio glass in the United States. To celebrate this milestone and recognize talented artists\, more than 140 glass demonstrati ons\, lectures and exhibitions will take place in museums\, galleries\, art centers\, universities and other venues across the country throughout 2012 .

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Michelle Cooke&rsquo\;s monumental Poem\, 2012\, glassha s been selected partially in honor of the 50th anniversary. The efforts of the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG) to build awareness for glass art in local communities in America have resulted in glass exhibitions\, r eviews and publications benefiting the American glass artist and the instit utions that promote them. Jina Brenneman\, Curator of collections and e xihibtions

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DTEND:20140404 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20110924 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Michelle Cooke: Curators Wall\, Michellle Cooke UID:330394 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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Highlights from the Harwood Museum of Art’s Collect ion of Contemporary Art is the first installation in the newly re-purp osed Joyce and Sherman Scott Gallery.  Previously utilized for temporary ex hibitions\, the Scott Gallery will now showcase work from the Harwood Museu m of Art's renowned collection of work created after 1965.

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“The Harwood Museum of Art has always been committed to celebrating both the rich cultural history of northern New Mexico\, and the art of our time” says Susan Longhenry\, Director of the Harwood Museum of Art. “We’re actively collecting contemporary art\, and we’ve got some fa ntastic pieces that we can’t wait to share with our visitors.”

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One of those works is Ronald Davis’ Six-Ninth s Red\, an important piece created in 1966 and recently acquired by th e museum with funds provided in part by the Harwood Museum Alliance. “The Harwood Museum Allia nce supports the museum in so many ways\, including the sponsorship of majo r acquisitions like this one\,” says Longhenry. Additional support for the acquisition was provided by Gifford and Joanne Phillips. The installation a lso features work by Larry Bell\, Ken Price\, Susan Ressler\, Tony Abetya\, Peter Chinni\, Johnnie Winona Ross\, and other contemporary artists who ha ve lived and worked in Taos.

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DTEND:20130707 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20120707 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Highlights from the Harwood Museum of Art's Collection of Contempor ary Art \, Ronald Davis\, Larry Bell\, Ken Price\, Susan Ressler\, Tony Abe tya\, Peter Chinni\, Johnnie Winona Ross UID:224974 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20120707T170000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20120707T100000 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Highlights from the Harwood Museum of Art's Collection of Contempor ary Art \, Tony Abetya\, Larry Bell\, Peter Chinni\, Ronald Davis\, Ken Pri ce\, Susan Ressler\, Johnnie Winona Ross UID:224975 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20130509 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130205 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Taos Clay: Hank Saxe \, Hank Saxe UID:262148 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130205T200000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130205T180000 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Taos Clay: Hank Saxe \, Hank Saxe UID:262149 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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“In my work… I hope to help preserve a record of the t raditional life of our people and to educate those who know little of us\, desiring that increased knowledge and understanding will help all of us to live better with one another and with the natural world.”

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     Jonathan Warm Day Coming

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Eah-Ha-Wa (Eva Mirabal) was born in New Mexico on the ancestral Taos Pueblo homeland. Her Tiwa (Taos dialect) name\, Eah-Ha-Wa\, translates to Fast Growing Corn. She studied at the Santa Fe Indian School \, and the Taos Valley Art School. The small village was frequented by visi tors from the nation and the world—Eah-Ha-Wa's father served as a model for Anglo artists including Nicolai Fechin and Joseph Imhoff. Thus his young d aughter had plenty of exposure to the wider world and the notion of art as career choice. She began to attract attention in her family as an artist at age nineteen when she was chosen to be part of a gallery exhibition in Chi cago. Despite early contact with mainstream art\, Eah-Ha-Wa painted scenes of everyday life free of European romanticizing\, and her natural inclinati on as an artist was toward cartoons.

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On May 6\, 1943 Eah-Ha-Wa enlisted in the Women’s Army Corp and was station ed at Wright Field in Ohio. She was assigned to create a cartoon for WAC pu blications. Her character\, G.I. Gertie\, found herself in all the aspects and situations —often comedic—of military life. Eah-Ha-Wa's skill as a grap hic artist was apparent\, and she was asked to continue with the character\ , as well as to create posters for US war bonds.

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With the elevation of comic books to the graphic novel of mains tream art\, cartooning has become a common and accepted medium for Native A merican artists as well. The cartoon now captures the complexity\, fluidity and adaptive quality of the culture itself. But when Eah-Ha-Wa began carto oning\, she was arguably the first published Native American cartoonist (ma le or female)\, and one of the first American female cartoonists. After the war\, she served as Artist in Residence at Southern Illinois University fo r the academic year 1946-1947.

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The te lling of stories through storyboards and the expression of cultural history through pictures were central to Eah-Ha-Wa's style. Her murals would serve the same ends as her cartoons. Eah-Ha-Wa's mural work had begun as early a s the late 1930s\, while she was a student in the Studio\, the fine arts pr ogram established in 1932 at the Santa Fe Indian School and whose roster of alumni includes Native American artists Allan Houser\, Ben Quintana\, Harr ison Begay\, Joe H. Herrara\, Quincy Tahoma\, Andy Tsihnajinnie\, Pablita V elarde\, Tonita Lujan\, Pop-Chalee\, Oscar Howe\, and Geronima Cruz Montoya . During that time Eah-Ha-Wa received instruction in working on large mural s\, often with political themes\, and became a sought-after muralist. Her m ural work could be seen at the Santa Fe Indian School (a building-length mu ral titled A Bridge of Wings)\, at the world headquarters of Air S ervice Command\, at Patterson Field\, Ohio\, and at Buhl Planetarium in All egheny Square\, Pittsburgh\, Pennsylvania (Eah-Ha-Wa was twenty-two years o ld when she painted this mural ). Eah-Ha-Wa's attention to detail and profi cient design skills also led to commissions for many other projects\, inclu ding a major work at the Veteran’s Hospital in Albuquerque\, New Mexico.

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In July 2008 the All Indian Pueblo Coun cil\, which administers the Santa Fe Indian School\, began demolishing the old campus. Along with many historic buildings destroyed were the unique an d invaluable murals created by Eah-Ha-Wa and other art students.

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Eah-Ha-Wa's fine art tradition is being carried on by her son Jonathan Warm Day Coming\, a self-taught Taos Pueblo artist\ , storyteller and writer. Jonathan Warm Day Coming is considered a deeply i nfluential voice for his family’s homeland\, the Taos Pueblo. He is primari ly known for his colorful acrylic paintings\, which provide a visual narrat ive of the daily experiences and spiritual life drawn from his many childho od memories at Taos Pueblo in New Mexico. Mr. Warm Day Coming's daily life of participating in tribal culture\, festivals and religious events is deep ly rooted in the message of his paintings\, preserving the memories of the pastoral lifestyle\, rich cultural heritage\, and daily life intertwined in separably with nature.

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Jonathan began woodcarving as a child. Gradually\, under the tutelage of his mother Eah-H a-Wah\, he became interested in drawing. After graduating from Taos High Sc hool\, Jonathan attended Diné College in Tsaile\, Arizona\, and then studie d art at the University of New Mexico. In his work\, careful homage is paid to his mother\, but Jonathan's style is clearly his own. Warm Day Coming o ffers a contemporary visual expression\, giving the viewer a unique and can did view into the intimate communal life of Taos Pueblo.

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Jonathan Warm Day Coming's paintings have been shown at The International Museum of Art\, El Paso\, Texas\; Castellani Art Museum of Niagara University\; and most recently at The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture\, Santa Fe\, New Mexico\, where he was the only living artist featu red in the exhibition Native American Picture Books of Change. His work is on display in Santa Fe (Hotel Santa Fe)\, and is included in many private and institutional collections.

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Warm Day Coming's Last Supper gained wide interest as a result o f its political connotations. The painting depicts a Taos Pueblo family sit ting in their home in the Pueblo\, during a meal\, looking through a window at silhouetted Spanish conquistadors riding by. He painted it in response to a visit to the Southwest by dignitaries from Spain: “Although the Hispan ic community was looking forward to their arrival\, there was a different f eeling about the visit on the part of the Native American community because it brought to mind old wounds” (Jonathan Warm Day Coming). Turner Publishi ng Company has asked to use the image in its publication\, The Native A mericans. The painting has also been featured in a college history tex tbook\, First Peoples\, A Documentary Survey of American Indian History  by Colin G. Calloway\, a professor of Native American Studies at Dart mouth College. It was also used in a grade school history book\, Perspe ctives: Authentic Voices of Native Americans\, published by Curriculum Associates.

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Jonathan Warm Day Coming 's first book\, Taos Pueblo Painted Stories\, was published in 200 2 by Clearlight Publishers of Santa Fe\, and is now in its third printing. The stories are drawn from both Jonathan’s personal experiences and his fam ily’s oral traditions. An article about the book was featured in the Decemb er 2005 issue of New Mexico Magazine. Warm Day Coming also illustr ated Kiki’s Journey\, a childrens’ book written by Kristy Orona Ra mirez and published by Children’s Book Press of San Francisco.

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Currently Warm Day Coming is devoting part of his time to researching and gathering a collection of his mother’s artwork\, h olding true to the Pueblo’s religious and cultural traditions\, and looking forward to the completion of his first novel.

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     Jina Brenne man\, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions

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DTEND:20130505 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130209 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Joint Exhibition\, Eah-Ha-Wa\, Jonathan Warm Day Coming UID:258440 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130209T170000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130209T100000 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Joint Exhibition\, Jonathan Warm Day Coming\, Eah-Ha-Wa UID:258441 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The Curator’s Wall is reserved for imagination and the creative process. Deborah Rael-Buckley has respond ed to this challenge by creating an installation based on the dimensions of this wall\, keeping in mind the impact on the viewer.

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In 2010 Rael-Buckley stated\, “As a child I loved playing with clay and all things muddy\, waiting for it to rain so I could dam up the flowing water in the gutters and sail leaves… waiting for the thin left over silt at the bottom of the gutter to dry and curl up at the edges. I wo uld try and lift the thin clay chips up carefully so as not to break them a nd try to save the largest pieces I could and balance them on each other hi gher and higher until the weight of them forced the whole thing to crumble. Those are my first memories of working in clay. Now I am 57 years old and I am a sculptor.”

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As stated on Rael-B uckley's web site\, the artist " . . . was born in New Mexico in 1953\, but she did not begin taking courses in art history at the University of New M exico in Albuquerque until 1987. She transferred to the University of Illin ois -Chicago\, where she was awarded the McNee Foundation Award\, and took a degree with honors in the history of art and architecture in 1994\, gradu ating Phi Beta Kappa. After a move to Milwaukee\, Wisconsin she began takin g several introductory courses in studio arts and uncovered a profound inte rest in ceramics and sculpture: she transferred to the Peck School of the A rts at the University of Wisconsin\, Milwaukee. In 1996 she took a three mo nth course of study abroad in Cortona\, Italy\, concentrating on bronze cas ting and ceramic sculpture. In 2000 she was awarded her MFA by UW-M\, along the way being awarded the Layton Special Achievement Award\, the Advanced Opportunity Program Fellowship and the Layton Graduate Fellowship.

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From 1998 until 2001 Rael-Buckley taught cera mics and ceramics history at the Peck School for the Arts at UW-M. Rael-Buc kley has exhibited nationally and internationally\, most recently in Brusse ls\, Belgium where she lived and worked for two years. While in Brussels sh e exhibited at Galerie 94 and had her work published in Ceramica 02: A Guide to Belgian Ceramics (Editions Armature Uitvegerij\, 2002). Other publications include numerous articles in Ceramics Monthly\, Santa Fea n Magazine\, American Art Collector\, Tempo Magazine\, Hispanic Ma gazine\, Southwest Art Magazine and Ceramics Art and Perc eption. She returned to New Mexico in 2003 after being away for nearly 13 years. She participated in her first Contemporary Hispanic Market in 20 05\, where she was awarded Best of Show and Best of Ceramics for her sculpt ure entitled Visitation. The State of New Mexico purchased that pi ece\, which is now permanently installed at the Tony Anaya Building in Sant a Fe. Her piece entitled Rosas sin Espinas was chosen to be exhibi ted with Originals\, 2007\, an exhibition at the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos\, NM\, sponsored by New Mexico Women in the Arts. Recently R ael-Buckley received a purchase award grant from the Peter and Madeline Mar tin Foundation.

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Rael-Buckley's works are in national and international collections\, including the State of New Mexico\, the Sara and David Lieberman Collection of Contemporary Ceramics a nd the Sandy and Diane Besser Collection of Contemporary American Ceramics. Her work can also be seen in the permanent collections of the National Mus eum of Mexican Art in Chicago\, Illinois\, the State of New Mexico\, Santa Fe\, and the National Hispanic Cultural Center Museum\, Albuquerque. Rael-B uckley lives and works in Taos\, NM\, where she has her studio. Her work ca n be seen at Blue Rain Gallery in Santa Fe\, New Mexico\, and privately in her studio.

DTEND:20130505 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130209 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Solo Show\, Deborah Rael Buckley UID:258442 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130209T170000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130209T100000 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Solo Show\, Deborah Rael Buckley UID:258443 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

“The land is my root a nd my being. Everything I am is the land and I spent 50 years interpreting it in painting and fighting lost causes.” 

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                              John DePuy

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When John DePuy first moved to Taos\, still under the in fluence of his teacher\, Hans Hofmann\, his painting was entirely abstract. Over time Hofmann's influence receded\, but his advice to paint from natur e remained. For DePuy\, the influence of New Mexico on his art was "mainly the land" and the inspiration provided by Taos Pueblo Indians' connection w ith that land.

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As stated by David Wit t in Taos Moderns\, "In DePuy's work\, the purely surface qualitie s of the land are often eclipsed by the land's sheer power. Subtle graduati ons of color on walls or in the sky or on limitless plains form a shifting\ , lively backdrop for suns which shimmer and rivers which slide away and me sas which stand dark. DePuy wrote\, 'This land speaks of another time sense than our Western-European lineal time.' The land DePuy began painting by t he mid-1950s exists within spatial time\, where moments do not proceed to a ny destination but repeat endlessly in the regular cycle of day\, years\, m illennia\, always returning\, circular rather than linear.”

DTEND:20130505 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130209 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Solo Show\, John DePuy UID:258444 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130209T170000 DTSTAMP:20140916T234257 DTSTART:20130209T100000 GEO:36.4059793;-105.5771041 LOCATION:Harwood Museum of Art\,238 Ledoux Street \nTaos\, New Mexico 87571 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Solo Show\, John DePuy UID:258445 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR