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San Francisco

CCA Wattis Institute

Exhibition Detail
The Way Beyond Art: Infinite Screens
Kent and Vicki Logan Galleries
360 Kansas Street (between 16th and 17th streets)
San Francisco, CA 94103


January 22nd, 2013 - March 30th, 2013
Opening: 
January 22nd, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
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© Courtesy of CCA Wattis Institute
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> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
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NEIGHBORHOOD:  
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TAGS:  
modern, conceptual, video-art, installation, film
> DESCRIPTION

The Way Beyond Art: Infinite Screens is the 4th iteration in The Way Beyond Art Series. Infinite Screens will examine the relationship between the moving image and the evolving contexts in which it is exhibited through a solo project by the artist and filmmaker Werner Herzog. The exhibition will feature the West Coast premiere of the 5-channel video installation Hearsay of the Soul, 2012.

An adjunct program of weekly talks will be presented by selected CCA Film Faculty, focusing on the changing nature of film language in a rapidly evolving landscape of physical and economic challenges to exhibition and distribution. These presentations will expand the content of the exhibition, further develop the research around this topic, expose students and audiences alike to a wider breadth of moving image practices, and incorporate a multitude of voices and perspectives into the presentation of this subject. Similarly, this strand of the exhibition hopes to acknowledge the work of moving image artists based within CCA, while highlighting their relationships within national and international communities connected to their practices.

The Way Beyond Art, refers to the title of a book written by the visionary German art historian Alexander Dorner, who advocated in the early 20th century for a closer dialogue among different artistic disciplines. He is best known for his collaboration with the Constructivist artist El Lissitzky on the Abstract Cabinet (1927) at the Landesmuseum Hannover, Germany, a unique, specially constructed space that explored a new form of multidisciplinarity produced by juxtaposing art, fashion, design, film, and literature.

The exhibition and public program is made possible through the generous support of the Cinema Visionaries Grant and Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy and Bill Timken. Generous support provided by the Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation, Grants for the Arts / San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund, Ann Hatch and Paul Discoe, and the CCA Curator's Forum.


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