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San Francisco
Highlights From Silicon Valley Contemporary (via Art Nerd SF)

As the first South Bay art fair Silicon Valley Contemporary was met with a little resistance, but in the end it was highly attended and the art was pretty great. Many visitors left in hopes that SVC would return next year. Here are the pieces we thought about “writing home” about, or better, to you.

1. Kate Gilmore, Rock. Hard. Place., 2012, HD video
David Castillo Gallery, Miami
This video piece was not only an aesthetic delight (mesmerizing, really) but quite funny and the artist is just plain brilliant. (part of the Moving Image Pavilion)

Kate Gilmore, Rock. Hard. Place., 2012, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

Kate Gilmore, Rock. Hard. Place., 2012, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

 

2. Gustavo Mahlor, Symphony No. 2, 2014
Jungsan Senim
An installation made of razorblades. Need I say more?

Gustavo Mahlor, Symphony No. 2, 2014

Gustavo Mahlor, Symphony No. 2, 2014

 

3. Clive McCarthy, Booth 411, digital pieces, 2014
San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art
These subtly transformative pieces catch you off guard and surprise you. Everything you feel you know about looking is challenged through Clive’s work.

Artist Clive McCarthy in front of pieces Raymund, Lotta and Beth, 2014, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

Artist Clive McCarthy in front of pieces Raymund, Lotta and Beth, 2014, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

 

4. Jonas Becker, Almost Always, 2013, video installation
Shulamit Gallery, LA
Seconds around the world before midnight is the focus for this piece, but its display and installation was also appealing.

Jonas Becker, Almost Always, 2013, video installation, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

Jonas Becker, Almost Always, 2013, video installation, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

 

5. Devorah Serber, Before Warhol, 2010
Bentley Gallery
The intriguing thing here is that your brain fills in the details that aren’t there, like the “Campbells” logo or the facial features on the Mona Lisa. Serber is both a talented artist and extremely smart to have figured out how to render upside-down images out of 701 spools of thread.

Devorah Serber, Before Warhol, 2010, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

Devorah Serber, Before Warhol, 2010, Photo Credit: Dan Fenstermacher

 

*This post was in collaboration with Dan Fenstermacher who exclusively photographed SVC for Art Nerd to bring you coverage this week.

 

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Posted by Abhilasha Singh on 4/15






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