ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/show en-us 40 Tammy Garcia - Blue Rain Gallery - May 1st, 2013 - May 31st, 2013 Sun, 28 Apr 2013 11:17:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Larry Bob Phillips, David Leigh - Center for Contemporary Art - April 18th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Albuquerque-based artists <strong>Larry Bob Phillips</strong> and <strong>David Leigh</strong> collaborate on an exhibition of fantastic and slightly grotesque drawings that aim to overwhelm the audience with comedic images of power. These giant drawings create a space of cartoon horror, featuring comedic landscapes of birds, death, politics, gingerbread houses and more. The <em>Big Hoot</em> provides the setting for an experimental, interactive performance by the New York-based collective, <strong>Cheryl</strong>, on May 4.</p> Sun, 31 Mar 2013 07:32:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list - Center for Contemporary Art - April 26th, 2013 - May 19th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">In its 13th iteration, Collect 10 invites artists to get lucky. 81 New Mexico artists have contributed are work for exhibition that fits within a 10" x 10" x 10" space with more than 130 pieces on display. On opening night a People's Choice award of <em>$300</em> goes to a lucky artist. A solo show in the spector ripps project space is the prize for the Curator's Choice. All works are for sale, benefitting CCA and the artists!</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2013 11:23:29 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Clark Walding - Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (Railyard) - May 3rd, 2013 - June 3rd, 2013 <p><b>Charlotte Jackson Fine Art</b> is proud to present an exhibition of new works, <b><i>Flux</i></b><i>, </i>by <b>Clark Walding</b>, running from <b>May 3 </b>through <b>May</b> <b>31.</b>  An <b>Opening</b> <b>Reception</b> with the artist will be held on <b>Friday, May 3 </b>from <b>5-7 p.m.</b>  The gallery is located in the <b>Railyard Arts District</b> at<b> <st1:street><st1:address>554 South Guadalupe Street</st1:address></st1:street>.  </b> </p> <p>Black murmurs, a molten seep-line of red.  Smoke.  Blue sea ice.  The seam of gold that runs through a dark cave.  The solid faces of these paintings, predominantly dark-hued, gleaming like black ice, hide fathomless depths.  Step forward and the small details, minute shifts, color flux, begin to come into focus.  What seemed to be a solid plane of black is complexified by currents, an undertow of colors changing <i>monochrome</i> into <i>myriad</i>.</p> <p>The plane of the canvas is interrupted (in some cases erupted) by geometry: a line, a square, the etched outline of a rectangle, a quarter circle.  The intersection of these shapes and color planes is volatile.  Colors seep up from deep below the surface.  Contrasts tug at the eye and mind.  Some of the geometric shapes suggest architecture, scaffolding—but in a way that bypasses the literal and runs straight to metaphor.  The seeming architecture of a piece like <i>Dark Intervals </i>speaks to the essence of what architecture is and does, how it gives shape not only to the world, but to the mind.  In the paintings in <i>Flux </i>the viewer is confronted by form and forced to <i>see </i>it, to recognize its imposition against the undifferentiated ground of being (the color plane). </p> <p>What rises up from the depths of these paintings by Clark Walding is the evidence of time and of process.  Color is not an end result but the record of a history rising up through layers to reveal itself, finally, just below the surface of the canvas.  This physical effect is mirrored by the methods that Walding uses to create the pieces, each of which is the result of months (if not years) of work.  Walding uses Japanese knifes to put down a layer of oil paint and wax (in some of the earlier pieces he also used alkyd).  Each layer varies—some nearly transparent while others are nearly opaque.  The lines and geometric shapes are made with graphite sticks or pencil.  As Walding builds the layers up, he also revises and strips away—going back to scrape the canvases or apply chemical wipes which remove layers and alter surface texture.  He calls this method of revision “repentances.”  Repentance is an apt word as it points toward not only the physical process which becomes so apparent in the final pieces, but toward the visceral effect of the works on the viewer.  Walding is always looking again, changing, altering.  The paintings are always in flux.  The viewer has this same experience, seeing first the ice-face of these pieces, then revising their view on closer inspection, revising again as detail and depths inspire an emotional response.  It is a paradox of these pieces that they can present such an elemental and solid presence, and yet simultaneously an inherent mutability. </p> <p>But meaning cannot be imposed.  Just like the color in these pieces is itself emergent, rather than superimposed, the stirring of emotion and meaning within the viewer while looking at one of these paintings does not come from the top down.  It bubbles slowly up in layers.  It is not, as one reviewer has said, so much that these paintings <i>get </i>“under your skin.”  Rather the experience is more like the discovery that these paintings have always been there, just under the skin, all along, only the viewer didn’t realize it before.  This is how close these paintings, repentance after repentance, come to the viewer.  There is recognition, a sense of familiarity and yet of challenge.  And of change.</p> <p>Clark Walding is always asking a question: of the painting, of the world, of the viewer.  The paintings in the exhibition, <i>Flux, </i>will challenge the viewer to engage in this process of questioning and recognition.</p> <p>For More Information:</p> <p>Press</p> <p><st1:city>Charlotte</st1:city> <st1:city><st1:place>Jackson</st1:place></st1:city> Fine Art</p> <p>554 South Guadalupe</p> <p>Santa Fe, NM  87501</p> <p><a href="mailto:press@charlottejackson.com" rel="nofollow">press@charlottejackson.com</a></p> <p>505-989-8688</p> <p>fax 505-989-9898</p> <p> </p> Fri, 19 Apr 2013 19:23:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Bebe Kimmer - Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art - May 3rd, 2013 - June 1st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Spatial Order</em> is a culmination of sorts, distilling ideas and techniques <strong>Krimmer</strong> has been developing for years. Put simply, it all comes together here: repetition, collage, color, paint-handling, scale and content. <strong>Krimmer</strong> has spent the better part of 2 years working towards this exhibition, which will include a dozen medium to large scale paintings, and wall installations of numerous small scale works. The paintings all contain an element of discovery. As you approach the work, the surface transforms from a riot of abstract marks into a formal structure forming a hypnotic rhythm of collage elements. The white-on-white and black-on-black pieces appear minimal from a great distance, then open up as you step closer.  </p> <p style="text-align: justify;"> </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Santa Fe-based <strong>Krimmer</strong> enjoys a long and productive painting career, first in Chicago and then Santa Fe since the early 90's. <strong>Krimmer</strong> has shown extensively in New Mexico, Illinois and California. Recent awards include a Merit of Excellence for the Miniature Exhibition, Roswell Museum, Roswell, NM, and a scholarship at Santa Fe Art Institute. This is <strong>Krimmer's</strong> second solo show with Chiaroscuro.</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2013 15:01:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Deniel Brice - Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art - May 3rd, 2013 - June 1st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">In two sizes, on paper, <strong>Brice</strong> explores thick layers of paint, meticulously applied and burnished to a fine sheen. This color field work, more complex than it initially appears, records the tension and release of color and form in a modest rectangular playing field. But what puts this work "over the top" is the indescribable quality of paint on paper -it's different from canvas, softer and more intimate, and the colors sing.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This small show features just over a dozen recent works on paper from this Los Angeles based artist. Nationally recognized and exhibited, this is <strong>Brice's</strong> third solo show at Chiaroscuro.</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2013 15:03:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Nancy Youdelman - Eight Modern - April 12th, 2013 - May 18th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Eight Modern is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibition, <i>Nancy Youdelman: Dogs Are Forever.</i></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Youdelman’s third solo show at Eight Modern reflects the continued refinement of her unique, highly memorable method and style. Youdelman’s mixed media sculptures and reliefs use vintage clothing as the foundation for sculptures incorporating vintage snapshots,  love letters, buttons, pins, and organic elements such as leaves, twigs and flowers. The artist continues to add depth to her already significant legacy as a pioneering feminist artist through her accessible, honest exploration of the personal objects that interconnect touchstone themes like love, mortality and femininity.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Some of the work in Youdelman’s latest exhibition was inspired by a collection of 300 vintage photos the artist bought on eBay in 2007, after receiving a Gottlieb Foundation grant. <i>Tuffy is the [One] I Love</i>–a small dress embedded with multicolored buttons and faded images of a girl and her dog—was inspired by some of these photos: “Taken in the early 1950s, they are of a young girl, <i>Sally</i> (written on the back) and her dog <i>Tuffy</i>. On the back of a photo of her dog, she wrote, “Tuffy is the I love”, forgetting to add the word “one”.  So poignant, this really grabbed me.  In my mind’s eye, I could see dearly loved dogs from my own childhood. … <i>Tuffy </i>and <i>Dogs Are Forever</i> give homage to all my beloved pets.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The artist has long been fascinated by  anonymous subjects whose letters, pictures and other artifacts inspire her art. In describing her fascination with these relics, Youdelman references a quote from Diane Arbus on photographs: “They are proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Youdelman is an art lecturer at Fresno State, where in 1970 she was one of the 15 founding students in the nation’s first feminist art program, which was led by Judy Chicago and continues to be recognized as a formative moment in American art history. Thereafter, Youdelman participated in other leading-edge feminist art collectives such as Womanhouse, Double X and The Woman’s Building, through which she honed her skills in “female technologies” such as sewing, fashion and performance.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“Throughout (Youdelman’s work), the cumulative debris of lived experience – buttons, jewelry, photos, letters, dried flowers, among an assortment of other mementos – reflect the contingencies of recollection and desire,” Alex Ross of Visual Art Source writes. “Operating at the intersections between preciousness and potency, beauty and banality, individual experience and cultural memory, Youdelman’s assemblages assert points at which the weathered and degraded emerge as the foundations for a strikingly expressive and continuously singular artistic practice.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Youdelman studied Theatrical Costume &amp; Make-up, Art and English Literature at Fresno State before earning a B.F.A. from Cal Arts and an M.F.A. from UCLA. She has taught at colleges throughout California, has written for and edited art magazines and books, been a mainstay in the Southern California art scene and even served as artistic consultant for a Rolling Stones concert. She has been honored with numerous awards, including grants from the Pollock-Krasner and Gottlieb Foundations.</p> Mon, 01 Apr 2013 13:05:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Lee Price, Sean Cheetham - EVOKE Contemporary - May 3rd, 2013 - May 31st, 2013 Tue, 21 May 2013 08:34:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Georgia O'Keeffe - Georgia O'Keeffe Museum - May 11th, 2012 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">“When I got to New Mexico that was mine. As soon as I saw it, that was my country. It fitted to me exactly.”<br />- Georgia O’Keeffe 1977<br /><br /> The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum is delighted to present “Georgia O’Keeffe and The Faraway: Nature and<br />Image,” which opens on May 11, 2012. This exhibition is the first to demonstrate how the beauty and elegance of O’Keeffe’s paintings were prompted by the intimacy of her ongoing experiences with the Southwest’s natural forms, especially because of the camping trips she made to remote areas.<br /><br />The exhibition will be on view until May 5, 2013, and includes drawings and paintings inspired by the beauty of the painted desert surrounding O’Keeffe’s house at Ghost Ranch, which she purchased in 1940, and by the camping and rafting trips she made. Highlights of the exhibition include O’Keeffe’s paintings, photographs made by others of places she camped, and a recently made photographic panorama of the “Black Place” that establishes a context for the exhibition’s reconstruction of a site where O’Keeffe and her friend Maria Chabot camped in 1944. This includes the tent the two pitched, their lanterns, camping stools, and cooking equipment from the camping gear Chabot bequeathed to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum at her death, in 2001.<br /><br />“O’Keeffe had been passionate about nature since childhood, but living amidst the astonishing beauty of the Ghost Ranch landscape, and making camping and rafting trips in the Southwest allowed her to form an immediate and personal relationship with the area through which she realized her independent spirit and sense of adventure,” said Barbara Buhler Lynes, Curator, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.<br /><br />As O’Keeffe herself pointed out, in 1943, “Such a beautiful–untouched lonely feeling place – such a fine part of what I call the ‘faraway.’ It is a place I have painted before but I wanted to do again - and even now I must do again.”<br /><br /><br /></p> Sat, 08 Dec 2012 01:50:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Annie Leibovitz - Georgia O'Keeffe Museum - February 15th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, this exhibition charts a new direction for one of America’s best-known living photographers; unlike her staged and carefully lit portraits made on assignment for magazines and advertising clients, the photographs in this exhibition were taken simply because Leibovitz was moved by the subject. She made two separate trips to New Mexico to photograph O’Keeffe’s home in Abiquiu, the landscape at The Ghost Ranch and the “Black Place,” and in the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum vault.<br /><br /> The photographs, while not containing people, are in a certain sense portraits of subjects that have shaped Leibovitz’s distinctly American view of her cultural inheritance. Visiting the homes of iconic figures, including O’Keeffe, Eleanor Roosevelt, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Pete Seeger and Elvis Presley, as well as places such as Niagara Falls, Walden Pond, Old Faithful and the Yosemite Valley, she let her instincts and intuitions guide her to related subjects—hence the title “Pilgrimage.” The images speak in a commonplace language to the photographer’s curiosity about the world she inherited, spanning landscapes both dramatic and quiet, interiors of living rooms and bedrooms, and objects that are talismans of past lives. <br /><br /> The exhibition, which includes photographs taken between April 2009 and May 2011, is making a national tour to 8 museums (a full list and dates can be found <a href="http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/leibovitz/" title="">here</a>), which opened in January 2012 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. <br /><br /> “Annie Leibovitz’s <em>Pilgrimage</em> is much like Georgia O’Keeffe’s work in that it captures a place in time with such evocative power and emotion that you cannot help but feel the connection, the deep sense of place,” said Rob Kret, Director of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. “We are honored to have her work here and feel that it truly commemorates and compliments the ongoing ‘Georgia O’Keeffe and the Faraway: Nature and Image’ exhibition with paintings and photographs of O’Keeffe’s most beloved and inspiring locations in the Southwest.”<br /><br /> “From the beginning, when I was watching my children stand mesmerized over Niagara Falls, this project was an exercise in renewal,” said Leibovitz. “It taught me to see again.”<br /><br />  “Pilgrimage” is an evocative and deeply personal statement by a photographer whose career now spans more than 40 years, encompassing a broad range of subject matter, history and stylistic influences. Together the pictures show Leibovitz at the height of her powers, unfettered by the demands of her career and pondering how photographs, including her own, shape a narrative of history that informs the present.
<br /><br /> <strong>THE LECTURE: </strong>Leibovitz will discuss her work Tuesday, February 12, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in downtown Santa Fe. Tickets will be available at <a href="http://www.lensic.com/" title="">www.lensic.com</a> or<br /><br /> <strong>THE BOOK:</strong> The accompanying book, published by Random House, which includes photographs, also includes an introduction by noted historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. <em>Pilgrimage </em>is available for purchase ($50) at bookstores nationwide and the museum’s store.
 <br /><br /></p> Sun, 17 Feb 2013 06:48:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Peter Burega, Gregory Frank Harris, Rick Stevens - Hunter Kirkland Contemporary - April 26th, 2013 - May 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">New works by Hunter Kirkland Contemporary's three local painters: Peter Burega, Gregory Frank Harris, Rick Stevens.</p> Sat, 04 May 2013 14:57:36 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Stuart Arends - James Kelly Contemporary - March 29th, 2013 - May 11th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">James Kelly Contemporary is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new work by Stuart Arends. This will be his fourth solo show with the gallery.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Arends’ newest body of work, the <i>Stormy Monday</i> series, is a continuation of the artist’s 30-year investigation of the box-form.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The series focuses on boxes and rectangles that are intimate in scale, and constructed of corrugated plastic, wood and oil paint. The walls of the forms are translucent, allowing for the subtle blocks of color to emerge from within. The strategic application of additional color to the surface of the works results in works that are both mysterious and direct. Because the surfaces are not pristine, the artist’s hand is very apparent in these new works. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“The objects I make are intended to exist in the world of real things unencumbered by any specific narrative, dogma or ideology.  They are meant to function only as a stimulus for a potential exchange of energy between a person who makes something and a person who comes into contact with it.   This exchange can result in a meaningful experience that is not literal or definable, but sensual, and felt, and touches us in the place that defines us as human beings.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“My pieces all come out of and deal with the traditional painting issues of color, light (implied vs. actual), scale, illusional vs. "real" space, and painting as objects, etc. The <i>Stormy Monday</i> series utilize real space by using a translucent plastic box that is painted on both the outside and inside. So rather than using paint to arrive at traditional "picture space", the <i>Stormy Monday</i> series approach traditional painting concerns in real space.”   </p> <p style="text-align: justify;"> </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Stuart Arends, March 2013</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"> Arends graduated in 1981 from the MFA program at the Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles.  His work has been exhibited widely throughout the U.S. and Europe and is included in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; the Villa Panza, Varese, Italy; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and The New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"> </p> Sat, 30 Mar 2013 03:05:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Marco Petrus - LewAllen Galleries (Railyard) - April 26th, 2013 - June 9th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">On view beginning April 26 – June 9 at its Railyard location, LewAllen Galleries premieres the first major gallery exhibition in the United States of the celebrated urban landscape painter and Venice Biennale artist Marco Petrus, who lives and works in Milan, Italy. Over a career that has spanned more than 20 years, Petrus has been acclaimed for his singular decontextualized use of highly geometric urban architectural forms presented with a purity of radiant color, unconventional perspective and reductive essentiality.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">These paintings are portrait-like in their subdued reverence for Modernist architectural subjects – buildings, towers, stadia, skyscrapers and industrial buildings – but they also radiate energy and conjure a phantasmal effect that produces an atmospheric sensibility verging on magical realism. Petrus, originally trained as an architect, uses a flattening and abstraction of color and geometry to create a rigid stillness that begets deep contemplation and wonder. Obscure down-up camera angles, foreshortened perspective, and zoomed-in building views reveal only partially, and engender an unaccustomed intimacy with the linear structure of architecture of Milan, Trieste, New York, Helsinki, Shanghai, Naples, Rome -- all rendered in an hypnotic range of pastel and electric colors that demand attention while offering the possibility for meditative insight.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In creating a unique visual articulation of the primary architectural forms of contemporary cities, Petrus' oils on canvas confer a remarkable opportunity for imagination and reflection, both about the urban experience in particular but also the making of culture in general. These images of an urban reality subtly altered from that ordinarily resident in most observers’ experience, jostle perception, shake the casual viewer into looking more closely and thinking more actively. In this regard, Petrus’ paintings function in a way similar to Jorge Luis Borges’ conception of post-modern literature and the effect of existentialist and magical realist writing to blur fiction and fact to provoke new ways of thinking.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Like an ancient petroglyph that fascinates but does not clarify, Petrus' images are imprints of cultural importance that valorize an essential aspect of human experience while remaining cloaked in mystery. They can be seen to serve an equivalent function in a post-modern world: the images inspire wonder and signify connections between time and space but, as Italian magical realist writer Italo Calvino has said about cities in general, the urban form of a Petrus painting "does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the banisters of the steps...". With their intricate delineation of line, angle and volume, the paintings focus literally on the city's "lines of the hand", they direct attention "in the corners" and -- with pure color, monochromatic skies, and shadow play in unexpected views -- they prompt memory and nostalgia for authentic creative achievement that once characterized great architecture and which today mainly is mimicked.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">They also exhibit the post-modern tendency for elimination of the unessential, in this case a total excision of the human form and any portrayal of life or the organic -- not even a cloud in the sky. This isolation of the architectural form -- devoid of reference to the people who created it or live among it -- intensifies the image and produces a mesmerizing effect. In so doing the artist introduces an element of the subtly abstract that slows the process of seeing and fosters a stillness derived from the total absence of any reference to the expected commotion of daily urban existence. Here there is the opportunity for meditative thinking, to see the stark immensity of the urban edifice that serves to concentrate a sort of daydream of matters beyond the immediate and greater than those of the human condition. In this stillness, in the purity of form and its suspension from time and location, in the removal of the mortal from the immortal, Petrus creates what the French philosopher Gaston Bachelard called "an attitude that is so special, an inner state that is so unlike any other, that the daydream transports the dreamer outside the immediate world to a world that bears the mark of infinity."</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Petrus began his artistic career carrying nothing but a small camera, wandering about Italian cities with legacies of industrial production such as Milan, Trieste and Rimini, snapping shots (which he considers to be his sketches) of gritty neighborhoods and Mussolini-era modernist buildings. After studying architecture and engraving, his first major painting exhibition was in Milan in 1991. His career quickly ignited and exhibitions followed at such distinguished venues as Milan's Centro Arte S.Fedele, the Pully Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland, Berlin's Kunsterforderung, the Palazzo Sarcinelli in the Veneto, Museo del Risorgimento in Rome, the "Sui Generis" exhibition at the Padiglione d'Arte Contemporanea in Milan, the Palazzo delle Stelline in Milan, as well as the "Italian Factory: The New Italian Art Scene" exhibitions in Strasbourg, Madrid, and Taipei, as well as other many other locales such as London, Moscow and Shanghai. In addition to his work being selected for two Venice Bienales, Petrus is a recipient of prestigious Lombardy San Carlo Borromeo Prize.</p> Mon, 15 Apr 2013 14:45:14 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Laura Wacha - Matrix Fine Art - April 19th, 2013 - May 31st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">Laura Wacha’s paintings tell stories that linger in the mind like an unanswered question. Her work is full of cartoon-like creatures on brightly patterned backgrounds that leave an impression that brings one to go back to a piece multiple times. Wacha’s images are of the domestically mundane and globally tragic or vice versa. The creatures in her paintings are fantastical; they are reminiscent of science fiction characters in unusual situations and places. The compositions of Wacha’s pieces give the viewer an opportunity to “fill in the blanks”, so to speak, and create their own story based on their life experiences.</p> Tue, 21 May 2013 08:11:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Group Show - Modified Arts - April 19th, 2013 - May 11th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">The multidisciplinary show will feature work that explores weight and tension. Artwork that visually conveys these aspects emotionally, physically, allegorically and philosophically through content or materials will be included. Merriam Webster defines “gravity” as: dignity or sobriety of bearing, a serious situation or problem, and the gravitational attraction of the mass of the earth, the moon, or a planet for bodies at or near its surface, a fundamental physical force that is
 responsible for interactions which occur because of mass between particles, between aggregations of matter. “The Sky is Falling” brings together artwork by twelve diverse artists, who currently or formerly lived and worked in Phoenix. The work in this exhibition explores the presence and the feeling of abstract and intangible forms of gravity- i.e., philosophical, spiritual, political, psychological, etc.- which are conveyed physically by transmission into image or object. The Sky is Falling surveys photography, painting, sculptural works and works on paper that provides a spectrum of our visual storytelling of the “gravitas” sensed in life, outside of the surface of our physicality.</p> Sun, 14 Apr 2013 00:16:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Brenda Croft, Tom Jones, Greg Staats, Anna Tsouhlarakis - Museum of Contemporary Native Arts - January 19th, 2013 - May 12th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Thicker Than Water</em> is an exhibition featuring the work of four lens-based artists addressing the complexities of family, biography and community that intersect through blood and memory.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition is supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.</p> Sun, 02 Dec 2012 04:45:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list