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San Francisco
Lb_frida_in_front_of_the_unfinished_unity_panel_new_worker_s_school_ny_1933_5x7
Lucienne Bloch
Scott Nichols Gallery
49 Geary St., Fourth Floor, San Francisco, CA 94108
July 3, 2008 - August 30, 2008


Another View Inside
by laurie halsey brown




Photography is the medium of focus at Scott Nichols Gallery. Until August 30th, the gallery has two exhibitions which share common themes to the Insider/Outsider exhibition @ Root Division, and more apparently to the Frida Kahlo retrospective presently at SFMOMA.

Lucienne Bloch, Frida by the Window, 1932 photograph

Lucienne Bloch was born in 1909 in Switzerland. She was an encouraged and accomplished artist, always interested in trying new forms. When she met Diego Rivera in New York in the 1930’s, she began working with him to learn about mural making. This began a deep friendship: with Diego as an artist/colleague but with Frida as an intimate friend. According to her biography, “The time spent with Frida and Diego were crucial in helping Lucienne establish her own sense of style.”- http://www.luciennebloch.com/biographies/lucienne_bloch.htm

Lucienne Bloch, Frida on the Train on Route to Mexico, 1937 photograph
The images of Frida and Diego illustrate the intimacy of her friendship with Frida - with Diego in a secondary position in front of the camera. The most compelling images are those in which Frida is reflective, of herself and of Diego. Formally, the hand-tinted images are most compelling. A lovely image of Frida can also seen in the concurrent Images of Mexico exhibition, as photographed by Lola Alvarez Bravo and taken 13 years after Bloch’s.

Lucienne Bloch, Frida & Diego at the Park, 1932 photograph


The exhibitions @ Root Division and Scott Nichols Gallery together reflect a shift in how we view the outsider, and how outsiders may view themselves. While cultural differences are inherent, a shared intimacy creates a sense of insider-ness, maybe more so than a shared cultural background.

-laurie halsey brown

(*Images, from top to bottom: Lucienne Bloch, Frida & Diego, a Personal Memoir, July 3 - August 30, 2008; Scott Nichols Gallery, Frida in Front of the Unfinished Unity Panel, New Worker's School, New York, 1933 photograph, courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery. Lucienne Bloch, Frida & Diego, a Personal Memoir, July 3 - August 30, 2008; Scott Nichols Gallery, Frida by the Window, 1932 photograph, courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery. Lucienne Bloch, Frida & Diego, a Personal Memoir, July 3 - August 30, 2008; Scott Nichols Gallery, Frida on the Train en Route to Mexico, 1937 photograph, courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery. Lucienne Bloch, Frida & Diego, a Personal Memoir, July 3 - August 30, 2008; Scott Nichols Gallery, Frida & Diego at the Park, 1932 photograph, courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery. Lola Alvarez Bravo, Images of Mexico, July 3 - August 30, 2008; Scott Nichols Gallery, Frida Kahlo, No.1, 1950 photograph, courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery.)



Posted by laurie halsey brown on 7/17/08

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