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San Francisco

Hackett | Mill

Exhibition Detail
Marc Trujillo: Drive-Thru
201 Post Street
Suite 100
San Francisco, CA 94108


March 12th, 2009 - May 2nd, 2009
Opening: 
March 12th, 2009 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
 
6502 Laurel Canyon Boulevard, Marc TrujilloMarc Trujillo, 6502 Laurel Canyon Boulevard,
2007
© The Artist
1742 La Cienega, Marc TrujilloMarc Trujillo, 1742 La Cienega, 2009
© The Artist
5625 Century Boulevard, Marc TrujilloMarc Trujillo, 5625 Century Boulevard, 2009
© The Artist
1603 South Le Brea Avenue, Marc TrujilloMarc Trujillo, 1603 South Le Brea Avenue,
2008
© The Artist
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> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://hackettmill.com/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Union Square/Civic Center
EMAIL:  
art@hackettmill.com
PHONE:  
415 362 3377
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Fri 10:30-5:30; and by appointment
TAGS:  
landscape, realism
> DESCRIPTION

In this most recent body of work, Marc Trujillo has taken the ubiquitous and mundane world of the North American drive-thru service industry and translated it into a series of pristine and surprisingly intimate paintings.


Like Trujillo’s large-scale investigations into contemporary culture's genericized consumer landscape, these smaller, compressed compositions show a deepening interest in Trujillo's idea of “placelessness,” the transitory experience of consumer environments that place us both somewhere and nowhere at the same time. The compositions are stripped of any identifying landmarks. They give no hint or indication of their geographical location and, with the exception of some gently suggested landscaping, are totally devoid of any natural or organic elements.


The carefully exaggerated frontality of the compositions transforms the exterior architecture of the industrial brick and glass facades, taking the physical window of the drive-thru itself and turning it into a metaphorical one. The paintings become little, disembodied window boxes in which time, space, and darkness are suspended. In these worlds, it is always light, albeit artificial, and there is always work to be done.


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