ArtSlant - Closing soon http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/show en-us 40 Adrian Arleo - Tansey Contemporary - September 14th, 2012 - October 9th, 2012 <p align="center"><strong>JANE SAUER GALLERY</strong> is proud to present <em><b>“HARBINGERS”</b></em>by Adrian Arleo. She is a star in the world of sculpture without reaching for fame. Her attention comes strictly from talent, passion and an enormous awareness of the world around her. Her home and studio are in rural Montana located at the base of the Selway Bitterroot Wilderness with Lolo Creek running through. Arleo states, “Having lived and worked in rural Montana for nearly twenty years, my sculpture springs from a deep sense of connection to the natural world and its cycles. My focus has been on environmental, psychological and spiritual concerns, communicated via both ancient and contemporary imagery. With a background in anthropology, and a strong connection to my Italian heritage, I'm often drawn to images from mythology and ancient belief systems.” </p> <p class="style479" align="center">The<strong> </strong><em><b>“Awareness Series”</b></em><strong> </strong>consists of animal forms such as a squirrel and a badger. The surface of each is covered both with eyes closed and startlingly wide open. Other than this one quite unusual feature, the animals are realistic and placed in a natural environment. The eyes are compelling and magnetic. Are we being watched or are these each a portal to the interior of the animal? Portals to the interior frequent Arleo's work, each suggesting complex concepts.</p> <p class="style479" align="center">Her sculpture <strong>“Veil”</strong> is another in a series using curly twig like construction to partially obscure an internal experience. Arleo sees this series refering to "Our bodies are screens, veiling and obscuring our inner experience from others. She notes that “Where I live, I see wild and domestic animals moving beyond trunks and branches, discover bird and wasp nests that were hidden all summer, see houses beyond that also obscure the life inside them. In <strong>“Veil”</strong> I was interested in carving the torso to suggest branches in a screen like way. “Inside <strong>“Veil”</strong> is a gold leafed couple embracing. “An embrace can hold so many meanings -- desire, acceptance, love, longing, attachment.”</p> <p class="style479" align="center">The BA image, a bird's body with a human face, has appeared in Arleo's work for many years. Her first discovery of this was in an Egyptian exhibition almost ten years ago. After recently seeing another bird/human form at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC, interest in the form was rekindled. In this exhibit the form was called a Siren and came from the coast of Southern Italy. Arleo was immediately drawn not only to the form but to fact that it was thought to represent a protector for vulnerable points of passage.</p> <p class="style479" align="center">Arleo’s studio, and the pieces she creates there, straddle the natural world and the world that man has constructed. Nature is invited in. The window sills are filled with treasures found on her rural property. Swallows nest in the eaves, her horse sneaks a look in the window of the studio, and a mouse is not considered an unwelcome intruder. The collection further contains beehives, honeycombs, abandoned bird nests, stones, twigs, shells and other bits of nature brought in for closer inspection and continuous inspiration. Arleo claims her studio to be “a kind of living structure.”</p> <p class="style479" align="center">Our gallery show <em><b>“HARBINGERS”</b></em> consists of contemporary figurative sculpture carefully and skillfully crafted of clay with the addition of various other materials such as beeswax, encaustic and glazes. Arleo works in series with some bridging many years and being developed simultaneously. This exhibit incorporates several series.</p> <p class="style479" align="center"> </p> <p class="style479" align="center">Adrian Arleo’s sculpture is exhibited internationally, and is in numerous public and private collections, including The World Ceramic Exposition Foundation, Icheon, Korea; The Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon, Georgia; The Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI; Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, MT; Microsoft, Seattle, WA; University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, MT; Gloria and Sonny Kamm Foundation, Los Angeles, CA; Ruth Kohler, Kohler, WI; and Candace Groot, Chicago, IL. </p> <p class="style479" align="center">The statistics from our web site continuously rate Arleo as having the most individual viewers every year, even though she is not a frequent giver of workshops and does not teach at a university. Arleo's work is labor intensive and each piece presents its own concept so she isn't able to have many solo shows. We can conclude simply that Arleo has many admirers without her going down the frequently traveled path of intense “marketing” to achieve attention.</p> <p align="center"><strong></strong></p> Wed, 12 Sep 2012 13:19:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Mati Milstein - Marji Gallery and Contemporary Projects - July 20th, 2012 - October 11th, 2012 <p>A new generation of Palestinian activists stands out from their society in the most distinct way: they are women.</p> <p>These women are on the front lines of West Bank protest. They are beaten and face arrest and sexual harassment for their bold role. Starting with the March 15, 2011 Palestinian unity rallies, they began to take on key organizational positions and lead street protests, standing on the lines – in front of their male counterparts – and bearing the brunt of soldiers’ blows. The women, who are mostly in their teens and 20s, employ a strictly non-violent strategy both to shake off Israeli occupation and to demand sexual equality and unity in a highly-fragmented and chauvinist, patriarchal society.</p> <p>“Throughout history, women have been active in revolutions but then, after the revolution is over, men would take the leadership roles. But we intend to go for all these roles,” said key activist Ashira, who was inspired by women in the Egyptian revolution. “Women are often scared of being leaders. But any woman who has a chance for a leadership role should take it. That’s the only way we can change society.”</p> <p><em>Nesa’iyeh</em>, the word chosen to represent this body of work, is Palestinian Arabic slang that means “feminist” or “a woman thing.” Through their actions, these women are reforging the manner in which we were taught that Palestinians are meant to act, that women are meant to behave, and that conflicts are meant to be conducted. The women appearing in these images are among those now changing the face of the Arab world.</p> Thu, 11 Oct 2012 18:46:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Nora Naranjo Morse - Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art - September 14th, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art</strong> is pleased to present a new body of mixed media and clay sculpture by <strong>Nora Naranjo Morse</strong>, titled <em>Cause &amp; Effect</em>. The show runs September 14 – October 13th.  Opening Reception is Friday, September 14th, 5-7pm.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This is <strong>Naranjo Morse’s</strong> first solo show since her inclusion in the 2008 Site Santa Fe International Biennial exhibition, <em>Lucky Number Seven</em>. The show represents ideas developed over the last two years at her studio in northern New Mexico.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Nora</strong> describes:</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“One day while gathering clay along the hillside, I realized a major trash dump was a stone’s throw from the clay pit I was mining. The proximity of the clay pit and the dump was significant and set off a chain reaction of thoughts that have influenced the current pieces. Culturally I grew up thinking the clay deposits that run along the hillsides were sacred places and that the clay extracted from the earth was an act of conscious thought. The juxtaposition of this ‘sacred’ place to the dump brings to light global, human and environmental issues. Using clay and discarded materials from the dump to create the pieces is a metaphor for striking a balance in the way we live as contemporary people (no matter what our cultural background).”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Cause &amp; Effect</em> explores themes of balance, movement and form, on an abstract level, and “humans adapting to an ever changing environment” on a conceptual level. The natural grounding and elegance of ceramic forms, juxtaposed with the upward movement of intricately wrapped wire sculptures, will fill the gallery with small and large scale works.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Naranjo Morse</strong> is an internationally known Native American artist from Santa Clara Pueblo, NM. She is part of a well-known extended family of Santa Clara Pueblo potters whose matriarch was Rose Naranjo. Her work has been exhibited in numerous museums across the country and resides in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian NMAI (Washington, DC), Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art (Indianapolis, IN) and the Heard Museum (Phoenix, AZ).  <strong>Naranjo Morse</strong> is also known for her numerous public art projects, most recently commissioned by the City of Albuquerque Public Art program for installation of <em>The Guardians</em>, at Altura Park. Currently on view on the Mall in Washington D.C. at NMAI, are five large scale sculptures titled <em>Always Becoming</em>, http://nmai.si.edu/alwaysbecoming/AlwaysBecoming.html  <em>Cause &amp; Effect</em> will be her second major solo exhibition at Chiaroscuro.</p> <p> </p> Mon, 24 Sep 2012 16:59:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Roger Shimomura - Eight Modern - August 10th, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;">Eight Modern is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibition, <i>Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff.</i></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Shimomura’s exhibition probes what it means to be an “other” in America, presenting fourteen paintings (all self-portraits) that skillfully blend anger and absurdity. Shimomura’s work draws heavily on his own experiences as an Asian American – in which he is often perceived and treated as a foreigner in his own country.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In<i> An American Knockoff, </i>the artist surrounds himself with or subsumes his own likeness into iconic representations of American and Asian popular culture. Shimomura’s distinctive round glasses and salt-and-pepper goatee appear incongruously on the famous visages of cartoon mice, pigs and crime-fighters. Frequently misidentified as Chinese, in “Chinese Imposter #5” the Japanese American paints himself as a muscular Chinese revolutionary off of a propaganda poster.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Shimomura was born and raised in <st1:place><st1:city>Seattle</st1:city></st1:place>. During World War II, he was held for two years at the Minidoka interment camp, one of 10 built to confine American citizens of Japanese descent. He went on to earn degrees from Washington (B.A.) and Syracuse (M.F.A.). Since 1969, he has resided in Lawrence, Kansas, where he taught at the University of Kansas for 35 years.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“Since living in <st1:state>Kansas</st1:state>, I have found it to be routine to be asked what part of <st1:place><st1:country-region>Japan</st1:country-region></st1:place> I am from, or how long I have lived in this country,” Shimomura said. “Just as common, subtle references continue to connect me to stereotypical ‘oriental’ traits, both physical and behavioral.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“Far too many American-born citizens of Asian descent continue to be thought of as only ‘American knockoffs.’ This latest series of paintings is an attempt to ameliorate the outrage of these misconceptions by depicting myself battling those stereotypes or, in tongue-in-cheek fashion, becoming those very same stereotypes.”</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Using a characteristic style that fuses American Pop art and ukiyo-e imagery, Shimomura has focused particular attention on the experience of Asian Americans and the challenges of being “different” in <st1:country-region><st1:place>America</st1:place></st1:country-region>. In his words, he seeks to “address sociopolitical issues of ethnicity.” His work resides in 85 museum collections worldwide, and he has received more than 30 grants, had more than 130 solo exhibitions and lectured at more than 200 universities. His personal papers are being collected by the Archives of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Shimomura will give a talk on his work on Thursday, August 9 at 6 pm at SITE Santa Fe (1606 Paseo De Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87501). The lecture is free and open to the public.</p> <p></p> Sun, 14 Oct 2012 10:08:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Robert Kelly - James Kelly Contemporary - August 10th, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;">James Kelly is pleased to present Back and Forth: New Paintings by Robert Kelly. This will be Robert Kelly’s first exhibition after joining the gallery in 2011.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Back and Forth: New Paintings by Robert Kelly will open with a reception for the artist on Friday, August 10, 2012, from 5:00 to 7:00 PM. The exhibition will continue through October 13, 2012.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition will consist of approximately eighteen new paintings of various sizes, ranging from large-­‐scale to more intimate works.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Kelly’s work is very much an investigation of forms, and formal relationships, imbedded in the history of modernism, yet done within the framework of being an artist in contemporary art culture. Having grown up in Santa Fe with its historical richness, combined with having lived the last 25 years in New York City sets up for him a parallel track of these concerns. He uses the historical, in the form of vintage paper collages, in combination this with the contemporary, in the form of painting on top of the paper collages.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For this exhibition, Kelly continues to play with the applied reference of the ‘historical present’ that he has developed over the past several years.  He builds up his surfaces with vintage papers he recently collected from Russia, Holland, the Czech Republic and Italy, letting the aged marks, bleeds and textural arrangements of these papers act as a guide to the subsequent laying down of pigments. The meticulously collaged surfaces create a mid-­‐narrative, inhabited ground of references referring to the Bauhaus and Constructivist sensibilities. The bold lays of juxtaposed blocks of color, arranged precisely along the fissures of the underlying paper collages, emphasize the weight, authority and<br />sensual beauty of the materiality of paint.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Kelly’s work is in a sense an amalgamation of collage and painting. Geometric-­‐ shaped color fields of<br />oil pigments are subsequently laid down with a trowel-­‐like brush leaving a fine, rhythmic pattern formed in dragsacross the overlapping sides of the collaged papers, covering the surface and revealing<br />an overall grid. The remaining uncovered areas of the vintage papers reveal unreadable printed elements that are present on these pages, introducing a kind of pentimenti. Kelly meticulously creates his paintings by first covering the entire canvas with a collage of paper and then masterly builds up the surface with  the pared down tools of line, form and color. His exquisite craftsmanship gives his work their remarkable elegance and grace.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Robert Kelly influences include the De Stijl movement, Malevich and Mondrian and modernists like Bauhaus, Joaquin Torres-­‐Garcia, Philip Guston, Richard Diebenkorn, Kurt Schwitters, Blinky Palermo and Brazilian Constructivist artists Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica. Kelly himself cites Hans Arp, Myron Stout, Tony Smith, Constantin Brancusi, Alexander Calder, Bill Traylor, Louise Bourgeois and Ellsworth Kelly.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Robert Kelly was born in Santa Fe, NM and received his B.A. from Harvard University in 1978. He has lived in New York City for the past 25 years.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Robert Kelly is represented by James Kelly Contemporary, Santa Fe; Leslie Feely Fine Art, New York; John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco, CA; AR/Contemporary Art, Milan, Italy; Galleri Weinberger, Copenhagen, Denmark. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">His work has exhibited in countless solo and groups show in gallery throughout the United States and Europe since 1982. His work is included in several museums, including, New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM; The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY; Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI; Smith College Art Museum, Northampton, MA; The Fogg Museum, Cambridge, MA; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; The Margulies Collection, Miami, FL; Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutger’s University, NJ; Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, AL; University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque, NM and the McNay Museum  of Art, San Antonio, TX.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Many private and corporate collections also include his work, namely, Graham Gund, Cambridge, MA;<br />Werner Kramarsky, New York, NY; William C. Mercer, New York, NY; General Mills, Minneapolis, MN; Microsoft Corporation, Mountain View, CA; Pepsi Cola Company of Annaplois, MD; Phillip Morris Co., Boston, MA; Time Inc., New York, NY.</p> <p></p> <p></p> Sun, 05 Aug 2012 11:39:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Heather Lembcke - Modified Arts - September 21st, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p align="center">With nature as inspiration, Los Angeles-based artist Heather Lembcke paints abstract landscapes using techniques borrowed from ink drawing to render a consistent palette of line, form, and color. Her paintings recall nature's inexorable chaos, however beautiful in its simplicity, through dense patterns and brush strokes that reflect a sense of controlled disorganization. </p> <p align="center"> </p> Mon, 08 Oct 2012 13:27:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Jen Urso - Modified Arts - September 21st, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;" align="center">Phoenix-based artist Jen Urso uses the landscape to question boundaries, both physical and sociological, in order to understand presumptions about safety, "flock" mentality, and complacency in regard to authority. Urso's multidisciplinary installations explore places of demarcation using photography, text, video, and documentation to construct dialogues between art and viewer.</p> <p>Artist Statement:</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;"><em>I’m tired of being told where to go and what to do for the sake of security and safety. I want to make my own mistakes without being protected while respecting the autonomy of others. I want to take the risk of my own death. I want to say no. I want to say no to being told no. In many ways, the system of caution that umbrellas us through written and audible words is a continuation and exaggeration of a system that has existed for ages constructed to take care of us. We are the flock and the state or governing system is our shepherd.</em></p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;"><em>In my collection of work “saying NO”, I construct scenarios utilizing signs, projections and interventions within the city to intentionally question the concept of a boundary. How do we formulate it physically given external visual and audible messages in our spaces and mentally given internal messages like our own guilt, sense of safety, and our desire to feel welcome? These pieces define and question physical boundaries such as the arbitrary “edge” of a cloud and the shifting projected message of a sign installed on the edge of a property—it’s message moving with the rising and setting of the sun. The work also looks at the subtleties of social boundaries by using familiar signage to suggest that a person frame her conversation differently.</em></p> <p align="center"> </p> Sat, 06 Oct 2012 05:28:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Michael A. Naranjo - Nedra Matteucci - September 15th, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;">The complete collection of limited edition bronzes produced from 1970 through 2010 by Native American artist Michael Naranjo will be featured. Created without the use of his sight (from injuries sustained in Viet Nam), Naranjo’s work presents a stylized narrative of his heritage and life experience in deeply hued and tactile bronze work. His decades-long career offers a repertoire of sculpture that is a display of his extraordinary artistic abilities, uniquely created with an inner vision and remarkably skilled touch.</p> Thu, 06 Sep 2012 00:23:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Susan Burnstine, Michael Crouser, Douglas Ethridge - Verve Gallery of Photography - August 24th, 2012 - October 13th, 2012 <p>VERVE Gallery of Photography is pleased to present our Fall Exhibition, <i>A Sense of Time, </i>displaying the works of three VERVE Gallery Artists - Susan Burnstine, Michael Crouser and Douglas Ethridge.  Susan Burnstine’s, <i>Absence of Being</i> and Michael Crouser’s, <i>Sin Tiempo</i> address time or the absence or end of time and timelessness in their splendid imagery. Their work evokes a timeless sensibility, exploring both nightmarish dreams and chanced vignettes, as if frozen in time for eternity.  On the other hand, Douglas Ethridge’s, <i>A Cycle of Seasons</i>, is an engaging juxtaposition in that his images explore the timeless beauty one finds in recurring seasonal vacillations.<br />  <br /> <b>SUSAN BURNSTINE<br /> </b><i>Absence of Being<br />  <br /> </i>Susan Burnstine is one of the few photographers today avidly pursuing alternative processes to create an idiosyncratic and deeply personal visual landscape. As a child, she suffered vivid nightmares that stayed with her for days. When awake, these powerful dreams would induce a liminal state that opened up an exploration of the sublevels of her mind, wherein she discovered a curious synthesis of magic and reality. She found in these portals to the unknown states of mind that bridged the gap between real and unreal, and even symbolic intimations of life and death. Though the intensity of her dreams did not lessen as an adult, her response transformed. “Initially,” she says, “I was lost within the haze of my dreams. But now, it is through my dreams that I truly see.”  <i>SF Weekly</i> writes of Susan’s work: The undeniable beauty of Burnstine’s black-and-white photos [haunting and seductive interpretations of dreams], and their connection to dreams brought on by family tragedy, give them an intensity that is both intellectual and visceral.<br /> <br /> “A plane disappears into the clouds. We can’t see it, hear it or touch it, but we know it’s there. Our senses can give us no tangible evidence it continues to exist. But still, we know beyond a shadow of a doubt it’s there. We suspend limitations of our senses, and believe.”<br /> <br /> “When a person dies, do they simply cease to exist because they no longer have a physical presence? Or do they remain with us through the remnants of the lives they lived? When a building is razed, is it truly obliterated, or does its imprint remain in the collective unconscious?”<br /> <br /> “This ongoing series explores how the past remains with us, if only in shadows. These images capture fleeting memories, spotted from the corner of an eye that vanish the moment we turn to really look. And yet they remain, for the imprint remains with us. We are living in the present, but the past reminds us that it is part of us, too, as is the future, and we of them.”<br /> <br /> “With this body of work as with my former series, I captured these visions entirely in-camera using a collection of hand-made film cameras and lenses that are frequently unpredictable and technically challenging. The cameras are primarily made out of plastic, vintage camera parts and random household objects and the single element lenses are molded out of plastic and rubber. Learning to overcome their extensive limitations has required me to rely on instinct and intuition – the same tools that are key when trusting in the unseen.<br /> <br /> Susan Burnstine is an award winning fine art and commercial photographer originally from Chicago now based in Los Angeles. Susan is represented in galleries across the world, widely published and has also written for several photography magazines, including a monthly column for <i>Black and White Magazine (UK)</i>. Burnstine was nominated for the 2009 Santa Fe Prize for Photography and winner of <i>B&amp;W Magazine's </i>2008 Portfolio Spotlight Award.<br />  <br /> Susan's first monograph, <i>Within Shadows</i>, has been published by CHARTA Editions and was released in Europe at the The Venice Biennale in June 2011. Additionally, <i>Within Shadows</i>, earned the Gold award for PX3 Prix De La Photographie Paris in the Professional Fine Art Books category and a Bronze overall.<br /> <br /> ****************<br /> <br /> <b>MICHAEL CROUSER<br /> </b><i>Sin Tiempo<br /> </i><br /> Michael Crouser gives us the first read for his photography, the literal rather than the symbolic aspects of this body of work.   He gives us the meaning of his work at its most basic level.  Here is how he describes it:<br />  <br /> “In 1986, after college, while traveling through Europe, I made a photograph of a woman selling her wares in the bookstalls near the river Seine. I made the picture quickly, and didn't give it much thought thereafter until I returned home to process my film. Upon seeing the negative, and the subsequent print, I noticed something striking about the image.  There was no evidence of popular culture in the photograph. No modern adverting typography, fashion, none of the latest automobiles or hairstyles.  There was nothing in the image that fixes the image in time. Thus, the image exists, for me, outside of time. It was the beginning of a realization that I am drawn to this aesthetic... chance vignettes, the crossing of certain faces, buildings, clothing, and light, that offer a scene that I think of as "<i>sin tiempo</i>"...Spanish for "without time”.<br />  <br /> “Around the same time I discovered the bullfights in Spain, and made another image that reinforced the burgeoning attraction to the "<i>sin tiempo</i>" concept. It was a young groundskeeper simply considering his rake. His face, his clothing, the entire scene exists in space; however, outside of the influence of that current time in culture; absent of cues that fix dates, the era in which the image was shot, that moment in time.  I made an entire book on the <i>corrida de toros</i> (<i>LOS TOROS</i>), with that phenomenon and focus in mind, the absence of current references that create a vintage for the photograph. In the years since I have remained drawn to such scenes and to the making of such imagery.”<br /> <br /> “There are certain elements I won't include in one of the images from <i>Sin Tiempo</i>; nevertheless, new challenges present themselves as I seize new opportunities to add to this work. These challenges are opportunities that allow the series to live and breathe and grow, so that with each new image I capture and create a new flavor and a new voice for the work.  The prints in this series are the result of an unremitting aesthetic fascination with this theme and an uninterrupted photographic education.”<br /> <br /> “All of my photographs are shot on Tri-X film and printed as toned silver gelatin prints in a traditional darkroom. I tell my students that "how you speak is as important as what you say", and for me that means working in a tactile and traditional way. I believe that process is vastly important if one considers photography to be a personal expression, as I do. The photographs of my own that make me the happiest also feel like the best reflections of myself. They feel like extensions of myself.”<br /> <br /> Michael Crouser was born in 1962 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was graduated from Saint John's University (Collegville, MN) in 1985. Michael began making photographs in earnest at the age of fourteen. Crouser's first monograph, <i>Los Toros</i> (Twin Palms Publishers 2007) was awarded first prize in the Fine Art Book category at 2008 International Photography Awards. His work can be found in the permanent collections of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts and The Museum of Fine Art, Houston. He has taught at The International Center of Photography in New York, The Mpls Photo Center and The Santa Fe Photographic Workshops.  Michael Crouser’s work has been exhibited throughout the US and Europe. When not on the road, he divides his time between his hometown of Minneapolis and where he now lives, Brooklyn, New York.<br />  <br /> ****************<br /> <b><br /> DOUGLAS ETHRIDGE<br /> </b><i>A Cycle of Seasons<br /> </i><br /> According to Bruce Jensen, editor of LensWork, Doug Ethridge “is blazing a trail”.  Doug is trained as both an excellent still photographer and a superb videographer.  Hence, it isn’t surprising that Doug would venture new ground and incorporate the two mediums.  As one looks at Doug’s video sequences, one can see the strength of his eye as a still photographer.  The images that begin sequences in the short films are that of the eye of a still photographer’s. The scenes then dissolve into sensitive fluid dream-like films that portray artistically the cycle of the four seasons.<br />  <br /> A Cycle of Seasons is an installation of four short films and accompanying mixed-media prints that document four seasons near the artist’s home in rural Washington State. 27 Mornings In Winter is a month-long diary of simple observations along an 8-mile stretch of road. Cause and Effect celebrates the complex interplay between sky and water as spring storms blow in from across the Pacific. Pursuit of the Elusive Lumen explores the unique quality of summer light in the Northwest. The Season of the Loon is a reflective, many-textured fall meditation on hidden locations in remote coastal Washington.<br />  <br /> “I have never considered myself a ‘nature photographer’ in the traditional sense of waiting for exactly the perfect moment when lighting and composition come together for one single image. I’m much more inclined to look for patterns and stories so as to document how things evolve and move. I like to compare and contrast, and to integrate music and sound into the overall experience for the viewer. The ability to utilize HD video as an acquisition tool and then create short films as well as prints in a variety of media fits my natural inclination as a storyteller. I am lucky to live in a place with distinct seasons and where the weather and tidal shifts constantly deliver an amazing array of visual opportunities every single day.”<br /> <br /> “A Cycle of Seasons is a return to my roots….. I have always looked to the forest with comfort and ease as a place of wonder, a place of solace, a place of unending beauty on scales both grand and small.  In a very real sense, these forests and remote shorelines are the cathedrals of my spirit, holy in every sense of the word.  I hope the viewers of this installation carry away with them something of the peace and wonder that I find so inspiring….”<br /> <br /> Douglas Ethridge is a writer, a video producer, and fine art photographer.  Douglas’s roots are in the Northwest, where he attended Reed College and the University of Washington in Seattle. His first creative efforts centered around music where he learned classical music and jazz. When Douglas moved on from music, he picked up a camera and after a trip to Kyoto, he found himself teaching photography and working for a small production company as a photographer and writer. After a few years, he started his own production company that became very successful. By 2000, he went back to making fine art photography. Douglas has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions throughout the U.S. and in Europe and he exhibited "Selective Memories" at the Lishui International Photo Festival in China in 2009. His work has been published in numerous magazines including <i>LensWork</i>, <i>Camera Arts</i>, <i>COLOR</i>, <i>Hasselblad</i>, <i>B&amp;W Magazine, B&amp;W UK, </i>and<i> Chinese Photographer</i>. He and his wife live on the shores of Hood Canal in Washington State.<b> <br /> <br /> <br /> </b></p> Mon, 20 Aug 2012 13:53:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Bea Mandelman - Harwood Museum of Art - July 7th, 2012 - October 14th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><strong>“I want my paintings to have not pattern but order and structure underneath – not on top- not what you see hidden – covered – but felt”</strong></em><strong> - </strong>Beatrice Mandelman</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">“<em><strong>Tensions exacerbate in Mandelman's work because of her desire to belong to the fashionable international realm of the vanguard. … Not just propaganda, this art manifests or symbolizes a range of feelings and is not simply a vehicle for persuasion” </strong></em>– Robert Hobbs</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Much of the art created during the 1960s and mid-1970s aimed to present a social critique in the tradition of the Social Realists of the 1930s. The Vietnam War spawned dissent among artists advocating social change. Many of Beatrice Mandelman’s contemporaries, often émigrés and Jewish, were actively political as a result of the devastating experiences that they had witnessed during World War II. Mandelman was the daughter of first generation Jewish émigrés. The work of the Social Realists, followed closely by the work of the Abstract Expressionists, was heavily influenced by social issues and related political controversy.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Beatrice Mandelman was something of an anomaly within this die-hard activism.  She was not as much committed to any specific social issues of the liberals and the left wing as she was energized by the passion and energy of the circle of artists and intelligentsia that espoused them.   During her life with Louis Ribak in New York and New Mexico, Mandelman followed an art world closely tied to high fashion and glamour. The subject matter and draftsmanship of Social Realism that she had mastered years before gave way to a new vocabulary centered on color and line.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The titles of Mandelman's work during this period reveal an effort to be part of the political fervor around her, even as Mandelman was immersed in line, shape and color - conveying her playful eye to the viewer. The effect of this work as political statement is minimal; rather the pieces are lyrical and poetic. It seems evident that Mandelman was influenced by the palette of Henri Matisse: the mix of complexity (form) and simplicity (color) yield a playfulness and freedom in complete contrast to the politicized title of each piece.  The work may be intended to translate the viewer from worry and confusion to a place of intellectual calm. “Collage," Mandelman once said,  "best represents my concern for the stressful, shifting, transitory nature of human experience."</p> Wed, 08 Jan 2014 08:12:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Bea Mandelman - Harwood Museum of Art - July 7th, 2012 - October 14th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;">In 1935 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt created the Works Progress Administration. Renamed the Work Projects Administration WPA in 1939, it employed millions of workers for public works projects. The Federal Art Project (FAP), operating from August 29, 1935 until June 30, 1943, was the visual arts arm of the WPA program.  Artists contracted through the FAP project created more than 200,000 works including posters, murals and paintings. Many of the murals survive and constitute a significant part of the historic art works in America.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Bea Mandelman’s professional career as an artist became historically significant when she was employed by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in 1935, first as a muralist and then as a printmaker with the Graphic Division of the New York Project. Mandelman was also one of the original members of the Silk Screen Unit under Anthony Velonis. She continued her career as an artist with the WPA until 1942, when the program came to a close.  Her husband Louis Ribak also worked as a WPA artist, creating murals. In 1933, just before his contract with the WPA concluded, Ribak assisted Diego Rivera on the mural for the lobby of Rockefeller Center.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Both Mandelman and Ribak felt a strong common bond to the proletariat, a feeling that was typical among the artists’ community of the day. During the WPA years Mandelman worked in a style based on Social Realism, yet was keenly aware of the aesthetic changes in the New York art scene, having befriended many of the major figures in Abstract Expressionism.   The prints in this exhibition demonstrate both Beatrice Mandelman’s virtuoso draftsmanship and her contribution to the legacy of Social Realism.</p> Wed, 08 Jan 2014 08:00:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Stella Snead, Barbara Harmon, Frieda Lawrence, Gisella Loeffler, Ila McAfee, Millicent Rogers - Harwood Museum of Art - July 7th, 2012 - October 14th, 2012 <h4 style="text-align: justify;">"… to the poet, all times and places are one; … no theme is inept, no past or present preferable. The steam whistle will not affright him nor the flutes of Arcadia weary him: … there is but one time, the artistic moment; but one law, the law of form; but one land, the land of Beauty - a land removed indeed from the real world and yet more sensuous because more enduring."</h4> <p style="text-align: justify;">                               Oscar Wilde, <em>The English Renaissance of Art</em>, 1882 <br /> <br /> The 19th century Irish playwright of <em>The Importance of Being Earnest </em>and author of <em>The Picture of Dorian Gray</em>, Oscar Wilde is remembered in film and journalism largely as one of the Victorian era's most famous dandies—an urbane aesthete, acerbic wit, and scandalous felon. What Wilde is less recognized for are his short stories for children, first published in 1888, including "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose", "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend", and "The Remarkable Rocket".</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">And it is even less known that these stories belonged to an inclusive aesthetic that established Wilde as one of the major figures among the Symbolists, the pervasive fin de siècle European literary and art movement that flourished from c. 1885 to 1910. Its emerging avant garde eschewed the Renaissance restriction of art to objective truth grounded in nature, advocating in its place the subjective criteria for beauty arising from the artist’s inner vision. That inner vision ranged from a world-weary escapism into religious mysticism and Romanticist rumination on evil and death, to naïve fantasies or pursuit of dreamy, sensual languor and aesthetic refinement, to morbid reveries replete with exotic or erotic themes and eclectic subject matter—all popularized by the likes of Orientalists, Symbolist poets, animaliers, illustrators, and designers working within the highly decorative ambient of Art Nouveau.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In England this attempt to rejuvenate art emerged by century’s end as the new “Renaissance in Art,” as Wilde described it in his lecture tour across America in 1882—the English version of Art Nouveau with roots in England’s mid-century Pre-Raphaelite movement and the earlier mystical visions of Romantic poet-artist William Blake, for whom imagination was everything. It achieved its wide dissemination through lesser artists and writers whose recourse to popular culture and art forms invested the decorative arts and illustration with the new aesthetic.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Just as Oscar Wilde’s stories for children popularized this late 19th century movement and its reassertion of art in contemporary life, its impact upon the early 20th century is reflected in the likes of Kenneth Grahame’s <em>The Wind in the Willows</em> (1908), A.A. Milne’s <em>Winnie the Pooh</em> (1926), and J.R.R. Tolkien’s <em>Hobbit </em>(1937) and <em>Lord of the Rings</em> trilogy (1949).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Perhaps surprisingly, this aesthetic is represented in the permanent collection of the Harwood Museum of Art. In concert with the Symbolist recourse to inner vision, Wilde’s “Renaissance of English art” opened a world of fantasy that would capture the imaginations of six independent and massively talented female artists living in Taos, New Mexico.  Stella Snead, Barbara Harmon, Frieda Lawrence (b. 1879), Gisella Leoffler (b. 1900), Ila McAfee (b. 1897), and Millicent Rogers (b.1902) were, if not all friends, contemporaries. The world of make-believe, fairies, unicorns, birthday cakes, Victorian window dressings, anthropomorphic kittens, dreamscape scenes of handsome princes and checkerboard floors and orientalia seemed to have little to do with the traditional western landscape! Yet these women were all drawing from the aesthetic legacy of Art Nouveau and the Symbolists. Hardly in tune with their time and place, for them there was “but one time, the artistic moment;… but one land, the land of Beauty–a land removed indeed from the real world and yet more sensuous because more enduring. ... And so it comes that he who seems to stand most remote from his age is he who mirrors it best, because he has stripped life of what is accidental and transitory, stripped it of that 'mist of familiarity’ which makes life obscure to us.” (Wilde, <em>The English Renaissance in Art</em>).</p> Mon, 16 Jul 2012 12:51:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Mimi Chen Ting - Harwood Museum of Art - July 7th, 2012 - October 14th, 2012 <div class="description page_content rich_text"> <p style="text-align: justify;">During summer 2012 the Curator's Wall will feature a work by Mimi Chen Ting entitled <em>Between Space 'n Time. </em>This work, created in 2012, measures 192" x 54" and consists of four panels of acrylic, charcoal, and graphite on canvas.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Artist's Statement</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Between Space n” Time, Mimi Chen Ting’s latest painting, is another step taken in her long journey as an artist. It is her habit, upon completing a piece, to reflect and acknowledge the influences that have helped to deliver her to this specific space.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Hung King, Ting’s maternal grandmother, with her little bound feet, and with whom she shared a bed until l she was nine, showed her that life is a continuous marathon. Her mincing steps might have slowed her down, but she always intended to reach where she wanted to go.  Henri Matisse, Piet Mondrian, and Clyfford Still, among others, keep Ting on track with painstakingly balanced and dynamic compositions where every square inch is crucial to the whole.  Eric Oback, Ting’s late teacher and mentor, gave her the one piece of advice Ting lives and works by, “Just find what it is you want to do, and the way to do it will follow”. He believed that all colors have a voice. If they are listened to, they will sing.  Then there is Henry James, who infected Ting with his compulsion from the beginning: “We work in the dark. We do what we can. We give what we have. Our doubt is our passion, and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.”</p> <p> </p> </div> Tue, 03 Jul 2012 19:14:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list - Harwood Museum of Art - July 7th, 2012 - October 14th, 2012 <h4>"… to the poet, all times and places are one; …  no theme is inept, no past or present preferable. The steam whistle will not affright him nor the flutes of Arcadia weary him: …  there is but one time, the artistic moment; but one law, the law of form; but one land, the land of Beauty - a land removed indeed from the real world and yet more sensuous because more enduring."</h4> <p>                               Oscar Wilde, <em>The English Renaissance of Art</em>, 1882 <br />The 19th century Irish playwright of <em>The Importance of Being Earnest </em>and author of <em>The Picture of Dorian Gray</em>,  Oscar Wilde is remembered in film and journalism largely as one of the Victorian era's most famous dandies—an urbane aesthete,  acerbic wit,  and scandalous felon.  What Wilde is less recognized for are his short stories for children, first published in 1888, including "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose", "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend", and "The Remarkable Rocket".</p> <p>And  it is even less known that these stories belonged to an inclusive aesthetic that established Wilde as one of the major figures among the Symbolists, the pervasive fin de siècle European  literary and art movement that flourished from c. 1885 to 1910.   Its emerging avant garde eschewed the Renaissance restriction of art to objective truth grounded in nature, advocating in its place the subjective criteria for beauty arising from the artist’s inner vision. That inner vision ranged from a world-weary escapism into  religious mysticism and Romanticist rumination on evil and death,  to naïve fantasies or pursuit of dreamy, sensual languor and aesthetic refinement, to morbid reveries replete with exotic or erotic themes and eclectic subject matter—all popularized by the likes of Orientalists, Symbolist poets, animaliers, illustrators, and designers working within the highly decorative ambient of Art Nouveau.</p> <p>In England this attempt to rejuvenate art emerged by century’s end as the new “Renaissance in Art,” as Wilde described it in his lecture tour across America in 1882—the English version of Art Nouveau with roots in England’s mid-century Pre-Raphaelite movement and the earlier mystical visions of Romantic poet-artist William Blake, for whom imagination was everything. It achieved its wide dissemination through lesser artists and writers whose recourse to popular culture and art forms invested the decorative arts and illustration with the new aesthetic.</p> <p>Just as Oscar Wilde’s stories for children popularized this late 19th century movement and its reassertion of art in contemporary life, its impact upon the early 20th century is reflected in the likes of Kenneth Grahame’s <em>The Wind in the Willows</em> (1908), A.A. Milne’s <em>Winnie the Pooh</em> (1926), and J.R.R. Tolkien’s <em>Hobbit </em>(1937) and <em>Lord of the Rings</em> trilogy (1949).</p> <p>Perhaps surprisingly, this aesthetic is represented in the permanent collection of the Harwood Museum of Art. In concert with the Symbolist recourse to inner vision, Wilde’s “Renaissance of English art” opened a world of fantasy that would capture the imaginations of six independent and massively talented female artists living in Taos, New Mexico.  Stella Snead, Barbara Harmon, Frieda Lawrence (b. 1879), Gisella Leoffler (b. 1900), Ila McAfee (b. 1897), and Millicent Rogers (b.1902) were, if not all friends, contemporaries. The world of make-believe, fairies, unicorns, birthday cakes, Victorian window dressings, anthropomorphic kittens, dreamscape scenes of handsome princes and checkerboard floors and orientalia seemed to have little to do with the traditional western landscape! Yet these women were all drawing from the aesthetic legacy of Art Nouveau and the Symbolists.  Hardly in tune with their time and place, for them  there was “but one time, the artistic moment;… but one land, the land of Beauty–a  land removed indeed from the real world and yet more sensuous because more enduring.  ... And so it comes that he who seems to stand most remote from his age is he who mirrors it best, because he has stripped life of what is accidental and transitory, stripped it of that 'mist of familiarity’ which makes life obscure to us.” (Wilde, <em>The English Renaissance in Art</em>).</p> <p>Jina Brenneman, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions</p> Sat, 17 Aug 2013 16:57:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Natasha Isenhour - The William & Joseph Gallery - September 14th, 2012 - October 14th, 2012 <h2><span style="font-size: small;">New Mexico artist Natasha Isenhour has the distinction of being invited to have a solo show at the Randall Davey Museum, home of Audubon in Santa Fe - It is the only solo show they are hosting for 2012. The exhibit, titled "Hope"  will be an entire show of birds in pastel and oil; there will be 30 paintings in this show.</span></h2> <h2> </h2> <p style="text-align: justify;">This show will be held September 14th through October 14th, with an opening reception for the artist on September 14th from 5-7 p.m. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In addition, The William&amp;Joseph Gallery, which represents Isenhour, will also have an exhibit of Natasha's work, in conjunction with this show.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The gallery is located at 727 Canyon Road, and this exhibit will also be held from September 14 - October 14. (there will not be a gallery reception).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A vanguard of modern art, Randall Davey was an important part of the Santa Fe Art Colony, and was a skilled painter, printmaker and sculptor. Davey successfully practiced his art here in his studio until his death in 1964. In 1983, the Davey family generously gifted the property to the National Audubon Society to be preserved as a wildlife sanctuary, and used as an educational, cultural and historical center. Davey’s works, along with antique furnishings and personal memorabilia are exhibited in house, art studio and administrative offices.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Randall Davey Audubon Center &amp; Sanctuary encompasses 135 acres of striking landscapes and wildlife. Bounded by thousands of acres of National Forest and Santa Fe River Watershed land, the Center and Sanctuary provides a peaceful sanctuary for plants, animals and our visitors. Ranging from common to rare, approximately 130 species of birds can be found in or over the various ecosystems of this sanctuary. We are currently open daily from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. You can also visit our Nature Store, which is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.</p> Mon, 20 Aug 2012 14:24:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list Jamie Kirkland - Winterowd Fine Art - October 5th, 2012 - October 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;">Jamie Kirkland is known for creating evocative landscape abstracts that are satisfying tributes to nature’s replenishing and healing powers. Quiet and tender, her landscapes are often painted from memory.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>"Most people don't get out into nature the way I do. You can often find me in the woods and mountains hiking and plein air painting. I am the conduit," says Jamie Kirkland, "of the immersion in nature experience for my viewers. I know emotionally what that feels like and I paint that for people."</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>                                                                                                                                                             Jamie Kirkland<br /></em></p> Mon, 01 Oct 2012 12:50:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/sfe/Events/list