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San Francisco

Ratio 3

Exhibition Detail
Andrejova-Molnár Papers
2831A Mission St.
San Francisco, CA 94110


June 22nd, 2012 - August 3rd, 2012
Opening: 
June 22nd, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
 
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© Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3
Andrejova-Molnár Papers, Katarina BurinKatarina Burin, Andrejova-Molnár Papers,
2012 , Installation view Ratio 3, San Francisco
© Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3
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> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.ratio3.org
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Mission
EMAIL:  
gallery@ratio3.org
PHONE:  
415·821·3371
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sat 11-6 and by appointment.
> DESCRIPTION

“During the interwar period young architects such as Josef Fischer, Bohuslav Fuchs, Jaromir Krejcar, Farkas Molnár and Petra Andrejova-Molnár, to name a few, were at the center of a vibrant architectural community in the newly established Czechoslovak and the Hungarian People’s Republics. Born between 1895 and 1901, they came of age with the countries that rose from the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s demise in October 1918. In the shifting political arena of redrawn boundaries, these architects were emboldened by the utopian spirit of the age and embraced an architecture that championed modernity, efficiency, functionality, and a commitment to human progress and innovation.

While dedicated to architecture’s role in the politically reorganised region, Petra Andrejova-Molnár and her colleagues were international in their sophisticated aesthetic approach... [and] helped to spread the principles of the Modern Movement. Both Krejcar and Fuchs were delegates to CIAM [Congress Internationaux d'Architecture Modern] while Farkas Molnár founded the Hungarian branch of the organisation with Jósef Fischer and György Masirevich. Petra Andrejova-Molnár attended several of the CIAM congresses, notably in Budapest in 1937 and was in contact with the Hungarian CIAM through her brief but consequential marriage to Farkas Molnár.

The dislocations wrought by the Second World War have made tracing even portions of P.A.'s extant interwar Eastern European work - much of which was unrealized or subsequently destroyed - a Herculean task. Yet despite such restrictions it is clear that, if the designs of P.A. and her contemporaries have been eclipsed, it is through no fault of their authors, but rather the storms of history.”

– E.R. Alden, “Idealism and Interwar International between Brno and Budapest”


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