STREET now open! Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
San Francisco
Verso Gron3 Beckett1 Gron6 Gron2 Pg_chryslerbuilding Pg-029 Pg-04 Pg-07
'rak'rüm (noun);
the back room of an art gallery
where artists and art lovers hang
Pg30
Verso "Les amoureaux en gris, Marc Chagall", Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Verso "Les amoureaux en gris, Marc Chagall",
2007, Epreuve pigmentaire
© Courtesy of the Artist and Galerie Dominique Fiat
Verso "Paysage," Henri Rouart, collection particuliere, Paris, Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Verso "Paysage," Henri Rouart, collection particuliere, Paris,
2006, Epreuve pigmentaire, 41x34 cm; Ed of 5
© Courtesy the artist & Dominique Fiat, Paris
Verso "Sans titre," Bram van Velde, collection Centre Pompidou, Paris, Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Verso "Sans titre," Bram van Velde, collection Centre Pompidou, Paris,
2007, Epreuve pigmentaire, 132x112 cm; Ed of 5
© Courtesy the Artist & Dominique Fiat, Paris
Verso "Today-series no. 7, On Kawara, collection @ Mamac, Nice", Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Verso "Today-series no. 7, On Kawara, collection @ Mamac, Nice",
2008, Epreuve pigmentaire, 43x53 cm; Ed of 5
© Courtesy the Artist & Dominique Fiat, Paris
Verso "Le Calvaire, Berthe Morisot, collection particuliere, Paris", Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Verso "Le Calvaire, Berthe Morisot, collection particuliere, Paris",
2006, Epreuve pigmentaire, 78x77.5 cm; Ed of 5
© Courtesy the Artist & Dominique Fiat, Paris
Chrysler Building Elevators - New York, Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Chrysler Building Elevators - New York,
2004, Cibachrome print, 120x47 cm; Ed of 7
© Courtesy the Artist & Dominique Fiat, Paris
Elevator - Lyceum Kennedy - New York, Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
Elevator - Lyceum Kennedy - New York,
2005, Photograph on aluminum, 233x120 cm; Ed of 5
© Courteys of the Artist & Dominique Fiat, Paris
Safe, Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon, Safe,
1991, Silver Gelatin print
© Courtesy the Artist & Yossi Milo, NY
(Safes, installation view @ Yossi Milo), Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon,
(Safes, installation view @ Yossi Milo)
© Courtesy the Artist & Yossi Milo, NY
Safe, Philippe GrononPhilippe Gronon, Safe,
1991, Silver Gelatin print
© Courtesy the Artist & Yossi Milo, NY
Philippe Gronon has exhibited widely in Europe in solo shows at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (1997), Centre Régional d'art Contemporain, Montbéliard, France (2001), and Mamco Geneva (2003), and in group exhibitions, including La Force de l'Art and Grand Palais (2006), and Centre Pompidou (2006 and 2007).  While extremely detailed, Gronon's images are conceptual in their abstraction of comm...[more]


RackRoom
Interview with Philippe Gronon

ArtSlant's writer, Frances Guerin met with Philippe Gronon at the Galerie Dominique Fiat in Paris.  Gronon's exhibition, Verso, had just opened.  They walked through the exhibit and talked about Philippe's style of working, his influences and his ideas about coincidence.

Personal photo of Philippe Gronon at Galerie Dominique Fiat; Courtesy of ArtSlant


Frances Guerin:  Can you tell us about your experience at art school?  Your professors? Your influences?

Philippe Gronon:  At this time, Christian Bernard was director of La Villa Arson - today he directs the Mamco in Geneva - and he was very important for me, as he was for many others of my generation: for example, Ghada Amer, Tatiana Trouvé, Philippe Mayaux, Philippe Ramette, Pascal Pinaud.  In particular, he stressed the breakdown of the distinction between various media practices, and this was the motivating principle, and primary concern of his artistic project.

FG:  What made you choose photography as a medium? How or what does it achieve for you that other media don't?

PG: Photography very quickly attracted me because of its relationship to distance. With photography I was able to stand back and to conceive my work very precisely, to see it evolve, and to construct it slowly.

FG:  In talking about your work, you mentioned Pandora's box.  The "box"(actually a jar) carried by Pandora contained all the evils of mankind - greed, vanity, slander, lying, envy, pining, as well as hope.  What secrets does your work hide?  How and where do you see the viewer's participation in unearthing the secrets?

PG: For me, the idea of Pandora's box has a much larger sense than the original one of what is contained in the box.  Specifically, what is contained in the box reflects back directly on the spectator, and his or her own interpretation (to each his box!)  Or perhaps I should have spoken of a launch pad for the imagination as opposed to Pandora's box ...I ask more questions with this work than I give answers!

FG:  In choosing your subject matter, you create situations where there is a challenge before you can start photographing: entry into museum vaults, access to banks, private buildings, and so on.  How does this sense of "that which cannot easily be accessed" transfer to the photograph?

PG: It's not true for all the works: the sheet film holders, the piles of manure, the sand castles, the match box towers do not conform to this rule. But it is true that for the majority of the other series, their realization depends on authorizations which are sometimes very difficult to obtain. This is directly linked to my artistic approach, and in turn, this approach appropriates the familiar principles of photography : the investigation, the making contact, the discovery of a universe, and my intervention into the discourses of the places where I find these targetted objects. The places are important because they are, at the same time, present in the light that they reflect, and that enables the objects to be seen, and to be photographed - remembering that there is no artifice illumination on my part. The places are also absent, due to the abstraction of the objects that results from my cropping of the photographs.

On the ambivalence of the work (which is its strong point), the works are, at the same time, hyper-real because they adopt the most precise principle of a perfect reproduction. They are also, totally abstract because they are not only taken out the original context, but also thanks to this précision written across the surface of the image, they are bizzarely abstract.

FG:  Both you and Vik Muniz opened exhibitions on the same day, with the title of Verso.  Muniz in New York; you in Paris. You both represent the backs of paintings.  The obvious difference is that Muniz reconstructs the object, and you photograph it. What are some of the other ways your work is conceptually different from Muniz's? What do you think about this coincidence?

PG: It is very strange and troubling, as are all chance events, everywhere. What else can I say ?  However, my versos and those of Vik Muniz only appear identicial because they have a common goal to show the back of a painting ...

But our two artistic propositions are conceptually very different. In effect, Vik Muniz represents the objects themselves.  He employs artisans who make « a copy » of a verso in three dimensions. We are not, in this case, dealing with the représentation of the real, but with its interprétation, even if the works want or claim to be as neutral as possible. While they claim to be a very precise replica of the original object, they are actually very remote from this claim.

For my versos, as is the case for my previous photographic series, the principle is something else since my photographs are, in essence, a recording of the real, and not copies or simulacres of versos.

But I think it would instead be very interesting, given that the the current exhibitions with the same title, Verso, that simultaneously show an apparently strong resemblance and an important conceptual gap,  if Vik Muniz and I were able to work on a joint exhibition.


ArtSlant would like to thank Philippe Gronon for his assistance in making this interview possible.

--Frances Guerin


SPECIAL NOTE:  To read Frances' review on Philippe Gronon's exhibiit, Verso, click HERE.  To read Frances' thoughts on the Vik Muniz exhibition, Verso, at Sikkema Jenkins in New York, click  HERE.

Original answers provided in French; translation into English by Frances Guerin.

 

FRANÇAIS


01 Oct. 2008:  ArtSlant l'écrivain, Frances Guerin, a rencontré Philippe Gronon à la galerie Dominique Fiat à Paris pour discuter de son actuelle exposition de photographies, de ses influences et de ses réflexions sur les coïncidences.

Personal photo of Philippe Gronon at Galerie Dominique Fiat; Courtesy of ArtSlant



Frances Guerin:  Voulez-vous nous parler de vos expériences à l'école d'art, et vos professeurs?

Philippe Gronon : La Villa Arson était avait à cette époque Christian Bernard pour directeur, il dirige aujourd'hui le Mamco à Genève et il a été très important pour moi comme pour beaucoup de ceux avec qui j’étais à l’époque comme par exemple  Ghada Amer, Tatiana Trouvé, Philippe Mayaux, Philippe Ramette, Pascal Pinaud et cela toute pratiques confondues car l’important était la motivation et l’engagement dans son projet artistique.

FG :  Qu'est-ce qui vous de choisir la photographie comme un moyen? Comment ou qu'est-ce que cela pour vous assurer que d'autres médias ne le font pas?


PG : La photographie m'a très vite attirée à cause de son rapport distancié, je pouvais avec la photographie prendre le recul nécessaire pour penser correctement mon travail et le voir évoluer et se construire lentement.

FG :  De parler de votre travail, vous avez parlé de la boîte de Pandore. La «boîte» (en fait un pot) transportées par Pandore contenait tous les maux du monde - la cupidité, la vanité, la calomnie, le mensonge, l'envie, pining, ainsi que de l'espoir. Qu'est-ce que les secrets ne cacher votre travail? Comment le spectateur à participer découvrir les secrets?

PG : L’idée de la boite de Pandore à un sens plus large que celui originel quant au contenu de la boite et surtout ce qu’elle contient renvoie directement au spectateur et à ses propres interprétations ( à chacun sa boite ! )
Ou bien devrais-je plutôt parler de rampe de lancement pour l’imaginaire plutôt que de boîte de Pandore …
Je pose plus de questions avec ce travail que je ne donne de réponses !

FG :  Dans le choix de votre sujet, vous créer des situations où il ya un défi, vous pouvez commencer à photographier: entrée en musée des voûtes, l'accès aux banques, aux bâtiments privés, et ainsi de suite. Comment fonctionne ce sens de "ce qui ne peut pas être facilement accessibles" transfert à la photographie ?


PG : Ce n’est pas vrai pour tous les travaux certains comme les châssis photographiques, les tas de fumiers, les châteaux de sables, les grattoirs de boîtes d’allumettes ne répondent pas à cette règle. Mais il est vrai que pour la majeure partie des autres séries, leur réalisation dépend d’autorisations parfois assez difficiles à obtenir, c’est pour moi dans ma démarche artistique directement lié au temps différé du principe même de la photographie, l’enquête, la prise de contact, la découverte d’un univers et l’organisation de mon intervention au sein des lieux ou se trouve ces objets qui sont mes cibles. Les lieux sont importants car ils sont à la fois présents dans la lumière qu’ils renvoient et qui donne à voir et à photographier l’objet (car il n’y a aucun artifice ou éclairage de ma part) et ces lieux sont aussi absents car abstraits de ces objets parce que je les ai détourés.
D’où l’ambivalence de ce travail ( qui est son point fort ) qui est à la fois hyper figuré car il adopte le principe le plus précis d’une parfaite reproduction et aussi totalement abstrait puisqu’il est non seulement sorti de son contexte mais aussi grâce à cette précision sur toute la surface de l’image, le rend  bizarrement abstrait.

FG :  Nous avons discuté du fait que vous et Vik Muniz expositions ouverte le même jour, avec le titre de Verso. Muniz à New York; vous à Paris. Vous utilisent tous deux le dos des tableaux comme votre point de référence. La différence évidente est que Muniz reconstruit l'objet, et de vous photographier. Quels sont les autres moyens de votre travail est conceptuellement différent de la Muniz ? Que pensez-vous de cette coïncidence?

PG : C’est vrai c’est étrange et troublant, comme tous les hasards d’ailleurs, quoi dire d’autre  !?
Cependant même si apparemment mes versos et ceux de Vick Muniz se ressemblent car au demeurant l’idée commune est de montrer l’arrière d’un tableau …
Mais nos deux propositions artistiques sont conceptuellement très différent en effet Vick Muniz réalise des artefacts, il emploi des artisans qui  vont faire “une copie“ d’un verso en trois dimension, nous ne sommes pas dans ce cas dans la représentation du réel mais dans une interprétation même si elle se veut la plus neutre possible qui va donné une idée précise de l’objet d’origine cependant on s’en éloigne considérablement.
Pour mes versos comme pour mes autres séries photographiques réalisées antérieurement le principe est tout autre puisqu’il s’agit de photographies qui sont par essence des enregistrements du réel, et non pas des copies ou des simulacres de versos.
Mais je pense qu’il serait plutôt très intéressant que sur cette série que nous avons tous les deux avec le même titre : Verso, ( étant donné qu’elle a toute à la fois une forte ressemblance apparemment et un important écart conceptuellement ) que nous puissions travailler Vick Muniz et moi même pourquoi pas sur un projet d’exposition en commun…


ArtSlant would like to thank Philippe Gronon for his assistance in making this interview possible.

-- Frances Guerin


Original answers provided in French; translation into English by Frances Guerin.

FORMER RACKROOMERS

Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.