ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/show en-us 40 Tammy Garcia - Blue Rain Gallery - May 1st, 2013 - May 31st, 2013 Sun, 28 Apr 2013 11:17:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Larry Bob Phillips, David Leigh - Center for Contemporary Art - April 18th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Albuquerque-based artists <strong>Larry Bob Phillips</strong> and <strong>David Leigh</strong> collaborate on an exhibition of fantastic and slightly grotesque drawings that aim to overwhelm the audience with comedic images of power. These giant drawings create a space of cartoon horror, featuring comedic landscapes of birds, death, politics, gingerbread houses and more. The <em>Big Hoot</em> provides the setting for an experimental, interactive performance by the New York-based collective, <strong>Cheryl</strong>, on May 4.</p> Sun, 31 Mar 2013 07:32:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list - Center for Contemporary Art - April 26th, 2013 - May 19th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">In its 13th iteration, Collect 10 invites artists to get lucky. 81 New Mexico artists have contributed are work for exhibition that fits within a 10" x 10" x 10" space with more than 130 pieces on display. On opening night a People's Choice award of <em>$300</em> goes to a lucky artist. A solo show in the spector ripps project space is the prize for the Curator's Choice. All works are for sale, benefitting CCA and the artists!</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2013 11:23:29 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Clark Walding - Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (Railyard) - May 3rd, 2013 - June 3rd, 2013 <p><b>Charlotte Jackson Fine Art</b> is proud to present an exhibition of new works, <b><i>Flux</i></b><i>, </i>by <b>Clark Walding</b>, running from <b>May 3 </b>through <b>May</b> <b>31.</b>  An <b>Opening</b> <b>Reception</b> with the artist will be held on <b>Friday, May 3 </b>from <b>5-7 p.m.</b>  The gallery is located in the <b>Railyard Arts District</b> at<b> <st1:street><st1:address>554 South Guadalupe Street</st1:address></st1:street>.  </b> </p> <p>Black murmurs, a molten seep-line of red.  Smoke.  Blue sea ice.  The seam of gold that runs through a dark cave.  The solid faces of these paintings, predominantly dark-hued, gleaming like black ice, hide fathomless depths.  Step forward and the small details, minute shifts, color flux, begin to come into focus.  What seemed to be a solid plane of black is complexified by currents, an undertow of colors changing <i>monochrome</i> into <i>myriad</i>.</p> <p>The plane of the canvas is interrupted (in some cases erupted) by geometry: a line, a square, the etched outline of a rectangle, a quarter circle.  The intersection of these shapes and color planes is volatile.  Colors seep up from deep below the surface.  Contrasts tug at the eye and mind.  Some of the geometric shapes suggest architecture, scaffolding—but in a way that bypasses the literal and runs straight to metaphor.  The seeming architecture of a piece like <i>Dark Intervals </i>speaks to the essence of what architecture is and does, how it gives shape not only to the world, but to the mind.  In the paintings in <i>Flux </i>the viewer is confronted by form and forced to <i>see </i>it, to recognize its imposition against the undifferentiated ground of being (the color plane). </p> <p>What rises up from the depths of these paintings by Clark Walding is the evidence of time and of process.  Color is not an end result but the record of a history rising up through layers to reveal itself, finally, just below the surface of the canvas.  This physical effect is mirrored by the methods that Walding uses to create the pieces, each of which is the result of months (if not years) of work.  Walding uses Japanese knifes to put down a layer of oil paint and wax (in some of the earlier pieces he also used alkyd).  Each layer varies—some nearly transparent while others are nearly opaque.  The lines and geometric shapes are made with graphite sticks or pencil.  As Walding builds the layers up, he also revises and strips away—going back to scrape the canvases or apply chemical wipes which remove layers and alter surface texture.  He calls this method of revision “repentances.”  Repentance is an apt word as it points toward not only the physical process which becomes so apparent in the final pieces, but toward the visceral effect of the works on the viewer.  Walding is always looking again, changing, altering.  The paintings are always in flux.  The viewer has this same experience, seeing first the ice-face of these pieces, then revising their view on closer inspection, revising again as detail and depths inspire an emotional response.  It is a paradox of these pieces that they can present such an elemental and solid presence, and yet simultaneously an inherent mutability. </p> <p>But meaning cannot be imposed.  Just like the color in these pieces is itself emergent, rather than superimposed, the stirring of emotion and meaning within the viewer while looking at one of these paintings does not come from the top down.  It bubbles slowly up in layers.  It is not, as one reviewer has said, so much that these paintings <i>get </i>“under your skin.”  Rather the experience is more like the discovery that these paintings have always been there, just under the skin, all along, only the viewer didn’t realize it before.  This is how close these paintings, repentance after repentance, come to the viewer.  There is recognition, a sense of familiarity and yet of challenge.  And of change.</p> <p>Clark Walding is always asking a question: of the painting, of the world, of the viewer.  The paintings in the exhibition, <i>Flux, </i>will challenge the viewer to engage in this process of questioning and recognition.</p> <p>For More Information:</p> <p>Press</p> <p><st1:city>Charlotte</st1:city> <st1:city><st1:place>Jackson</st1:place></st1:city> Fine Art</p> <p>554 South Guadalupe</p> <p>Santa Fe, NM  87501</p> <p><a href="mailto:press@charlottejackson.com" rel="nofollow">press@charlottejackson.com</a></p> <p>505-989-8688</p> <p>fax 505-989-9898</p> <p> </p> Fri, 19 Apr 2013 19:23:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Bebe Kimmer - Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art - May 3rd, 2013 - June 1st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Spatial Order</em> is a culmination of sorts, distilling ideas and techniques <strong>Krimmer</strong> has been developing for years. Put simply, it all comes together here: repetition, collage, color, paint-handling, scale and content. <strong>Krimmer</strong> has spent the better part of 2 years working towards this exhibition, which will include a dozen medium to large scale paintings, and wall installations of numerous small scale works. The paintings all contain an element of discovery. As you approach the work, the surface transforms from a riot of abstract marks into a formal structure forming a hypnotic rhythm of collage elements. The white-on-white and black-on-black pieces appear minimal from a great distance, then open up as you step closer.  </p> <p style="text-align: justify;"> </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Santa Fe-based <strong>Krimmer</strong> enjoys a long and productive painting career, first in Chicago and then Santa Fe since the early 90's. <strong>Krimmer</strong> has shown extensively in New Mexico, Illinois and California. Recent awards include a Merit of Excellence for the Miniature Exhibition, Roswell Museum, Roswell, NM, and a scholarship at Santa Fe Art Institute. This is <strong>Krimmer's</strong> second solo show with Chiaroscuro.</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2013 15:01:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Deniel Brice - Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art - May 3rd, 2013 - June 1st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">In two sizes, on paper, <strong>Brice</strong> explores thick layers of paint, meticulously applied and burnished to a fine sheen. This color field work, more complex than it initially appears, records the tension and release of color and form in a modest rectangular playing field. But what puts this work "over the top" is the indescribable quality of paint on paper -it's different from canvas, softer and more intimate, and the colors sing.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This small show features just over a dozen recent works on paper from this Los Angeles based artist. Nationally recognized and exhibited, this is <strong>Brice's</strong> third solo show at Chiaroscuro.</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2013 15:03:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Nancy Youdelman - Eight Modern - April 12th, 2013 - May 18th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Eight Modern is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibition, <i>Nancy Youdelman: Dogs Are Forever.</i></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Youdelman’s third solo show at Eight Modern reflects the continued refinement of her unique, highly memorable method and style. Youdelman’s mixed media sculptures and reliefs use vintage clothing as the foundation for sculptures incorporating vintage snapshots,  love letters, buttons, pins, and organic elements such as leaves, twigs and flowers. The artist continues to add depth to her already significant legacy as a pioneering feminist artist through her accessible, honest exploration of the personal objects that interconnect touchstone themes like love, mortality and femininity.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Some of the work in Youdelman’s latest exhibition was inspired by a collection of 300 vintage photos the artist bought on eBay in 2007, after receiving a Gottlieb Foundation grant. <i>Tuffy is the [One] I Love</i>–a small dress embedded with multicolored buttons and faded images of a girl and her dog—was inspired by some of these photos: “Taken in the early 1950s, they are of a young girl, <i>Sally</i> (written on the back) and her dog <i>Tuffy</i>. On the back of a photo of her dog, she wrote, “Tuffy is the I love”, forgetting to add the word “one”.  So poignant, this really grabbed me.  In my mind’s eye, I could see dearly loved dogs from my own childhood. … <i>Tuffy </i>and <i>Dogs Are Forever</i> give homage to all my beloved pets.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The artist has long been fascinated by  anonymous subjects whose letters, pictures and other artifacts inspire her art. In describing her fascination with these relics, Youdelman references a quote from Diane Arbus on photographs: “They are proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Youdelman is an art lecturer at Fresno State, where in 1970 she was one of the 15 founding students in the nation’s first feminist art program, which was led by Judy Chicago and continues to be recognized as a formative moment in American art history. Thereafter, Youdelman participated in other leading-edge feminist art collectives such as Womanhouse, Double X and The Woman’s Building, through which she honed her skills in “female technologies” such as sewing, fashion and performance.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“Throughout (Youdelman’s work), the cumulative debris of lived experience – buttons, jewelry, photos, letters, dried flowers, among an assortment of other mementos – reflect the contingencies of recollection and desire,” Alex Ross of Visual Art Source writes. “Operating at the intersections between preciousness and potency, beauty and banality, individual experience and cultural memory, Youdelman’s assemblages assert points at which the weathered and degraded emerge as the foundations for a strikingly expressive and continuously singular artistic practice.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Youdelman studied Theatrical Costume &amp; Make-up, Art and English Literature at Fresno State before earning a B.F.A. from Cal Arts and an M.F.A. from UCLA. She has taught at colleges throughout California, has written for and edited art magazines and books, been a mainstay in the Southern California art scene and even served as artistic consultant for a Rolling Stones concert. She has been honored with numerous awards, including grants from the Pollock-Krasner and Gottlieb Foundations.</p> Mon, 01 Apr 2013 13:05:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Lee Price, Sean Cheetham - EVOKE Contemporary - May 3rd, 2013 - May 31st, 2013 Tue, 21 May 2013 08:34:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Georgia O'Keeffe - Georgia O'Keeffe Museum - May 11th, 2012 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">“When I got to New Mexico that was mine. As soon as I saw it, that was my country. It fitted to me exactly.”<br />- Georgia O’Keeffe 1977<br /><br /> The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum is delighted to present “Georgia O’Keeffe and The Faraway: Nature and<br />Image,” which opens on May 11, 2012. This exhibition is the first to demonstrate how the beauty and elegance of O’Keeffe’s paintings were prompted by the intimacy of her ongoing experiences with the Southwest’s natural forms, especially because of the camping trips she made to remote areas.<br /><br />The exhibition will be on view until May 5, 2013, and includes drawings and paintings inspired by the beauty of the painted desert surrounding O’Keeffe’s house at Ghost Ranch, which she purchased in 1940, and by the camping and rafting trips she made. Highlights of the exhibition include O’Keeffe’s paintings, photographs made by others of places she camped, and a recently made photographic panorama of the “Black Place” that establishes a context for the exhibition’s reconstruction of a site where O’Keeffe and her friend Maria Chabot camped in 1944. This includes the tent the two pitched, their lanterns, camping stools, and cooking equipment from the camping gear Chabot bequeathed to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum at her death, in 2001.<br /><br />“O’Keeffe had been passionate about nature since childhood, but living amidst the astonishing beauty of the Ghost Ranch landscape, and making camping and rafting trips in the Southwest allowed her to form an immediate and personal relationship with the area through which she realized her independent spirit and sense of adventure,” said Barbara Buhler Lynes, Curator, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.<br /><br />As O’Keeffe herself pointed out, in 1943, “Such a beautiful–untouched lonely feeling place – such a fine part of what I call the ‘faraway.’ It is a place I have painted before but I wanted to do again - and even now I must do again.”<br /><br /><br /></p> Sat, 08 Dec 2012 01:50:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Annie Leibovitz - Georgia O'Keeffe Museum - February 15th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, this exhibition charts a new direction for one of America’s best-known living photographers; unlike her staged and carefully lit portraits made on assignment for magazines and advertising clients, the photographs in this exhibition were taken simply because Leibovitz was moved by the subject. She made two separate trips to New Mexico to photograph O’Keeffe’s home in Abiquiu, the landscape at The Ghost Ranch and the “Black Place,” and in the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum vault.<br /><br /> The photographs, while not containing people, are in a certain sense portraits of subjects that have shaped Leibovitz’s distinctly American view of her cultural inheritance. Visiting the homes of iconic figures, including O’Keeffe, Eleanor Roosevelt, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Pete Seeger and Elvis Presley, as well as places such as Niagara Falls, Walden Pond, Old Faithful and the Yosemite Valley, she let her instincts and intuitions guide her to related subjects—hence the title “Pilgrimage.” The images speak in a commonplace language to the photographer’s curiosity about the world she inherited, spanning landscapes both dramatic and quiet, interiors of living rooms and bedrooms, and objects that are talismans of past lives. <br /><br /> The exhibition, which includes photographs taken between April 2009 and May 2011, is making a national tour to 8 museums (a full list and dates can be found <a href="http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/leibovitz/" title="">here</a>), which opened in January 2012 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. <br /><br /> “Annie Leibovitz’s <em>Pilgrimage</em> is much like Georgia O’Keeffe’s work in that it captures a place in time with such evocative power and emotion that you cannot help but feel the connection, the deep sense of place,” said Rob Kret, Director of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. “We are honored to have her work here and feel that it truly commemorates and compliments the ongoing ‘Georgia O’Keeffe and the Faraway: Nature and Image’ exhibition with paintings and photographs of O’Keeffe’s most beloved and inspiring locations in the Southwest.”<br /><br /> “From the beginning, when I was watching my children stand mesmerized over Niagara Falls, this project was an exercise in renewal,” said Leibovitz. “It taught me to see again.”<br /><br />  “Pilgrimage” is an evocative and deeply personal statement by a photographer whose career now spans more than 40 years, encompassing a broad range of subject matter, history and stylistic influences. Together the pictures show Leibovitz at the height of her powers, unfettered by the demands of her career and pondering how photographs, including her own, shape a narrative of history that informs the present.
<br /><br /> <strong>THE LECTURE: </strong>Leibovitz will discuss her work Tuesday, February 12, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in downtown Santa Fe. Tickets will be available at <a href="http://www.lensic.com/" title="">www.lensic.com</a> or<br /><br /> <strong>THE BOOK:</strong> The accompanying book, published by Random House, which includes photographs, also includes an introduction by noted historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. <em>Pilgrimage </em>is available for purchase ($50) at bookstores nationwide and the museum’s store.
 <br /><br /></p> Sun, 17 Feb 2013 06:48:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Michellle Cooke - Harwood Museum of Art - September 24th, 2011 - April 4th <p>Michelle Cooke, one of the most important young contemporary Taos artists&rsquo; will be featured on the Harwood Museum of Art Curator&rsquo;s Wall. The Curator&rsquo;s wall features work selected by the curator based on the based on the artist&rsquo;s promise and the import of the work.</p> <p>Ms. Cooke lives and works in Arroyo Seco, NM and New York City, NY. She holds an MFA in Sculpture from Claremont Graduate University and a BFA from the Art Institute of Southern California. Her glass installations have been included in numerous museum and gallery exhibitions in the United States and Europe, with dozens of solo and group shows in New Mexico.</p> <p>Cooke&rsquo;s body of work comprises poetic, Minimalist drawings, avant - garde fashion, and found object sculpture, along with her signature glass installations. Cooke has moved gracefully through incarnations of a unique installation process, which has led to an unusual viewing experience. Carefully inserting each 2 x 2 thin, delicate, square piece of transparent glass, Cooke creates a combination of illusion, tension, danger, poetry and beauty.&nbsp; &ldquo;I find the recurring themes in my work to be those of fragility, transparency, balance, weightlessness, and gravity,&rdquo; she writes. &ldquo;Each work yields its meaning through the handling of the material. I prefer fragile materials used in unconventional ways. In my work with glass I&rsquo;ve focused on the inherent tension between its transparency as a light medium and its aggressiveness as a projecting grid.&rdquo;</p> <p>The year 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the development of studio glass in the United States. To celebrate this milestone and recognize talented artists, more than 140 glass demonstrations, lectures and exhibitions will take place in museums, galleries, art centers, universities and other venues across the country throughout 2012.</p> <p>Michelle Cooke&rsquo;s monumental <em>Poem, </em>2012, glasshas been selected partially in honor of the 50th anniversary. The efforts of the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG) to build awareness for glass art in local communities in America have resulted in glass exhibitions, reviews and publications benefiting the American glass artist and the institutions that promote them. <em>Jina Brenneman, Curator of collections and exihibtions</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 04 Apr 2014 16:04:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Ronald Davis, Larry Bell, Ken Price, Susan Ressler, Tony Abetya, Peter Chinni, Johnnie Winona Ross - Harwood Museum of Art - July 7th, 2012 - July 7th, 2013 <div class="description page_content rich_text"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Highlights from the Harwood Museum of Art’s Collection of Contemporary Art </em>is the first installation in the newly re-purposed Joyce and Sherman Scott Gallery.  Previously utilized for temporary exhibitions, the Scott Gallery will now showcase work from the Harwood Museum of Art's renowned collection of work created after 1965.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“The Harwood Museum of Art has always been committed to celebrating both the rich cultural history of northern New Mexico, and the art of our time” says Susan Longhenry, Director of the Harwood Museum of Art. “We’re actively collecting contemporary art, and we’ve got some fantastic pieces that we can’t wait to share with our visitors.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">One of those works is Ronald Davis’ <em>Six-Ninths Red,</em> an important piece created in 1966 and recently acquired by the museum with funds provided in part by the <a href="http://harwoodmuseum.org/about/membership">Harwood Museum Alliance</a>. “The Harwood Museum Alliance supports the museum in so many ways, including the sponsorship of major acquisitions like this one,” says Longhenry. Additional support for the acquisition was provided by Gifford and Joanne Phillips. The installation also features work by Larry Bell, Ken Price, Susan Ressler, Tony Abetya, Peter Chinni, Johnnie Winona Ross, and other contemporary artists who have lived and worked in Taos.</p> </div> Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:03:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Hank Saxe - Harwood Museum of Art - February 5th, 2013 - May 9th, 2013 Sat, 17 Aug 2013 16:57:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list John DePuy - Harwood Museum of Art - February 9th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>“The land is my root and my being. Everything I am is the land and I spent 50 years interpreting it in painting and fighting lost causes.”</strong> </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">                              John DePuy</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">When John DePuy first moved to Taos, still under the influence of his teacher, Hans Hofmann, his painting was entirely abstract. Over time Hofmann's influence receded, but his advice to paint from nature remained. For DePuy, the influence of New Mexico on his art was "mainly the land" and the inspiration provided by Taos Pueblo Indians' connection with that land.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">As stated by David Witt in <em>Taos Moderns</em>, "In DePuy's work, the purely surface qualities of the land are often eclipsed by the land's sheer power. Subtle graduations of color on walls or in the sky or on limitless plains form a shifting, lively backdrop for suns which shimmer and rivers which slide away and mesas which stand dark. DePuy wrote, 'This land speaks of another time sense than our Western-European lineal time.' The land DePuy began painting by the mid-1950s exists within spatial time, where moments do not proceed to any destination but repeat endlessly in the regular cycle of day, years, millennia, always returning, circular rather than linear.”</p> Sat, 02 Feb 2013 14:50:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Hank Saxe - Harwood Museum of Art - February 9th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Unbeknownst to the wider audience, Hank Saxe has been a dominant figure in the Taos Clay scene - having provided the means and technique for a better part of the anagama advent, an enigmatic process of clay that stems from a blend of wood kiln firing with erratic color and intricate texture compositions.  </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">"Saxe appears to be the genius behind so many great ceramic artists," states Harwood Curator of Collections and Exhibitions Jina Brenneman."   "Jim Wagner, Lee Mullican, Lynda Benglis and Ken Price have all relied on Hank's technical skill and creative know- how." Saxe owns a ceramic atelier in Taos where such artists have witnessed his artistic and technical prowess.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Saxe himself describes anagamas as "finicky" and yet potent with "impurities" that are not as accessible through conventional firing techniques. Thus the aesthetic yields a process all its own, becoming a reinterpretation of sorts, reconciled under certain unforeseen volatile effects and shades. All in all, Saxe merely provides the scope for artists to explore their own creative sensibilities within his studio.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Saxe is known for public art, for ceramic work he produces for architecture. His mission statement: "Our sculpture uses combinations of architectural materials including cast concrete, high-fire glazed tile, and stone. It often appears to be abstract, but it has a traceable lineage to imagery and ideas that we glean from our research and discussions on what defines an area."</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">                        James Kent, Harwood Museum of Art Intern</p> Sat, 02 Feb 2013 14:58:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list VARIOUS - Harwood Museum of Art - February 9th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p><strong>The Tiwa (or Tano) are a linguistic group of Pueblo American Indians who speak the Tiwa language and share the Pueblo culture. Tiwa (also known as Tano) is one of five Tanoan languages spoken by the Pueblo people of New Mexico. The name Taos is derived from the Tiwa word for “place of red willows.” The red wllow is a variety know for its reddish or purple twigs and bark rich in tannin. It is also known as the basket willow, having pliable twigs used in basketry and furniture.</strong></p> <p>                -nmhistoricpreservation.org</p> <p><em>Red Willow: Portraits of a Town</em> presents portraits of the many compelling historic and contemporary members of the Taos, New Mexico community. Artists from around the world have visited Taos to capture the iconic and exotic faces of the people.  “The People” include both the native Tiwa people from the Taos Pueblo and the Hispanic and Anglo populations that now form the majority of Taos' population. Taken together, these three groups have made Taos a tri-cultural and tri-lingual community.</p> <p>The material for portraiture was, and is, plentiful. Many from Taos Pueblo have sat for portraits, including artist Eva Mirabal Gomez.  Joseph Imhof, who influenced the young artist, would often sketch the Pueblo people. The exhibition includes a lithograph portrait of Eva created by Imhof. The piece was gifted to the Museum by Lucy Case Harwood, whose ca. 1890 oil portrait is installed nearby.</p> <p>In 1932 Taos Modernist Emil Bisttram painted a portrait of agriculturalist and cowboy, Bing Abbott. Although done in 1932, the portrait appears to be an ultra contemporary, slick rendition of a questionable character, holding within it a powerful affectation. A self-portrait of Taos icon Jim Wagner proclaims this contemporary artist’s place in the chronicles of this town. Accompanying this exhibition are the narratives of these subjects’ lives. They tell a rich story that weaves their lives together as a family, in a way that only a small community could.</p> <p>             Jina Brenneman, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions</p> Sat, 17 Aug 2013 16:57:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list