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San Francisco

Traywick Contemporary

Exhibition Detail
Traces and Accumulations
895 Colusa Avenue
Berkeley , CA 94707


June 9th, 2013 - August 17th, 2013
 
Wall Circles I, David FoughtDavid Fought, Wall Circles I,
2013, Wall, metal rods, latex paint, Installation dimensions variable
© Courtesy of the artist and Traywick Contemporary
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Traywick Contemporary is pleased to announce Traces and Accumulations, a group exhibition featuring the work of Inga Dorosz, Ken Fandell, David Fought, Léonie Guyer, Nathan Lynch, Christy Matson and Christine M. Peterson. The exhibition focuses on artistic practices of layered mark making and minimal gestures, and how these processes coalesce to accumulate meaning.

With carefully ordered compilations of rhythmic line work, Inga Dorosz creates abstracted forms – mountains, trees, dirt mounds – that are removed from the context of the landscape. Often incorporating literary fragments in the form of Morse code, Dorosz’s drawings are amalgamations of cultural and geological histories.

Ken Fandell’s photographs are physical traces of a fleeting phenomenon: the interaction of light and atmosphere as brightly colored lasers intersect in a fog-filled, darkened space staged by the artist. The photographs are saturated with intense color, suggestive of a tension between expectation and reality, as well as the scientific and the mysterious.

Using line, mass and surface to create shadows both real and artificial, David Fought’s site-specific installation offers a subtle look at the engagement between object, viewer and space. The artist joins straightforward material forms with simple sculptural gestures to investigate more complex principles of perception.

Léonie Guyer’s paintings record traces of the artist’s hand and subtle variations of hand-mixed pigments in their richly layered surface. Nuanced, idiosyncratic forms take shape in the dynamic grounds of the paintings, hinting at the relationships between rigorous simplicity and subtle eccentricities of form, between intimate scale and expansive space.

Nathan Lynch’s sculptures examine the accumulation of excess, often enlisting materials that are pushed to their limits. A pile of hand-carved wooden branches crowned with green paint references a natural context that is otherwise absent. Stacks of imperfect orbs move beyond the ceramic from which they are made, tenuously drooping and tilting to the verge of collapse.

Based on drawings and painted collages, Christy Matson’s graphic weavings reveal traces of the artist’s hand as a painter, drawer and weaver. Using a Jacquard loom to create hand-woven constructions, Matson’s work explores the various ways that mark making can be translated through woven forms.

In Christine M. Peterson’s site-specific installation, accumulations of art historical and architectural images come in and out of focus as they overlap and coalesce on a dual-sided hanging screen. The layered slide projections directly respond to the architectural space of the gallery, exploring the idea of geometric stability and its allusion to larger spiritual powers. 


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