ArtSlant - Contemporary Art Network http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/show en-us 40 Following Francesco Clemente's Fantastic Voyage <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>The original impulse in my life as an artist was to write and to break from writing into image... Art is the last oral tradition alive in the West.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 330px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Francesco Clemente</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Francesco Clemente, the nomadic Neo-Expressionist painter and sculptor, continues to pursue his travels and artistic investigations, and, fortunately for New Yorkers this season, has brought back the resulting documents in two concurrent shows: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/351602-inspired-by-india" target="_blank"><em>Francesco Clemente: Inspired by India</em></a>, at the Rubin Museum and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/362565-two-tents" target="_blank"><em>Two Tents</em></a> at Mary Boone. Clemente follows somewhat in the traditions set by writers such as Paul Bowles and Christopher Isherwood, or musicians like The Beatles and David Bowie&mdash;artists who used travel both as a metaphor and as a source for their seemingly endless reserve of creative energies. As Bowie said about living in New York: &ldquo;a person finds a place by being out of place&mdash;that means neither being in one place, like England, or another, like the U.S. New York allows you to be both and neither &hellip; It&rsquo;s a home from home, a home that frees you from home.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Clemente has always traversed boundaries in his work. The geographical, political, and sexual have all, at one time or another, been routed through his explorations of other cultures in an impressive variety of media. It is misleading to say that Clemente&rsquo;s work is about the breaking down of perimeters, though; rather, he renders them porous through his work and peripatetic lifestyle. He lives and works in New York, Italy, and India throughout various parts of the year, working in painting, sculpture, prints, pastels, and watercolors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219114901-01-_Inspired_by_India_NIGHT_-Rubin_Museum_of_Art.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Francesco Clemente</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Inspired by India</em>, Installation view at the Rubin Museum of Art, 2014; Courtesy of the artist and the Rubin Museum of Art</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the exhibition <em>Inspired by India</em> at the Rubin, we might also note that Clemente has added Time as a space to be explored, presenting recent sculptures <em>Moon</em> (2014), <em>Hunger</em> (2014), and <em>Earth</em> (2014), the best of the offerings. When comparing works from Clemente&rsquo;s early period with the recent sculptures, time's distancing effect allows us to see how far he has traveled as an artist. These composite sculptures correspond to large gouache drawings on artisanal Pondicherry papers, which Clemente collaborated on with Tamil sign painters in Madras in 1980. Clemente invites us to compare and contrast handmade versus found objects in these sculptures, as well as traditional imagery and postmodern style.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219114937-Moon.jpg" alt="" height="450" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219115005-Hunger_2.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Francesco Clemente,&nbsp;</strong><em>Moon</em>, 2014 (left),&nbsp;<em>Hunger</em>, 2014 (right); Courtesy of the artist and the Rubin Museum of Art</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">All four sculptures in this exhibition include a pedestal, cast in aluminum, which evokes the precarious scaffolding and ladders common in India. <em>Moon</em> features a found Indian military trunk, with a large moon on the side, underneath a patinated metal cast of an old &ldquo;boom box,&rdquo; a piece of stereo equipment that has quickly disappeared from our landscape but is still something Clemente sees frequently in India. The coloring of the trunk and cast metal evoke the pink of the sandstone of Rajasthan, the region where Clemente created these pieces, bringing a sense of landscape into the objects. Then, one may consider the earlier <em>Moon</em>&nbsp;gouache&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(1980, shown above)&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of a man with a large rock tied to his neck who is seen from below, as if drowning in a large well, creating a visual analogy to Yeats&rsquo;s existential comment, &ldquo;We are chained to a dying beast.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219115348-Hunger.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Francesco Clemente</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Hunger</em>, 1980,&nbsp;Gouache on twelve sheets of handmade Pondicherry paper, joined by cotton strips, Installation view at the Rubin Museum of Art, 2014; Collection Philadelphia Museum of Art / &nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and the Rubin Museum of Art</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the gouache version of <em>Hunger</em> (1980) a man bites into the Ouroboros, a snake eating its own tail. The man's place at the table and gesture recall Balthus&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Le Chat de la Medit&eacute;rran&eacute;e</em> (1949). The traditional imagery is painted on a surface composed of composite sheets of thick paper, bound together by cotton strips, creating a grid that suggests Carl Andre or Robert Ryman&rsquo;s minimalist compositions. The sculpture <em>Hunger</em> (2014) is fashioned from leftover fabric from tents he created at a tent factory in Jodhpur for the Mary Boone exhibition <em>Two Tents</em>. The fabric tie-dyes and embroidery are common techniques in Jodhpur fabrics. The embroidered quotation on the flag, taken from Guy Debord&rsquo;s <em>Society of the Spectacle</em>, is encircled again by the Ourorboros, bringing the archaic and the modern together&mdash;a kind of logo for Clemente&rsquo;s particular brand of postmodernism.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219115824-_FC__Angels__Tent_2014_DETAIL_3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219115851-_FC__Devil_sTent_2014_DETAIL.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 14px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Francesco Clemente</strong>, <em>Angels' Tent</em> (detail, above) and&nbsp;<em>Devil's Tent&nbsp;</em>(detail, below),&nbsp;Both: 2013-2014,&nbsp;Tempera/cotton, wood, embroidery, hand stitching, </span></p> <p style="line-height: 14px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">118 x 236 x 158 in;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Courtesy of the artist and Mary Boone Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="line-height: 14px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Two tents are exactly what Clemente gives us at Mary Boone<em>: Angels' Tent</em> (2014) and <em>Devil&rsquo;s Tent </em>(2014) are decorative Mughal-style patchwork canvas walk-in environments, ornamented with a fresco-like style of painting. <em>Angels' Tent</em> depicts quattrocento-style angels hidden behind keyholes, lying on benches or beds, under umbrellas (a Surrealist note). <em>Devil&rsquo;s Tent</em> presents a more narrative, though no less oblique, diorama of a man who looks somewhat like "The Banker" character in Monopoly&mdash;top hat, monocle, big cigar&mdash;surrounded by a honeycomb pattern, smoking, and posing with nude women. Perhaps a comment on the follies of the One-Percenters, or simply &ldquo;vice&rdquo; in general, the tent does not particularly distinguish the actions of the Angels from the Demons. Given Clemente&rsquo;s penchant for ambiguity in most of his work, perhaps this is his point.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since the eighties, and particularly with his <em>Stations of the Cross</em> series, Clemente has proven to be a strong teller of painterly travel stories. In both <em>India</em> and <em>Tents</em> we find Clemente playing to his strengths as an artist, bringing us along on his painterly journey.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216789-bradley-rubenstein?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Bradley Rubenstein</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">(Image at top: <strong>Francesco Clemente, </strong><em>Moon</em><span style="text-align: left;">, 1980, Gouache on twelve sheets of paper with fabric,&nbsp;96 1/4 x 91 in (244.5 x 231.1 cm)</span><span style="text-align: left;">; Collection MoMA, New York, Gift of Alan Wanzenberg in honor of Kynaston McShine, 2012&nbsp;/ Courtesy of the artist and the Rubin Museum of Art)</span></span></p> Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:34:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Why We All Want to Punch Art <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;I really understand wanting to punch art,&rdquo; I wrote back to my Editor after being asked my opinion on the </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://news.artnet.com/in-brief/thug-who-punched-10-million-monet-painting-convicted-191151" target="_blank">Andrew Shannon Monet-punching story</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. &ldquo;I think about it almost daily.&rdquo; And I do. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Personally-speaking, I can think of several </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">specific</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> incidents during which I have fantasized about punching an artwork in the last five years alone: at the height of "First Thursdays" mania in East London three or four years ago, for instance, I attended a "hip" show by an artist whose work was assembled from raw pasta, what looked like human hair, and a number of china dinner plates, in which one artwork had been given the title <em>A Portrait of the Actress Whoopi Goldberg</em>, and another <em>A Portrait of the Actor Richard Pryor</em>&mdash;a decision which felt not only fundamentally wrong and nonsensical, but also faintly, inexplicably racist in its pointlessness. The whole thing felt like the kind of trendy slapstick play that the filmmaker Harmony Korine makes with famous names, where casual juxtapositions and roughshod word-associations make a kind of white-trash Hollywood mythology; but the joke had fallen flat. Gluing a handful of fusilli to a dish and then naming it after a prominent African American media personality isn't a hate crime in the most traditional sense, I'll admit, but it felt </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">off</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> nonetheless: the work was eminently punchable, both then and in retrospect, and I wish I'd smashed it when I had the chance.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My point is this: while I wouldn't dare to equate a creakily-crafted depiction of the star of Sister Act&mdash;rendered in raw Italian food, no less&mdash;with the work of Claude Monet, the principle remains the same. Art can have the power to alienate, infuriate, or confound its viewer, almost to the point of distraction. Sometimes this is good, and sometimes it is bad; I have also seen art which made me angry in the way that a thing makes you angry when you wish you had thought of it first (the very first time I saw <em>Blue Velvet</em> on the big screen I was, dumbly, absolutely incensed. Incensed!), or because it made me consider things about the world which I knew to be true, but which I wasn't entirely ready to face. At six years old, my parents took me to the National Gallery, and I saw the painting <em>Whistlejacket</em> by George Stubbs, and I cried and cried with something a little like rage. As an adult, I might be tempted to theorize that it made me angry and overwhelmed to think that there was so much real and enormous and unattainable beauty in the universe; as a six-year-old girl, I imagine it was more to do with the fact that I'd never own a pony. Even a child's reaction to art is still a reaction, and valid&mdash;my God, I'd have punched that Monet myself as a kid, if it meant that I'd get my own horse.</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141219130514-Screen_Shot_2014-12-19_at_2.03.55_PM.png" alt="" /></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If the feeling of wanting to tussle with artworks occasionally isn't a common one, why has a <a href="http://punchamonet.gallery/" target="_blank">Monet-punching simulator</a> also popped up on the internet within the last few days?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(Perhaps you've played it &mdash; if so, please send me your high-score. I'd like to hear from someone who's done the full eight-million sterling damage, so that I can send them a card and fruit basket.)</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>New York Magazine</em>'s Vulture offshoot calls the painting &ldquo;a stupid, pathetic streak of paint single sailboat&rdquo; in a write-up about the game: you see how pent up all art critics are, underneath it all, to a man? Picture having to traipse from gallery to warehouse to &ldquo;pop-up creation space&rdquo; looking at the wares of artists of varying degrees of talent, year-in, year-out. The horror! <em>The horror! </em>You can't tell me that the biggest names in art criticism haven't considered feigning a faint, fist-out, near a canvas&mdash;Shannon-style&mdash; at least once: probably once an hour at Art Basel Miami Beach, if this year's reports are to be believed. &nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ArtNet calls our Monet-puncher a thug, but is he also, in some awful way, a folk hero for the angry critic, allowing the unsaid to come to light not in written copy, but in a flurry of fists? True leaders of men are always complicated. Shannon on, you crazy diamond.</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/265136-philippa-snow">Philippa Snow</a></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Fri, 19 Dec 2014 15:16:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list An Artist Residency Brings Art and Life Together in a Beijing Apartment Complex <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On Tuesday, December 2, Beijing-based artists Song Xi (宋兮) and Yang Xinjia (杨欣嘉) received notice that their apartment complex, Dongxindian, in Cuigezhuang village, would soon be demolished, following an edict issued in December 2013 that declared the government would initiate extensive investigations into Beijing&rsquo;s many overcrowded, often illegally-populated and dilapidated apartment complexes. These complexes are generally inhabited by a large migrant population, in apartments divided into tiny living spaces rented out for a small fee per month. Because such action is illegal, the inhabitants do not register their addresses with the local police station, and the structural and social instability created by this situation has led to the recent governmental crackdown. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The imminent destruction of Dongxindian is a problem for Song Xi and Yang Xinjia, not only because it is their home, but also because for the last month and a half they have been running an artist-in-residency program there, called <em>Apartment of Dreams Come True</em>. Starting at the beginning of November, each week a new artist is invited to live for seven days in Dongxindian. They are asked to make art in response to their living environment and the people they meet. They document their activities and artistic progress each day, as a sort of photo-journal, which is then posted on the social networking platform WeChat for anyone to follow. Song Xi and Yang Xinjia give each artist 60 RMB (approximately $9.65) per day, China&rsquo;s minimum wage, to spend however they like.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218093745-Wang_Ping_1__fig.1_.jpeg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Wang Ping and&nbsp;participant Li Yinhua</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The artists participating so far have engaged the community to varying degrees. The first resident, Wang Ping (王平), took a very direct approach: Each day he found a stranger in the community who would sleep in his bed for eight hours in exchange for his allotted 60 RMB. He interviewed each participant, asking about their individual histories and what brought them to live in this community. He took pictures of them sleeping on the bed and posted them, along with their biographical information, to WeChat.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218115820-fig._3.jpg" alt="" width="550" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218094735-Peter_s_work_1__fig._4_.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Yesu</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Yesu (耶苏), the second artist, made a series of ink drawings on a long scroll in response to first-hand observations and comments he found on a community-based internet chatroom. One drawing, for example, is a rather unflattering depiction of a plump waitress, accompanied by a story he found on the internet by a restaurant guest who overheard this waitress complaining about her to another co-worker. Another is a beautiful configuration of lines, illustrating the sound waves of noisy neighbors bouncing off the walls of an unhappy local residence.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218094900-Chen_2__fig._5_.jpeg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Chen Lingjie</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the third week, two artists resided in the apartment: Chen Lingjie (陈凌杰) and Luo Qiang (罗蔷). Chen wrote the Christian biblical seven-day creation story in Hebrew on the walls and ceiling of the apartment using glow-in-the-dark blue and green stones, producing an other-worldly glow in the unlit apartment. In the small kitchen, Luo created a sound art piece of a couple&rsquo;s quarrel with the man telling the woman that she must submit to him. The work comments on the role religion and tradition play in the continued oppression of women, thus providing an interesting foil to Chen&rsquo;s overtly religious work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The fourth artist, Yang Junling (杨俊岭), drew the floor plan of the apartment onto a map of China. Each day he carved a line along its interior, collecting debris from the carving on papers lining the floor along the wall. Through careful research, he identified 54 nationwide addresses intersected by his drawing on the China map. On the final day, he collected the debris from the floor, putting it in 54 different envelopes intended for the 54 identified addresses, chosen according to the origin of the debris within the layout of the apartment. In this way, he literally and conceptually makes connections between the <em>Apartment of Dreams Come True</em> and greater China.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218095246-Screen_Shot_2014-12-18_at_10.50.36_AM.png" alt="" width="550" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Yang Junling</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The 5th artist, Cheng Guangfeng (程广峰), never made it to the apartment because of some legal problems. But he did manage to send some pictures of the police station where he was held, and the hospital where he underwent treatment, all posted to WeChat.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The setting of this project, a housing community primarily occupied by migrant workers, made me consider the legacy of earlier art projects in China that responded to the migrant population. In 2001, when Beijing learned it would host the 2008 Summer Olympic Games, the government picked up the pace on an already rapid urbanization. As new, modern high-rises were built, old, dilapidated structures were torn down. Many traditional <em>hutong</em> courtyard houses were razed in the name of modernization, resulting in the displacement of thousands of residents. And while the government poured resources into urbanization and modernization, it overlooked the needs of the countryside. As China moved from an agricultural to an industrial society, thousands of rural people migrated to the city to find work and make money to send back to their families. Because they lacked a Beijing registration card, they lacked governmental support; their lives and livelihoods were precarious.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218103533-6871822403_c03757c43c_o.jpg" alt="" width="550" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Zhang Dali,&nbsp;<em>Chinese Offspring</em>, 2003&ndash;2005, Resin and fiberglass, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>La Route de la Soie</em>,&nbsp;Saatchi Gallery, 2010; Image vie Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/76446067@N05/6871822403/in/photolist-4Um6pm-5QPn6X-5UeJMw-5MaFF-nPDxX-5UeKtE-5UaiEa-5UeHjw-5UeJ6j-5UeEmb-5UeLaY-5UeGuW-5UeFS9-5UapiB-95WHS8-95WJa6-95ZKNo-88BoGb-bLEGEv-dbUKyH-8p8US4-95WHZV-95WHBB-5MaFf-5BrUxF-65qwjf-5SbwYB-7tGN3z-nPpDi-3dSTzY-5KkVtu-4LStD5-4LSsJG-4LNjdr-4LSteL-3dSTCh-8nGz8a-3dST8s-5QTZp4-5DehY3-bteToB-bteTNi-5Puuek-ajwyPd-ajwDFw-5vfZLG-fQQ7kF-fQQ1gk-5wuezN-fR2gUN" target="_blank">CalieSN</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Some prominent Chinese artists began making work specifically about the problems encountered by this burgeoning population. <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/rackroom/563-song-dong" target="_blank">Song Dong</a> did a few performance pieces in which he paid migrant workers to enact a series of choreographed movements within gallery spaces; Liang Shuo made a series of life-sized sculptures realistically depicting migrant workers; Zhang Dali made plaster casts of migrant workers' bodies which he hung upside down, from rafters. The goal of all of these projects seems to be to reflect the problems faced by migrant workers in order to raise the consciousness of the art-viewing audience. In general, the &ldquo;migrant worker&rdquo; was represented as a static entity, one whose identity was separate from that of the artist. The problems presented&mdash;instability, marginalization, and prejudice&mdash;are those specific to the migrant worker.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Comparing <em>Apartment of Dreams Come True</em> to these projects reveals a marked shift in the way Chinese artists envision their subjectivity in relation to the societal problems their works address. I asked Song Xi to comment on this issue. He said:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although we cannot remove art from the reality of society&mdash;art and the lives of people today are closely linked, but an artist&rsquo;s role is not to be a social worker or reporter. Art-making is not a simple, reflexive mirroring of problems. We are just making today&rsquo;s societal problems the backdrop for artistic thought, and at the same time, we&rsquo;re making society the environment in which art happens, we&rsquo;re seeing how today&rsquo;s artists respond within this environment, how they carry out their work.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141218115153-luo_qiang.jpeg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Artist&nbsp;Luo Qiang (center) talking with visitors&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Further discussing his understanding of the difference between his project and those mentioned above, he says:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The problem of migrant workers was quite prominent in the &lsquo;90s, many artists wanted to represent this phenomenon...Since that time, China has undergone huge changes, many policies have been initiated to solve the problems of migrant workers, for example, providing spouses with housing, giving them insurance, etc. But these suburban areas not only include the problems of migrant workers&hellip;there are a lot of different types of people there [besides migrant workers], the problems are more complicated. We do not take these problems as our artistic medium or object, and we do not simply express some lofty moral declaration or try to aimlessly reflect these problems&hellip;We chose this very complicated societal environment and inserted art into it to see what kind of relationships could be established and what kind of possibilities it carried. Modern day problems are getting more and more complicated, the problems that we are considering are not only societal, they also include today&rsquo;s art system, artists&rsquo; working methods, the relationship between art and society, the identity of the artist, etc. <em>Apartment of Dreams Come True </em>aims to initiate action at the intersection of these many problems.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Song&rsquo;s statement, the duration of the project, and the fact that both Song and Xi live in the same apartment complex as <em>The Apartment of Dreams Come True</em>, all indicate a different conceptualization of the art/life dichotomy that has been in constant tension throughout the history of modern and contemporary art worldwide. It reflects a more integrated model and understanding than the aforementioned works made in the late 1990s and early 21st century, which are based on a stronger subject/object dichotomy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After all, the fate of the community is the fate of the artists and the fate of the project. This can also be seen in the project&rsquo;s WeChat presence, which allows for a different relationship, closer to everyday interactions, between the artist and viewing public than that afforded by traditional gallery exhibitions. As both the news of the apartment&rsquo;s impending destruction and Cheng Guangfeng&rsquo;s troubles with the police prove, the project&rsquo;s trajectory&mdash;much like that of an individual life&mdash;is contingent. Its main purpose is not to represent the people in the community, nor to draw the attention of the art world to their plight, nor to enrich the lives of the community through art, but rather to initiate a dialogue with the community about shared societal concerns, as <em>part of</em> the community. This not only complicates the definitions of an artist, art, and audience, it also initiates a re-conceptualization of the role art plays in contemporary society.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Madeline Eschenburg&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">More information about the&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Apartment of Dreams Come </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">True</span><em style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> residency program, including a complete list of participants, can be found <a href="http://www.artslant.com/cn/events/show/367553-%E5%9C%86%E6%A2%A6%E5%85%AC%E5%AF%93" target="_blank">here</a>.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Participant&nbsp;Li Yinhua sleeping during Wang Ping's residency; All images courtesy of&nbsp;Yang Xinjia and Song Xi)</span></p> Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:15:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list A Photographer Captures a Dying Tradition at the Del Mar Racetrack <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">New York based photographer <a href="http://www.ericchakeen.com/">Eric Chakeen</a> (a former assistant to Ryan McGinley) shared some of his shots from his latest project, </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">And Away They Go</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">, which documents the life at the Del Mar racetrack&mdash;a place Chakeen visited often growing up in San Diego. Here, the photographer gives ArtSlant his personal perspective on the complex social atmosphere at one of California's most historic sports venues.</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">The Del Mar racetrack opened in 1937. It was a huge part of Hollywood in its halcyon days. Lucille Ball, Frank Sinatra, and Bing Crosby were frequent visitors. Del Mar is my hometown, a small beach town with a population of 5,000 people. I have a strong connection with the Del Mar track. As a kid I used to go betting with my dad, who spoke on a handicapping (offical term for betting on horses) show on local San Diego radio. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Now it's a place that shows class disparity: with super wealthy people driving Ferraris and Bentleys sitting in elevated seating and the alcoholics and gambling addicts on the ground floor, all day every day. This season, eight horses died on the track, and the most valuable horse of the last 30 years ran while I was shooting, bringing in 40,000 people to see him run one race. The stable hands are mostly illegal immigrants who travel with the horses as they tour the country, and live in squalor; they're massively underpaid and work these crazy hours, up at 4am to feed the horses and prepare them for training. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Horse racing is dying out. A big track, Hollywood Park, in LA just closed down&mdash;which makes Del Mar now the 3rd or 4th biggest track in the country. Happiness and sadness flow fast into one another and because the race lasts just a minute, waves of emotion run strong and high. The jockeys race each race, and often don't win. They ride horses that cost over $500,000 while the average better walks away with $40. The fashion at the track does its own unique thing: tank tops and sandals and Hawaiin shorts with horse print. It's a real sporting event, so many layers of inequality, beauty, and emotions juxtaposed: I wanted to document the fading world of this traditional lifestyle.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;Eric Chakeen</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216204501-horse_and_gauge_portrait.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216204553-nipple_ring.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216204752-horses_in_tunnel.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216204923-horse_banana.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218123217-jockey_tiger_portrait.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218123026-old_woman_race_program.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216205543-finish_line_race.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218123150-binoculars_1.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218161424-onlooker_tecate.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218123316-horse_tear.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218161503-california_chrome_portrait.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218122931-cowboy_teller.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141218161545-tracks_close_up.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(All Images: Eric Chakeen)</span></p> Fri, 19 Dec 2014 14:39:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Art, Alcohol, and Fundraising: Match Made in Heaven or a Doomed Relationship? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) and The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have taken on a novel approach to programming in the last year with two common purposes: to increase institutional relevance and popularity, and as a fundraising strategy. Both institutions organize frequently scheduled parties; AGO has First Thursdays and ROM hosts Friday Night Live. They are certainly not the first museums to develop programming that entices patrons and a larger audience with attractive parties featuring drinks and live music (take for example MoMA PS1's events, the Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Target First Saturdays, and London's Tate Late and SLAM Fridays).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the case of the AGO, the first Thursday of every month sees a transformation in one of Canada&rsquo;s largest art institutions: the space opens up for $15 per person at the door, where one enters the gallery space and socializes with other members of the Toronto arts community. The event features performance work, live music, artist talks, and alcohol that one can purchase at one of the many cash bars. The AGO invites a wide audience that can mingle and enjoy the museum&rsquo;s collection and alternative programming. Little mind is paid to the artwork. Instead of absinthe and whiskey, Toronto's creative professionals sip on mixed cocktails, craft beer, and wine; tattooed DJs play music in the background, and needless to say, everyone's outfit is impeccable.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Members of the Toronto arts community feel pressured to attend the event, at least once. It may seem, otherwise&mdash;that they are not &ldquo;in the know&rdquo; and that their conception of institutional programming is traditional (and traditional is bad). So we stand with our colleagues, holding a Chardonnay while actively participating in the "contemporary art world." It's reminiscent of an art opening, full of small talk and attendees with an acute interest in pursuing a career in the local art world. The museum that houses the event may gain from its ability to remain contemporary and relevant by offering its space for social networking. On the negative side of the ledger, it may weaken its reputation in an act &ldquo;selling out&rdquo; by undermining its historical and cultural significance.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The ROM&rsquo;s Friday Night Live event is somewhat different in terms of the participating audience and nature of the party. The formula is the same: a visitor (typically a young university student) lines up and pays a ticket at the entrance on a Friday evening, purchases a drink and casually sips it next to a dinosaur skeleton. The museum space transforms into a nightclub&mdash;you can even get your picture professionally taken against a customized backdrop for event-advertising purposes. As the night goes on, people dance to live music in state of inebriation under the watchful eyes of museum guards. Spilling a vodka cranberry on a decaying Egyptian mummy is a faux pas.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The &ldquo;cool factor&rdquo; here pervades the exchange, and it is reciprocal for both the institution and the visitor. The museum outwardly shows its separation from tradition. It distinguishes itself from any negative connotations of spending dull afternoons with family surrounded by lifeless, dusty objects. It becomes sensitive to yuppie social needs and interests&mdash;networking, alcohol, partying. Its visitor chooses to pay cover to a museum rather than a nightclub because they gain cultural capital by displaying an interest in history and philanthropy (they all know their money goes back to the beloved museum). But was the museum so beloved before it became <em>hip</em>? Does the museum lose its reputation as a stable cultural institution in the name of being hip, and does the problem lie deeper, in the lack of public funding?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On that note, such programming is a shrewd fundraising strategy, one that intuitively taps into current social needs and trends, and a way to remain culturally relevant. So, buy yourself a drink, save the museum, and let the party begin.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/396844-yoli-yoanna-terziyska?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Yoanna Terziyska</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image on top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">Sourced from HUG: The Hip and Urban Girl&rsquo;s Guide)</span></span></p> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:13:36 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Doing It All: Young Galleries Get Ahead with Strong Research and Publishing Programs <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Peckham's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.arcadiamissa.com/" target="_blank">Arcadia Missa</a>, founded by Rozsa Farkas with Tom Clark as assistant director and head of publishing, and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tenderpixel.com/" target="_blank">Tenderpixel</a>, founded by Etan Ilfeld with&nbsp;Borb&aacute;la So&oacute;s as director and curator,&nbsp;are two broad and interesting London gallery projects worth getting to know.&nbsp;Both have evolved over the past few years beyond the typical gallery's scope, by pushing strong research collaborations and rigorous publishing programs. As such they both represent unconventional and expansive gallery models (and also happen to have lovely names).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I asked Rozsa Farkas from Arcadia Missa and Borb&aacute;la So&oacute;s of</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Tenderpixel a few questions about how the galleries started, about their publishing and programming output, and what&rsquo;s coming up in 2015.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Aracdia Missa</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216124131-16.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation shot of Harry Sanderson's exhibition <em>Unified Fabric</em>, October 2013; Courtesy of Arcadia Missa 2014</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Phoebe Stubbs:</em> <em>I gather Arcadia Missa developed out of conversations and collaborations while you were studying at Central St Martins. Can you say a little about how the gallery came about?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Rozsa Farkas:</strong> I realized I wanted to open a space early on, in part because I was on a Fine Art course but had found I was far more invested in research and curation. I channeled much of my interests into the 10th Floor Project, which I told Tom Clark about, and he began hanging out there too, so we did a lot of work and collaborative writing for that (including the A Course symposium). After leaving uni I just set Arcadia Missa up&mdash;very&nbsp;naively in some senses; I feel it was continuing the momentum of self-organization that had begun during my BA.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: Your output has consistently focused on the influence of the internet and the digital on culture and society and yet publishing printed books is also a central part of what Arcadia Missa does. Why is the printed book important to you?&nbsp;</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>RF:</strong> We have always been interested in alternative archives and institutional critique. For example, when I was younger I was into net.art precisely because it was outside of the institution in many ways (of course it isn't now). We digitally archive a lot of what we do, and all our books are also ebooks, plus we have an ejournal online publication,&nbsp;so the printed books are totally bound to the digital production of the space. However, I do still think there is something very important about the printed book. The process of creating it, as well as having the object and distributing it to libraries, forms a strong sense that we are authoring our own history&mdash;and being from a self-organized background I think that this is a typical desire.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216124356-Flat.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Every Whisper</em> Anthology;<em>&nbsp;</em>Courtesy of Arcadia Missa 2014</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: The exhibitions, events, publishing, and projects of Arcadia Missa seem to encompass a rolling, multidisciplinary conversation, and as such are an incredible vehicle for interrogating ideas of the contemporary as they arise without assuming a completely fixed position. In terms of the gallery, was there at the outset an idea of which artists you would show, or has its output evolved? Each exhibition often speaks clearly to the next or previous one. Was this an aim from the outset?&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>RF:</strong> Yes I'm glad you have noticed this, thanks! Basically we curate our programme along long themes connected to the journal (<a href="http://%20www.howtosleepfaster.net%20"><em>How to Sleep Faster</em></a>)&nbsp;also so that there is an ongoing conversation, research project, and interrogation of our own (past) assertions&mdash;directly challenging ourselves, and critiquing the culture which we are a part of: critique isn't necessarily criticism, the good parts of culture I believe are by definition self-reflexive.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We knew what our research was and some of those we wanted to show when we began. But we were very young&mdash;when I set up the company and got the space I was 22, when the gallery opened I was 23&mdash;so although we knew our interests and our loose aims (much more regarding our self-organized research) we were initially focused on showing our peers from London and online. This rapidly developed and within six months' of opening we had begun to plan our gallery programme, as roughly six-month programmes along different focuses. This, I reckon, was when we explicitly began thinking very carefully about the artists we wanted to show.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: I have been reading your anthology&nbsp;</span></strong></em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The (networked) Every Whisper is A Crash on my Ears</span></strong><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;and thinking about the notion of community in relation to post-digital/post-internet practices. What does community mean for you and how does it function in your organization?&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>RF:</strong> Obviously community is extremely important. The artists we represent, for example, began as our peers, but also people we were fans of. We were the first gallery to give duo/solo exhibitions to Amalia Ulman, Jesse Darling, and Harry Sanderson, and the first in the UK to show Maja Cule and Ann Hirsch. So there is this practical side of community&mdash;the fact that we have supported artists from the start, but then there is also the obvious fact that communication has changed how discourse is formed, and we are part of a much larger community, a generation who are on the one hand displaced from each other under networked capitalism, yet on the other find new ways of forming culture and community within the cracks.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: What is coming up in 2015 for you?&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>RF:</strong> We are doing at project for <a href="http://artgeneve.ch/" target="_blank">Art Geneve</a> at the end of January,&nbsp;and the first book we will publish for 2015 will be the <a href="http://rematerialisingfeminism.org/"><em>Re-Materialising Feminism</em></a> document. Our gallery programme will then kick off in February, showing artists we have never exhibited before as well as some who have been with us from the start.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Tenderpixel</strong>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216123913-Tenderpixel_Before_Breakfast_Kentaro_Yamada_Fay_Nicolson_June_2014.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">Kentaro Yamada and Fay Nicholson, Installation shot from <a href="http://www.tenderpixel.com/before-breakfast-event"><em>before breakfast we talked about the furthest visible point before it all disappeared</em></a>, June 2014; Photo by Original&amp;theCopy; Courtesy of the artists and Tenderpixel</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Phoebe Stubbs: How did Tenderpixel come about?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Borb&aacute;la So&oacute;s:</strong> Tenderpixel was set up as a project space in 2007 by Etan Ilfeld.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: Was the location, among the book dealers in Cecil Court a specific choice? It seems to both work incredibly well in terms of your output and publishing activities and also to challenge the quite traditional ideas of publishing in the area. What is the relationship between the gallery and the bookshop?&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BS:</strong> Tenderpixel is in a unique position being in Central London just around the corner from Leicester Square. Cecil Court is a quirky little street, with a special atmosphere hosting specialized antiquarian bookshops. The gallery has grown quite considerably since its opening, and at the moment it operates from two former shop spaces. Being close to the ICA and its bookshop, as well as Koenig Books, Foyles,&nbsp;Claire de Rouen&nbsp;Books, and&nbsp;Donlon Books, the street is also very much on the track of arts professionals.&nbsp;We opened&nbsp;Tenderbooks next to the gallery in May 2014, a partner bookshop that supports independent artist publications, artist research and original print editions, along with a series of late night events and publication launches. Beyond the clear advantage of the location, and the idea that a specialized bookshop would fit with the street and its wider environment very well, it also made sense to start this enterprise in terms of underlining the commitment to research, education, and publishing. Tenderpixel and Tenderbooks often collaborate on events&mdash;the bookshop always presents a collection of publications complementing the gallery's exhibitions (reading list), and we also produce our own publications and commission artist prints together.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216123938-Tenderpixel_Tenderbooks.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Tenderbooks shop at Tenderpixel,&nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">Courtesy of Tenderbooks</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: I love your Riso-printed exhibition catalogues and publishing projects around the exhibitions. Was publishing a major objective from the start?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BS:</strong> The gallery started changing its programme around January 2012, adopting more of a research, textual, and theory-based approach&mdash;and this is when we also started working with Hato Press.&nbsp;The publications we produce with them have become an integral part of Tenderpixel's new identity.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: How do you conceive of the exhibition series? Tenderpixel's approach of linked series of events and exhibitions suggests longer-term goals than merely having a rolling exhibition series. Do you plan a long way ahead? What are your objectives in exhibition planning?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BS:</strong> For the past two years we have been programming our exhibitions and events so that at least 3&ndash;4 projects explore a certain theme, including "alternative structures and working methods," "the apparent demand for progress and resolution," "language of interaction in the digital age," "object orientation and alchemy," and most recently, "social choreography, and the structures and tools of theatre to address wider social issues." These series give us a chance to engage with a subject through deeper research,&nbsp;to look at a subject from various standpoints, and also to develop an invested and returning audience, who can see a&nbsp;theme unfolding over a few months.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216124003-Tenderpixel_Tim_Ivison_Julia_Tcharfas2_Nov_2014.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Timothy Ivison and Julia Tcharfas, <em>The Conquest of Gravity as Such</em>. Installation view from <a href="http://www.tenderpixel.com/Acting-Truthfully-Under-the-Circumstances"><em>Acting Truthfully Under the Circumstances</em></a>; Photo by Original&amp;theCopy; Courtesy of the artists and Tenderpixel</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PS: What is coming up in 2015?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BS:</strong> In January 2015 we will open with an international group exhibition and event series, curated by Sabel Gavaldon,&nbsp;including recent works by&nbsp;Anna Barham, Olivier Castel, I&ntilde;aki Garmendia, M&oacute;nica Restrepo and Katarina Zdjelar. <em>M/Other Tongue</em>&nbsp;takes its departure from&nbsp;Derrida&rsquo;s sharp statement: "I only have one language&mdash;but it&rsquo;s not mine,&rdquo; and&nbsp;addresses identity and&nbsp;theatre of language. It questions the relation between individuals and their "own" language, by exposing the limits, desires, and interdictions inherent in such possession. Understanding language as an essential component of collective identities, the show will explore the politics of cultural translation, while bringing together a group of international artists from diverse backgrounds.&nbsp;In February Tenderpixel will participate in Art Rotterdam art fair presenting Cathy Haynes, Erika Hock, Fay Nicolson and Ilona Sagar, and in March we will continue the explorations into the theme of theatre and social choreography with a screening programme.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top:&nbsp;Maja Cule's exhibition <em>Facing the Same Direction</em>, October 2014; Courtesy of Arcadia Missa 2014)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:49:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list The Djerbahood Project: Street Art in Dialogue with the People of Tunisia <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In much of the Middle East, graffiti is regarded as a form of vandalism&mdash;a subversive crime to be scrubbed away or painted over and concealed. However, that outdated understanding may be shifting, due to the impact of the wildly popular Djerbahood Project. From July through August, 2014, Djerba, an ancient Tunisian island, recently welcomed around 150 of the world&rsquo;s best known and emerging street artists to bring new life to the whitewashed walls of the tiny, traditional village of Erriadh.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.djerbahood.com" target="_blank">The Djerbahood Project</a>&nbsp;was organized by the Paris-based <a href="http://itinerrance.fr" target="_blank">Galerie Itinerrance</a> under the direction of Tunisian artist and gallery director Mehdi Ben Cheikh, who wanted to show the outside world that freedom of expression, tourism, and street art have blossomed in the wake of the eventful January 2011 Jasmine Revolution, which marked the first chapter of the Arab Spring.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Djerbahood project brought together some of the biggest names in street art from 30 countries in a collaboration that marks one of the largest meetings of contemporary street artists to date: participating artists included <a href="http://c215.fr/C215/HOME.html" target="_blank">C215</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/291803-el-seed" target="_blank">eL Seed</a>, Faith 47, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/36607" target="_blank">Know Hope</a>,&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://instagram.com/phlegm_art" target="_blank">Phlegm</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="https://www.facebook.com/ROAStreetArt" target="_blank">ROA</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, and a stable of others. Djerba is home to active communities of Muslims, Jews, and Christians, who all live in simple harmony, and the artists engaged in conversations with Erriadh&rsquo;s residents, many of whom provided the visitors with music, warm dinners, and even the walls of their family homes to use as a canvas. Most of the murals engaged directly with the island&rsquo;s history and culture, such as the octopus that Belgian artist ROA painted, with a head formed from a local mosque&rsquo;s dome, or the mural of a Berber woman by Dubai-based </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.myneandyours.com" target="_blank">Myneandyours</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, which celebrates the island&rsquo;s legacy in Homer's&nbsp;<em>Odyssey</em>&nbsp;as the home of the mystical Lotus Eaters.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Follow ArtSlant on a tour of Erriadh, as we take in the results of the Djerbahood Project:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215134036-Add_Fuel_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Add Fuel</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215141548-C215_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: justify;">C215</span><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215141758-Curiot_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Curiot</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215142012-Dan23-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Dan 23</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215142135-eL_Seed_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">eL Seed</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215142259-Faith47_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Faith 47</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215142443-Know_Hope_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Know Hope</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215135200-Liliwenn_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; line-height: 26px;">Liliwenn</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215142708-Monica_Canilao_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Monica Canilao</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215135748-Mosko_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; line-height: 26px;">Mosko</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215140324-Roa_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; line-height: 26px;">Roa</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215140618-Saner_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Saner</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215140905-Swoon_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Swoon</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215143128-Rea_-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: center;">Rea</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215143314-Rodolphe_Cintorino_-_Copyrights_Mehdi_Ben_Cheikh_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: center;">Roldolphe Cintorino</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141215143537-Shoof_and_BomK-_Copyrights_Aline_Deschamps_-_Galerie_Itinerrance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;Shoof and BomK</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danna Lorch</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(All images:&nbsp;&copy;&nbsp;Aline Deschamps; Courtesy of Galerie<a>&nbsp;</a>Itinerrance, Paris)</span></p> Mon, 15 Dec 2014 15:37:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list <em>Walls of Freedom</em> Documents the Art of the Egyptian Revolution <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Egyptian Revolution incited an outpouring of graffiti, most of it politically motivated and aimed at an audience of ordinary Egyptians. A multitude of artists&mdash;including Ganzeer, Keizer, Ammar Abo Bakr, and the late Hesham Rizk&mdash;put their lives on the line to write on every available surface, from walls to military barricades and even army tanks. Basma Hamdy and Don Karl aka Stone meticulously documented the street art that came before, amidst, and in the aftermath of the Revolution and ultimately collaborated with a large group of artists, writers, and intellectuals to publish <em><a href="http://wallsoffreedom.com" target="_blank">Walls of Freedom</a></em>, a powerful collection of photographs and poignant storytelling that makes the street art of the Egyptian Revolution accessible in English to a global audience.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danna Lorch spoke to its co-authors for ArtSlant:</span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danna Lorch: The most prominent feature of Egypt&rsquo;s graffiti during and following the Revolution were the martyrdom murals commemorating those who had fallen. When did you first see these?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Basma Hamdy:</strong> The first time an actual Martyr Mural was created was when Ganzeer painted Islam Raafat in 2011. Ammar Abo Bakr was responsible for the most memorable Martyr Murals, the last one commemorating Hesham Rizk in July 2014, a young street artist who was found drowned in the Nile the same month.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216192241-2._BasmaHamdy_AmmarAbouBakr_.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: left;">Ammar Abo Bakr&rsquo;s large scale portraits of weeping mothers clothed in black, mourning the loss of their sons. <strong>Ammar Abo Bakr</strong>, Mohammed Mahmoud Street, Cairo; Photo Basma Hamdy</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216192436-3._BasmaHamdy_AmmarAbouBakr.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Closeup of Ammar Abo Bakr&rsquo;s walls on Mohammed Mahmoud Street, Cairo; Photo Basma Hamdy</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">DL:&nbsp; In your opinion, what difference has graffiti made?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BH:</strong> Every historical event related to the revolution was captured on the walls. The walls became the real &ldquo;newspaper&rdquo; telling the story of the revolution and reiterating its importance.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Don Karl:</strong> For me, one of the most striking things I ever saw in relation to graffiti was the powerful way that mothers, siblings, or friends reacted to murals depicting their loved ones, some of whom we describe in the book.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">DL: Do you believe that street art in Egypt is democratic?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BH:</strong> I think graffiti in general should be, or is democratic. It stems from the anarchic principle of revolt and rejection of authority. Perhaps in some respects graffiti has lost some of this edge due to commercialization and the entrance of mainstream pop culture.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In Egypt specifically, graffiti was created for all people. The "No Walls Campaign" visually opened up the barrier walls erected by the military to impede pedestrian movement downtown; the artists used <em>trompe l'oeil </em>technique<em>s </em>to open the wall visually and this was aimed at everyone, from the shopkeepers to the residents. The bulk of graffiti was created in downtown Cairo and a lot of work was painted in Mohamed Mahmoud Street, which is considered the aorta of Tahrir Square.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216195918-7._BasmaHamdy_Omar_Fathy_Picasso.jpg" alt="" /><span style="text-align: center; font-size: x-small;">The fourth installment of the mural<em> Illi Kalif Ma Matsh</em> (He who delegates authority has not died) Text reads: &ldquo;Down with all those who betrayed, Mubarak, Military and Brotherhood.&rdquo; &thinsp;<strong>Omar Fathy aka Picasso</strong>, Ittihadiya Palace wall, Cairo; Photo Basma Hamdy</span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DK:</strong> The graffiti of the revolution was democratic in a sense that its role was to capture and carry the mood and grievances of those protesting. It was a direct extension of the chants and wishes of the people. You could see this especially in the very early days of the uprising when it seemed that virtually everyone felt the urge to write his thoughts on the walls of downtown and everything up to the tanks got covered with graffiti.</span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">DL: Ganzeer is the artist whose tag has become best known outside of Egypt in association with the street art of the revolution. Why do you suppose that is the case?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BH:</strong> Ganzeer does not like to be called a street artist and I think that&rsquo;s precisely why his work is effective. As a formally trained graphic designer, his aesthetic is reminiscent of comic illustrations and pop art, which traditionally challenged fine art and were characterized by graphic work that heavily drew on pop culture and advertising.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">His poster "Mask of Freedom," [shown above] which was later a popular sticker, was a work that earned him an international reputation. The irony in borrowing advertising terminology and graphic design elements to express the human rights violations committed by the SCAF (Supreme Council of the Armed Forces) caused the piece to go viral.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141216200450-5._MunirSayegh_AmmarAbouBakr.jpg" alt="" /><em style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">Trompe-l&rsquo;&oelig;il </em><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">&thinsp;by Ammar Abo Bakr, Mohamed Elmoshir, Layla Magued, Hanaa El Degham and team, Sheikh Rihan Street, Cairo; Photo Munir Sayegh</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">DL: What made you decide it was critical to document these walls before they were painted over?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BH:</strong> Somebody needed to tell the story accurately, truthfully, and from every angle possible. History needed to be documented because we are aware that history is rewritten and fabricated easily in authoritarian states. The visual story of the revolution is an honest one that cannot be fabricated and erased. Thousands of years later we understand the Ancient Egyptians because of the visual legacy they left behind.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch" target="_blank">Danna Lorch</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top:&nbsp;Ganzeer, <em>Mask of Freedom,&nbsp;</em>All Images from <a href="http://wallsoffreedom.com" target="_blank"><em>Walls of Freedom</em></a>&nbsp;)</span></p> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:37:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Why There Aren’t More Important Canadian Artists: An Irrelevant Rivalry <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I remember when I first moved to Vancouver, and told people I was from Toronto, the venom and animosity for my hometown astonished me. Many of the people who were so vehemently hateful of Toronto and had never been there before, I was told. I found this astonishing, because in the 28 years I lived in Toronto, I'd never heard a single person bash Vancouver. If anything, people from Toronto spoke highly of Vancouver&mdash;the phenomenal beauty of British Columbia, the number of great artists Vancouver had given the world. I felt and still feel that there's something terrifically sad about a rivalry where only one side is even aware that a rivalry is taking place. To me, this reaction mirrored the way that people in Toronto have a love/hate relationship with New York. Or the way Canadians in general tend to castigate America, while being totally enthralled by America. If Toronto felt insecure about New York&mdash;I will discuss the deleterious effects of this neurosis later on&mdash;then it seemed to me that Vancouver felt about Toronto the way Toronto felt about New York.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Before I continue, some statistics: that the following lists do not include any female artists is both problematic, and also too complex to address in one essay. However, I write this piece fully cognizant of the glaring exclusion of women amongst the artists I'm about to list.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">According to the 2011 census, Toronto's population was 2.6 million people. Going back 50 years, the artists that Toronto has produced and who have gone on to have an influence in the larger art world are Michael Snow and General Idea. For the purposes of both these summaries, I am not going to include artists from either of these cities who moved to New York to achieve their success, and become influential&mdash;and in reality, there really was only ever Peter Schuyff,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">golden boy of 80s abstraction and one-time resident of Vancouver,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">who matches this standard. From Toronto, Paul P. moved to New York, erasing all evidence of having shown in Toronto from his curriculum vitae, and after having had a few years of real success, seems to have vanished completely from the contemporary art landscape.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The 2011 census of Vancouver states that Canada's westernmost city had a population of 603,500 people. The notable artists that never left Vancouver, but also smartly bypassed showing in Canada (save Ian Wallace, who shows on occasion in Vancouver seemingly to qualify for certain awards and be seen swathed in layers of cashmere) are as follows: Jeff Wall, Ken Lum, Rodney Graham, Ian Wallace, Steven Shearer, and Stan Douglas. Some might argue that Douglas Coupland deserves mentioning, but Coupland is a truly bad visual artist who wrote one influential book, <em>Generation X</em>, and beyond that has written novels whose primary virtue is that they have good titles: <em>Girlfriend in a Coma</em>, <em>All Families are Psychotic</em>. Coupland is no visual artist. His artwork exists in a category that I would call &ldquo;passable&rdquo;&mdash;art that resembles trinkets you'd purchase in an art gallery gift shop. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">So why? Why has a city with just over half a million people produced so many great artists, and why has a city with millions of people given us so very little?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The question here does not ask why some of the artists from Vancouver are talented, or even why they are successful. It asks why certain Vancouver artists are seminal, influential, ground-breaking. Jeff Wall may not have been the first person to display photographs in a lightbox. However, it is irrefutable to say that any artist today mounting their photographs in a lightbox owes Jeff Wall, if not a royalty cheque, then a sincere acknowledgment of his importance and innovation. I may not necessarily think highly of his work, or the work of Steven Shearer, but many people do. I can say that, as a painter, when I see a Shearer painting, I just see a homoerotic rehashing of Edvard Munch, executed with much less skill and a fractional amount of sincerity. That's irrelevant though. My opinion is not important when it comes to the ascendency of artists who seem to have had a great effect on culture at large and are lauded worldwide, commanding enormous sums of money. Shearer has been vouched for, and re-vouched for&mdash;and knowing as I do that art and its industry are extremely picky about who is allowed access to the golden palace, he is by definition an Important Artist.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141214165729-Lum_K_E.2013.0472.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ken Lum</strong>, <em>Midway Shopping Plaza</em>, 2014, Installation view at the Whitney Biennial; Collection of the artist / Courtesy Marc Jancou Gallery, New York; Photo: Bill Orcutt&nbsp;Blouin; Via <a href="http://blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic/2014/05/23/daily-pic-ken-lum-sells-us-vietnams-memories/" target="_blank">ArtInfo</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ken Lum is, I think, the best artist Canada has produced in a hundred years. He achieves what has always been my goal, a quality I'm painfully aware of the difficulty of achieving: Ken's work makes you laugh, and it makes you cry. And not on occasion. Consistently. Ian Wallace is ostentatious and bothersome to me, but people take him seriously and his work is expensive. I've seen him wearing two scarves at once, and that alone is a signal that Wallace is a real somebody. Stan Douglas makes films that are presented as art, so I don't watch them, because I'd prefer to watch a movie than a two-hour movie trying to convince me it's an artwork. Rodney Graham is indisputably talented and has a seemingly endless range of skills. From tiny Picassoesque paintings to hilarious videos to emotionally charged installations; Rodney can do it all. And does it all.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Toronto has a longstanding issue with wanting to be seen as a &ldquo;world-class city.&rdquo; In this way, it never can be a world-class city, because a world-class city is something that develops organically, and more importantly, sincerely. New York, Los Angeles, Paris, and London are all without a doubt world-class cities. They've become such through accretion, through attempting, some cities more successfully than others, to maintain the presence of their historical monuments, and by not looking to other cities as models for what cities should be, instead too busy doing the work of becoming a city. Toronto's primary identity is its quest for identity. It's a highly neurotic place that spends far too much time wondering how it appears to other cities. I don't imagine Los Angeles wonders what Chicago thinks of it, or Paris wonders what Athens has to say about it. But Toronto has always wanted you to know that it's a serious place! A big city with big aspirations and a lot going on! In fact very little is going on, or has ever gone on.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141214165319-Toronto-Skyline.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;<span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">Toronto, a &ldquo;world-class city&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I would posit that the primary factor in Toronto remaining forever mediocre is its proximity to New York. Toronto loves to divide its neighborhoods up into &ldquo;districts.&rdquo; There is, for example, literally a three-square block named &ldquo;Design District,&rdquo; where I've never once seen a person rolling a rack of clothes through traffic towards a fashion shoot. Certainly there are a smattering of leather wholesalers, modelling agencies, and various other nebulous &ldquo;branding&rdquo; companies nestled inside of this area. It is not however, a district. There is also the &ldquo;Theatre District,&rdquo; which is one small stretch of King Street marked by a few theaters. We also have here, Little Portugal, Little Brazil, Little Italy, Koreatown, Little India. When I say we have these districts and areas, I mean that these appellations are emblazoned on the street signs. The designated ethnic neighborhoods are in fact the most flourishing ones, the ones with the most legitimate claim to being a &ldquo;district.&rdquo; However, this has nothing to do with the city, or the signs it posts in two languages; it's entirely the result of the immigrants who settled within these areas, opened small business, and stayed within the confines of their neatly organized replications of their home countries. But the other districts, Fashion, Theater, Design, etc., are Spartan at best, and frankly pitiful when compared to their sister districts in New York. It's a fundamental clich&eacute; at this point that attempting to be &ldquo;cool&rdquo; automatically renders it impossible to be so. The same goes for wanting to be a world-class city. Make this your goal, and watch it never materialize.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The problem then is mimicry. Toronto as a city mimics other cities. And artists in Toronto have historically mimicked the art they've seen succeed in other cities. This can and does work within the very small art world in Toronto, where the vast majority of people are uninformed about the larger contemporary art world, so that artwork containing elements of contemporary art culled from magazines like <em>Artforum</em> and 13-hour bus trips to Manhattan can and does sell in Toronto. But anyone with sophistication and a broader understanding of what is happening in art currently can spot and then dismiss a replica in an instant. Artists in Toronto look at art far too much. And the art they look at is in magazines, and those magazines most often showcase art that is being made and shown in New York.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The result? Many pastiches are made, and sometimes even outright frauds are created in the hopes that nobody will notice, and sometimes nobody does, and that is where innovation begins and ends in this city. There will always be a few artists with real vision and originality, but then the proximity to New York is problematic in a different way, in that collectors here figure they might as well take the 50-minute plane ride to New York and buy strong contemporary art that's already being reproduced in magazines and written about in the <em>New York Times</em>, not the <em>Toronto Star</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141214165223-20140313071313-JW_Invisible_man_by_Ralp_Ellison__the_Prologue_1999-2000_transparencyinlightbox_174x250_5cm_courtesytheartist.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Jeff Wall</strong>, <em>After &lsquo;Invisible Man&rsquo; by Ralph Ellison, The Prologue</em>,1999-2000, Transparency in lightbox, 174 x 250 x 5 cm; &copy; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There exists in nature a fairly apt example of all that plagues art in Toronto. In ethology, certain species display a quality known as passive mimicry. In order to not be beleaguered and eaten by predators, some animals are able to transform themselves in such a way that they appear to be, if not a threat, harmless and inedible. The Owl Butterfly can contort it's wings in such a way that it appears to have two giant eyes, resembling an owl, which thwarts off attacks from lizards and predatory birds. Toronto is the Owl Butterfly&mdash;able to mimic something which it is not in order to stay under the radar and alive, although alive with the constant tremble of fear and neurosis.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vancouver is as far west as one can go in Canada without falling into the ocean. Like all cities in the West&mdash;Fairbanks, Alaska, Joshua Tree, California&mdash;it is the end of the road for social miscreants and outsiders. The west is the refuge of the freak, the disenfranchised, and the lonely. The closest American city to Vancouver is Seattle. Vancouver is isolated; isolation breeds creativity and innovative thought. There was a period in the early 2000s when Winnipeg was spewing a lot of unique and, to some people, interesting art out into the larger world. Winnipeg is also isolated, a tiny city in a vast range of nothingness. Isolation is a great thing for an artist, but it also takes a terrible toll on the psyche of a human being. Prisoners in solitary confinement will, if they aren't allowed pencils, scratch drawings into the walls of their cells with their fingernails or stray fragments of brick. Humans have an innate desire to express themselves visually when in isolation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As I mentioned above, there's no avoiding that the art scene in Vancouver is a boy's club. Certainly this is unfortunate, but it's a topic for another essay. Jeff Wall, putatively the first person to establish what has come to be called &ldquo;photoconceptualism,&rdquo; had his first solo show at Vancouver's Nova Gallery in 1978. Between 1976 and 1987 Wall was an associate professor at Simon Fraser University and for many years also taught at the University of British Columbia. His influence on his students cannot be underestimated, in that he essentially nurtured and launched an entirely unique school of Vancouver art. It helped that Wall also published essays on other Vancouver artists, such as Rodney Graham, Roy Arden, and Ken Lum. This generosity of spirit and championing of companion artists is a throwback to the days of another boy's club: Abstract Expressionism's painters such as Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, and Robert Motherwell. It could be argued that without Wall's support of other artists, Vancouver might not have become the important city for art that it is today. It's certainly a quality and community-minded spirit that is admirable, and sadly rare in other cities, such as Toronto. Through championing the work of other artists, by recommending his peers to curators, dealers, writers and the like, Wall was instrumental in creating a culturally autarkic art scene. In Toronto, where everyone is seemingly battling to get to the very middle, there is a noticeable lack of generosity.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If artists in Toronto have connections to galleries, curators, writers, they keep these connections close to their chests. The closest Toronto artists get to generous is a sort of quid pro quo: <em>I'll show your website to this person if you show them mine</em>. Self-advancement and competitiveness are the status quo. As a result, with nobody helping anybody else, everyone remains mediocre, and unable to break through to a more dynamic level of success and creative development. Artists in Toronto seem to be so desperate to be successful, that they forget that success is something most easily achieved through the help and assistance of other like-minded people. Vancouver understood this, and artists helped artists. I know from my own experience that much of my success has been contingent on the recommendations of other artists, and in turn I have acted out of a similar desire to help others. Because it is, in fact, extremely difficult to break into the more relevant contemporary art world, and too easy to stay mired in the simulacrum of a real and vital art community.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141214165133-mocca11.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Exterior of the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA), 2014</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One glaring difference between Toronto and Vancouver that's symptomatic of both the success of Vancouver artists and the perpetuated mediocrity of Toronto are the publicly funded institutions in both cities.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I live in Toronto again now. Toronto is home to the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art. I've yet to see a single interesting show there. And this was true before I left Toronto in 2002. What's remained consistent about MOCCA in those 12 years are that it has had the same director, David Liss, and it has no curator. It desperately needs a curator, or some other advisory employee, but it is, as it's always been since he took over the job, the empire of David Liss. As a result, while it's supposed to showcase the best art in Canada, and could occasionally show us good contemporary art from other countries, it's mired in the anachronistic vision of a single person: a middle aged white man given free reign to run his own private museum. That second-rate Toronto artists like Balint Zsako, mostly likely unknown to over 99 percent of the international art audience, have been given solo shows there, is symptomatic of a Toronto-centric parochial approach to running a museum that is supposed to represent and speak for an entire country.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141214164539-SHEAS31813.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Steven Shearer</strong>, <em>Toolsheds no. 2</em>, 2001, Inkjet-print, framed. Ed. of 5 + 1 AP. 61 x 72 cm / 24 x 28 3/8 in.; &copy; Courtesy the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">However, in Vancouver, at the Contemporary Art Gallery, under the auspices of curator Jenifer Papararo, I saw shows by Mike Nelson, Frances Stark, and Canadian Tim Gardner. Group shows exhibited work by artists such as Hans-Peter Feldmann, Ingmar and Dragset, alongside Vancouver artists Jeff Wall, Rodney Graham, and Steven Shearer. There was at the CAG, as there should be (at MOCCA as well), a conversation between Canadian artists and international artists, which immediately gave Canadian artist from Vancouver the patina of international contemporaneity. And this is a small building, a small institution, with a budget surely much smaller than the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art. There was more bravery involved in the shows put together, and a sense that Canadian artists were just as interesting as &ldquo;famous&rdquo; artists from around the world. This alone lends Vancouver artists a certain aura of importance and glamor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And this is how it should be. That MOCCA consistently provides a reliably mediocre Can-Con experience is fundamentally disappointing, and something art-loving taxpayers should take issue with.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Vancouver Art Gallery also mounts much more interesting shows, which often include international artists. The VAG collects the work of both established and emerging artists from Vancouver. Like the Art Gallery of Ontario, they also have shows designed to bring in the broader public, to make money off ticket sales, but when serious contemporary art shows are mounted at the VAG, they are always more internationally minded.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Art Gallery of Ontario is dismally tourist oriented. Not that this is a bad thing in itself. It was nice to see Frida Kahlo paintings in Toronto; the Francis Bacon/Henry Moore show mounted by Dan Adler, although a curatorial stretch, was wonderful in that we got to see a great deal of paintings by Francis Bacon. But the AGO is notorious for not buying the work of artists from Toronto. I'm not sure what they buy, if anything&mdash;but I do know, either personally or second-hand, the majority of successful artists from Toronto, none of whom are in the collection of the AGO. This is not only a shame, but it is municipally unpatriotic, and again, something that taxpayers should take issue with. I think it costs thirty dollars to get into the AGO, to walk through room after room of Group of Seven paintings&mdash; meanwhile, artists in Toronto who have done well internationally and may have sold work to the New Museum or The Museum of Modern Art, and the AGO still cannot deign to purchase their work. Consciously ignoring local artists is a basic dereliction of duty for an institution that relies on tax dollars, yet would rather spend that money to print Frida Kahlo mugs for the gift shop, than buy the work of a single mid-career artist from Toronto.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ultimately, the disparity between myopic and parochial Toronto institutions, and broad minded and courageous Vancouver institutions is another important factor in what has allowed artists from Vancouver to have international cache while the Toronto scene remains stuck in a cycle of mediocrity and malaise.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If Vancouver is <em>Artforum</em>, Toronto is <em>Art in America</em>. If you're familiar with these magazines, you'll understand the distinction.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141214164833-20110124231642-303_Gallery___New_York___Rodney_Graham___Lighthouse_Keeper_with_Lighthouse_Model__1955___2010_aaaaaaaaaaavbfk_1_.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Rodney Graham</strong>, <em>Lighthouse Keeper with Lighthouse Model, 1955</em>, 2010; &copy; Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York and Lisson Gallery, London</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It's been a while now since Vancouver has produced new artists with global influence. This may in part be due to the fact that the succeeding generations have also chosen selfishness and careerism over community and kindness. Toronto remains, as it has always been, basically an irrelevant city for art. If one were to use warfare as a metaphor, it would seem obvious that a smattering of people, stationed behind boulders and on rooftops with grenades and sniper rifles aren't going to do much to advance their cause, but should a group of them gather together and combine their skills, weaponry, and communication devices, advances would be made. That weapon can be a rifle; that weapon can be an email. But the intense suspicion of other artists, and the essentially selfish and ungenerous nature of artists working in Toronto, ensures that it will always be a city that makes art that looks a bit like art, and where original thought and innovation by a small number of people will always be drowned out by the voices of copycats, imitators and, essentially, interior designers. If and when Toronto gets over itself, puts its neurotic self-obsession on hiatus, and begins to formulate communities and generosity, it may have a chance.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the meantime, the real hope for urgent and innovative art coming out of Canada will remain in Vancouver, where artists are too far away from Los Angeles to bother attempting to replicate it, and isolated enough that they spend more time thinking, and less time looking at the results of other people's thinking. Like anything in being alive, communing with like-minded people and sharing information is the antidote to a malady called mediocrity.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And hopefully it will happen soon, because Toronto is, and has been for some time now, quite ill.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/6978-brad-phillips?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Brad Phillips</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <strong>Rodney Graham</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Small Basement Camera Shop circa 1937</em>, 2011, Painted aluminum light box with trans mounted chromogenic transparency, 71-1/2 x 71-1/2 x 7 in. (181.6 x 181.6 x 17.8 cm), Ed: 3 of 5 + 1 AP; &nbsp;Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Mary and Earle Ludgin by exchange in honor of Donald Young, 2012;&nbsp;&copy; 2011 Rodney Graham;&nbsp;Image courtesy Donald Young Gallery, Chicago)</span></p> Fri, 19 Dec 2014 20:06:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Here, Listen: <em>Allora & Calzadilla: Intervals</em> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;&ldquo;<em>Intervals</em> revels in the unknowable as essential to human experience. The exhibition bears witness to incomplete presences and resonant remainders. It finds in music a measure and a reckoning with these elusive forces and the abyss that lies between.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 60px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Gesamtkunstwerk</em>, as German-defined, is a work that sums all arts&mdash;aural, visual, and performative&mdash;to total a perfect affective state. No other word seems capable of describing the mission of Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla in&nbsp;<em>Intervals</em>. Echoing their artistic partnership, the massive exhibition, which opened to the public on Friday, is produced by the coupling of two revered Philadelphia institutions, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Fabric Workshop, and is split between the two locations. With both old projects and new works created especially for the show, it follows that Allora and Calzadilla seek to fill the space in and between the buildings with meaning if not quantity.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Indeed, almost all of the works achieve exceeding profundity for a sumptuously Wagnerian, almost spiritual experience. Uniting performance, music, film, and sculpture, the works do justice to the efforts of multiple collaborators such as the local choir The Crossing, the chamber ensemble Rel&acirc;che, and composers David Lang and Christopher Rountree. The communal participation is not surprising: while Allora is a Philadelphia native and the two work in Calzadilla&rsquo;s birth country (state) Puerto Rico, the pieces aspire to an atavistic universality predating and beyond colonial histories, beyond post-colonial theories, and beyond the twisted biases of human language. As such, the subjects in the works often communicate through transforming ancient, even animal artifacts like a Venus figurine in&nbsp;<em>3</em>&nbsp;(2013), a billions year old stone in&nbsp;<em>Lifespan&nbsp;</em>(2014), or a flute carved from a griffin vulture in&nbsp;<em>Raptor&rsquo;s Rapture</em>&nbsp;(2012) into instruments.&nbsp; On the other hand are the glorious classical harmonies in&nbsp;<em>In the Midst of Things</em>(2014) that simultaneously evoke flocking behavior and narrate the psychological vicissitudes of creation.&nbsp; The reaffirmation of the human into the natural cycle by the reanimation of things in some part destroyed by modern society is a romantic even trendy notion.&nbsp; However, hearing Hayden&rsquo;s rearranged&nbsp;<em>The Creation</em>&nbsp;resounding through the PMA in reverse was an eerily up-lifting, even transcendent experience.&nbsp; A return is also a journey to somewhere, it seemed to say, a sentiment that runs throughout&nbsp;<em>Intervals</em>. &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141213020217-Allora___Calzadilla_Intervals_GREAT_SILENCE_STILL.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Allora &amp; Calzadilla,&nbsp;<em>The Great Silence</em>, 2014</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While the exhibition is undeniably moving in swathes, the cosmic proportions left me with a slightly uncomfortable aftertaste at times.&nbsp; The extreme emotional register forced the human to abstract into The Human and even as Allora and Calzadilla profess to explore of communication, I felt cut off, like an atheist watching a church service or a TV watcher of the moon landing&mdash;or worse, a little tricked by the drama.&nbsp; That said, I found&nbsp;<em>The Great Silence&nbsp;</em>(2014) to be the most interesting of the works.&nbsp; In a 3-channel video installation, a parrot laments how while humans obsess over finding life in space&mdash;a modern day search for God&mdash;it ignores the profuse bio-societies that inhabit earth, leading to the preset day near extinction of its kind.&nbsp; Not to be flippant, but in the rarified world of&nbsp;<em>Intervals</em>, I wonder: who is the parrot? &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/354852-s-v-kim?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">S V Kim</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(Image at top: Allora &amp; Calzadilla,&nbsp;<em>Raptor's Rapture</em>, 2012,&nbsp;Single channel video projection with sound, 23:30 min;&nbsp;&copy; the artists)</span></p> Sat, 13 Dec 2014 15:55:14 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list "Adoption Agency" for Art Might Herald New Dynamic in Market <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An empty wall to fill but on a tight budget? Looking for an original Christmas gift? Or are you just an avid bargain hunter? A semi-abstract print by Jaap Hillenius could be just the ticket for you. Price: somewhere between 175 and 250 euro&mdash;and that&rsquo;s including the frame. If you like large formats, the reclining nude by Hans van der Ham costing 450 euro is an option. And at 175 euro a diptych by Bert Loerakker is a good deal&mdash;especially if you take into account the original price of 810 euro. A work by Eug&egrave;ne Terwindt has been marked down even more: from 2,393 to 450 euro.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211204952-Stichting_Onterfd_Goed_-_Bart_Invites__Amsterdam.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Bloemgracht 2, Amsterdam, Bart Invites: Stichting Onterfd Goed</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These works and many more can be found at Bloemgracht 2 in Amsterdam, the former location of Galerie Bart. Ever since moving to the Elandsgracht the gallery has invited external parties to use the space and this month Onterfd Goed takes its turn. Onterfd Goed (a wordplay on "heritage," "disinherited," "goods," and "good") took off two years ago in &lsquo;s-Hertogenbosch, where it administers a former industrial building filled with discarded art pieces and other objects. The foundation advises museums, government institutions, and companies about what to do with their art collections and especially how to make them more efficient. The fact that only five percent of all 65 million collection pieces in The Netherlands ever leaves an expensive storage facility has prompted a plea for redistribution. Onterfd Goed poses as a euphemistically named "adoption agency for art," placing the poor neglected orphans with new parents in exchange for a fee.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Of course, over the years art collections&mdash;both institutional and corporate&mdash;have been disbanded and sold. Companies weeding out their endless print collections would organize cash &amp; carry-sales for their personnel or auction off the whole lot for charity&mdash;like ING did in 2009 for Unicef. The municipal art lending facilities known as CBKs have in most cities been privatized and are selling off large parts of their collections, as recently happened in Rotterdam. But in the museum world deaccessioning was for a long time absolutely not done. Museums were supposed to collect and preserve for eternity, never to discard anything&mdash;even worthless trash that had found its way into the collection as part of a legacy. Selling top pieces in order to buy something else or to pay the utility bill was completely out of the question. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rudi Fuchs tried it in 1988 in the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag with a Mondriaan and a Picasso, Chris Dercon ten years later at the Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum with one of the two Rothkos in Dutch museums. Both were publicly condemned in the harshest of terms. The same goes for Stanley Bremer of the Wereldmuseum in Rotterdam, who now wants to balance the books with the sale of African sculptures. Only a few museum directors have gotten away with deaccessioning. In 2005 Wim van Krimpen of the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag was the first to bring museum pieces to auction and have their provenance noted in the catalogue. The surprise record price of 3,3 million euro for an Ilya Mashkov still life enabled the museum to buy a room full of contemporary artworks. And Gerard de Kleijn of Museum Gouda has to live with the eternal wrath of Marlene Dumas for selling her <em>The Schoolboys</em> in 2011, but the one million euro proceeds have probably saved the institution.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141212040927-Interior_Stichting_Onterfd_Goed_-_Bart_Invites__Amsterdam.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Interior Bart Invites: Stichting Onterfd Goed, Amsterdam</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the US museum directors more routinely ask their staff to "reassess the collection." Being more dependent on private funding than their Dutch counterparts they have to optimize their collections and minimize administrative costs of storage and conservation. But this can lead to excesses and that&rsquo;s why the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) has set up guidelines for deaccessioning, which have most recently been updated in 2010. The most important rule is that institutions may sell a piece of art in order to buy another, more suitable work, but they may never do so to merely cover costs. Quite a few times the AAMD has stepped up and issued warnings. The National Academy Museum in New York essentially got blackballed for auctioning works to ward off a financial crisis. And condemning words have been spoken about the Delaware Art Museum (for trying to alleviate a $20 million debt by selling part of the collection), Randolph College&rsquo;s Maier Museum of Art (for selling a George Bellows painting to London&rsquo;s National Gallery for $25.5 million) and, of course, the Detroit Institute of Art, which&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is <a href="https://aamd.org/for-the-media/press-release/aamd-statement-on-detroit-institute-of-arts-collection" target="_blank">seen as a kind of piggybank</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;by the political leaders of this bankrupt city.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Netherlands has its own set of guidelines called the LAMO (Leidraad Afstoting Museale Objecten), which has been in place since 2000 and was updated and tightened last year as a result of the upheaval generated by the sale of <em>The Schoolboys</em>. The LAMO dictates an extensive and strict selection procedure. Before being able to sell works, a museum must present them to other Dutch institutions to see if they are interested. A special database has been created for this, which at the moment contains about 12,000 pieces from 45 museums. But considering that only ten percent of these will find a new institutional home, there is ample room for an alternative channel like Onterfd Goed.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211205900-Marnix_Goossens__Hortus_1__2006___Stichting_Onterfd_Goed.jpg" alt="" height="400" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211205917-Marnix_Goossens__Hortus_1__2007___Stichting_Onterfd_Goed.jpg" alt="" height="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Marnix Goossens</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Hortus 1</em>, 2006 (left),&nbsp;<em>Hortus 1</em>, 2007 (right);&nbsp;&copy; Stichting Onterfd Goed</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Optimists will say it&rsquo;s a good thing that Onterfd Goed is preventing art from dying a slow and anonymous death in dark storage spaces. In private homes the work is at least appreciated and taken care off. Moreover, Onterfd Goed could act like a stepping stone for emerging collectors, infecting them with the bug and helping build the future art market. Pessimists, on the other hand, will insist that the art market is a zero sum game and money can only be spent once. Art market newbies like Onterfd Goed compete with galleries and small auction houses. Moreover, it&rsquo;s questionable what these "art garage sales" imply for the artists whose work is being sold. In the case of high edition multiples the effect is probably negligible, but it&rsquo;s different for unique pieces. True, at 3,250 euro a pop the three Marnix Goossens photographs Onterfd Goed has on sale now are not ridiculously underpriced, but the shabby entourage does take away a bit of the shine. It&rsquo;s not the same as buying a Goossens at his representative Nouvelles Images in The Hague.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Until now Onterfd Goed has sold off two museum collections. The work on show in Amsterdam came from the municipality of Utrecht. But the foundation is negotiating with two other museums and in light of the current cultural climate more are bound to follow. Add to this the number of corporate collections expected to deaccession because of changing office architecture (fewer walls) or plain downsizing, and a virtual flooding of the secondary market is in the offing. It&rsquo;s safe to expect that with increasing volume the quality of what&rsquo;s on offer will increase over time. Since a secondary market for contemporary art has hardly existed in The Netherlands up till now, the gallery circuit should brace itself for a whole new dynamic.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Interior Bart Invites: Stichting Onterfd Goed, Amsterdam;&nbsp;All images courtesy of Stichting Onterfd Goed, 's-Hertogenbosch)</span></p> Fri, 12 Dec 2014 04:11:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list The Kochi-Muziris Biennale Take Two: Why We Need to Improve Arts Funding in India <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The story of the first <a href="http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org/" target="_blank">Kochi Muziris Biennale</a> could quite well have been a Bollywood film plot, so melodramatic was its December 2012 inauguration (12/12/12). It battled fund crunching fires, technical spills, and bad press before emerging as a hero, hailed as a new format of biennale making. The biennale was established by two artists, Bose Krishnamachari and Riyas Komu, who, in the decades contemporary art came into its own in India, went where no one had been before. Like the quintessential heroes of Bollywood, they did it against all odds, day to day, putting up work as money trickled in. Indeed, </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Against All Odds,</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> as the biennale was appropriately called, taught lessons. But lessons learnt in India in 2012 about a barely understood&mdash;and often </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">mis</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">understood&mdash;contemporary art world didn&rsquo;t mean that there were &ldquo;readymade&rdquo; converts the second time around.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211150017-_DHE1128.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Kochi Biennale Director Bose Krishnamachari, Artistic Director and Curtor Jitish Kallat, and Director of Programmes Riyas Komu</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Which is why funding art that is not popular in India is a seemingly insurmountable challenge. This year the <a href="http://www.mumbaifilmfest.org/" target="_blank">Mumbai Film Festival</a>, which brings the best of world cinema to the city and showcases regional and alternative Hindi cinema to an eager audience each October, failed to garner a big sponsor till a month before the festival&rsquo;s start&mdash;and this, in the 16th edition of the festival. Desperate fans started crowdfunding, energizing the movie industry and others, and managed to collect the bare minimum needed to hold the festival in a reduced format. And still the crowds came: ordinary citizens, passionate film buffs for whom travel to Cannes or Berlin or Toronto or Venice or Sundance is but a dream. With the Mumbai Film Festival the best of these festivals was brought to a cinema near them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Why is it so difficult to fund such democratic ventures that are, in fact, inclusive rather than alienating (as is often the case with the exclusivity of a white cube or a private screening)? Personally, I think it&rsquo;s a lack of understanding by those not engaged with contemporary art or non-Bollywood cinema. This kind of art or cinema is readily termed elitist. Yet of the thousands who came to the biennale there were, yes, art aficionados and foreign visitors, but they were outnumbered by ordinary Keralites and others from around the country: students and locals&mdash;from teachers to rickshaw drivers&mdash;who engaged with art forms they had never seen before, instinctively, emotionally, and intelligently. Whether it was Amar Kanwar&rsquo;s videos of endangered forests and tribal lands or Angelica Meseti&rsquo;s video about immigrants in Australia, seeing was believing: thousands of visitors saw what contemporary art had to offer. It wasn&rsquo;t elitist or trifling; it was thought provoking&mdash;and not only in subject matter. It was inspiring to see young artists, exposed to art from around the world, moved by the shock of the new.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The same applies to cinema. The film festival is a platform for reflecting current stories of the world around us. Whether it&rsquo;s Nishtha Jain&rsquo;s documentary <em>Gulabi Gang</em> about women&rsquo;s rights in Bundelkhand or Keralite Sajin Babu&rsquo;s confident debut feature <em>Unto the Dusk</em>, an experimental delve into changing social mores, it&rsquo;s the young who are shaping our worlds. And these youth live around the country, in cities and in villages; it&rsquo;s reversely elitist to think that exposing them to contemporary art or cinema is beyond their understanding or desire.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211162601-IMG_0008.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Artists working on site at the </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Kochi-Muziris Biennale</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Even among India&rsquo;s educated the biennale&mdash;<em>what&rsquo;s that?</em>&mdash;is misunderstood for an art fair or a festival. It is not seen as being about education. About placing our art in context with what&rsquo;s happening around the world, a peer review, so to speak, much needed in a country where critical thinking has suffered as education standards have eroded over the years. About the outreach programs it conducts throughout the year, the revival of traditional arts it engages with, the jobs it brings back to a state where most of the male population is in absentia, earning their living elsewhere, where alcoholism and dowry deaths are a social problem. And most do not understand that nothing is for sale. Three months of art <em>just being exhibited</em> is an alien concept.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As we approach the second edition of the Kochi Biennale, which opens tomorrow, December 12, it&rsquo;s crisis time again. Of the 63 percent of the total cost promised by the government (of a total estimate of Rs 26 crores [$4 million USD]) only two crores have been released as opposed to the four agreed upon. The organizers are left with their backs up against the wall&mdash;again. Fundraisers invited collectors and patrons for preview screenings and appeals for support. Artists Vivan Sundaram and Sudhir Patwardhan have not only donated Rs 40 lakhs ($64,000 USD) and Rs 10 lakhs ($16,000 USD) respectively, but like other artists, they are bearing the installation costs of their projects. Such is the deep understanding that the artist community here has: that the biennale must continue in this iteration and onward into the future. As artworks arrive at the port in Kochi, it&rsquo;s with bated breaths that the fundraising continues, with crowdsourcing and private donations supplementing the garnering of big sponsors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211165414-IMG_0068.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a country beleaguered with huge numbers still living below the poverty line, the government has other priorities, of course. Budget allocation for art is negligible, yet it is imperative that a biennale be a private/public partnership. After all, the Kochi-Muziris Biennale is for everyone: it's held in public spaces (in Kochi, the most incredible venues will be open to the public for the first time, and preparation included the restoration of the state&rsquo;s Lalit Kala Akademi allowing for year-round use of its international quality gallery space), boosts the state&rsquo;s economy in terms of employment and tourism, and is a most efficient education tool; the numbers it reaches out to, so cost effectively, should be heeded.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While the government dithers, and private donations start building up the coffers slowly, the new company law (Companies Act 2014) should allow for corporate social responsibility (CSR) funds. A certain percentage of a company&rsquo;s profits must be compulsorily used in non-profit ventures. In the arts and culture section, restoration, heritage, and crafts are specifically mentioned (perhaps the contemporary needs to be lobbied for as well?). We need an enlightened corporate entity to realize that contemporary arts will define our future heritage and cannot be ignored; the scale of outreach a biennale or a film festival could have needs to be understood. The Venice Biennale has been funded for decades by BMW&mdash;it&rsquo;s grown to be the biennales of biennales, a platform of cultures that an entity like UNESCO alone cannot achieve.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This is where the future lies&mdash;in both machines working together&mdash;the nonprofit and the bound-by-law-profits (whether it is education or health or the arts) melding for the good of society. Art is not measurable wealth, but a nation without an understanding of the arts is a nation with a floundering sense of self or awareness of humanity. If all the emphasis is on material or quantifiable gain, at the cost of that which is without measure, it will only make a country of no measure.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211165801-valsan_koorma_kolleri_at_cabral_yard.JPG" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Valsan Koorma Kolleri at Cabral Yard</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One Kochi Biennale established will not change things overnight, but a successfully recurring biennale&mdash;one that reengages public spaces with new, stimulating histories&mdash;would be the fastest and most critically sound transformative experience able to reach out to the neophyte and the already converted alike. This awareness can then be ignited once integrated into art &ldquo;education&rdquo; through the outreach programs planned by the Biennale. Some exciting ideas this year include a <a href="http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org/students-biennale/" target="_blank">Student&rsquo;s Biennale</a> that spans the entire country bringing in work of students from existing art colleges into the contemporary presence of the biennale; the artist film project <a href="http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org/artists-cinema/" target="_blank">Artists' Cinema</a> that cross-pollinates ideas between video art and experimental cinema; <a href="http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org/history-now/" target="_blank">History Now</a>, a series of talks and seminars involving leading artists and thinkers that will be available to all on the website; and a <a href="http://kochimuzirisbiennale.org/childrens-biennale/" target="_blank">Children&rsquo;s Biennale</a> with workshops, guided tours, and other initiatives to engage the young.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">All this does not even include the Biennale&rsquo;s main draw: the artists&rsquo; projects that at its center. This year curator and artist Jitish Kallat&rsquo;s <em>Whorled Explorations</em> invites the interpretations of 94 artists (from 30 countries) to draw attention to two 14&ndash;17th<sup>&nbsp; </sup>century outreaches in Kerala&rsquo;s history: its mathematical journeys and its shores that have been the site of so many outside conquests. Artists will seek to re-interpret what&rsquo;s left in the hybrid culture of Fort Kochi, reaching out to the cosmos, in the currency and agency of the present.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/364333-deepika-sorabjee?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Deepika Sorabjee</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Aspinwall House venue; All images courtesy of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale)</span></p> Thu, 11 Dec 2014 19:49:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list <b>Plastic Words: Events in the Contested Space Between Literature and Art</b> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening this weekend at <a href="http://www.ravenrow.org/" target="_blank">Raven Row</a>&nbsp;London is a series of events about the intersection of literature and art called </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Plastic Words</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, which will run throughout December and January. There has been a resurgent interest in the overlap of contemporary literature and art recently. The development of the independent Art Writing MFA at Goldsmiths and its swift subsumption back into the MFA in Fine Art neatly demonstrates the sometimes contested, sometimes happily shared, ground these modes of working occupy. Whatever motivated the shift to independence from the MFA in Fine Art, the move to incorporate it back perhaps suggests a newly found willingness to integrate ideas, methods, and practices from literature into contemporary art conversations, spanning two disciplines which were for a time difficult to incorporate.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The six weeks of talks, panels, performances, book printings at Raven Row will cover ground far beyond the specific genre of art writing, but this contested space between literature and contemporary art will be their starting point. The events have been organised by a collaboration of writers, critics, artists and publishers whose own varied practices speak to need for an expansive look at the ways in which these activities increasingly overlap.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141211185556-Isou_Recital.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Isidore Isou reading his manifesto of cultural and meca-aesthetical wrapping (<em>&OElig;uvre d&rsquo;anti-emballage et de super-emballage</em>, 1985)&nbsp;on the Pont-Neuf, Paris, on May 26, 1987; Photographer unknown; Courtesy and copyright: Archives Eric Fabre</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The first event, called<em> Opening Event: Verberations</em>, kicks off the series this Saturday 13 December, from 5pm &ndash; 9pm. Tickets are now sold out for events with the biggest names in both literature and art, such as Tom McCarthy or Chris Kraus, but it might be worth hoping for no-shows or returns. Kraus will be talking about her in-progress biography of Kathy Acker on January 14, and then in conversation with Helen DeWitt and Jeremy Akerman the following evening about publishing options for writing in the expanded field. It will be a rare chance to hear Kraus speak in London.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There are tickets still available for many events though, and there are a number of unticketed performances that will definitely be worth attending. I highly recommend going to see Helen DeWitt speak. Her last book, <em>Lightening Rods </em>(2011), is a story about an idea gone too far and as such has something of Tom McCarthy&rsquo;s <em>Remainder</em> about it, albeit drier in style and with a biting satire of sexual politics and overzealous management language. Other highlights will be a conversation between Peter Osborne and David Cunningham on January 21st, and a screening of Isidore Isou&rsquo;s <em>Trait&eacute; de Bave et D&rsquo;&Eacute;ternit&eacute;</em>&nbsp;(1951) on January 30th.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Raven Row Event Flyer)</span></p> Thu, 11 Dec 2014 19:42:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list What Is It About Tom Friedman's <em>Up in the Air</em>? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">900 sculptures of everyday objects that together comprise the work <em>Up in the Air</em>&nbsp;by Tom Friedman have arrived at the Tel Aviv Museum. Suspended from the museum's ceiling, pieces of chewing gum, miniature planes, sporting equipment, and fragments of fencing float alongside other recognizable tropes in Friedman's iconography such as crumpled boxes of cereal, cigarettes, FedEx, and big burgers, exploded into space.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141210113703-Tom_Friedman_Up_in_the_Air.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The piece debuted four years ago at Switzerland's <a href="http://www.magasin3.com/en/" target="_blank">Magasin III</a> gallery last year. Its orbit now continues in Israel where it has recently been installed, and will be on view at the&nbsp;Lightfall of the Herta and Paul Amir Building until March.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What is it about this work that everyone finds so compelling?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141210113504-TF_detail_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Is it Friedman's approach to the contentious subject of the product-oriented psyche?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">His art transforms the banal into the sublime;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he elevates items that are normally held up for critique. Looking up at this falling cornucopia, the physical experience of viewing these works gives a new perspective, and when seen en masse, you</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;look on in awe at manmade creation. Friedman's installation</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;puts a much needed positive spin on the items that for other people represent the landfill graveyard of consumerism, just like his giant styrofoam pizzas or slices of white bread reinstate a feeling of comfort in the simple things.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Friedman's also an alchemist, transforming the still life genre into a plucky Pop Art portrait. Objects are memories, anecdotes, and feelings. He conveys everything about mainstream culture&mdash;and that's the point. He's not a snob and he's fun. <em>Up in the Air</em>'s&nbsp;everday objects and materials relate to everyone. It's brilliantly simple, and executed with the kind of technical aplomb that audiences love to find in art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141210113519-TF_detail.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And yet, steady your gaze a bit longer at Friedman's universe and it takes on another charge: it's suddenly a polluting mess and chaos that rains suffocatingly down on us. The game with <em>Up in the Air</em> is how long can you keep admiring, before the mass begins to consume you with it. As the work's title forewarns, nothing is certain.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image on top: Tom Friedman)</span></p> Thu, 11 Dec 2014 16:07:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list The Man at Ululation: Bob Cobbing <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the wall of the gallery space at Chelsea College of Arts there is a screen on which a monochrome film plays out. It&rsquo;s a transfer from an old tape marked at the edges with braided lines, strange interference artifacts of spooling marks in stark black and white framing the scene. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The image of a room looks smoky, misty, colloidal, but that&rsquo;s just the video. A man with a tight buzz cut stoops over a fire bucket, poised, an end-blown flute to his mouth, using the opening and the movement of the water in the fire bucket to create a strange, shrill glottal stop, over and over. He dips it. He stops. In the background comes the clatter of drums: galloping timbales, staccato, pecking in a rattle of arrhythmic ticks and jolts. Someone starts throwing bang snaps, the trick noisemakers a crisp beat, too. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Through the not-really haze of the video screen digital transfer comes a man in a check suit, confidently stepping in front of the performers: he occupies the same space, but further out. He seems to guide the camera, panning back, almost as if he&rsquo;s going to make the final announcement of the night, to bring on the last band. He is resplendent in graph-paper jacket, greyscale, and peaked beard; he looms through the mild generational decay mist, carrying himself at a point somewhere between an evil mastermind and a cheerful, late-middle-aged English teacher with a splash of goblin&mdash;and he&rsquo;s here to steal the show.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141210120914-Bob__John_Bennett_sm.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Bob Cobbing reading "Are Your Children Safe in the Sea'" circa 1966-1972; Photograph: John Bennett</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the screen next to this one the same man, wearing the same inscrutable smile and beard tenses his mouth and prods the tin and copperware spread against the table with a couple of beaters. The metal complains, and so he smacks it harder, clattering one of the bowls off its perch to make a messy final noise on the floor. It&rsquo;s reminiscent of a child aggressively imagining a drum-kit in a kitchen, both in its sound&mdash;which travels very directly through the good headphones&mdash;and in energy. It carries on for some time. The man with the wonderful face tucks it down into his beard and grumbles with enough force to overcome the noise, and we can hear above the cacophony of another dish colliding as he starts to sing out: it is the sound of an engine trapped in a hollowed-out tree.</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the next screen over on the same wall he&rsquo;s here again, in color, but a long time ago. He stands alone, like the performer&mdash;hands clasped affront, microphone leaning in&mdash;and he&rsquo;s giving the silent crowd merry bloody hell. This is Bob Cobbing, performing his poem T<em>he Sacred Mushroom.</em></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/2VNW5wiFE4M" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Cobbing&rsquo;s vast catalogue of work is being given a year&rsquo;s exposure under the banner <a href="http://www.bobjubile.org/" target="_blank">Bob Jubil&eacute;</a>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">and <em>Bill Jubobe</em>&mdash;to name the Chelsea show&mdash;presents a rare and wonderful opportunity to view the man at ululation, as well as providing a good amount of archival information.</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This mainly comes in the form of contemporaneous newspaper clippings and articles. Many of them expound the levels of anger, befuddlement, rebuttal, counter-grievance, pride, and protectiveness one would expect over the small-but-vibrant Hendon arts scene that birthed Cobbing&rsquo;s own <em>AND</em> magazine in July of 1954 (the mock-up of the first issue of which is on display here). In the <em>Finchley Post</em> "Beat poems" at the North Finchley Library are compared to &ldquo;mental sludge&rdquo; under the headline &ldquo;THOSE SHOCKING POEMS.&rdquo; A <em>Manchester Guardian</em> piece from '66 involving Cobbing and the destruction-in-art &ldquo;boys&rdquo; weighs the potential of the world&rsquo;s nuclear arsenal against &ldquo;disturbing tendencies in modern art.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141210120945-Bob_Cobbing_Beethoven_Today__1970_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>Beethoven Today</em>, typewriter piece, 1970</span></p> <p class="p1" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Those unfamiliar with Cobbing&rsquo;s work may admittedly be tempted to be taken with a similar notion, but this small, highly-concentrated exhibition is here to show, not explain, and it does an excellent job of conveying the vivacity and furore surrounding these works: abstract vocalizations which were definite readings, pictures which are texts, and poems. Poems which are often composed of ambiguous language stripped entirely of representational content. The hooning <em>ur</em>-chant or the processual thresher that pushes toward the breaking of the boundaries of meaning itself. Let&rsquo;s have one more to play us out. Take it away, Bob.</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_1cJ_VExm2E" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/387041-thogdin-ripley">Thogdin Ripley</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image on top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">Front cover of Bill Jubobe, selected texts of Bob Cobbing 1942-1975. New River Projects (1971))</span></span></p> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 14:23:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list MTV's Radical Pro-Riot Viral Video <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Why are young black men 20 times more likely to be shot by the police than young white men? Especially while only 13% of the US population is black?" These words are not from the pages of The Huffington Post, or the lips of Jon Stewart, but from a viral video released by MTV.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It's been a long time since MTV's values seemed to reflect anything deeper than the interiors of the planet's richest and worst human beings, but in the video, the station's sex educator Laci Green makes what could be one of the most important political statements of these post-Ferguson times.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Asking the question "Is Ferguson like Mockingjay?" this is left-wing politics brilliantly translated to a youth audience. I'm thinking, "Hey, kind of brave for a company owned by media giant Viacom." And then it happens: the Amps all the way to 11/2001 Starchild moment, she askes: "How far does peaceful protest get?" and follows this with a roll call of riots that have affected social change, including The Stonewall Riots of 1969, which Obama championed in his inaugural speach. This is MTV very unambigously suggesting that maybe, you know, there are worse ways to affect social change than a riot. I repeat: This is MTV.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141210124433-photo_3.PNG" alt="" /></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Radical also is the inclusivity. Laci Green here is utterly successful in removing the language barriers that institutionally hem politics within the politically educated. Even Russell Brand, our current champion of regular working people, often can't resist climbing into his hermetically sealed library of dogmatic political language.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mockingjay's $300 million and counting US box office takings merely represent the tip of the iceberg in a franchise's cultural relationship with teenagers (of all ages and genders) and politicizing Katniss's struggle into the very real clusterfuck of Ferguson, as well as legitimizing past examples of non- peaceful protest, Laci Green could well find herself elevated to generational spokesperson.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kl70IdKqyMQ" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/408013-paul-hanford">Paul Hanford&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: screenshot of MTV's Laci Green)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 13:35:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list New Delhi: Avinash Veeraraghavan and Pieter Schoolwerth's Fragmented Selves <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Recently exhibited at <a href="http://galleryske.com/PastExhibitions2014Page.html">Galleryskye, New Delhi</a>, Avinash Veeraraghavan and Pieter Schoolwerth's works, <em>We Don't See What Things Are, We See What We Are</em> and <em>Your Vacuum Sucks</em> interrogate the notion of multiple subjectivities and fragmented selves. &nbsp; &nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141208161058-Avinash_Veeraraghavan__6_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Avinash Veeraraghavan;</strong>&nbsp;Courtesy&nbsp;Galleryskye, Delhi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Veeraraghavan's dense, intricate visual collages are mind/memoryscapes dotted with personal signifiers that document the explosion of signs and symbols one constantly encounters nowadays. Veeraraghavan&nbsp;says they can be read as a celebration of the immensely hybrid and cross-pollinated cultural times we live in. &ldquo;It is a comment on our identities' heterogeneous nature today, which makes it more and more difficult to group people into singular categories of nationhood or culture,&rdquo; he says referring to his fictional maps, <em>Ithri Folami, Elorio,</em> and <em>N.E Dara.</em> &ldquo;On the other hand, it's also a forcing together of contradictions and opposites that is the nature of the world we live in.&rdquo; Profusely erupting with texture and image, when the works are seen from a sufficient distance, there is a unity to this fragmentation, everything seemingly connected to everything else. &ldquo;My journey was an imagined glimpse into the connected nature of things.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141208155505-Avinash_Veeraraghavan__5_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Avinash Veeraraghavan</strong>; Courtesy&nbsp;Galleryskye, Delhi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Veeraraghavan&nbsp;wrestles with the notion of a fragmented self through his masks, overlaid on one another, which refer to the absence of the concrete, singular "I"; they become a collage of parts, pattern, and habit. This jigsawing of multiple selves nevertheless contains the latent and omnipresent awareness of everything ultimately all falling apart. Decay razors through the works' visual and psychological fecundity. &ldquo;There has been a kind of exhaustion at the end of my journey...both in terms of the body as well as psychologically in terms of structures one held dear and to be true. The decay in the narrative is the inevitable entropy of ageing and perhaps, even an acceptance of one's limitation.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The artist mentions that this body of work is a part of a larger body and narrative that has been his practice in general. &ldquo;My work has been generally rather autobiographic and often quite opaque to the outside reader. I have attempted with this show to open up the story a bit to make it a bit more universal and accessible.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141208155917-Pieter_Schoolwerth__2_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Pieter Schoolwerth;</strong>&nbsp;Courtesy&nbsp;Galleryskye, Delhi</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>In a concurrent exhibition at Galleryskye, American artist, Pieter Schoolwerth fights with a&nbsp;malfunctioning vaccum cleaner. He distills the genesis of his project like so:&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>This vaccum sucks'! &ldquo;If it didn't suck it wouldn't be a vacuum. In other words, performing the function of 'sucking' is precisely what creates its identity, yet if it doesn't work properly it still possesses and maintains this same identity&mdash;it sucks. There is only one end result in the use of and experience of a vacuum. And the fact that this word can be used both to designate a everyday appliance as well as a larger model for the abstraction of social space (as in 'I feel like I&rsquo;m living in a vacuum') made this linguistic conundrum intriguing.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">His explorations of the terrain of vacuum resulted in a film, <em>Your Vacuum Sucks </em>(in collaboration with Alexandra Lerman) in which the lead character has been digitally erased from the image. Appearing as a hole, a shadow, or a mirror of his properly embodied friends and coworkers, Schoolwerth engages in a series of exchanges in which he attempts to negotiate the nature of his existence, whereby he is present to others entirely through his own visual absence. &ldquo;I have long been interested in how the ever-changing forces of abstraction in the world effect the task of representing the human body. This ongoing investigation has caused me to think about how one forms an idea of another&rsquo;s bodily presence, and how to represent the compression of space and time that is such a familiar part of day-to-day communication.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141208160752-Pieter_Schoolwerth__8_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Pieter Schoolwerth</strong>, Installation view; Courtesy&nbsp;Galleryskye, Delhi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Schoolwerth presents the video in conjunction with paintings and collages, commenting that he has come to feel &ldquo;that presenting a dialectic of still and moving images can do something different than painting can do by itself.&rdquo; He also explores the idea that video might be able to open up a new space for painting, a newly destabilized <em>space-less </em>ground zero of sorts in which the body of paint itself could be liberated.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Priyanka Sacheti<br class="Apple-interchange-newline" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image on top:&nbsp;<strong>Avinash Veeraraghavan</strong>,&nbsp;Courtesy&nbsp;Galleryskye, Delhi)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Mon, 08 Dec 2014 20:36:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Texture Trip: Surreal Substances in Art <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Paint, in its ancient origins, was made from available materials: egg yolks to bind, sand, soil, plants, and so on for pigment. The whole process of manufacturing materials to make art has been steadily removed from the artistic process over time, but some artists still introduce the physical messiness of making art, by remolding everyday materials to provoke uncanny, humorous&mdash;and often, revolting&mdash;reactions to substance in the viewer. They might arouse strong responses, but they also open our eyes to the objects around us&mdash;as well as raising ethical questions about the limits of the artistic license.<br /></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-style: normal; line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wool&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; <iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/q6RZZf6HMzo" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></p> <p style="font-style: normal; line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="font-style: normal; line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">...from a vagina. </span></p> <p style="font-style: normal; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When <em>Casting of My Womb</em>, a 28-day-performance piece by artist Casey Jenkins&mdash;since condemned to be know as Vaginal Knitting&mdash;was released, it&nbsp;sparked outrage. As the artist wryly remarks in a response article she wrote for <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/dec/17/vaginal-knitting-artist-defence">the <em>Guardian</em></a>, this was not because of the skeins of wool that she unfurled from her vagina&mdash;but mainly because of her poorly cut hair.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Eyeball Sacks</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209121713-otvratitelnogo-estetika-krasivye-kartinki_7746812280.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;Jonathan Payne</span><span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Sweeping the net of late, Los Angeles sculptor Jonathan Payne's absolutely revolting synthetic "fleshlettes" (even the name causes my internal muscles to contract violently) include hyperrealistic renderings of tongues coated in fur made out of teeth, sprouting toe nail mutants, and nipples and eyeballs contained in their own ball sacks. Please, Hollywood, hire this guy&mdash;before someone puts him in a public gallery.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oreos</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209121340-tisha-cherry-4.jpg" alt="" /><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Tisha Cherry, Via&nbsp;<a href="http://www.foodiggity.com/tag/tisha-cherry/" target="_blank">foodiggity</a><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">See, I like Oreos, and I like art, but I'm not sure the two go together so well. Though, this does officially raise the valid question, of which biscuit is the best medium.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Pubic Hair&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VH8kAJwZ2p0" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Ian Dennis, better know by his online pseudonym Fox Bronte, is surely the hero of our life and times, purely for the fact that he got the public to lop of their pubic hair and send it to him, so that he could fashion a portrait of Justin Bieber out of it.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Pigeons</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></strong><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209130807-IMG_1052.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">For the project&nbsp;<em>Some Pigeons Are More Equal Than Others</em>&nbsp;artists <a class="profile" href="http://www.fastcompany.com/person/julian-charriere">Julian Charriere</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;Julius von Bismarck&nbsp;spray-painted and released 35 pigeons at the Venice Biennale to make them more colorful.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The question is not Should Animals Be Used as Art? but rather Are Animals Ticklish? or Is This The Future for Street Art?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Pigs</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209132643-2013-04-03-kisalala-wim-delvoye-Livetattooedpigs.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Shit stirrer (quite literally) Wim Delvoye began his infamous pig tattooing on an "art farm" he set up in China in 2007. The Belgian received ardent criticism, especially since he branded one pig with Louis V, when Givenchy was so much better that season.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Other works of his include x-rays of blow jobs, a fecal-matter producing machine, and anal kisses, printed impeccably on hotel letterhead paper.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Skin and Hair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209135957-skin-sculptures-by-jessica-harrison-designboom-13.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Jessica Harrison, Detail of <em>High back Chair</em>&nbsp;and <em>Sofa,</em>&nbsp;2009</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jessica Harrison used skin and hair cast from her own hands to make her 2009 <em>Hand Held</em> series of minature furniture: you can just imagine them in a pretty dollhouse.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Vomit</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209111600-Wyse_Gabriely_Cereal_Video_Still_2013.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Wyse + Gabriely, Video still from <em>Cereal</em>, 2013&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">In case you didn't know, there's a whole charming movement of art made with or involving vomit: I wouldn't recommend googling it after a meal. Or indeed before one. Just don't google it. Ever.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Octopus heads</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209123151-fe7fcf02-4c95-448d-a7b2-1585be873e92-1020x729.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Stacy Makishi&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Welcome to wackyland with East London resident Stacy Makishi's performance works which include this octopus, worn as a hat. Wear jauntily on the angle, with optional fag in hand.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Dough</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141209160820-dough_original_large2.jpg" alt="" /></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Mika Rottenberg,&nbsp;<em>Dough</em>, 2006</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">All of dough's physical qualities ooze out in</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/22296" target="_blank">Mika Rottenberg</a>'s 2006 video piece, a surreal social commentary on the capitalist production chain, which stars size 20, 6ft pro-wrestler, activist, and model </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.raqui.com/model.html" target="_blank">Raqui.</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Coathangers</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141209113315-Sandy-Skoglund9.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Sandy Skoglund</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Swedish photographer Sandy Skoglund is the Queen of surreal textures. She's also responsible for titles such as <em>Radioactive Cats</em>&nbsp;and <em>Raining Popcorn</em>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image on top:&nbsp;Mika Rottenberg,&nbsp;<em>Dough</em>, 2006)</span></p> Tue, 09 Dec 2014 16:14:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Sarah and Joseph Belknap Translate the Solar System for Earthlings <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>The ways by which men arrive at knowledge of the celestial things are hardly less wonderful than the nature of these things themselves</em>. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 180px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Johannes Kepler</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Walking down Franklin Boulevard in Chicago&rsquo;s Garfield Park, an otherwise nondescript bungalow stands out because of the strange, multicolored rock jutting out of its front yard; this object&mdash;like a meteor from a sci-fi B movie&mdash;hovers over 10 feet above the ground, mounted on a long metal pole. It marks the beginning of </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Planetoids</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, a solo exhibition at <a href="http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">the Franklin Gallery</a> where artists Sarah and Joseph Belknap carefully intersect uncanny and everyday bodies. In this and a concurrent exhibition at the MCA the collaborative pair translate celestial bodies into terrestrial spaces, concentrating on how those bodies intersect with subjective experience.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141209202641-Planetoids_n1.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Planetoids</em> at The Franklin, Installation view; Via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/thefranklinoutdoor" target="_blank">The Franklin</a></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The main portion of <em>Planetoids</em> continues in a backyard gazebo behind the bungalow in a 12 x 12 foot open air exhibition cube built specifically&nbsp;to host artist installations. Here, the Belknaps installed an interactive field of four extraterrestrial-looking rocks. Those multicolored, irregularly shaped &ldquo;planetoids&rdquo;&mdash;each roughly the breadth of my arms&mdash;hang by yellow mountaineering ropes strung from the gazebo&rsquo;s 8-foot-hight roof. Some room exists between the rock formations&mdash;just enough to invite viewers to walk between the sculptures, activating the negative space they prescribe. Upon entering, one cannot help but bump into the planetoids, causing the narrow space between bodies to shift and jostle. One is bumped into and bumping against strange bodies. The rocks are surprisingly light and their surfaces boast an abstract myriad of colors; puce, neon yellow, gray, blue, brown, green collude vigorously in small spatters.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141208151744-unnamed.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Microscopic images of meteorites;&nbsp;Meteorites from Vesta. Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA15605" target="_blank">NASA/University of Tennessee</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;The colors of the planetoids are based on polarized microscope images of meteorites from the asteroid, <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/dawn/ceresvesta/#.VITckFfF-6Q" target="_blank">Vesta</a>,&rdquo; the Belknaps explained in a recent email. &ldquo;Each color on the images depicted a different mineral or mineral composition&mdash;another way of seeing.&rdquo;&nbsp;Although the colors they used to paint each surface is based on scientific data, that data is not tied to human sight specifically. Meteors would not, for instance, appear to us in the colors prescribed by the data. Rather, the colors translate data about the mineral content of each stone, rending what is typically invisible to the human eye both visible and identifiable.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> &ldquo;We are extremely interested in filtered seeing,&rdquo; the artists continued. &ldquo;It allows us to see things that the human eye cannot see. It is both real and faked/mediated. The enhancement and modification is not done to deceive but rather to show what we cannot see.&rdquo; The Belknaps thus play with the translation of extraterrestrial bodies, bringing them into a human range of perception, whether that means shrinking a meteor so that it is proportionate to my body in a backyard, or blowing up microscopic attributes so that they become visible to my eye.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/176387011&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="600" height="450"></iframe></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In August, scientists picked up on a series of electromagnetic pulses emitted by a comet. Although below the range of human perception, the pulse was described as a "song." Scientists found a singing comet!&mdash;one producing music that, at least according to human translation, is more akin to an experimental synth track than the nonsecular compositions of The Vienna Boys&rsquo; Choir. &ldquo;<a href="http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/11/11/the-singing-comet/" target="_blank">The scientists think it [the song] must be produced in some way by the activity of the comet, as it releases neutral particles into space where they become electrically charged due to a process called ionization. But the precise physical mechanism behind the oscillations remains a mystery</a>.&rdquo; Listening to the comet on Soundcloud, I remembered the end of Jodi Foster&rsquo;s <em>Encounter</em> (1997), a movie that played so often on TV during my adolescence that I never saw the entire movie sequentially. Still I remember the end, where she waits for a signal from aliens in outer space. How strange a conclusion if the signal she finally received did not come from the bug-eyed alien icon popularized in the 90s, but rather from an inanimate rock minding its own business in a far corner of the universe.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141209202735-Planetoids_n3.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>Planetoids</em>&nbsp;at The Franklin, Installation view; Via&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/thefranklinoutdoor" target="_blank">The Franklin</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On the only dry wall in the Franklin exhibition gazebo, two silicon casts of the artists&rsquo; hands protrude strangely; each hand&mdash;one gray and one white&mdash;cups small pebble-size meteors in its palm. Normally (the day I visited the space they were not) these hands also shake, causing the pebbles to jump and jiggle ever so slightly. Like the body-sized planetoids, these life-sized hands further problematize one&rsquo;s experience of scale. Certainly the pebbles feel like translations of the larger hanging objects, yet in one instance the planetoids are larger than the body, while in another the body is significantly larger than the planetoids. By virtue of the gazebo, they exist in the same frame, creating a vertiginous experience. These troubling and simultaneous scale shifts convey an unstable material world, whose properties are only visible according to the perspectival filter or translation being applied.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141211020546-kepler-and-kircher-1.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Johannes Kepler's <a href="http://hermetic.com/godwin/kepler-and-kircher-on-the-harmony-of-the-spheres.html" target="_blank">"The Music of the Spheres"</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I am reminded of <a href="http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/315225/Johannes-Kepler">Johannes Kepler</a>, suddenly&mdash;a German mathematician from the 1500s who discovered three major laws of planetary motion. Following on the footsteps of Copernicus, Kepler&rsquo;s model of the universe embraced the sun at the center of the Universe, while seeking to quantify and predict the movement of planets; his course of investigation led to a then-revolutionary conclusion that Mercury&rsquo;s orbit was an ellipse, rather than a perfect (and thus more divine) circle, as had been previously supposed. In addition to his mathematical proofs, Kepler believed the planets possessed an extraterrestrial harmony, what he referred to as &ldquo;The Music of the Spheres.&rdquo; This was not an audible harmony, but rather emerged from the mathematically harmonious and proportional movement of planets in time. Based on that harmony of geometrical mathematics, planetary songs modeled their behavior. Venus, for instance, only had one note. Like our singing comet, the &ldquo;song&rdquo; is not literal, but a translation of regular movement beyond the frame of human perception.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a concurrent show at the MCA, curator Karsten Lund places the Belknaps in the historical lineage of Bruce Nauman, Eva Hesse, Robert Overby, and Vija Celmins, emphasizing the artists&rsquo; ability to create material surfaces of extraterrestrial bodies in terrestrial space. The Belknaps' site-specific installation&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vredefort Dome/Aitken Basin Skin</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;(2014) features a silicon-mica flake cast of two craters&mdash;one on the moon and one in Arizona&mdash;creating a scaled and hybrid topographical map of inter- and extra-terrestrial landscapes. The pockmarked black surface consumes the length of the gallery, rising up from floor to rear wall at a 60 degree angle. In a moment similar to the Belknap hand casts, a breathtaking print of the sun is mounted on the facing wall, to the right of the gallery entrance; </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">12 Months of Sun Spots </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is lit so softly as to be easily overlooked, yet it provides a counterbalance to the room. The moon and the earth have the sun in common, orbiting as we all are around its bright light. The balance feels formal as well; the print&rsquo;s crisp roundness echoes the crater and pockmarked shapes in the landscape.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141208161606-4months-975x975_belknaps.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap</strong><em>, 4 months of Sun Spots</em>, 2014,&nbsp;HMI intensity gram,&nbsp;9 x 9 in. (22.86 x 22.86 cm);&nbsp;Courtesy of the artists and MCA Chicago</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the next room, the Belknaps installed a series of 12 &ldquo;Moon Skins&rdquo; and &ldquo;Exoplanet Skins.&rdquo; Like the topographical crater map, they are also made of silicone and</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">like the Franklin planetoids</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;boast complex surfaces of texture and sometimes color. The irregularly concave forms hang limply off of the wall, like deflated basketballs or wrestling masks (see image at top). They feel expired somehow, but nevertheless mesmerizing. One wants to touch them, to feel the differences in their surface, perhaps even to explore the inside of the skin&mdash;a private space where one imagines a planet might once have resided.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Finally, to the right of the skins on the museum mezzanine, the artists installed a series of five videos on square television screens that stack modularly. <em>12 Months of the Sun</em>, represents a subjective intersection between the artists&rsquo; lives, NASA&rsquo;s live stream (and translation) of planetary activity, and the planetary activity itself. They collected the images on a regular, though nevertheless subjective basis, using a NASA iPhone app. The screen shots were modified in order to reflect and highlight certain threads of data. Here again scales of space and time are collapsed and refracted through the unique individual experiences of Sarah and Joseph Belknap.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/155816-caroline-picard?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Caroline Picard</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<strong>Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap,&nbsp;</strong><em>Exoplanet Skin (1)</em>, 2014 and&nbsp;<em>Deflated Moon Skin (1)</em>, 2014;&nbsp;Photo courtesy of the artists and MCA Chicago)</span></p> Thu, 11 Dec 2014 02:06:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Collective Delusions Bad and Good: Art Basel Day 2 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The increase in events, exhibitions, one-offs, happenings, parties, cultural gatherings, informal mixers, themed bashes and networking raves is about 1,000% compared to non-Art Basel time in Miami (which is what we call it. Not &ldquo;Art Basel Miami Beach,&rdquo; or &ldquo;Art Basel Miami&rdquo;&mdash;just &ldquo;Art Basel,&rdquo; or even more often, and funnily enough, most everyone truncates it to just &ldquo;Basel,&rdquo; har har), scientifically speaking, so right around now everyone involved in the whole thing seems to be phasing through rapid cycles of tiredness and frenzy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205194056-NADA_pic.JPG" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Yesterday was spent on North Beach at the New Art Dealers Alliance fair, housed in the mid-century Deauville: truly a beach resort, designed by Morris Lapidus in the <em>depression moderne</em> aesthetic, thusly cheesy and kinda skeevy but also classy in a dated way. A monument to <em>Too Much is Never Enough</em>, Lapidus&rsquo; book and maxim, it&rsquo;s where The Beatles had their second U.S. performance.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205194248-parrot_pic.JPG" alt="" width="400" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Will art fairs someday have to not look like art fairs in order to sell art? Looking at art and trying to tease meaning or pleasure out of it is hard when there&rsquo;s so much of it around you. Luckily, the fair format is one for buying and selling. The upside down painting of a parrot by Sean Bluechel at the Tang Gallery booth really, really, spoke to me.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205194424-Food_pic.JPG" alt="" width="400" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I had a pleasant time. Out front I ate a ropa vieja sandwich, some Lay&rsquo;s Potato Chips, and a Coca Cola. The sandwich was tasty and lukewarm, and I was taken aback by the crunch of the lettuce, the freshness of the tomato. The Lay&rsquo;s Potato Chips were archetypal. The cola was, well, you know.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205194520-Deauville_pool.JPG" alt="" width="500" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">I overheard in the long line, &ldquo;There&rsquo;s art in money!&rdquo; as the Cuban ladies yelled and yelled and laughed and sang. Also in line, some guy in a Dash Snow shirt. If not already, read about him, and form an opinion about the dead&mdash;and yourself in the process. Some friends joined me at the table and we cheers-ed our tiny colada cups, then lay by the pool. Thick storm clouds gathered just east.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205194819-Leaving_the_Deauville.JPG" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After gathering ourselves we headed to PAMM for the Future Brown and Kelela performance. Rain in the early evening oscillated from drizzle to downpour, and the embracing porous architecture of the museum meant wet bars and some grumbling patrons. Of course, the rain subsided. The waters of Government Cut twinkled with the lights of the Port of Miami reflected. The bay, for now, remains at bay, and it is beautiful.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195029-Crowd_at_PAMM.JPG" alt="" width="500" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It was a surprise to see the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/venues/show/43931-p%C3%A9rez-art-museum-miami" target="_blank">PAMM</a> so so full of people. The function of the museum as a high-end/high-volume gala venue was on display, but it felt more democratic than a nightclub. Great big crowds stood outside to watch the performances, blossoming the Herzog &amp; de Meuron-designed building into a Roman coliseum of sorts, the mass assembled for everything but the lions. A sense of civic pride mixed with other feelings.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195437-Geoffrey_Farmer.JPG" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One of the best art experiences of the entire week was an exhibition at the PAMM by Geoffrey Farmer, a native of Vancouver. <em>Let&rsquo;s Make the Water Turn Black </em>is a netherwordly room installation of playful, deep-psyche sculptures that referenced things like Duchamp, Nazis, and artifice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195528-Geoffrey_Farmer_2.JPG" alt="" width="300" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195544-Geoffrey_Farmer_3.JPG" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The lighting changed from fluorescent blues to pinks, creating a sensate mood far beyond the abilities of the white cubed booth. Sound effects from different sources and silly, unexpected kinetics from several sculptures were joys in strangeness.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The next peg on the marathon was FKA Twigs at the YoungArts Foundation national headquarters. I mistakenly assumed it would be held in the courtyard of the historic Bacardi building, which YoungArts acquired in 2012 and is a gem of this end of Biscayne Boulevard, but it was instead inside a large tent adjacent.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195311-FKA_Twigs._Photo_courtesy_of_Brad_Lovett.JPG" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Courtesy Brad Lovett</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A spectacle of fog and lights, FKA Twigs and her band emerged bathed in white, with Tahliah Bernett (Twigs) delivering her signature sweet-nothings in higher octaves. Live electronic drums and instrumentation backed up a straight forwardly great pop performance by the R&amp;B artist. Something was sad in the tent though, collectively: not many danced even as Twigs worked it right through, though clearly everyone was entranced, their phones creating a multiplicity of the scene within itself. The room would light up, then fade away and wilt.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After all, these are dark times for a place such as ours, as usual.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195845-A_blurry_picture_of_Jeffrey_Deitch.JPG" alt="" width="300" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205195904-Domingo_Castillo__local_gallerist_and_Jeffrey_Deitch_impersonator__motions_across_the_Sandbar.JPG" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Blurry stalker photos: Jeffrey Deitch (left) and Domingo Castillo, local gallerist and Deitch impersonator motions across the bar (right)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After the show, we crossed back over to North Beach, NADA ensconced in neon glow. We arrived at the NADAWAVE party fretting the fact that we were missing Syrian artist Omar Souleyman. We stood in line near the front as Jeffrey Deitch&mdash;who was responsible for this party as well as the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41471" target="_blank">Miley &ldquo;Mike Kelley&rdquo; Cyrus show</a>&mdash;stood on the other side, inside, on the sand-covered floor. We did not catch Souleyman.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We left shortly after getting in because we got sleepy.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/343478-rob-goyanes?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Rob Goyanes</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Unless otherwise noted all images: Rob Goyanes)</span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 20:17:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Adam Douglas Thompson: Dialogical Particulars <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A word forms a concept of its own object in a dialogic way.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Mikhail Bakhtin, Discourse in the Novel, 1941</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Adam Douglas Thompson&rsquo;s drawings are words. His installed formations are sentences. His words, however, are not defined. His sentences are not linear. They are dialogic imaginations, each image acts a concept which through their relational grouping gains meaning. The groupings can and should be read multidirectionally. This approach is how Thompson believes thought works, a concept trailed by consciousness that couples with nearby conceptual points, with each move gaining contextual meaning.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205162033-03-left.jpg" alt="" width="300" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205162050-03-right.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;I believe in particulars,&rdquo; says Thompson, &ldquo;in a bottom-up emergence of meaning.&rdquo; Each image that Thompson draws in a characteristic minimal manner draws on the context a viewer brings to the work, however, it is when these particular objects are grouped that the dialogical wonder becomes apparent.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A cursory glance at his work would suggest that he is playing with juxtapositional readings however a closer look reveals that complex stories about the human condition emerge from very particular visual situations. Juxtaposition relies on contrast. Thompson&rsquo;s drawings rely on relation to gain their meaning. If you take a series of three of his images you can see how his sentences take shape. Each image is related, image one progressing in form to image two and so on. However, If you view image one and three, the shared form will not be present, their only relationship will be one of juxtaposition. This analogy is imperfect since the serial nature of numbers implies a linear progression. Each drawing is made in relation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205162741-IMG_1901.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The images do rely on known forms&mdash;a whale, a boot, etc.&mdash;but these known forms are integrated through stark, black lines. There is certainty in the minimalism of the drawings. The visual economy of the drawings find a visual partner in lingual fonts. They are particular, if peculiar. These form mash-ups are often funny or bizarre like the products of an exquisite corpse game. Sometimes they rely on more stylized interpretations, a sharp, angular Whistler&rsquo;s Mother, for example, elicits the kind of relationship that would prod Whistler to paint his mother in the way he did. No matter the relational technique employed by the drawing, their stylistic character reinforces their use as component parts of a web of meaning.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The installations that Thompson produces are carefully planned to induce a particular tension. Within the nebulous, associative array, specific and tangible concrete objects call out and produce points of departure through which he addresses major themes in human subjectivity and experience in humorous and deft ways. &ldquo;A friend once told me in regards to writing, &lsquo;all elements of life must be in appropriate proportions,&rsquo; I always think about this as I&rsquo;m making these webs.&rdquo; A little bit of humor, some regret&mdash;out of these associative formations come an existential poetics, unique to this artist but understandable to any viewer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/website/joel-kuennen" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>This essay was first published in the ArtSlant Prize 2014 Catalogue, on the occasion of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41446" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2014 exhibition</a>&nbsp;at Aqua Art Miami, from Thursday, December 4&mdash;Sunday, December 7, 2014. Adam Douglas Thompson is the ArtSlant Prize 2014 2nd Place winner.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Other ArtSlant Prize catalogue essays:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41469" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>,</em><em>&nbsp;</em><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41473" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41477" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a><br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images: Adam Douglas Thompson,&nbsp;2014;&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and ArtSlant)&nbsp;</span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 16:27:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list A Play on Material: Oren Pinhassi <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Material can be transcendent.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Postmodernism is failing.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">History is a spiral.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These three assumptions underlie Oren Pinhassi&rsquo;s work. Beginning with the familiar&mdash;towels, a backpack, a dwelling&mdash;objects are transformed through the addition of another common material, plaster. Through this addition, he transubstantiates the everyday into thematic sculptural and architectural forms, an act that Pinhassi describes as transcendent. There is a key definition being explored through Pinhassi&rsquo;s work: transformation vs. transcendence. Both connote change, however it is not a change in form that is Pinhassi&rsquo;s goal, rather an elevation of form into the realm of critique.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205154546-Back_pack__1_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Postmodernism promised a revaluation of culture following the deconstruction of Modernism. Pomo was suppose to be a putting back together. Pinhassi rightly accuses postmodernism, however, of focusing on deconstruction and calling it reconstruction. While these two activities are dialectically bound, the object of postmodern art and indeed postmodern society remains an act of deconstruction. Think of the popular memes of our society and the cultural attitudes they address. As a culture, we are still working to deconstruct the infrastructures of racism, sexism and power that predisposes an individual. Postmodernism ultimately promised a freedom of creation, a freedom of potential that is seemingly impossible without the dissolution of existing paradigms of power and privilege. The problem with this is that dissolution itself is an impossible activity, there is no null state of society that can act as a point of departure in reconstructing society. This is why the act of deconstruction and reconstruction are dialectically bound and subvert a linear understanding of history (hence, the spiral), while something is deconstructed, it transforms, it finds new context within the existing paradigm. Through the simultaneous act of reconstruction the object is always transformed but, Pinhassi asserts, it may transcend as well.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In Pinhassi&rsquo;s 2014 installation, <em>Untitled</em>, he created a domestic space, a safe space, a shelter. The work isn&rsquo;t actually a shelter, however, through its material form that calls upon the historical and material histories of its components while at the same time being present in a gallery context and through the material alterations of Pinhassi, it transcends what it is and becomes thematic. Behind this shelter is a brick bathtub, really a brick cube that is built around an emergency water reservoir, a 100 gallon plastic bag that consumers can buy to fill with water in emergencies instead of filling their apparently dirty bathtubs. The plastic bag in the shape of a bathtub calls up the theme of safety, security, necessity, while at the same time disrupting the cassual understanding of the object.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141205154611-20140510184556-IMG_0054.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Plaster has a long history of being an art material but it is also used to build and parget walls, to set broken bones and was used in the mummification process. Modroc, the form of plaster used for setting bones is actually noted as one of the first invented composite materials. A very basic compound of alkaline lime and sand, plaster itself is transubstantial.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sometimes these histories are obvious like the material itself, other times, not so much. The sweeping parabolas that constitute the shelter in Untitled are formed by gravity, an idea Pinhassi gleaned from a technique of the Spanish architect Antoni Gaud&iacute;. Pinhassi saw this use as bringing an otherwise hidden force to the fore. Gravity is always implicated in a structure as the structure must defy gravity to stand but one doesn&rsquo;t necessarily think of this every time you step into a building. By submerging burlap in plaster then draping the sheets from two stable points and letting gravity and time shape the plaster arches, Pinhassi uses gravity as a material, the effect of which becomes apparent when the burlap arches are set sideways to form billowing columns that support a much greater arch canopy over the dwelling. The rigidity of the plaster together with the perceived flaccidity of the burlap situates the forms in a contested state. It is in this state of indeterminacy where the objects transcend their form and become contemplative objets d&rsquo;art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/website/joel-kuennen" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>This essay was first published in the ArtSlant Prize 2014 Catalogue, on the occasion of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41446" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2014 exhibition</a>&nbsp;at Aqua Art Miami, from Thursday, December 4&mdash;Sunday, December 7, 2014. Oren Pinhassi is the winner of the ArtSlant Prize Student category.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Other ArtSlant Prize catalogue essays: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41469" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>,</em></span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41479" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>,&nbsp;</em><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41473" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><br /></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">(All images: Oren Pinhassi,&nbsp;2014;&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and ArtSlant)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 16:18:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list <em>Queer Biennial I</em> Opens During Art Basel Miami Beach <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">With a flurry of activity already under way in this year&rsquo;s Miami Beach Art Basel, it&rsquo;s no surprise that some artist groups are creating their own activities outside of the huge event. Described as &ldquo;an unabashed exhibition of queerness,&rdquo; the <a href="http://www.queerbiennial.com/about.html" target="_blank"><em>Queer Biennial I</em></a> is taking place during Art Basel weekend at the <a href="http://www.gaythering.com/" target="_blank">H&ocirc;tel Gaythering</a>. The Hotel is known as a meeting place for Miami&rsquo;s LGBT locals and is the area&rsquo;s only hotel that caters solely to this community. The space is transformed with more than 100 artworks from 35 artists, curated by "Conceptual Pop" artist <a href="http://www.rubenesparza.com/bio-bits/" target="_blank">Rub&eacute;n Esparza</a>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Queer Biennial I</em> includes artists from a variety of aesthetic and cultural backgrounds. For example, Gio Black Peter, a New York Cigty-based Guatemalan artist, creates performances and two-dimensional pieces that explore authority, identity, and rebellion. Many of his paintings combine acrylic with portions of the NYC subway map to create complex portaits of confident young men.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141205090444-___Slava_Mogutin.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Slava Mogutin, Courtesy of Tandy Weems/The Murray Agency</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Meanwhile during the exhibition, Los Angeles based artist Ben Cuevas will spend time in the hotel locker room, knitting himself a jockstrap as he sits nude. This &ldquo;knit performance exploring space and gender,&rdquo; (as his website describes it) looks to shatter the associations between knitting and gender tropes&mdash;or specifically, the definitions of women's work versus men&rsquo;s work. His performances takes place nightly from December 4&mdash;6, &nbsp;8&mdash;10 pm.</span>&nbsp;</p> <p class="normal" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Lili Lakich, an artist working in neon with a number of public art pieces, has also contributed work along with figures like Slava Mogutin&mdash;the first Russian man to receive political asylum from the United States for homophobic victimization. Other names includes Alex La Cruz, Amy Von Harrington, Stuart Sandford, and Alonso Tapia. The exhibition first debuted in Los Angeles and this iteration hopes to attract both Miami&rsquo;s LGBT residents and those visiting from other locations. Beyond Art Basel, <em>Queer Biennial I</em> will stay on display at the Hotel until January 14, 2015.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141205090552-___Mel_Odom.jpeg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Mel Odom, Courtesy of Tandy Weems/The Murray Agency</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347546-eva-recinos?tab=REVIEWS">Eva Recinos</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Connie Fleming, Courtesy of Tandy Weems/The Murray Agency)</span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 18:01:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Anastasia Samoylova: On Facebook Everyone Is on Holiday <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Anastasia Samoylova does not go out into summer fields when she begins a new work of landscape photography. She goes online, haunting public domain photosites for images of picturesque landscapes: sunsets, waterfalls, forests, oceans, and flowers. Despite the seductive vistas each calendar image portrays, they are so common they become redundant. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m almost monumentalizing them in my installations,&rdquo; Samoylova said during a recent (Skyped) studio visit, &ldquo;otherwise they would just be these little orphans of images.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204225726-05_Samoylova.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After printing out her source material at home, Samoylova brings the reproductions to her &ldquo;studio,&rdquo; a single table on which she stages her collages and a desk with a cutting board; there the artist begins to cut and reconfigure her images, constructing elaborate three-dimensional arrangements that combine, reflect, and distort fragments of public domain printouts with gels, reflective surfaces, and semi-transparent corrugated sheets. The result is a slick, kaleidoscopic environment that revels in the process of its own staging&mdash;to such an extent that Samoylova even makes stop animation films of her process. Finally, she photographs the complete tableau, flattening her installation back into two-dimensions. Like the distorted space within each print, the production process is a constant expansion and contraction during which images slip in and out of three dimensions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The colors in the final prints are saturated and bright; the patterns she incorporates similarly appear so regular that they read like Photoshop tools. The white backdrop feels too bright&mdash;everything feels artificial. And yet her interventions occur entirely in real time and space. Rather it&rsquo;s the source material that&rsquo;s digital: images of Nature that are as doctored as the celebrities in magazines. Samoylova, by contrast, insists on working with her hands, even going as far as refusing post-production edits. By printing out the images at home&mdash;translating the originally expansive outdoor space from its digital jpg form into a domestically proportioned object&mdash;Samoylova brings the images into a material space with practical limitations. Consequently, the final print shows evidence of dust and small imperfections socialized habit would remove. &ldquo;You start seeing blemishes,&rdquo; Samoylova said, &ldquo;The studio shows through.&rdquo; In that respect, her photographs are particularly honest. Unlike early landscape photographs that presume to give you the &ldquo;real&rdquo; Yosemite experience, Samoylova exposes the contrivance implicit in photographic works, and in so doing emphasizes the curious ideologies embedded beneath our generic desire to frame and capture the environment.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204225832-01_Samoylova.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Before getting her MFA, the Russian born artist originally studied environmental design with Bauhaus and Dadaist roots&mdash;roots that no doubt contribute to her appetite not only for the strangeness of social media (she was one of the first Flickr users in 2004), but also the game of creative constraints. Add to that the two years she spent working as a designer for Armani, and the origins of her aesthetic begin to emerge. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The nature Samoylova portrays is not natural&mdash;it never was natural. Beaches presents a series of boxes and flat planes, hanging together in defiance of gravitational forces. Oceanic tides draw in and pull back from one another, refracting as though in a hall of mirrors. It&rsquo;s impossible to discern the scale of the composition; skylines appear at cross-purposes. It&rsquo;s no wonder the experience of space seems so strange when the images themselves are facsimiles of facsimiles of facsimiles.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204225941-09_Samoylova.jpg" alt="" /><br /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A pervasive desire haunts Samoylova&rsquo;s tableaux. &ldquo;Pictures are a manifestation of our search for the sublime,&rdquo; she told me through the screen of my laptop. And like its historical precedents, this &ldquo;sublime&rdquo; is skewed. Beaches plays with the idea of the beach, how desirous it is because of what it signifies: the luxury of vacation, the implication of success, the appeal of relaxation as an untroubled psychological state. When one gets to the beach it must be photographed and shared, not only to prove that such places exist, but perhaps most of all to prove that one has arrived there.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/155816-caroline-picard?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Caroline Picard</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>This essay was first published in the ArtSlant Prize 2014 Catalogue, on the occasion of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41446" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2014 exhibition</a>&nbsp;at Aqua Art Miami, from Thursday, December 4&mdash;Sunday, December 7, 2014. Anastasia Samoylova is the ArtSlant Prize 2014 3rd Place winner.</em></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><em><em>Other ArtSlant Prize catalogue essays: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41469" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>,&nbsp;</em></em></em></span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41479" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, </em></em></em><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41477" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></em></em></em></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images: Anastasia Samoylova,&nbsp;<em>The ArtSlant Prize Exhibiton</em>, 2014;&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and ArtSlant)</span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 16:29:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list On the Fear and Reality of Missing Out: Art Basel Miami Beach, Day 1 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Last night, the poignancy of being a local for Art Basel Miami Beach was acute when talking to Kyle Chapman, an artist who grew up&mdash;like many of us&mdash;far from the lapping waters of South Beach. He told a story about a time in middle school when he found a baby leopard-patterned Lisa Frank trapper keeper in the bathroom, and you could tell who was just visiting by their gasps at the great reveal of what was inside.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204181450-Jim_Drain_s_piece_at_the_International_Friendship_Exhibition_at_Primary.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Metaphors for life abounded throughout the evening, which started out with staring at the ceiling of <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/venues/show/24156-primary-projects?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Primary Projects</a>, which Jim Drain had painted with a foreboding message in the bumper sticker font where COEXIST is spelled out with major world religious symbols.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204183717-Traffic_in_the_design_district.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Traffic in the Design District</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After missing the de la Cruz opening because of traffic, I attended the opening of #ihaitibasel, located in the Little Haiti Thrift and Gift Store, Inc. On one side: racks and racks of clothes and knick-knacks. On the other side: a darkened hall blasting with music and lasers and art on the wall, with a guy in the back having passion fruit frozen drinks of Haitian moonshine. Mmm.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204222932-_ihaitibasel_bathroom.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">The bathroom at #ihearhaiti</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204181936-Impromptu_promptu_fashion_show_at__ihaitibasel_Courtesy_of_Sarah_Moody.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Impromptu/promptu fashion show at #ihearthaiti; Photo courtesy Sarah Moody</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The space erupted with what seemed to be a planned fashion show/dance party. Reluctant fashionistas put on furs from the other side and strutted. Worlds here were colliding in refreshing ways.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On a last-minute whim around midnight, I decided to ride solo to The Raleigh Hotel to try and catch the much-buzzed Miley Cyrus performance presented in some way by Jeffrey Deitch. I parked easily and watched men in suits try to ride their rented beach cruisers. There were people in the park of the New World Symphony, mistaking blue herons for emus.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Arriving at the front doors, I employed the many methods of getting in. First, the confident stroll past the well-guarded divider: not confident enough, apparently. Next, the old &ldquo;I write about things like this for a living&rdquo;: barely a peep, not even a list to check.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Without hope, I went around to the north end of the hotel, seeing if I could muster the pathetic will to scale the wall. I slithered up towards a big steel door lamenting my lack of aplomb&mdash;then suddenly, an angel appeared.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A young prep cook or bar back opened the big steel door to leave. I looked at him, and he at me. Without a word, he held the door open, unassumingly, and let me through. I walked through hallways adorned with "Warning: security camera signs," and felt the lump in the throat that comes with the assurance that you&rsquo;ll soon be dragged out of a place, probably by the lump itself. There but for the grace of God go I, who decided to wear all black.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Past the kitchen, past the liquor storage room, I found myself in the boutiquey lobby, surrounded by people. Then I was outside, surrounded by even more. Through the glitz and glamour glowing red with my pulse&mdash;just feet from the pristine sands of South Beach&mdash;I saw the pool area. My mind pumped images of Miley and redemptive victory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-version="4"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;">&nbsp;</div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" href="https://instagram.com/p/wLG0JCADU5/" target="_top">#MileyCyrus + #ArtBasel = This</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A photo posted by Ricardo Mor (@rmormormor) on Dec 12, 2014 at 9:45pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <script type="text/javascript" src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js" defer="defer"></script> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">I made it so close, but had to vicariously experience Miley via Instagram.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Quickly moving past those costumed and dining, I came to a second divider. Squinting, looking harder, I saw the big pieces of a stage being carted away. I wouldn&rsquo;t have another chance at skirting boundaries. A French man sitting for dinner smirked at me and said, &ldquo;I am sorry.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204183329-_ihaitibasel_parade_Courtesy_of_Sarah_Moody.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">#ihaitibasel parade; Photo courtesy Sarah Moody</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Back at a warehouse party in Little Haiti, where #ihaitibasel moved to via parade from the thrift store, I listened to a Sade cover band, as a native Miami man told me about the sublime mix of wonder and terror he felt when he delivered his and his wife&rsquo;s 6th&nbsp;child, and then the afterbirth.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">He cried the wettest tears I&rsquo;d ever seen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/343478-rob-goyanes?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Rob Goyanes</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Afrobeta performing at #ihaitibasel; Photo courtesy Sarah Moody; Unless otherwise noted all images: Rob Goyanes)</span><em><br /></em></span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 16:38:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Edra Soto: Selling a Fantasy <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Luxury is so often determined by a price tag. But commerce is rarely how we interact with the phenomena of high-end merchandise&mdash;its excessiveness, its indulgence; its extravagance is almost always (and exclusively) experienced visually. We feel the texture of opulent velvets and silks first with our eyes, the metallic gleam of a smooth reflection through its cool touch on our sight, in jewels that refract their prismatic color back onto our gaze. There is something intensely tactile in the image of luxury&mdash;it is as visual as the eye that perceives it. The aesthetics of lavishness are accessible to all; it is not limited to the ones who can afford it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204151356-close_up.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Luxury sells you a fantasy. So does the work of Chicago-based artist Edra Soto.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Soto&rsquo;s recent work elaborates on the false paradises promised to us by the imagery of the tropical vacation&mdash;an artificial aesthetic that carries with it the possibilities of warmth, leisure, and relaxation through the vehicle of the art object. These representations often take the shape of familiar domestic objects&mdash;plastic lawn chairs, side tables, patriotic flags, etc.&mdash;and indeed impersonate their function. We imagine experiencing this work surrounded by palm trees, while a cool breeze that comes of the shore, the faintest echo of the sea as the tide washes closer and farther in the distance. But with every vacation comes discomfort. The sand in between your toes, mosquito bites, sunburnt skin, the unappealing resort food&mdash;the dream is broken. The work is exposed as a cover-up.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In Soto&rsquo;s work, the spectacular and its simulation are presented within a single experience. Fittingly matching its title,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Say Everything</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, the imagery within this series of work hinges on excess. Two pieces within stand out in particular&mdash;in one, a bright, striking orange tiger commercially printed on terrycloth envelops a series of chairs, stacked on top one another. In the other, the bright blue eye of a snow leopard pierces the viewer with its gaze, positioned just to the center of the seat back. In both works, the printed image is treated as upholstery. While the fabric perfectly conceals the surface of the chair, neatly sewn and carefully applied, it does not disguise its material. The shape is undoubtedly familiar; you can almost feel the white plastic seat beneath you. While the image exists on top of the entire object, almost flattening the chair through the optical busyness of its overall pattern, the furniture becomes anthropomorphic. That the chair has &ldquo;legs&rdquo; takes on a new meaning. There is something humorously futile about the artist&rsquo;s attempt to hide the cheapness of the material support by superimposing such a painstakingly labored image. A camouflage in plain sight.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204150328-IMG_0244.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Through their treatment, the chairs are transformed into a type of digital backdrop; like a screensaver or desktop wallpaper, the imagery allows viewers to ascribe their different projections on the status of the object&mdash;from utilitarian to decorative, useful to purely ornamental. Soto&rsquo;s silk flags operate in a similar way. Though the works are not quite abstractions&mdash;their shape and scale quite obviously betrays the countries they propose to represent&mdash;they take full liberty with how they describe intensely familiar patterns. More reminiscent of foliage than governmentally appointed colors, which strips them of their &ldquo;official&rdquo; function, the flags are strangely more connected to their originally intended use. Which is, of course, to wave in the air. Here, the flags billow in the breeze more naturally, like leaves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Just as the image of luxury sells us a fantasy, Soto&rsquo;s work allows us to experience that more often than not, the dream of paradise is better than the thing itself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/183982-stephanie-cristello?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Stephanie Cristello</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This essay was first published in the ArtSlant Prize 2014 Catalogue, on the occasion of the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41446" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2014 exhibition</a> at Aqua Art Miami, from Thursday, December 4&mdash;Sunday, December 7, 2014. Edra Soto was the ArtSlant Prize 2014 Grand Prize winner.</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Other ArtSlant Prize catalogue essays: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41479" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>,&nbsp;</em></em><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41473" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41477" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></em></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images: Edra Soto, <em>The ArtSlant Prize Exhibiton</em>, 2014, Installation views at Aqua Art Miami;&nbsp;Courtesy of Edra Soto and ArtSlant)</span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 16:19:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list A First Look at Miami's Newest Contemporary Art Museum <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Institute of Contemporary Art hosted its inaugural show last night to a fanfare of eager art world denizens. Following its staff's departure from the now defunct Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, the ICA is now open in its temporary home in Design District&rsquo;s landmark Moore Building. The edifice, built in the 1920s by the Moore Furniture Company, has been operating as a pop-up event space for some time and is for now serving as the location for the city's newest contemporary art museum. Located across the street from DASH High school, Miami&rsquo;s featured charter school for Arts &amp; Architecture, and just down the block from the newly established headquarters of Louis Vuittons&rsquo; Latin American operations, the museum promises to serve a diverse community of museum-goers both, young and old, inside and out of the developing South Florida art and design scene.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /><img style="float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204035802-IMG_6264.JPG" alt="" width="275" />During Miami Art Week, the Museum opens to a foyer of commodified creative goodies. Imported from Basel, Switzerland,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.june-basel.com/" target="_blank">JUNE Fine Goods &amp; Souvenirs</a>&nbsp;dons shelves with limited edition gold dust sachets and conversation-starting coffee table books to line any art connoisseur's bookshelf. Entering the main hall, one is immediately immersed in a four-story panopticon of artistic endeavour. The first floor features international artist Andra Ursuta&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>As I lay Dying</em>&nbsp;installation, a modern-minimalist&rsquo;s version of the Egyptian sarcophagus. A flattened wax figure is the sole entity inhabiting the first floor exhibition space (besides the paid security guard so perfectly placed the scene teeters on the brink of irony) and establishes the &ldquo;scene of the crime&rdquo; as it were. Like a page out of&nbsp;<em>Murder She Wrote</em>, the mummy&rsquo;s lifeless body invokes a sense of violence as if passively pushed, or maybe an active leap&nbsp;from lethal heights. As you continue to walk around, you notice the ascending shrines of the artist's work, built atop &ldquo;monuments&rdquo; of modern construction elements like cracked drywall and exposed nail heads. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204042023-IMG_6303.JPG" alt="" width="400" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pedro Reyes,&nbsp;<em>Sanatorium</em>, 2011&ndash;present, Installation view at ICA Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The exhibition continues on the second floor with Mexican artist Pedro Reyes&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Sanatorium,</em>&nbsp;a multi-room installation series of pseudo-psychological lab experiments and team building workshops. The artist employs &ldquo;doctors&rdquo; (museum docents in white lab coats) who lead viewers through the segmented rooms, each featuring a new exercise of personal or shared self-discovery. Guests are invited to participate in activities like&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">attach little trinkets of positive intention to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">handmade&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">GooDoo&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">dolls (like VooDoo dolls, only for used for positivity), praying upon them with good-willed consciousness. In the adjacent room, self made epithets are physically etched into index cards and put on view for the public, while further down the corridor team building exercises invite guests to hold hands and share gestures in an adult-friendly version of the kid&rsquo;s summer camp classic Indian Chief</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204040037-IMG_6247.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For many the evening concluded in an afterparty of audio visual stimulation featuring DJ Twin Shadow and a performance by Prince Rama. The younger generation reveled in the opportunity to let their hair down and move to the beat of the well-choreographed drum. Perhaps in anticipation of a Miami audience during the frenzy of Art Basel Week, the museum segregated its&nbsp;<em>before&nbsp;</em>and&nbsp;<em>after&nbsp;</em>moments, and&mdash;at least for one night&mdash;kept its Art in one section and everything else in a malleable alternative space. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204041439-IMG_6321.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Andra Ursuta,&nbsp;<em>Soft Power</em>, 2013, Installation view at ICA Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204041634-IMG_6273.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pedro Reyes,&nbsp;<em>Sanatorium</em>, 2011&ndash;present, Installation view at ICA Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204041904-IMG_6315.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pedro Reyes,&nbsp;<em>Sanatorium</em>, 2011&ndash;present, Installation view at ICA Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204042148-IMG_6285.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pedro Reyes,&nbsp;<em>Sanatorium</em>, 2011&ndash;present, Installation view at ICA Miami</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141204042311-IMG_6296.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pedro Reyes,&nbsp;<em>Sanatorium</em>, 2011&ndash;present, Installation view at ICA Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/121595-allyson-parker?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Allyson Parker</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: ICA Miami;&nbsp;Via&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/instituteofcontemporaryartmiami" target="_blank">Facebook</a>;&nbsp;All other images: the author)</span></p> Thu, 04 Dec 2014 20:43:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Positions 2014: 7 Solo Project Previews from ABMB <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Positions, o</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ne of Art Basel Miami Beach's nine sectors,</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">was conceived as a platform for established gallerists to present to one major project by a single artist they represent. Visiting curators and collectors meanwhile lick their lips at the presumed cream of the crop, with the new talents of 16 global commercial art venues being introduced to the arena. What is involved in a gallery's decision making process as they select an artist from their roster? How will their artist stand out to the fervent Miami art crowds?&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We put three simple questions to a selection of the galleries presenting at Positions in 2014 to find out:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/par/venues/show/19425-galerie-crevecoeur" target="_blank">Galerie Cr&egrave;vecoeur</a>&nbsp;on Julien Carreyn</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: center;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202201723-Galerie_Creve_Coeur_Julien_Carreyn.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;<strong>Julien Carreyn</strong>&nbsp;courtesy Galerie Creve Coeur&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Why have you chosen to present this artist?</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">At a time when new modes of communication impose a system that seems to be constantly redefined, Julien Carreyn's&nbsp;aesthetic environment&mdash;where a throwback to a form of putative French prestige meets signs of intractable&nbsp;globalization&mdash;reveals the existence of a world that we cannot, or can no longer, or cannot yet define. Shana Moulton (whom we show in the Film sector), through her character Cynthia can be analyzed as a synthesis of American neurosis and obsessions, inside a population caught between two fields of promises: on the one hand, the "paradise"<em>&nbsp;</em>offered by the massive consumption goods, on the other hand, the medical or spiritual therapies orientated towards the so-called well being.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tell us something we don't know about them.&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Julien Carreyn used to be a DJ. Shana Moulton was raised in Whispering Pines (California), which is the title of her video series initiated in 2001.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What can we expect from the booth at Positions?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Everything!&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/17736-clifton-benevento" target="_blank">Clifton Benevento</a> on&nbsp;Zak Kitnick</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141202235424-CB9785_KIT_Removableplates2014_24.5x23.5x12.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Zak Kitnick</strong>, <em>Romovable Plates</em>, 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">UV cured ink, acrylic, vinyl, powder-coated steel, hardware,&nbsp;</span></span></span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">24 1/2 x 23 1/2 x 12 inches;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Courtesy the artist and Clifton Benevento,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Photo credit: Andres Ramirez</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Why have you chosen to present this artist?</em>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">For Art Basel&nbsp;Miami&nbsp;we propose a solo presentation of new sculptures by Zak Kitnick that incorporate industrial and commercial materials to raise issues of production and distribution.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Tell us something we don't know about him.&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Inverting the boundaries between art, interior design and commodity production, Kitnick&rsquo;s work explores how these parallel worlds borrow from each other, acquiring and defusing each other&rsquo;s potential.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>What can we expect from the booth at Positions?&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">For Positions, Kitnick presents a series of printed plexi-glass sculptures atop steel shelving units. Dichotomies erupt across the Hamilton Beach products that inspire the series&mdash;haptic/optic, image/object, art/decoration&mdash;in infinite regress. Underscoring issues of form while negating issues of function, the sculptures appear utilitarian without being utilitarian.&nbsp;The products are gone but their ghosts linger in a "minimal aesthetic" without being minimal.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kitnick offers:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>I remember growing up in LA in the late 80s/ early 90s,&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>all of the sudden it seemed like we had a lot of choices.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Before there had been iceberg lettuce and romaine lettuce.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Now there was radicchio and arugula, endive and things that didn't look like lettuce at all.&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Thinking about food as material, what about process?</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Food processors.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>I bought a slow cooker, a toaster, and a blender.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Each one labeled "For Household Use Only"&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>but with a deceptive commercial grade stainless steel finish.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>How could anything be more functional or more modern?</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Keeping them around informed other things&hellip;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Work would simmer in the studio, in the powder-coating oven it would toast,</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 16px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>and back in the studio it would be disassembled, rearranged up, and reassembled. Blended.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Wagner Lungov of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/sp/venues/show/45296-central-galeria-de-arte" target="_blank">Central Galeria de Arte</a>&nbsp;on&nbsp;Nino Cais</span></strong>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141203143428-CentralGaleriadeArte_NinoCais_Untitled5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Nino Cais</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Untitled</em>, 2014, Inkjet print on cotton paper, 40 x 60 cm;&nbsp;Courtesy&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Central Galeria de Arte</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Why have you chosen to present this artist?</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Nino Cais has a consistent body of work and a solid carreer as an emerging artist in Brazil. He is very well articulated conceptually without compromising with a poetic and intuitive vein. The gallery were in a smaller fair in Miami last year and we sold all Nino Cais' works to an important American private collection. We felt like we should come back to US with a strong project of the same artist but now showing to a larger audience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Tell us something we don't know about him.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">We can give you a hint: In the present project Nino combines different realms like classic sculptures, vintage nudes, his own body and fresh vegetables. We invite the visitors to discover how the pairing of one realm to another produces a flowing narrative as one move along them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>What can we expect from the booth at Positions?</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Very fresh and vibrant contemporary art.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/25692-raebervonstenglin" target="_blank">RaebervonStenglin</a>&nbsp;</span>on Thomas Julier&nbsp;</span></strong>&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202202842-P1000075_neu.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Thomas Julier,&nbsp;</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>Requiem for RGB, BKLN-NY-AUG14</em>, 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">photograph of a LED display, archival pigment print, artist&rsquo;s frame,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">42 x 29.7 cm,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Edition of 5;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Courtesy: RaebervonStenglin, Z&uuml;rich</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Why have you chosen to present this artist?</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Thomas Julier is a young Swiss artist born in 1983. Positions is the perfect format to introduce his work to a larger, international audience.</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Tell us something we don't know about him.&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">He loves Thomas Pynchon's book&nbsp;<em>Bleeding Edge</em>&nbsp;and has made works inspired by it.</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>What can we expect from the booth at Positions?</em></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">A curated booth consisting of a mix of photographs, videos, and sculpture. </span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/venues/show/298-honor-fraser" target="_blank">Honor Fraser</a> on Meleko Mokgosi</span></strong></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202201118-ExordiumInstallMM300dpi.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Meleko Mokgosi</strong>,&nbsp;<em>In essence, you can only describe the democratic intuition as other people's children, not just yours., Exordium</em>, 2013-2014.&nbsp;Oil and charcoal on canvas,&nbsp;4 parts: 94 in. diameter, 36 in. diameter, 96 x 144 in., 96 x 108 in; Photo Farzad Owrang; Courtesy Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles, CA</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Why have you chosen to present this artist?</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Meleko is a unique voice among his generation of painters, so we are thrilled to present his work at Art Basel Miami Beach.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Tell us something we don't know about him.&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Meleko will have his first one-person museum exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in April 2015.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>What can we expect from the booth at Positions?</em></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The new piece that Meleko created for the Honor Fraser Gallery booth at Positions is a major four-panel installation that is the introductory part of what will be a series of works looking at democracy in the southern African region.</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.spazioa.it/" target="_blank">SpazioA</a>&nbsp;on Esther Kl&auml;s</span></strong></p> <p class="p7" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202202415-unnamed-1.jpg" alt="" /><br /></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Esther Kl&auml;s,<em>&nbsp;</em></strong><em>Girare con te</em>, 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Exhibition view, Museo Marino Marini, Firenze;&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Photo: Dario Lasagni;&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Courtesy SpazioA, Pistoia</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Why have you chosen to present this artist?</em></span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">I really liked the project Esther Kl&auml;s worked on, she&rsquo;s a terrific artist and I&rsquo;ve believed in her right from the start; she's very talented.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">We were her first gallery, even before she started receiving the attention she's getting now and so rightfully deserves.</span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Tell us something we don't know about her.</em><strong><em>&nbsp;</em></strong></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The installation in the Positions sector is the second part of a two-part exhibition portraying the moments in time before a performance is about to take place.&nbsp;The setting is to be imagined as a moment of high concentration in which the sculptures stand focused in subliminal communication with one another. The contact continuously ebbs and then re opens, in spite of the actors themselves.</span></p> <p class="p7" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>What can we expect from the booth at Positions?</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Sincerely I'm really curious to see visitors' reactions to Esther Kl&auml;s' project.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/44030-kalfayan-galleries-athens" target="_blank">Kalfayan Galleries</a> on&nbsp;Hrair Sarkissian</strong> &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202203358-HrairSarkissian1_Homesick_2014_Photograph_ABMB_Positions_KalfayanGalleries.jpg" alt="" /></span><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Hrair Sarkissian,</strong>&nbsp;<em>Homesick</em>, 2014,&nbsp;archival inkjet print,&nbsp;150 x 182.5 cm; Courtesy Kalfayan Galleries, Athens / Thessaloniki</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Why have you chosen to present this artist?</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This is the second time we are showing at the Positions section. Last year, we presented the very well received solo exhibition by the artist Stefanos Tsivopoulos, who represented Greece at the 55th La Biennale di Venezia (2013) with his solo show titled&nbsp;<em>History Zero</em>. This year we present the world premiere of Hrair Sarkissian&rsquo;s project&nbsp;<em>Homesick</em>. The project is being premiered at ABMB and it is more timely than ever. Furthermore it marks the first time that the artist has created a video work indicating a challenging development of his artistic practice.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In&nbsp;<em>Homesick</em>&nbsp;(2014) Hrair Sarkissian recreated and destroyed an architecturally exact scaled model of the apartment building in Damascus where his parents are still living. While taking as a starting point the current socio-political situation in Syria, the artist&rsquo;s home country, the work examines inter-temporal issues of personal and collective history, memory and displacement.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Tell us something we don't know about him.&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Every artwork of Hrair Sarkissian is a piece of his autobiography which the viewer is being challenged to decipher!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>What can we expect from the booth at Positions?</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="text-align: justify;">That it will catch your attention! It will make you stop at the booth, it will require thought and will make you eager to learn more about the work and the artist!</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 14:35:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Curator Charlotte Dutoit on Work, Travel, and How She'll Be Spending Her Time in Miami <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Parisian-born, Puerto Rico-based Charlotte Dutoit is a jet set curator working with some of the hottest tipped new names in the large outdoor painting game worldwide: Brazil's Bicicleta Sem Freio, Alexis Diaz, and Borondo to name a few. In fact, their eye-catching projects are often the result of Dutoit's organizing. Recent productions have taken her to London, Las Vegas, Hawaii (she is a part of the family of the annual <a href="http://powwowhawaii.com/" target="_blank">Pow!Wow!</a> graffiti jam), and now she's checking out the action in Miami, which is where we caught up with her about her journey until now, and her plans for the future.&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Who are you, where are you from and where do you live?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I am French, I grew up in Paris, and moved to the US ten years ago. I now live between Puerto Rico, that I love and consider home, and London&hellip; but I've mostly lived on a plane for the last 2 years.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What do you do?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">So... I curate events, festivals, gallery shows, and I take to the road with artists for the JustKids tours; I also design spaces and connect artists with brands&mdash;the ones that allow creative freedom. Basically, I make things with people I like, under different artistic forms and I try to make them socially conscious.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">How did you start out doing all this?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In 2008, I started a company in Puerto Rico to design spaces and interiors for hotels, restaurants, stores, always leaving a big space for art within the design and collaborating with artists on murals, installations, or furnitures. It became pretty successful and clients started to take interest in the artworks. At this point, I decided to organize art shows, first in San Juan where the scene was very prolific, and then larger scale events, festivals etc. Shortly after, I got contacted to do projects in others cities and other countries: Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Miami, London, Mexico, Berlin&hellip; This led me to create Justkids a platform for artistic projects and since then it didn&rsquo;t stop.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">How did you make contact with the artists&mdash;they're all from very different places and backgrounds?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since I was a teenager I always had my fingers on the pulse of the underground and I was surrounded with an artistic entourage of artists, musicians, skateboarders, directors, photographers. At one point it became like a small family so at first I did shows with them and then the family extended organically.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Now I work with artists from all over the world. Of course, a lot are from what is called the "urban" and "street art" scene but not exclusively. It's important for me to blend artists that work on different medias and styles. That's why I like to have D*Face, Bicicleta Sem Freio, Misaki Kawai, or Edoardo Tresoldi under the same hat.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202194858-Bicicleta_Sem_Freio_-_Theonepointeight__7_.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Bicicleta Sem Freio</strong>, Los Angeles, 2014, the biggest ever building painting in the city to date</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What are your plans at Miami this year?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I will be here for a few days&mdash;I really want to meet <a href="http://instagram.com/therealswizzz" target="_blank">The Real Swizz</a> to talk about his amazing collection.</span><span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">How do you think the Wynwood project has changed the city?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wynwood is probably the largest open-air gallery in the US, giving an opportunity for artists to be massively seen during the entire Basel week or during the monthly art walk. It's beautiful, evolving, and inspiring. Where else can you see murals of Futura, Os Gemeos, Shepard Fairey, Ryan McGinness, El Mac and Retna, Miss Van, Roa, Vhils&hellip; it's insane. Of course we can&rsquo;t forget that it's also a gentrification process which comes with its good and bad sides.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What are your art tips for Miami? Galleries, projects, murals to look out for this year?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Visit the fairs, Scope, Basel, hang out in Wynwood and try to get a room at South Beach to make sure you are not too far after the Basel parties. This year I would like to see the murals of D*Face, Ana Maria, Alexis Diaz and Faith, Shepard Fairey, Swoon&hellip; I will also explore around Little Haiti as I heard about good pop-up show including Jim Drain. I absolutely want to see Misaki Kawai's teepee [at <a href="https://www.morganshotelgroup.com/mondrian/mondrian-south-beach" target="_blank">Mondrian South Beach</a>] and also Daniel Arsham's installation. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="text-align: left; font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Your best/worst Miami experience?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The best was last year when I organized murals for Bicicleta Sem Freio, Sainer, Cyrcle, and Ana Maria. The worst last year too, the lack of sleep when Cyrcle was working until&nbsp;3am&nbsp;and Sainer starting at&nbsp;7am&nbsp;everyday. Tough!</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202194956-Borondo1.jpg" alt="" /><strong>Borondo</strong>, Life is Beautiful Festival 2014</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202195129-Misaki_Kawai_2.jpg" alt="" /><strong>Misaki Kawai</strong> at Life is Beautiful Festival 2014</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202195207-Maser1.JPG" alt="" />The Maser Motel, Life is Beautiful Festival 2014</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; text-align: left; font-size: medium;">What do you love most about your work?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">My work! To be honest traveling the world to work with amazing artists and interact with creative personalities is quite enjoyable. I don&rsquo;t see it as work! That doesn&rsquo;t mean that I am not doing it seriously or that I don&rsquo;t put all of my energy into it, actually I truly believe that trying and working harder is the only rule, but I have never seen it as a sacrifice for all the time I've been working in this field. I am just exactly where I wanted to be.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What's after Miami?</span></em></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A new hair color, Bicicleta Sem Freio's first gallery show in January and then Borondo's solo show in February, both in London. A festival in Mexico in March, another in May in Brazil, and a group show in Berlin, Life is Beautiful Festival 3rd edition&hellip; lots of work, fun, and miles!</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202195325-Edoardo_Tresoldi.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Edoardo Tresoldi</strong> working on his giant wire mesh man, Life is Beautiful Festival 2014</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><em>Follow Charlotte's projects and travels on&nbsp;Instagram @justkidsofficial and Twitter @therealjustkids</em>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&mdash;Char Jansen</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: Charlotte Dutoit)</span></p> Thu, 04 Dec 2014 13:58:26 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list The Top 5 Art Basel Tips from <em>Modern Matter</em>'s Olu Michael Odukoya <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Olu Michael Odukoya is an art director, publisher, and curator who has founded two independent art magazines&mdash;<a href="http://kilimag.com/" target="_blank"><em>Kilimanjaro</em></a>, a large-format magazine which has produced monograph editions with artists like Roni Horn and Hans Josephsohn, and <a href="http://amodernmatter.com/" target="_blank"><em>Modern Matter</em></a>, a contemporary arts and culture biannual whose new issue is covered by Sarah Lucas. Here, Olu chooses his five favorite things at this year&rsquo;s Art Basel Miami for the discerning ArtSlant reader.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202193526-Obrist_conversing_via-NY_Observer.jpg" alt="" width="450" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;">Via <em>NY Observer</em>, Hans Olbrist in Conversation&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">1. &nbsp;</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hans Ulrich Obrist: The Artist As Curator (<a href="https://www.artbasel.com/miamibeach/conversations" target="_blank">Art Basel Conversations</a>&nbsp;</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">panel discussion</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">)</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hans was one of the first people to champion my magazines, and his talks are always fascinating&mdash;there&rsquo;s a reason that he&rsquo;s done so many interviews! This is the latest installment in a series which looks at the practice of artists who also work as curators, both on their own shows, and on other practitioners&rsquo;. It's a great idea, because Hans does the opposite, and makes curation and interviewing into an art form. This time around, he&rsquo;s speaking with&nbsp;<strong>Liu Ding</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Rirkrit Tiravanija</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Joseph Kosuth</strong>,&nbsp;<strong>Martha Rosler</strong>, and&nbsp;<strong>Martha Wilson</strong>. It&rsquo;s on the Sunday from 10&ndash;11am, but Art Basel are usually excellent at getting it up on their website not long after, if you aren&rsquo;t attending.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">2. &nbsp;</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hauser &amp; Wirth at booth L17</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I&rsquo;ve worked with <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/20129-hauser-wirth-savile-row" target="_blank"><strong>Hauser and Wirth</strong></a> many times in the past, and they&rsquo;re one of my favorite galleries: they&rsquo;re also showing two of my favorite artists, <strong>Roni Horn</strong> and <strong>Paul McCarthy</strong>, at their booth this year. Creating an edition of <em>Kilimanjaro</em> with Roni a couple of years ago has been one of my all-time career highlights, as I&rsquo;d wanted to work with her forever&mdash;I always try to catch her work whenever I can, and the same with Paul. They&rsquo;re both very, very different artists, but they&rsquo;re equally iconic.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">3. &nbsp;</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Glenn O&rsquo;Brien&rsquo;s TV Party&mdash;mystery location</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As well as contemporary art and fashion, I&rsquo;m also really fascinated with underground culture from the 60s, 70s, and so on: I&rsquo;m especially interested in <strong>Andy Warhol</strong> and the Factory. <strong>Glenn O&rsquo;Brien</strong>&rsquo;s a figure who occupies both of those groups, and he&rsquo;s bringing back his old public access show, <em>TV Party</em> &mdash;which used to give airtime to people like <strong>Basquiat</strong> and <strong>Debbie Harry</strong>&mdash;for this year&rsquo;s Basel. It&rsquo;s co-hosted by <strong>Andr&eacute;</strong>, the graffiti artist.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">4.&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sports cars in front of the convention center</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Not a party or a talk, but maybe an artwork: I&rsquo;ve included photographs of the incredibly expensive cars which end up parked up outside the Convention Center twice in <em>Modern Matter</em>, once a Lamborghini and once a Ferrari, which appears in the most recent issue. I own a classic car myself&mdash;a &rsquo;64 Singer Vogue&mdash;and I love vehicles with really iconic bodies and paint jobs."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202193709-Oscar-Murillo-La-era-de-la-sinceridad-IV-2014.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Oscar Murillo&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">5.&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oscar Murillo &amp; Ed Fornieles at Carlos/Ishikawa</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Two performance pieces&mdash;one in which&nbsp;<strong>Oscar Murillo</strong>&nbsp;is making sculptures out of cornmeal (they&rsquo;re not for sale, though the table he makes them on is), and one in which&nbsp;<strong>Ed Fornieles</strong>&nbsp;offers manicures with his initials on them. I&rsquo;ve worked a lot with Oscar in the past few years: most recently, we released a book with him in association with&nbsp;<strong>David Zwirner</strong>, and he appears in the new <em>Modern Matter</em> interviewing&nbsp;<strong>Kerry James Marshall</strong>. I started working with him not long after his RCA graduation, and it&rsquo;s been really great to watch him explode in popularity since then. He continues to surprise me.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><a href="http://www.amodernmatter.com">Modern Matter&rsquo;s </a>new issue, Postmodern&mdash;which features Sarah Lucas, Oscar Murillo, Kerry-James Marshall, Eddie Peake &amp; others&mdash;is out now.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&mdash;</em>The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 19:01:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list The Woman as Object: Wax Live Unravels Modern Feminism <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">From Emma Watson's recent "game-changing" UN speech, to Petra Collin's banned-from-Instagram bikini line debacle, gender equality is back on the mainstream social issue agenda&mdash;and of particular concern in our visual-centric culture is how to reinforce positive images of women.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The radical French feminist writers Helene Cixous and Anne LeClerc theorized about women's bodies as a currency in advertising, refering to the process of "tampaxification"&mdash;an example of the oppression of women in modern society by concealing menstrual blood shown in tampon adverts. The issues of the female body in mass media are complex: is there a duty to show reality? Is it okay to exploit sexuality? Does use of the body empower women? </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">With the individual advertising now also at our disposal, the hyper-sexualized female product dialectic is more relevant than ever, and not only to Feminist discourse. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202190630-Still-vf.png" alt="" /><span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;Vasilisa Forbes</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Wax Live reopens the debate with a multimedia event starting on Thursday in London in conjunction with The&nbsp;Library Members Club at 112 St Martins Lane&nbsp;and <a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artnaked.co.uk/" target="_blank">ART NAKED</a>. An exhibition coordinated by provocateurs <a href="http://www.anninarts.com/">Annin Arts&mdash;</a>who often focus on the body and sexuality in billboards&mdash;will feature works by&nbsp;Vasilisa Forbes, Tom Beard, and Xaviera Simmons. In tandem, an opening night immersive performance and screening of the experimental film <em>Wax</em>&nbsp;will take place. The artists will also be putting up their own billboards in East London, in an attempt to further the discussion on the relationship between public art, advertising, and feminism.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141202192127-web3_oq.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Vasilisa Forbes</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The event runs Thurs, Dec 4, &nbsp;6&ndash;9pm at The Library Members Club, 112 St Martins Lane; RSVP:&nbsp;vasilisa@firstfilms.co.uk</span></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;Artslant Team</span><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Vasilisa Forbes)</span></p> Thu, 04 Dec 2014 14:13:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list "Ethnic Chic and Sustainable Vintage": Does Hype Kill Culture? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In late October, a YouTube video for a hotel in Copenhagen&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">went moderately viral</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;you may have seen it.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Filmed using the glossy &ldquo;people coming together&rdquo; bank advert template, an orthodox voiceover man says things like &ldquo;together we laugh at conformity&rdquo; and &ldquo;buzzing with authentic vibes&rdquo; over footage of hipsters using their phones, visiting microbreweries, sitting in&nbsp; cafes, and generally looking like they&rsquo;re auditioning for an alt reboot of </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The O.C</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. As the soundtrack swells with post-Grizzly Bear piano clich&eacute;s, you&rsquo;re sitting there thinking:&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Is this some Nathan Barley style spoof? No fucking way is this real!&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And then, just as it builds and builds into some kind of phoenix of hypnotic insanity, the real money shot is delivered. Are you ready? The voice-over says: &ldquo;Spanning the gulf between ethnic chic and sustainable vintage.&rdquo; He actually says that! He really does!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/h1-vcEwzNbk" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">OK. So in hype terms, this advert isn&rsquo;t exactly the <em>Breaking Bad</em> finale&mdash;with less than 175,000 YouTube plays at the time of writing,&nbsp;it&rsquo;s hardly even on any kind of radar. What it does do though, is reveal one of the biggest, Ballardianest car crashes of post-cultural slop online, and asks the question of whether this kind of apex kills the culture it faux-represents.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I grew up with Chuck D rapping &ldquo;Don't believe the hype&rdquo; as some kind of mantra. The idea of questioning the sincerity behind a culture once it reaches the tipping point into mass consumption has always been a water margin between where your perception of value lies. Cast your mind back in to the midst of the early naughties and remember those early few Kings Of Leon singles and how strangely raw and jagged they sounded, way back before "Sex On Fire" exiled them and their clean cut new hair and jackets onto the playlist at high street shops. Or was that point where you jumped on, wondered who these unusual boys were howling across the weekend&rsquo;s Glastonbury TV coverage?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141202162603-Screen_Shot_2014-12-02_at_11.23.48_AM.png" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It was that moment of saturation, media blitz, and the way they rewired their aesthetic that comprised their hype. But do I lay awake at night, my heart betrayed at how those barbed Beefheartisms of <em>Youth &amp; Young Manhood</em> have had their tender pumps ripped out and are now transported from an Indonesian sweatshop with softening agents into the Volvos of median income Mums? Do I find it unfair that a bunch of guys, now in their 30s, have managed to channel their early energy into a successful living for themselves and their families? Of course I don&rsquo;t&mdash;and I presume neither do you.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The slang of Hype is hypodermic needle: a circular relationship where the audience is addict, &ldquo;The Man&rdquo; is the pusher/dealer, and the creative/origin is the product. If culture doesn&rsquo;t like the taste of this emulsified freeze-dried version of itself, it moves on. No, fuck that, it already has done. And it did it organically, forming new connections, rewiring continually and eternally like any lattice-formed base of life will do. If the hotel&mdash;once it opens&mdash;succeeds, I imagine it will be down to appealing to a post-hipster demographic with money. A kind of Soho House vibe. But does this matter when across the road there are a dozen Airbnb locations or whatever the equivalent will be in 2015?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/408013-paul-hanford" target="_blank">Paul Hanford</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images: <a href="http://urbanhouse.me/" target="_blank">Urban House</a> via <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1-vcEwzNbk" target="_blank">YouTube</a>)</span></p> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 01:53:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Black Box and White Cube Merge but Audiences Are Slow to Follow <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The current art market status of video art is comparable to that of photography in the early nineties. Back then photography wasn&rsquo;t considered "real art" requiring hard-won skills going beyond simply pointing a lens and pressing a button. Moreover, prints could be reproduced endlessly rendering the work devoid of true artistic aura, a Benjaminesque nightmare. For video art too, controlling editions and authentication are the biggest obstacles to overcome, even more than trying to convince collectors that buying a certified DVD at a gallery is preferable to watching the same video on YouTube or Vimeo.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">While acknowledging these problems, there is no denying that video art&mdash;or better said: time based media&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/41380" target="_blank">is on the rise</a>. For young artists, especially the so-called digital natives, picking up an HD-camera feels just as natural and necessary as sketching was for generations before them. Museums have latched on and transformed white cubes into black boxes in order to facilitate screenings; most newly constructed buildings come outfitted with a film theater. Artists on the other hand, have crossed over into cinema, Oscar-winning director Steve McQueen being the prime example. For years now, the short film program of the International Film Festival Rotterdam has been dominated by artists such as <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/artists/rackroom/23575-yael-bartana" target="_blank">Yael Bartana</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/30326" target="_blank">Nicolas Provost</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/38136" target="_blank">Mika Taanila</a> and Johan Grimonprez. And the winner of the world&rsquo;s first award dedicated to cinema and art, the EYE Prize, is to be announced this January.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The market cannot ignore these developments and art fairs have responded. Events dedicated solely to video art, such as <a href="http://www.loop-barcelona.com/" target="_blank">Loop</a> in Barcelona and <a href="http://www.moving-image.info/new-york/" target="_blank">Moving Image</a> in New York, are still very rare, but an increasing number of fairs are opening up a special section for time based media. Last summer the Melbourne Art Fair launched a program showcasing contemporary Australian video art, and Projections at Art Rotterdam, taking place in February, is already going into its third year. Art Basel, the mother of all art fairs, has been operating a film program for the last 15 years and its Miami Beach incarnation has followed suit.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141129000318-RaniaBellou_TightRopePrisonPrivacy_2008_Still_KalfayanGalleries.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Rania Bellou</strong>,<strong>&nbsp;</strong><em>Tight Rope / Prison Privacy</em>, 2008, Animation, 39&rdquo;;&nbsp;Courtesy the artist and Kalfayan Galleries, Athens (<a href="http://vimeo.com/102461800" target="_blank">View animation on Vimeo</a>)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The film program in Miami Beach features works presented by 61 international galleries. Veterans like Turner Prize-winner Mark Leckey (<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/venues/show/8357-galerie-buchholz" target="_blank">Galerie Buchholz</a>) and Scandinavian superstars Elmgreen &amp; Dragset (<a href="http://www.artslant.com/par/venues/show/2476-galerie-perrotin---saint-claude?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Galerie Perrotin</a>) are presented next to emerging artists like Bill Balaskas and Rania Bellou (both represented by Athens-based <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/venues/show/44030-kalfayan-galleries-athens" target="_blank">Kalfayan</a>). Catchy titles like "Armchair Surfers" (about "humanity in the 21st&nbsp;century") and "Radio Ga Ga" (about "concepts of radio and waves in a broader sense") adorn the mostly thematic programs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the sake of historical context the curators have not limited themselves to recent works only. But instead of screening hardcore Bruce Nauman or Vito Acconci videos, they have chosen the aesthetically easier to grasp <em>Ex-Romance</em> (1986) by Charles Atlas. For this work the American inventor of so-called "media dance"&mdash;contemporary dance directly created for the camera&mdash;worked with Karole Armitage. Based on her postmodern choreography the film unfolds at such unlikely locations as an airport lounge, a gas station, and a baggage conveyor belt.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Completely of the now and extremely topical is the program "Digital Revolutionaries" (Thursday, December 4, 10&ndash;11pm) which was co-curated by rising star Tabor Robak. Unabashedly plundering, transforming, and criticizing the visual language and logic of computer games, websites, and the internet at large, the artists included point the way to tomorrow&rsquo;s video art. But they&rsquo;re not doing so without acknowledging their predecessors. "Digital Revolutionaries" caps off with a tribute to Harun Farocki, screening his <em>Parallel II</em> in which the recently deceased multimedia pioneer questions the inherent rules of computer animated worlds.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141129022352-CiprianMureanUnchienandalou.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ciprian Mureşan</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Un chien andalou</em>, 2004, 51'';&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and David Nolan Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The program titled "The Night of the Forevermore" (Friday, December 5, 9&ndash;10pm) focuses on the link between cinema and video art. It features the 51-minute-long <em>Un Chien Andalou</em> by Ciprian Mureşan, in which the artist mixes the 1929 Bu&ntilde;uel/Dal&iacute; classic with the 2001 animation hit <em>Shrek</em>. In <em>Sunday</em> Alex Prager presents a tableau vivant in split screen and retro style, invoking the spirit of Douglas Sirk. And Jose D&aacute;vila, known for his photographs with the protagonists cut out, applies his favorite technique to Sergio Leone&rsquo;s spaghetti western <em>The Good, The Bad and The Ugly</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201014204-BigEyesTimBurton12014TheWeinsteinCompanyAllrightsreserved.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tim Burton</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Big Eyes</em>, 2014;&nbsp;&copy; 2014 The Weinstein Company. All rights reserved</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ever since the sixties and seventies commenting on film&mdash;or tv for that matter&mdash;has been one of the dominant themes in video art. In the 21st&nbsp;century, however, the subject has become less urgent, the medium being overtaken by youngsters with a different frame of reference, the type of artists included in "Digital Revolutionaries." The reason why Art Basel Miami Beach is still programming these works is probably because by doing so it hopes to attract a new audience: the cinema going crowd. This hypothesis is backed by the fact that the film program kicks off with Tim Burton&rsquo;s latest feature film <em>Big Eyes</em>. This biopic about Margaret Keane, 1950s painter of popular doe-eyed children&rsquo;s portraits who got duped by her husband but got even in the end, is solid mainstream cinema. Fans of Burton and lead actors Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz will no doubt flock to the Colony Theatre&mdash;and will probably leave immediately after the screening, not even taking a peek at the rest of the program. The traditional movie audience, the people who consider film entertainment and love it exactly because of that reason, is not easily lured into watching non-narrative, experimental video art. Although the creators of visual art and cinema mix more freely nowadays and happily share a medium, their audiences are still highly segregated. Art Basel Miami Beach has its missionary work cut out for it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<strong>General Impression,&nbsp;</strong>Art Basel in Miami Beach 2013 | Film,&nbsp;&copy; Art Basel)</span></p> Mon, 01 Dec 2014 01:42:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Art Basel Miami Beach: The Essential Guide <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It's an understatement to call Art Basel Miami Beach an art world event: it's a phenomenon. Organizers reported some 75,000 attendees in 2013&mdash;and that's just for the Miami Beach Convention Center main show. In addition to Art Basel's seaside outpost, this year more than 20 art fairs&mdash;some brand new, others established in their own right&mdash;will take over the Miami beaches and Wynwood Arts District during Miami Art Week. Coordinated with these shining satellites are citywide museum and gallery exhibitions and openings, film screenings, lectures, performances, public art exhibitions, brunches, and of course lots and lots of parties.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">With so much happening, it can be hard to keep track of the what, when, and where of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Art Week</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. We present to you here a list of fairs, openings, parties, and major events taking place this week. We'll be updating all week. Did we miss your favorite party or opening? Be sure to add it in the comments!</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=zKxNSmDpqTjY.kAINEeMIWg68" width="640" height="480"></iframe></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jump to:</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="#miami%20beach%20fairs"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fairs: Miami Beach</span></strong></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="#midtown"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fairs: Midtown / Wynwood Arts District</span></strong></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="#other"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fairs: Other Areas</span></strong></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="#collections"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Museum and Private Collections Exhibitions Openings</span></strong></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="#parties"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Other Parties, Concerts, and Public Events</span></strong></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">See our top Street Art picks <a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41426" target="_blank">here</a>!</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a name="miami beach fairs"></a> MIAMI BEACH FAIRS</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art Basel | Miami Beach</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>The</em> fair around which all others orbit</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Private view: Wed, December 3, 11am&ndash;8pm (invitation only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vernissage: Thurs, December 4, 11am&ndash;3pm (invitation only)&nbsp;&nbsp;3&ndash;8pm (general admission)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public days: Thurs 3&ndash;8pm, Fri/Sat 12&ndash;8pm, Sun 12&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$45 one-day pass, $100 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.artbasel.com" target="_blank">https://www.artbasel.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201020255-edra_soto_artslant_prize.png" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Edra Soto</span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">, ArtSlant Prize Presentation, Aqua Art Miami</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Aqua Art Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Come visit ArtSlant at this unique fair in a classic South Beach hotel&mdash;now celebrating its 10th Miami season! We'll be presenting the winners of the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/41234" target="_blank">2014 ArtSlant Prize</a>. Find us in Room 124 on the courtyard and join us for Happy Hour on Thurs/Fri 4&ndash;6pm&mdash;sponsored by ArtSlant and Aqua Art Miami.</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Wednesday, December 3, 3&ndash;10pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public days: Thurs 12&ndash;9pm, Fri/Sat 11am&ndash;9pm, Sun 11am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Aqua Hotel, 1530 Collins Ave., Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$15 one-day pass, $75 multi-day pass (includes admission for Art Miami, CONTEXT, and Aqua Art Miami)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.aquaartmiami.com/" target="_blank">http://www.aquaartmiami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">NADA Art Fair Miami Beach</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Run by the non-profit New Art Dealers Alliance, NADA aims to represent contemporary emerging and underexposed art not typical of the "art establishment.&rdquo; Now in its 12th year.</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Preview: Thurs 10am&ndash;2pm (invitation only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Thurs 2&ndash;8pm, Fri/Sat 11am&ndash;8pm, Sun 11am&ndash;5pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Deauville Beach Resort, 6701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://newartdealers.org/" target="_blank">http://newartdealers.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PULSE Miami Beach</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The middle-market contemporary art fair celebrates its 10th year by moving to a new beachside location</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Private preview brunch: Thurs 9am&ndash;1pm (invitation only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Thurs 1&ndash;7pm, Fri/Sat 10am&ndash;7pm, Sun 10am&ndash;5pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Indian Beach Park, 4601 Collins Ave., Miami Beach &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$20 one-day pass, $25 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="http://pulse-art.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">http://pulse-art.com/</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Scope Miami Beach</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Tues 4&ndash;8pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed&ndash;Sun 11am&ndash;8pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Scope Pavilion, 910 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$30 general admission</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://scope-art.com/" target="_blank">http://scope-art.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Select Art Fair Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Emerging and Mid-Career Contemporary Art</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Tues 4&ndash;8pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed&ndash;Sat 11am&ndash;8pm, Sun 11am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">7200-7300 Collins Ave., Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$15 general admission</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.select-fair.com/" target="_blank">http://www.select-fair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201021034-untitled_art_fair.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">UNTITLED Art Fair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Emerging and Mid-Career Contemporary Art</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening Party: Mon, December 1, 6&ndash;9pm (<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41252" target="_blank">hosted by Ryan McGinley</a> and benefitting non-profit <a href="http://www.acria.org/" target="_blank">ACRIA</a>&nbsp;for HIV research and education)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Tues, December 2, 3&ndash;7pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed 3&ndash;7 pm, Thurs&ndash;Sat 11am&ndash;7pm, Sun 11am&ndash;4pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ocean Drive and 12th Street, Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$25 general admission</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.art-untitled.com/" target="_blank">http://www.art-untitled.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Design Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vernissage: Tues, December 2, 6&ndash;8pm (invitation only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed/Thurs 10am&ndash;8pm, Fri 11am&ndash;8pm, Sat 12&ndash;8pm, Sun 12&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Meridian Avenue and 19th Street, Miami Beach Convention Center</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$25 one-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="http://designmiami.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">http://designmiami.com/</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ink Miami Art Fair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami's only fair dedicated to modern and contemporary works on paper</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Preview breakfast: Wed 9&ndash;11am (invitation only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wed 12&ndash;5pm, Thurs 10am&ndash;5pm, Fri/Sat 10am&ndash;8pm, Sun 10am&ndash;3pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dorchester, 1850 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://inkartfair.com/" target="_blank">http://inkartfair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a name="midtown"></a> <strong>MIDTOWN/WYNWOOD ARTS DISTRICT</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201021819-art_miami.png" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art Miami
</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Before there was Art Basel Miami Beach, there was Art Miami: Miami's longest-running modern and contemporary art fair celebrates 25 years in 2014!&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2-7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Tues 5.30&ndash;10pm (invitation only, benefitting <a href="http://www.pamm.org/miami-art-week-2014-pamm#" target="_blank">PAMM</a>)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed&ndash;Sat 11am&ndash;8pm, Sun 11am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Midtown Miami, 3101 NE First Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$35 one-day pass, $75 multi-day pass (includes admission for Art Miami, CONTEXT, and Aqua Art Miami)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.art-miami.com/" target="_blank">http://www.art-miami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CONTEXT Art Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art Miami's sister fair dedicated to the development and reinforcement of emerging and mid-career artists</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7. 
</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Tues 5.30&ndash;10pm (invitation only, benefitting&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pamm.org/miami-art-week-2014-pamm#" target="_blank">PAMM</a>)<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed&ndash;Sat 11am&ndash;8pm, Sun 11am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Midtown Miami, 2901 NE First Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$35 one-day pass, $75 multi-day pass (includes admission for Art Miami, CONTEXT, and Aqua Art Miami)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.contextartmiami.com/" target="_blank">http://www.contextartmiami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Project</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Tues 5.30&ndash;10pm (invitation only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed/Thurs/Sat 10am&ndash;7pm, Fri 10am&ndash;8pm, Sun 10am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Midtown Miami, NE 34th Street and NE First Avenue, Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$25 one-day pass, $35 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://miami-project.com/" target="_blank">http://miami-project.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ArtSpot Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art Fair</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vernissage: Wed 6&ndash;10pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed 6&ndash;10pm, Thurs&ndash;Sat 1&ndash;9pm, Sun 12&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Midtown Miami
, 3011 NE First Avenue at NE 30th Street, Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$5 general admission, $25 preview and weekend pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artspotmiami.com/" target="_blank">http://www.artspotmiami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201023421-pinta_sonia_falcone.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Sonia Falcone</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Color Field</em>, 2013, Mixed media installation, Courtesy Salar Galeria de Arte, Colombia; At Pinta Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Pinta Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Modern and Contemporary Art from Latin America, Spain, and Portugal</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Preview: Tues, December 2, 6&ndash;9pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Vernissage: Wed 5&ndash;8pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed 5&ndash;8pm, Thurs&ndash;Sat 11am&ndash;8pm, Sun 11am&ndash;5pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">3401 NE First Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$20 one-day pass, $45 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.pintamiami.com/" target="_blank">http://www.pintamiami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Red Dot Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Tues 6&ndash;10pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed 11am&ndash;5pm, Thurs&ndash;Sat 11am&ndash;8pm, Sun 11am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Midtown Miami, 3011 NE First Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$15 one-day pass, $25 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.reddotfair.com/" target="_blank">http://www.reddotfair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Spectrum Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP Vernissage: Wed 6&ndash;10pm (tickets required)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Thurs&ndash;Sat 12&ndash;9pm, Sun 12&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Late night parties nightly 7&ndash;9pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Midtown Miami, 3011 NE First Avenue at NE 30th Street, Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$10 general admission, $25 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://spectrum-miami.com/">http://spectrum-miami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sculpt Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Contemporary Sculpture Art Fair</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP party: Sat 7&ndash;10pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Wed&ndash;Sun 11am&ndash;8pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">46 NW 36th St., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://sculptmiami.com/" target="_blank">http://sculptmiami.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Zones Art Fair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;A unique fair with a performance centric mission&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Tues&ndash;Sun 12&ndash;5pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Edge Zones Project, 8325 NE Second Ave., Miami &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.zonesartfair.org/" target="_blank">http://www.zonesartfair.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a name="other"></a> <strong>OTHER AREAS</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201023852-home-aiweiwei_pull_of_the_moon.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ai Weiwei and Bert Benally</strong>,&nbsp;<em>Pull of the Moon,</em>&nbsp;2014,&nbsp;Film;&nbsp;A collaborative project funded by New Mexico Arts 50&rsquo; Digital Dome Experimental Program, Shown daily at Concept between 11am and 9pm; Premiers at VIP Collectors' Invitational, Tues, Dec 2, 7.30&ndash;11pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Concept Art Fair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A new fair, presenting secondary market blue chip artwork aboard the Seafair mega-yacht</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 2&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP Collectors&rsquo; Invitational: Tues 7.30&ndash;11pm (passes only)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Mon&ndash;Sat 1&ndash;10pm, Sun 1&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">SeaFair, 100 Chopin Plaza, Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$15 one-day ticket, $25 multi-day pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.concept-fair.com/" target="_blank">http://www.concept-fair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fridge Art Fair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An irreverent young fair founded by New York artist Eric Ginsburg (yes, it's a play on Frieze)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;9</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">VIP preview: Thurs (ticket required)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public Hours: Thurs 2&ndash;8pm, Fri&ndash;Mon 1&ndash;9pm, Tues 1&ndash;3pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Third Street Garage, 300 SW 12th Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.fridgeartfair.com/" target="_blank">http://www.fridgeartfair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami River Art Fair
 </span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Public hours: Thurs&ndash;Sun 12&ndash;8pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Convention Center, 400 SE Second Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Free with printed pass</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://miamiriverartfair.com/" target="_blank">http://miamiriverartfair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Prizm Art Fair</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Thurs 7&ndash;10pm, Fri 10am&ndash;6pm, Sat/Sun 10am&ndash;7pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Center for Architecture &amp; Design, 100 NE First Ave., Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.prizmartfair.com/" target="_blank">http://www.prizmartfair.com/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><br /><br /><br /></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a name="collections"></a> <strong>MUSEUMS/PRIVATE COLLECTIONS</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201024733-10655416_816864445023468_6278911564160229493_o.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/instituteofcontemporaryartmiami" target="_blank">Facebook&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ICA Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami's newest museum!</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Museum opening celebration: Tues, December 2, 7&ndash;9pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening celebration after-party featuring DJ set by Twin Shadow/ Live performance by PRINCE RAMA: 10pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening Exhibitions:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Pedro Reyes,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Andra Ursuta,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dec 3, 2014&ndash;Mar 15, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">4040 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami 33137</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.icamiami.org/" target="_blank">http://www.icamiami.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM</strong>)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Project Gallery:</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Mario Garc&iacute;a Torres &ndash; R.R. and the Expansion of the Tropics</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, Tues, Dec 2</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Special Opening Hours during Miami Arts Week: Mon&ndash;Sun 10am&ndash;6pm, Thurs 10am&ndash;5pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">PAMM Presents&nbsp;Future Brown featuring Kelela, a DIS Magazine + THV Entertainment production, Thurs, Dec 4, 8pm&ndash;midnight&nbsp;(invitation only: Open to PAMM Sustaining and above level members, and Art Basel Miami Beach, DesignMiami/ and Art Miami VIP cardholders)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">1103 Biscayne Blvd, Miami 33132</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.pamm.org/" target="_blank">http://www.pamm.org/</a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Margulies Collection at the Warehouse</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Extended opening hours:&nbsp;Mon/Tues 9am&ndash;5pm,&nbsp;Wed&ndash;Sat 9am&ndash;6pm,&nbsp;Sun 9am&ndash;2pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Special Breakfast for Art Basel:&nbsp;Wed&ndash;Fri 9am&ndash;12pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">591 NW 27th Street, Miami 33127</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$10 general admission</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.margulieswarehouse.com/#/exhibitions" target="_blank">http://www.margulieswarehouse.com/#/exhibitions</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rubell Family Collection</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Group Show <em>To Have and to Hold</em>, plus solo commissions by&nbsp;Will Boone, Aaron Curry, Lucy Dodd, Mark Flood, David Ostrowski, and Kaari Upson, Dec 3</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Extended opening hours: Dec 3&ndash;7, Wed&ndash;Sun, 10am&ndash;6pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">95 NW 29 Street, Miami 33127</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.rfc.museum/" target="_blank">https://www.rfc.museum/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Shifting the Paradigm: The Art of George Edozie</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Tues, Dec 2, 7pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">770 NE 125th Street, North Miami</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://mocanomi.org/" target="_blank">http://mocanomi.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">de la Cruz Collection</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Group Show </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Beneath the Surface</em></span><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><br /></em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening hours during Miami Art Week: Dec 2&ndash;6, Tues&ndash;Sat, 9am&ndash;3pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">23 NE 41st Street, Miami 33137</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.delacruzcollection.org/" target="_blank">http://www.delacruzcollection.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CIFO</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening:</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> Impulse, Reason, Sense, Conflict:&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Abstract art from the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dec 3, 2014&ndash;Mar 8, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hours subject to change during Miami Art Week</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">1018 North Miami Avenue Miami 33136</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.cifo.org/" target="_blank">http://www.cifo.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><br />&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Bass Museum of Art</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening Reception:&nbsp;<em>One Way: Peter Marino</em>&nbsp;Wed, Dec 3, 7&ndash;11pm (Open to Bass Museum of Art members, Art Basel Miami Beach/Design Miami VIPs and Exhibitors)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">2100 Collins Ave.,&nbsp;Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">$8 general admission</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.bassmuseum.org/" target="_blank">http://www.bassmuseum.org/</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a name="parties"></a>MORE EVENTS, PARTIES, AND EXHIBITIONS</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141201024927-strandbeest.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art Basel Miami Beach&rsquo;s Public Sector </span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dec 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Collins Park (free)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tip! Walk down to the beach to see Theo Jansen&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.strandbeest.com/events.php">Strandbeest performances</a>. Dec 3&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oceanfront, Miami Beach Drive between 21st and 22nd Streets</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Art Basel Miami Beach's Film Program </strong>(<a href="http://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/41441" target="_blank">our preview here!</a>)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wed/Thurs 6&ndash;11pm, Fri/Sat 6&ndash;10pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Screenings in SoundScape Park, New World Center</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">500 17th St, Miami Beach 33139</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Additionally, Tim Burton's&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Big Eyes</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">will have a special screening at the Colony Theatre, Lincoln Road, Fri, Dec 5, 8.30pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.artbasel.com/en/Miami-Beach/About-the-Show/Calendar?filtertype=type&amp;filtervalue={A76B852C-799F-43C7-85D5-B3037F91FDF5}" target="_blank">Program Calendar</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">#NADAWAVE 2014</strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A series of performances organized in collaboration with Common Space</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dec 4&ndash;6, from 9.30pm, nightly</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Official NADA Miami Beach after-party: Thurs, Dec 4, 9.30pm&ndash;late, (9.30pm:&nbsp;Diamond Terrifier with Mbeharie &amp; Trouble VJs;&nbsp;12am: Jeffrey Deitch, Common Space, and&nbsp;NADApresent: Omar Souleyman,&nbsp;DJ set: Jon Santos)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sandbar,&nbsp;6752 Collins Ave, Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="http://nadawave.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">http://nadawave.com/</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Ryan McNamara's <em>MEEM 4 MIAMI: Story Ballet about the Internet</em></strong><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A Performa Commission, Presented by Art Basel, and produced by Performa and Art Base</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dec 3 &amp; 4, 8 &amp; 10.30pm</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Grand Theater at Castle Beach Resort,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">5445 Collins Ave, Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://performa.secure.force.com/ticket/#details_a0So0000000nq0cEAA" target="_blank">Tickets here</a>&nbsp;(now sold out)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Solange Knowles Presents for SELECT Art Fair</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Nightly performances Tues&ndash;Fri, from 7pm&ndash;10p (11pm on weekend)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">North Shore Bandshell,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">7275 Collins Ave.,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Beach, FL 33139</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Admission is free (capacity limited)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Queer Biennial Miami</strong><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">December 4, 2014&ndash;January 14, 2015</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening receptions: Dec 4&ndash;7</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hotel Gaythering, 1409 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="http://queerbiennial.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">http://queerbiennial.com/</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">UOVO x NEWD</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Presents new and site-specific projects from SIGNAL [Brooklyn] metro pcs [LA]</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opening: Wed, December 3, 6&ndash;9 PM (cocktails and hors d'oeuvres provided by T</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he Broken Shaker at Freehand Miami)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">2727 Indian Creek Drive, Miami Beach</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.newdartshow.com/#uovo-x-newd-in-miami">http://www.newdartshow.com/#uovo-x-newd-in-miami</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">YoungArts</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The National YoungArts Foundation has an entire Art Basel line up including exhibitions, tours, and musical performances</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Pop-Up Lounge: Stephen Starr Events caters&nbsp;lite bites and craft cocktails each evening;&nbsp;nightly performances by YoungArts alumni including&nbsp;Grace Weber,&nbsp;Kate Davis,&nbsp;Elliott Skinner, Dec 4&ndash;6,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">7th</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Floor of YoungArts&rsquo; Tower Building</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">FKA Twigs Performance: Thurs, Dec 4,&nbsp;YoungArts Tent (entrance on 22nd Street);&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">James Blake: Fri, Dec 5 (sold out)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Slow Motion Walk</em>&nbsp;performances partnered with the Marina Abomovich Institute:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dec 4&ndash;7, 12&ndash;6pm,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">free, YoungArts Jewel Box</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The National YoungArts Campus, 2100 Biscayne Blvd</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.youngarts.org/artbasel" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">http://www.youngarts.org/artbasel</span></a></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">FIU Breakfast in the Park</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Patricia &amp; Phillip Frost Art Museum Sculpture Garden</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sun, Dec 7, 2014, 9.30am&ndash;noon</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Guest Speaker: Artist Daniel Arsham</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Florida International University,&nbsp;10975 S.W. 17th Street,&nbsp;Miami 33199</span></p> <p><a style="text-align: justify;" href="http://thefrost.fiu.edu/BreakfastinthePark.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">http://thefrost.fiu.edu/BreakfastinthePark.html</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(Daniel Arsham also has a solo exhibition at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.locustprojects.org/#1" target="_blank" data-ls-seen="1">Locust Projects</a>&nbsp;(3852 North Miami Avenue, Miami)</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: justify;"><br /><br /></p> Tue, 02 Dec 2014 01:44:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Tony Oursler Hacks a Church with Reverse Iconoclasm <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">True to their sometimes petty nature and deep-seated adversity to change the town folk of Amsterdam were up in arms last year when Jacqueline Grandjean made public her plans for the Oude Kerk (Old Church). The new director wanted the venue to become more than a glorified exhibition space filled with penurious looking temporary bulkheads. She envisioned large-scale installations by artists of international repute, in interviews casually mentioning the Unilever Series in Tate Modern&rsquo;s Turbine Hall as a benchmark. In terms better reserved for the hooligans and drunken tourists roaming the surrounding red light district, local residents spoke out against what they feared would become "a spectacle." Emotions ran high in readers' letters to the local newspaper as if Grandjean were proposing to set fire to Amsterdam&rsquo;s oldest building. All these protestors should now go and visit Grandjean&rsquo;s maiden exhibition to find out that not only has the integrity of the 1306 monument been preserved, but the place has actually been injected with new energy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tony Oursler provides the star power necessary for a flying start of the new Old Church. In the early eighties the American pioneered what was then called multi-media art with elaborate installations combining video, sound, language and sculpture. He ran with the CalArts crowd of the day, even playing in a band with the late Mike Kelley, and collaborated with David Bowie. His list of exhibitions is sheer endless but <em>Systems of Dramatic Feedback</em> in 1995 was his last solo show in The Netherlands. For Oude Kerk's&nbsp;<em>I/O underflow</em>, his long overdue re-acquaintance with a country that was amongst the first to appreciate his art, he has made four new works. Oursler worked site-specifically, reacting to the seven-century-old architecture or&mdash;as he puts it himself in the exhibition brochure&mdash;"hacking the church."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141130022648-__Tony_Oursler_in_the_Oude_Kerk_2014.jpg.2.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For the younger generation new to Oursler&rsquo;s work there&rsquo;s the opportunity to get up to speed in the period rooms adjacent to the main space. The oldest work, <em>X-doll</em> from 1992, which is presented in the holy sepulcher, features a restless, spread-eagled nude figure projected on a cross. This combination of projection and three-dimensional objects is vintage Oursler and is further refined in <em>Orbit</em> (2007), a snake-like figure inhabiting the marble sculpture of a giant knot. An example of the evil-looking dolls with animated faces, which Oursler first presented at <em>Documenta 9</em> and were popular for a while at international art fairs, can be found in the mirror room. And <em>Talking Light</em> (2014), a large lightbulb flickering in time with a speech delivered by the artist himself, echoes the 1997 key work <em>Streetlight</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The four new works are large-scale projections dealing with the themes that have run like a thread through Oursler&rsquo;s work since the turn of the century: virtual imagery, the relationship between man and machine, and the power of media in shaping our experiences and thoughts. Using the human figure in a theatrical way, mostly as moving portraits, Oursler questions the authenticity and integrity of digital representation. Here, digital technology and human subjectivity, face and interface, clash and mix. This is very explicit in <em>Jim Fletcher, Jason Scott</em>, in which a ghostly Jim symbolizes the computer unable to fully represent humans (and obviously ill at ease with this fact); meanwhile actor Jason spits out names of computer viruses as if he himself is fatally infected with digilitis.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The work, laced with fragments of Christian prayers, is projected high on a wall, next to a round window depicting a dove carrying an olive branch back to Noah&rsquo;s Ark. It adds an extra layer to the work: fear for a virtual Deluge but also the promise of rebooting humanity with a clean slate. With a kind of reverse iconoclasm, Oursler cleverly plugs into the historic and religious, echoes and images bouncing off the church walls, the vaulted ceiling, and stained glass windows. Moreover, by enriching the architecture with his projections he also makes you look closer at it, reactivating the space which for a long time was mostly seen through the eyes of tourists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141130022817-__Tony_Oursler_in_the_Oude_Kerk_2014.jpg.3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the central piece of the show, <em>Holly Stanton/Josie Keefe, Jim Fletcher/Kate Valk</em>, two couples take turns delivering a fragmented narrative. The work was inspired by the Turing Test, devised by the British mathematician Alan Turing, who is generally considered the grandfather of computer science. Its aim is to test whether a computer is impersonating a human. At first the older, robot-like couple seems to fit the bill perfectly, but along the way they become more warm-blooded and dramatic. At some point an apple appears and the woman eggs on the man to "make a wish and take a bite." It&rsquo;s an explicit reference to Turing who, upon being found out as a homosexual, committed suicide by eating a poisoned apple. But Snow White and, naturally in this consecrated context, Eve&rsquo;s original sin come to mind just as quickly.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although the projections are massive, they are not at all intrusive. The monumental space easily stands up to them, transcends the role of temporary canvas by being a partner in dialogue. <em>I/O underflow</em> raises expectations for what&rsquo;s to come, interventions by the likes of Tatzu Nishi and Susan Philipsz. It&rsquo;s the kind of spectacle a city can never have too much of.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images:&nbsp;&copy; Tony Oursler in the Oude Kerk 2014)</span></p> Tue, 02 Dec 2014 13:50:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list On the Streets Guide: The Top Street Art Events During Miami Art Week <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Graffiti was born in protest. Recalling this origin, street, graffiti, and mural artists in Miami are standing up for social justice during this year's Art Basel Miami Beach.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Through a series of creative altruistic events s</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ome of the city's most prominent artists, curators, and activists will connect with visitors by drawing attention to ways of improving their communities through art. Here's our selection of some of Miami Art Week's best street art projects and events.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Wynwood Walls</strong>&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The mammoth <a href="http://thewynwoodwalls.com/Art-Basel/">Wynwood Walls</a> project aims to bring some of the best-known artists in the field out to paint in Miami's Wynwood district. This year, their primary project is "The Art of Collaboration," a program that pairs artists together to execute new murals, celebrating art and community. This year's confirmed collabs include Faith 47 and Alexis Diaz, Cleon Peterson and Shepard Fairey, and Pose and Revok. Opening night is Tuesday&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(open to the public from 9&ndash;11pm)</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with a series of special events planned within the unveiling of new walls. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Wynwood Embassy</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141129094547-Wynwood_Embassy.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Herakut at Wynwood Embassy</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">At&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wynwoodembassy.org">Wynwood Embassy</a>&rsquo;s <em>Shoot for the Moon</em> sequel, German artistic duo Herakut will co-create an interactive mural with teens from Here&rsquo;s Help, a local substance abuse agency that provides programs to at-risk youth. Starting November 29, 2014, Wynwood Embassy will host the duo&rsquo;s solo exhibition with a series of events each night of art week at <a href="http://www.manawynwood.com/" target="_blank">Mana Wynwood</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>RAW Project</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141129094212-IMG_0285.JPG" alt="" /><span style="font-size: x-small;">Jose Mertz at Jose de Diego Middle School for #RAW Project, Courtesy Raw Project, Photo:</span><span style="font-size: x-small;">Kerry McLaney (@305creative)</span></span><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An army of spray-painting heroes will transform the white-washed walls of Jose de Diego Middle School in Wynwood into colorful representatives of the surrounding graffiti culture. <a href="http://www.wynwoodmap.com/" target="_blank">WynwoodMap dot com</a> and the Wynwood Arts District Association present the <a href="http://projectwynwood.com/raw/" target="_blank">#RAWProject</a>, which includes a massive fundraiser on&nbsp;December 2, 2014. The money raised will go to an art education program.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Sketches for Mankind&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.sketchesformankind.com/">Sketches for Mankind</a> is a non-profit organization founded by Evoca1, a well-know local artist. The charity is designed to help feed the homeless with their '3rd Sunday for Hunger' in the downtown Miami area. &nbsp;Their Basel Miami kicks off with thirteen local artists will create original pieces on uniform wooden panels that will be auctioned off at R House Restaurant in Wynwood on Sunday November 30, 2014, hosted by the Miami community's street art voice, <a href="http://wynwoodmuraltours.com/2014/11/06/talking-off-the-wall/">Talking Off the Wall.</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Miami Marine Stadium</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141129094340-IMG_0290.JPG" alt="" />&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"> Miami Marine Stadium, <a href="http://arthistory2014.com/collections/frontpage/products/rone-open-edition" target="_blank">Rone - Open Edition</a>;&nbsp;Photo: Logan Hicks</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">An interactive pop-up exhibition starting December 1, 2014 in Wynwood will raise funds for the restoration of one of Miami&rsquo;s most iconic buildings, the <a href="http://www.marinestadium.org/" target="_blank">Miami Marine Stadium</a>. Hosted by the&nbsp;<a href="http://arthistory2014.com/" target="_blank">Art |History Mural Project Exhibition</a>,&nbsp;the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Friends of Miami Marine Stadium, the event is open to all, and children are invited to assist in the creation of large-scale murals. The long list of artists participating includes Evoca1, Jose Mertz, and Reiner Gamboa.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Life Is Art</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><a href="http://www.spectrum-miami.com">Spectrum Miami</a> has donated a booth to <a href="http://www.lifeisartfest.org/" target="_blank">Life Is Art</a>. They'll use it to explore the role of the arts in community building. Life is Art is a non-profit organization that seeks to improve communities through art and culture. Starting on December 3, 2014 at [mi.ami][inter.play], there will be collaborations between artists and the community. On December 4 they will also host Art Lab 02, a live artist match up with <a href="http://www.yo-miami.com/" target="_blank">Yo Miami</a>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">White Porch Gallery at R House Wynwood&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141129094423-White_Porch_Gallery.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">White Porch Gallery&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span>On December 3 HRC South Florida and the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.whiteporchgallery.com/" target="_blank">White Porch Gallery</a>&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.rhousewynwood.com" target="_blank">R House Wynwood</a>&nbsp;will host ART for Equality, a unique one-off event (7&ndash;9.30pm) benefiting the Human Rights Campaign with a silent auction of 20 different artworks, with a flavor of the mixed cultures in Florida and neighboring regions. Artists include Colombian&nbsp;Manela Holly and Cuba's&nbsp;Yunier Gomez Torres.&nbsp;</span><span>You can also check out local installation artist Judith Meuller's outdoor mural along the exterior patio walls.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span>&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><strong>Miami Beach Regional Library</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">The walls of the Miami Beach Regional Library auditorium will be transformed into a huge work at <a href="http://www.mdpls.org/news/press-releases/2014/i-geek-art-a-community-event.html" target="_blank"><em>I Geek Art: A Community Event</em></a>. Commencing December 1 at 3pm the two-day event invites artists of all backgrounds to participate in the creation of a large-scale community art project that will be unveiled to the public the following day. Muralist Serge Toussaint (whose artwork adorns the walls of Little Haiti) will lead the project.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><em>South of the Walls</em> for Urban Blue Project&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141129094124-IMG_0302.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">Urban Blue Project,&nbsp;Courtesy of Urban Blue Project&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Big name homegrown and internationl artists (among them&nbsp;Atomik, Abstrk, Luis Berros, Rafael Domenech, Antonio de Felipe, Aquarela, Suki)&nbsp;will perform live paintings at <em>South of the Walls</em>, starting on November 30 (at&nbsp;1731 N. Miami Ave). The event benefits <a href="http://urbanblueproject.org/" target="_blank">Urban Blue Project</a>, a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">group that creates art events blurring the lines between various forms of art and allocates resources to stimulate inner city development.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/361847-monica-torres"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&mdash;Monica Torres&nbsp;</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Miami Marine Stadium,&nbsp;<a href="http://arthistory2014.com/collections/frontpage/products/rone-open-edition" target="_blank">Rone - Open Edition</a>;&nbsp;Photo: Logan Hicks)</span></p> Mon, 01 Dec 2014 14:41:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Amsterdam Art Weekend: A Look at the RijksakademieOPEN's Top Artists <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>This weekend&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Amsterdam's prestigious Rijksakademie&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>opens its doors for the annual&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.rijksakademie.nl/ENG/rijksakademieopen/" target="_blank">RijksakademieOPEN</a>,</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;a perennial highlight of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the <a href="http://www.amsterdamart.com/" target="_blank">Amsterdam Art Weekend</a>, a weekend packed with exhibitions and events, which runs this year&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">from </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">November 27&ndash;30.&nbsp;What happens behind the closed doors of the academy is only visible once a year for the general public, so as soon as the doors opened, I went in for a sneak peek.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span>The Rijksakademie is a post-academic institution offering young artists time, space, and both technical and intellectual support to focus on their work.</span>&nbsp;Its residency program's tough selection process generally guarantees some interesting art&mdash;applications can reach numbers up to 1,400, of which only 50 artists from all over the world get the chance to study in the former military barracks housing the Rijksakademie.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A peek into the academy's studios this season reveals many different artistic positions, working methods, and personalities present amongst the 49 current residents, and this year's presentations are of particularly high quality.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Some of the residents have already made quite a name for themselves: Magali Reus, for instance, has been praised by Beatrix Ruf, the new director of the Stedelijk Museum, and will be given a solo exhibition there in the near distant future. (Unfortunately her only work presented during the RijksakademieOPEN is a bottled scent reminiscent of new sneakers&mdash;perhaps she is focusing on bigger things at the moment.) Most, however, spend their residency time as hermits in their studios, so when the Rijks opens its gates, there's always a lot yet to be discovered. It's no wonder you'll stumble over gallerists scouting for new talent this weekend.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I present to you here a selection of eight of the Rijksakademie's most promising artists:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Mehraneh Atashi</strong> (Tehran, Iran, 1980)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128094735-Mehraneh_Atashi.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Atashi&rsquo;s room-filling installation&nbsp;<em>The place where I live</em>&nbsp;is dark and gloomy; it is filled with constructions and projectors, presenting mostly organic material which is in a constant state of transformation. Poetic text describing the space hints at the experience of passing time. Time is indeed tangible in the installation since it is constantly subjected to change: many elements are made from organic material that will decay over time, and there are other natural transformation processes going on like the melting of ice and the heating of water. &ldquo;Elements perform, dwell and the rest defined.&rdquo; The poem invites the reader to &ldquo;change with the space&rdquo;&mdash;we as organisms transform and even decay over time&mdash;but as the poem reassures: &ldquo;fermentation becomes a consolation.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Catherine Biocca</strong> (Rome, Italy, 1984)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128094834-Catherine_Biocca_2.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If someone had asked me what I would expect to see at the Rijksakademie my answer would never have been: a screaming character from a Giotto mural being chased by a velociraptor equipped with a bazooka, riding on a shark. But Catherine Biocca defied my expectations. Her absurd, cartoonish installation is a hilarious sensory overload consisting of animations, drawings, and digital collages. When you position yourself in an installation&mdash;in front of two of Biocca's clumsy characters who are in a nonsensical discussion about hobbies and doing nothing&mdash;and look on at the weird interpretation of the Giotto chapel they're staring at, you become a part of Biocca's absurd world for as long as you can stand it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Tim Breukers</strong> (Breda, The Netherlands, 1985)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128094928-Tim_Breukers__2_.JPG" alt="" width="300" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141128151852-Tim_Breukers.JPG" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Amongst the residents who take full advantage of the Rijksakademie's ceramics facilities is Tim Breukers. He can be described as a classical sculptor born in the age of fast food, body building, and <em>Jurassic Park</em>. Drawing his subject matter from this rich, greasy pool of pop culture, he translates them into sculptures with the skill and cleverness of a traditional craftsman. His medium of choice is mostly ceramics, and he pushes the delicate and fragile material to its limits. Damage and accidental discoveries are an integral and important part of the finished work. The bright orange tape covering the studio's floor ironically stating &ldquo;fragile!&rdquo; combines both the serious and humorous, which go wonderfully well together in Breukers' work. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Felix Burger</strong> (M&uuml;nchen, Germany, 1982)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128095010-Felix_Burger__2_.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Entering the installation&nbsp;<em>Shell Shock Syndrome&nbsp;</em>feels like stepping into the mind of a very disturbed person. Once inside the dimly lit, eerie space you encounter 50 gypsum casts of the artist's grinning face, turned into a ramshackle mechanical choir singing the opening hymn of "St Matthew Passion" by Johann Sebastian Bach, a masterpiece about suffering, death, and resurrection. Elsewhere in the space there are construction plans of the Hindenburg and in one of the two films projected on the walls we see the artist being frightened by a stuffed animal, benumbed in his chair in terror like a traumatized soldier suffering from shell shock. The work is darkly humorous in a way and seems to praise failure and suffering as viable sources for the creation of something new.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Carlos Irijalba</strong> (Pamplona, Spain, 1979)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128095110-Carlos_Irijalba.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In Carlos Irijalba's work the aesthetic of 3D scanning and printing clashes with the look of his ancient subject matter. Irijalba's starting point is often geological, as it is here. After the prehistoric caves of the Spanish Cantabrian coast had been declared a World Heritage Site by Unesco in 1985, they were closed for the public. However, the national government had copies of the cave made to display as a museum. Irijalba worked with the company responsible for these reproductions and created his own. While the skin and texture of his sculptures seem to have been formed by ages of erosion and geological formation, the rhythmic repetition of the identical slabs clearly reveals their artificiality. The natural, technological, cultural, and sociopolitical aspects of this historic location overlap in this clean, yet multi-layered presentation. (Read our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/artists/rackroom/56386-carlos-irijalba" target="_blank">2013 interview with Irijalba here</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Jisun Kim</strong> (Seoul, Korea, 1985)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128095206-Jisun_Kim__2_.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">While a lot of the artists presenting themselves during the Rijksakademie OPEN try to impress with scale and spectacle, one of the more modest presentations Jisun Kim's. She has traveled throughout the world, but now employs a traveling method used by early European &ldquo;armchair&rdquo; anthropologists, who relied on the testimonies of others to explore the world instead of venturing out into it themselves. Kim makes her audience travel in a similar fashion by presenting the world to us through short poetic stories printed on small canvases. These mental journeys are enough to stimulate the imagination and address a wide range of topics. The small, subtle gestures result in rewarding little trips that can easily take on other more bombastic presentations. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Katja Novitskova</strong> (Tallinn, Estonia, 1984)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128095303-Katja_Novitskova.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One of the residents who has managed to make quite a name for herself outside of the Rijksakademie is Katja Novitskova. In previous work she addressed the circulation of images on the internet by transforming found stock images into flat, cardboard cutout-like sculptures, re-photographing them and posting them online once again. In her current presentation she transforms state of the art, futuristic looking baby rockers into strange hybrids of machines and organisms. The once comforting baby equipment seems to have gotten a life and will of its own. The machines move without the purpose they once had, perhaps just for the sake of being &ldquo;alive.&rdquo; The result is a futuristic room where the borders between the natural and the technological aren&rsquo;t clearly defined.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Belit Sağ</strong> (Biographical information not shared by the artist)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141128095323-Belit_Sa___screenshot_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Sağ analyses news, media, and entertainment images creating new narratives from her findings. The video work&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">And the image gazes back&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">questions the role of images in current and historical events. For example&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">Sağ&nbsp;ponders the similarities between one of the shots in ISIS's execution video of James Foley and a shot in the final scene of the movie <em>Seven</em>, both of which feature a decapitation. She discusses the re- and pre-mediation of images&mdash;the way they appear and reappear either deliberately or accidentally. Her findings are an artistic investigation in what it means to live in a world where fiction and non-fiction influence each other in ways we can&rsquo;t even imagine.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/248299-manus-groenen">Manus Groenen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All photos: Manus Groenen / Image on top:&nbsp;Catherine Biocca)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Fri, 28 Nov 2014 16:17:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Whose Work Is It <em>Really</em>? On the Much-Maligned Role of the Artist's Assistant <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The job of artist&rsquo;s assistant has a confusing reputation in the press. Articles about the <a href="https://www.google.nl/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=7&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0CDQQFjAG&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2014%2F08%2F28%2Farts%2Fdesign%2Fformer-assistant-to-jasper-johns-pleads-guilty-in-thefts-of-artworks.html&amp;ei=E1N1VK-DK4SDNqmdgMAE&amp;usg=AFQjCNHXwCxttySD6711CYIna9SCqqyzWw&amp;sig2=9f-Ef5PxP3NtTVJJpONaxg&amp;bvm=bv.80642063,d.eXY" target="_blank">ongoing saga</a> of </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jasper Johns'&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">civil suit against his longtime assistant James Meyer for the theft and sale of $3.4 million of his drawings is a prime example of the way the media talks about the relationship between artist and assistant. The horrifyingly giant and blatant theft aside, </span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.vulture.com/2014/11/jasper-johns-assistant-theft-james-meyer.html" target="_blank">this recent Vulture article</a>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">about the incident presents the power difference between an artist and his assistant as tauntingly acute and palpable. There is the usual implication that assistants are failed artists wanting a piece of the action, hoping their job with a star will get them there. But the bigger problem, made apparent in the mention of &ldquo;silent armies of assistants,&rdquo; is the stranger and harder to comprehend notion that the genius artist only wishes to be alone all the time, tirelessly creating without any external input or bother&mdash;and that the assistant&rsquo;s job is to stealthily put everything in place.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1349639/Artist-Damien-Hirst-hire-apprentice-20k-10m-masterpiece.html" target="_blank">This <em>Daily Mail</em> article</a> about a job advert for Damien Hirst&rsquo;s studio is another less subtle version of a negative portrayal, coupled with incredulity over the prices that Hirst&rsquo;s work achieves.&nbsp;In reality, even in Hirst&rsquo;s studio&mdash;the focus of many a horror story about painters with MFA debt painting nothing but dots for months at a time&mdash;this narrative is only a half truth. For every disgruntled ex-employee there are many more happily taking the paycheck. You are actually hard pressed to find an article about the topic of artist&rsquo;s assistants that doesn&rsquo;t feature Hirst, which probably says much more about Hirst than it does about assisting in general.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The flipside of the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artist&rsquo;s assistant</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;job fantasy loved by the media is a romanticization of the relationship. The closeness between Lucian Freud and his assistant David Dawson is the wish fulfillment of this fantasy. Theirs <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/sep/01/david-dawson-lucian-freud" target="_blank">was portrayed</a> as a deeply and touchingly fulfilling relationship in which the assistant gave up most of his time and painting career in the service of his master and was eventually rewarded with a house in Kensington.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141126043228-Fr_d_ric_Bazille_-_Bazille_s_Studio_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Fr&eacute;d&eacute;ric Bazille</strong>, <em>Bazille's Studio,&nbsp;9 Rue de la Condamine</em>, 1870, Oil on canvas; Mus&eacute;e d'Orsay, Paris; From left to right: Pierre Auguste Renoir sitting, Emile Zola (standing on the stairs), Eduard Manet and Claude Monet (with the hat) next to Bazille, talking about one of his paintings; Via <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fr%C3%A9d%C3%A9ric_Bazille_-_Bazille%27s_Studio_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Perhaps the continued return to these polarizing and overly reductionist ideas are simply a product of the role&rsquo;s secrecy. Many large-scale studio operations make their employees sign confidentiality agreements, which only increases the idea to the outside world that the labor is somehow thankless or that all the employees are being screwed. The truth is always much more boring. Confidentiality protects future projects in their infancy. For megastars like Jeff Koons it&rsquo;s probably also <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/jul/03/jeff-koons-master-innovator-whitney-money-art" target="_blank">protecting his collectors&rsquo; investments</a>. But on a smaller level nondisclosure contracts safeguard novel techniques and the content of upcoming exhibitions not yet made public. They'd be no different in a design firm.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These typical media portrayals are a million miles from the reality of the job, which is eloquently outlined in Graham Beck&rsquo;s insightful 2008 article &ldquo;<a href="http://www.brooklynrail.org/2008/02/artseen/a-portrait-of-the-artist-as-a-young-assistant" target="_blank">A portrait of the Artists as a Young Assistant</a>." Jasper Johns and Lucian Freud are reduced, albeit differently, to the myth of the artistic genius. Artists like Koons and Hirst are typically depicted as art factory CEOs with dollar signs for pupils. What&rsquo;s most interesting is that at the heart of both of these ideas is a difficulty the public seems to have with the honesty and integrity of artistic endeavor. These stories aren&rsquo;t about artists&rsquo; assistants; they&rsquo;re about the artist as a figure the media would rather mythologize than learn anything about.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In reality, assisting can be a useful part of a learning process that can&rsquo;t be taught entirely at art school. It isn&rsquo;t for everyone. I have friends who work as PAs for artists, as manual fabricators, as CAD technicians, and even as engineers on large-scale studio projects, not to mention as preparators who stretch and prep canvases or make molds. None of us ever discuss the problem the media has with an artist signing a work they haven&rsquo;t 100 percent made themselves, because that problem doesn&rsquo;t exist for makers, buyers, or sellers of art, and it never has. Anthony Caro worked for Henry Moore; the Chapman Brothers worked for Gilbert and George; Marc Quinn was Barry Flanagan&rsquo;s assistant; Ed Fornieles worked for Anish Kapoor; and many little or hardly known artists will continue to work for better known artists till time immemorial. The list will go on and on, and none of them will ever wonder about the status of the artist genius or question whose name appears on the work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Phoebe Stubbs</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Rodin observing work on the monument to Victor Hugo at the studio of his assistant Henri Leboss&eacute; in 1896; Via <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Auguste_Rodin_-_Monument_to_Victor_Hugo.jpg" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a>)</span></p> Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:28:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Alchemists, Necromancers, and Magicians: An Alternative History of Illusion and the Moving Image <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The moving image has a long-standing relationship with trickery: deceiving the eye, suspending disbelief, displaying the impossible. In fact, it's devilishly good at it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Everybody's heard about the audience who ran screaming from the oncoming train at the premiere of the Lumiere Brothers&rsquo; <em>L'Arriv&eacute;e d'un train... </em>(1895). I recently read a suggestion that they ran partly to avoid being crushed by a steam train and partly because they knew doing so offered them bit parts in an anecdote that would last the ages.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125221243-L_Arrivu00E9e_d_un_train_en_gare_de_La_Ciotat.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">The Lumiere Brothers&rsquo; infamous&nbsp;<em>L'Arriv&eacute;e d'un train...&nbsp;</em>(1895)&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Our collective understanding of the screen image has developed and matured since then. We carry movie studios in our pockets, learn Film Theory in 6th grade. Film has become a sophisticated and constantly adapting post-structural system of signs and meaning, but the desires of the moving picture pioneers endure in contemporary visual media as if the old magi had never left the director&rsquo;s chair. Evidence of moving images&rsquo; magical origins can be tracked across history from its inception up to the present day.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Alchemical projections: stars, necromancy, and the homunculus</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The first movie producers and directors existed long before cinematographic apparatus associated with the art today. They were alchemists and magicians like Paracelsus, Giovanni Fontana, and Athanasius Kircher. Prior to the development of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_lantern">Laterna Magica</a>, a 17th century image projector, they studied and presented the movement of heavenly bodies, tracking their passage across the night sky.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In these light shows the constellations were attributed character and plot, with epic stories of sex, death, and heroism. However these actors&mdash;despite being punctual and dependable&mdash;responded poorly to instruction and the magicians could only dream of the day all those little points of light would be under their direction.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125220130-Dee_and_Kelly_raising_the_dead_-wiki.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Dee and Kelley raising the dead; Via <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/A_Magician_by_Edward_Kelly_%28cropped%29.jpg?uselang=en-gb" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The same individuals also sought fame with claims to be able to fabricate life in the form of the homunculus, a man-made being, and with necromancy, the art of animating and bringing the dead back to life. These pursuits would often achieve only limited success and were highly taxing for the alchemists. John Dee (1527&ndash; 1608), for example, would spend long, cold nights in graveyards with fellow magus Edward Kelley (1555-1597), standing ankle-deep in London clay trying to rouse and commune with the dead, or bent over his obsidian mirror scrying (a sort of early method of Skyping with the netherworld) until his head hurt. Paracelsus undertook some laborious and seriously icky magical workings to create a homunculus only to have it run off while he was fixing a bite.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The development of early movie technology, adopted by these individuals, can be seen within this context as presenting great convenience to its users. As its <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sU9AfktYLQg&amp;t=0m19s" target="_blank">capability to generate illusion</a> develops previous approaches become obsolete and are abandoned by all but the most diehard. (Dee and Kelly later forewent the graveyard for nights indoors and some wife-swapping sex magic.) Nonetheless the ambitions of these pioneers&mdash;to evoke cosmic fear with claims of magical abilities to create life, to animate the dead&mdash;prevail.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125223648-Phantasmagoria_-_wikimedia_commons.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Phantasmagoria:&nbsp;Etienne Gaspard "Robertson's Phantasmagoria in a sinister disused cloister of an old Capucine chapel in Rue des Champs, Cours des Capucines, Paris, 1797; Via <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1797_Robertson_phantasmagoria_CapuchineChapel_RueDesChamps_Paris.png" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Of course, it wasn't all plain sailing. Occultist and magician Johann Georg Schr&ouml;pfer (1730&ndash;1774) did well duping audiences in his Leipzig coffee shop into believing he could summon demons and raise the dead through masterful use of the magic lantern, developing primitive animated slides and projecting them onto smoke. He sold a lot of mokka and his repertoire would go on to become the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantasmagoria">Phantasmagoria theatre</a> and travel the world. Schr&ouml;pfer, however, became so convinced by the specters he had created he believed they were real and had beef with him. With a flash of light and a puff of smoke he undertook his final performance by blowing his brains out with a pistol. The patrons screamed as the image hit the wall.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Early cinema and the seeds of &ldquo;life&rdquo;: photography, optical toys, and magic lanterns</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125223355-Nice_Kinetoscope_image_-_wikimedia_commons.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Kinetoscope image of "Annabelle" by William K. L. Dickson (1860-1935); Via <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Annabelle.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Annabelle.jpg" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Pre-cinema technology took on new energy as photography, optical toys like zoetropes, and the magic lantern were combined to create new systems given names reflecting their abilities to bring images to life: Bioscope, Biograph, Vitascope. At its simplest, giving the illusion of life is a trick more easily achieved than it sounds. Imagine a blank white screen and place upon it a dot or squiggle. If we imagine the dot moving up and down or jiggling from side to side, it's not long before our brains want to attribute it the status of &ldquo;living.&rdquo; Movie magic would appear to require tricking the eyes into believing what they are seeing is real&mdash;only to the extent that we are happy to ignore everything that is clearly not. We place great trust in our eyes and they can have direct effect on our hearts, bypassing the brain entirely.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As the film material these devices used became increasingly sensitive to a broader spectrum of light and so too did the resolution of the film emulsion. The surface of each film frame would be coated with an increasingly higher number of microscopic silver halide crystals, which captured and displayed ever more convincingly realistic images.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Stars: faking the astral body</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As the cinematic medium developed, and as early narrative structures were devised, what we think of today as a movie emerged. The players in early dramatic efforts were kept, by their producers, uncredited, unknown, and underpaid. Producers had seen the demands for control and profit sharing the leading lights of the stage could make, and sought to keep their stable of film actors as little more than bodies, marionettes performing a function onscreen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But when directors like D. W. Griffith began to play with the apparatus&mdash;to utilize the close-up shots, in particular <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reaction_shot">the reaction shot</a> highlighting the actor&rsquo;s emotional response&mdash;something odd began to happen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125221615-Nice_image_to_highlight_the_stars_section_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Florence Lawrence; Via <a href="http://mythicalmonkey.blogspot.com/2011/02/silent-oscars-1906-1914part-three.html" target="_blank">Mythical Monkey</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The audiences began to imagine relationships with these oneiric effigies of light and shadow, and in the absence of credits they named them. The Biograph Girl, The Imp Girl, Little Mary&mdash;on the faces of these simulacra audiences saw the hopes and dreams of a new era and they fell in love with them with a degree of suspension of disbelief and rapport akin to a mass outbreak of de Cl&eacute;rambault's syndrome.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The bewitching had been quite inadvertent on the part of the producers, but it didn't take long for them to pick up on its potential and seek to exploit it. They sought to breath further life into the illusion, fleshing out the personas of the new idols. Very soon their prot&eacute;g&eacute;s underwent name and background changes, elocution coaching, makeovers; their social and love lives were planned, scripted, or falsified. The power of the producers to make these idols out of nothing is in many ways akin to an alchemical process. What, after all, could be more magical than transforming a body into a radiant star?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The industry fell into an orgy of decadence at this stage. Aleister Crowley blew through Tinseltown during this era, making study of the coked up debauchery as he might the behavior of wild animals on one of his mountain peregrinations. The ecstasy of the dream factory made even the Great Beast blush.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em>The Terminator</em></strong><strong>: SFX and the craft of subterfuge</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125222132-SFX_Masters_workshop_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">SFX Masters Workshop; Via <a href="http://www.glowingdial.com/Project%20UFO%20Page/images/starlog20_sfx_p3photo_workshop_low.jpg" target="_blank">Glowing Dial</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It's not just the movie star that plays a roll in the continuation of the tricks and illusions of the long-bearded first fathers of film. The art of special effects is in direct lineage to many of the magical practices and methods of subterfuge from the golden era of alchemy. Prior to CGI, the techniques of the &ldquo;SFX masters&rdquo; read like the contents page of a grimoire: animatronics, prosthetics, the Sch&uuml;fftan process, pyrotechnics, motion control. Stereotypically these masters were often hirsute, squirrely men of the dream factory who spent their days not in the LA sunshine but in windowless backrooms pouring latex or detailing glass eyeballs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Their fascinating and secretive art pinnacled around the late 1980s. At this point CGI effects gained ground simultaneously destroying everything that had come before it and completely setting it free.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A good example of practical (that is, non-digital, live-action) SFX at its peak is the motel room sequence in <em>The Terminator</em> (1984). In this scene the titular cyborg/homunculus repairs his metallic skeleton and the fleshy mask that covers it. The set-piece is quite superfluous to the plot. It could be said to demonstrate the capabilities of the antagonist cyborg, but these have already been well established at this stage of the film. It could also be seen to add production value in playing to the audience appetite for &ldquo;gore&rdquo; and effects of the time.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But it is also a true Laterna Magica moment where the driving narrative pauses and we, the audience, are simply invited to awe at the illusion of the homunculus, the living dead, the demon projected on the wall. It is a highly self-reflexive landmark in SFX where the subject becomes an active participant in the illusion, modifying his own mask and means of artifice.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141126153512-terminator.PNG" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a making-of video actor Arnold Schwarzenegger draws on all of his powers of eloquence to explain just how convincing the illusion was&mdash;<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OI8pLF62HY&amp;t=4m50s" target="_blank">even he wasn't sure if he was looking at his own head or that of the dummy</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Max Headroom: ersatz digital man</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125223000-Maxheadroom_wiki.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Max Headroom; Via <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Headroom_(character)" target="_blank">Wikipedia</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There has been sustained pressure on the creators of illusion to constantly improve on and outdo what has come before. Sometimes the demands and appetites of the audience get ahead of what is actually achievable at the time. In the same year that <em>The Terminator</em> was awing audiences, a new type of presenter appeared on British TV. Max Headroom was a media savvy, fast-talking, digital commentator and pop-video-jocky.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For fledgling cyberpunks and media-philes he was just what the world had been waiting for&mdash;an entirely computerized man-made-man who encapsulated the plasticity of television and was, as the first CGI star, the shape of things to come. But the illusion that was Max ran deeper still. CGI was not yet capable of generating an amiable human face (especially not on UK TV budgets) and Max was, in fact, London-based American actor Matt Frewer in a ton of makeup and a plastic suit. Even Max's trippy screensaver style background was a fraud&mdash;not computer generated but created using conventional cell animation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>CGI and the zombie redux</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Those disappointed by the fraudulent Max Headroom wouldn't have to wait long for computerized image technology to deliver. Indeed, it would make a spectacular impact in movies such as the sequel to <em>The Terminator</em> in 1991.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As well as populating films with a plethora of groundbreaking onscreen effects, CGI and the digital control yearned for by Max Headroom's makers provided another sort of illusion to protect the investments of the producers. Stars, both astral and onscreen, die. And when a star of a big budget Hollywood blockbuster expires during production, the show must go on.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">CGI has offered producers the chance reanimate the dead and have stars fulfill their contracts from beyond the grave. Oliver Reed, who after years of notoriously fast living sadly passed away after a protracted piss-up in a Maltese pub, was one of the first to receive this treatment. His part as Antonius Proximo in <em>Gladiator</em> (2000) was completed using CGI imagery, perhaps slipping it into the peculiar sub-genre of Sword-and-Sandal-Zombie flick.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We all enjoy a good zombie movie and they are valid part of this history, but what Ollie Reed and, since then, Paul Walker, Roy Schneider, etc. have experienced is more akin to the true zombie mythos than most movie imaginings. In Haitian folklore the zombie is not so much a rampaging cannibal as an unfortunate called back from the tranquil sleep of death to work and toil again under the strict instruction of a zombie master.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Delivering these thespians a posthumous early morning call back to life is in the tradition of necromancy and as such is not for everyone. Whereas this treatment was seen as appropriate for Oliver Reed, Brandon Lee, and others, some directors and producers have stated that such an approach would be in poor taste. Director Christopher Nolan, who lost Heath Ledger during filming of <em>The Dark Knight</em> (2008), stated that he had too much respect for the late actor and his family to &ldquo;resurrect him.&rdquo; More recently, after the equally tragic loss of Philip Seymour Hoffman, Francis Lawrence, director of <em>The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1</em> (2014), said he had no intention of engaging in any &ldquo;digital trickery&rdquo; (though I wonder how he got the shot of Katniss downing that bomber with her bow and arrow without it?)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is clearly something hierarchical at work here: some actors, it seems, never die, while others do. It's reminiscent of the oligarchical system of death and the beyond recognized by the ancient Egyptians or the Vikings for whom the safe passage to and assurance of an afterlife was only for a select few.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>RIGGED: CGI&rsquo;s video art avatars</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125221821-kw_kate_cooper_rigged_03_300dpi.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Kate Cooper</strong>,&nbsp;<em>RIGGED</em>, 2014; Courtesy of the artist and KW, Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There is&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/events/show/355851-rigged---schering-stiftung-art-award">an exhibition</a>&nbsp;currently showing at the KW in Berlin by Kate Cooper called&nbsp;<em>RIGGED&nbsp;</em>(2014). It's a multiscreen, mixed media installation that features some breathtaking CGI video of a completely digital female protagonist&mdash;possibly the most advanced example in fine art to date. She could be, and in a sense is, Lara Croft's granddaughter though she's probably as much a descendant&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/articles/show/40261">Lynn Hershman Leeson's Roberta Breitmore or Agent Ruby</a>. She is depicted working out then failing, lying awkwardly on the floor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">All the powers of illusion that the early metteurs en sc&egrave;ne wished for when they lit the lantern for the first time are now within reach. There are two million pixels on an HDTV screen, eight million on the 4K screen tipped to become the consumer standard within the next five years; 8K will have 30 million. With all those little points of light, what is most striking about the technology that went into <em>Rigged</em> is the feeling that there is total control over every pixel. The healthiest human eye has one hundred and twenty million rod and cone sensors. We are getting pretty close to being able to completely manipulate the digital image: the ultimate tromp l'oeil.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And yet there is no sense of triumph in <em>Rigged</em>, but rather a feeling of vulnerability and even loss. A recorded voiceover accompanying the images speaks of the capability for digital media to download, replicate, and in doing so become more permanent than flesh. There is a sense of identity being eroded by media. Viewing this hyperreal image, a perfect living fabrication with big, beautiful, dead eyes we may wonder: <em>has the illusion gone too far?</em> Have we created a Golem that will somehow be our undoing? I'm told there is an emptiness, a vague but abiding void felt by those who use magic to achieve their objectives. Magic comes at a price. In a world so invested in images that we so often unquestioningly believe, have we managed to pull the wool over our own eyes? Within this expanded reality of images will we, as the haunting voice in <em>Rigged</em> laments time and time again, and in tradition of the illusionist before her, disappear completely?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/372591-guy-parker?tab=REVIEWS">Guy Parker</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: "Optic Projection fig 404" by Athanasius Kircher; From&nbsp;<em>Optic Projection: Principles, Installation and Use of the Magic Lantern, Projection Microscope, Reflecting Lantern, Moving Picture Machine</em>, by Simon Henry Gage and Henry Phelps Gage, Ph.D. Ithaca, New York, Comstock Publishing Company. 1914, page 676; Via <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Optic_Projection_fig_404.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Optic_Projection_fig_404.jpg%20" target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a>)</span></p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 13:53:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Blimey! Art in London's Changed <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I recently came across Matthew Collings&rsquo; mid-nineties book<em> Blimey! From Bohemia to Brit Pop</em>,&nbsp;a no-holds-barred, bystander-style, verbal diarrhea of a monologue about the London Art World and its eccentricities. It&rsquo;s so delightfully outdated not even two decades on that it makes you both inwardly cringe and want to read on in a &ldquo;why isn&rsquo;t art like this anymore?&rdquo; kind of way. I was momentarily left mourning an irreverent art attitude I was too young to experience. For a while I was genuinely sad about this.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What&rsquo;s fascinating about <em>Blimey!</em> is that it captures the start of what has been a seismic shift in London&rsquo;s art atmosphere and attitude. Back then London felt unique, special for a bit, but that feeling now looks historic and a bit quaint&mdash;a giddy moment that didn&rsquo;t last long.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Almost twenty years on, V22, the studio group and London-based art collective are releasing the catalogue for their 2011&ndash;2014 exhibitions titled <a href="http://www.v22collection.com/events/exhibitions/young-london-catalogue-2011-2014-book-launch/%20"><em>Young London</em>,</a> which, as a showcase for artists working in the city, provides a contemporary counter picture to the nineties world Collings presented. But more than just as bookends for this time of change, the counterpoints themselves made me look more generally at what&rsquo;s different and why&mdash;from the impossibility of writing criticism like <em>Blimey!</em> anymore because of the centrality of research in subjects that surround art to its practice; to the lack of cheap physical spaces to show art, like the infamous nineties warehouse shows; to the impossible-to-emulate career models of the YBAs after their astronomic economic success in post-80s ramped-up consumerism. Despite the seeming difficulties these factors have on art-making, the artists in the <em>Young London</em> book have made these constrictions productive. Art always seems to find a way to play the cards it's dealt.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141125111536-unnamed-1.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Cover of&nbsp;<em>Blimey! From Bohemia to Brit Pop, </em>by Matthew Collings; Photo: Phoebe Stubbs</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Collings&rsquo; section on galleries was particularly telling of change: &ldquo;We imagine that galleries are gleaming white cubes but in reality they mostly look like old fashioned tea rooms or bespoke tailors or jewelers. Like a Mary Poppins or Upstairs Downstairs world of fake old-style poshness. Collectors seem to like it.&rdquo; Now galleries are mostly gleaming white cubes inside, painted in shades of neutral grey or black outside&mdash;always matte, never gloss.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141125110424-Galleries.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image: Phoebe Stubbs&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The choice is now white box or not, but the "nots" are no longer physical spaces. The artists in <em>Young London</em> tend to have multivalent practices. Lucky PDF, for instance, experiment with different media platforms&mdash;playing with TV and online magazines&mdash;existing in many formats at once. The work you see often seems to be documentation for something you can never experience as a single entity. <a href="http://www.danielswan.co.uk/%20">Daniel Swan&rsquo;s</a> digital animations&nbsp;move the viewer through worlds reminiscent of corporate lobbies and are applied liberally with trippy visual effects and creepy music, transposing the artwork itself to a purely digital format that displays a fascination with corporate consumerism.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When the works of these artists are shown in the gallery there is a noticeable shift towards creating relationships within the artists&rsquo; own different modes of working&mdash;between their images and objects, videos and sculptures, paintings and material explorations. <em>Young London</em> artists&rsquo; work tends away from the single image or object&mdash;creating a dialogue with itself. Gabriel Hartley&rsquo;s crumpled looking objects, for instance, appear to have a symbiotic relationship to his paintings of intensely meshed knotty forms. Benedict Drew&rsquo;s videos and objects imply connections to each other and invade and transform the spaces they inhabit.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Collings makes a big deal in <em>Blimey!</em> of what he calls &ldquo;the secret code&rdquo; of art speak. He called art magazines &ldquo;the mystery section,&rdquo; adding that &ldquo;art criticism now can only be real if it&rsquo;s secret, even though it&rsquo;s nothing like other secret worlds, science or psychology or philosophy, say.&rdquo; And yet artists responded to this feeling in the nineties by getting on board with the &ldquo;secret&rdquo; languages, by developing complex research practices, remixing art speak with that of philosophy, politics, and pop culture. David Raymond Conroy&rsquo;s recent work at Modern Art Oxford, <em>PPE or It is Spring and I am Blind,</em> uses the method implied by the study of PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics) to determine artifice from sincerity in found objects and images.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It&rsquo;s hard to tell at this stage whether the combination of deep theoretical research and mixed up pop culture will further isolate art or invite others to the study party. With all the talk of &ldquo;interdisciplinarity&rdquo; and the boom in Art PhDs, I am excited by the possibility that the latter might be true.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141125111924-unnamed-2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Interior of <em>Blimey!</em> by Matthew Collings; Photo: Phoebe Stubbs</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Reading <em>Blimey!</em> is like looking at old family albums. It&rsquo;s amazing to see what&rsquo;s happened to the art that was in its rebellious teenage phase back then and now is blue chip. The works that seem to me to be in their gangly teenage phase in <em>Young London </em>are the strange combinations of digital projections with cobbled together sets like Hannah Perry&rsquo;s work, or the image-objects that drift about in space like Anthea Hamilton&rsquo;s kooky sculptural collages. These are ways of working across media which displace the viewer into a non-space within the gallery, half there, half not there, looking into archived and cross-pollinated materials. These kinds of practices seem to me to be evidence of the working out of the shifts between digital and physical practices&mdash;between a language that was visual and is now academic&mdash;and as such have the most direct parallels with the excitement and coming-of-age-ness that in the nineties manifested as abjection and consumerism. <em>Young London</em> is a list of artists worth watching.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Phoebe Stubbs&nbsp;</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top:&nbsp;Zoe Anspach's Book Cover for V22 Young London)</span></p> Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:09:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Street Art Reality Show or How the US Killed Another Subculture <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">"That's not real. Tell me that's not real. Is it?"&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"This is the worst thing I've ever seen :("</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"FUCK THAT."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Whack."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Die."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These were just some of the comments I received when I started to share a trailer that landed in my inbox for the first season of <a href="http://www.oxygen.com/shows/street-art-throwdown" target="_blank"><em>Street Art Throwdown</em></a>, which premiers on Oxygen network on February 3, 2015. Trying to swallow down the small bit of vomit that rose in my throat as I watched the anninhilation of a culture, I realized it&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">was only a matter of time; in fact, it's surprising it took so long, when walls are being rented on a monthly basis to artists, and 12-year-old rich kids are walking around in Obey hats while their heinous creator sips on a King size Coca Cola and parps out his phony ideology while yelling at his wife.&nbsp;</span></p> <div id="fb-root">&nbsp;</div> <p> <script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); // ]]></script> </p> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=1547866505449215" data-width="466"> <div class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=1547866505449215">Post</a> by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/StreetArtThrowdown">Street Art Throwdown</a>.</div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">America: world champions at inventing the most effective subcultures and then destroying them with their own hands. D</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">escribed as "a&nbsp;new groundbreaking, adrenaline-charged competition series," <em>Street Art Throwdown </em>will follow a&nbsp;carefully selected group of contestants (of&nbsp;diverse sex and ethnicities, of course) as they participate in an increasingly absurd series of weekly "challenges" in a desperate bid to win $100,000, which will in no way cover the total and complete loss of any artistic credibility the participants will suffer as a result of the show. Their moral guide through this is scumbag "judge" Justin Bua, friend of Eva Longoria, among his other remarkable achievements and accolades.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Making sure not to miss a single cliche from the handbook of Shit Shows; expect a cacophonous orgy of tears, fights, overcoming obstacles, children, bandanas, and joy, proving that in the end this is not just a programme about street art&mdash;it's about life.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Take some of these amazing moral lessons:</span>&nbsp;</p> <p><br class="Apple-interchange-newline" /><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Art literally changed my life."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">"I'm not gonna let anything stand in my way."</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"I'm breaking boundaries by just being myself."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"We are surrounded by all of the walls that are meant to keep us apart, but once we paint on them, it brings us all together."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"I'm one tough cookie."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"This is art for the people."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">But the best message by far:&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Getting recognized can take years.... Until now."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/StreetArtThrowdown?fref=ts" target="_blank">Street Art Throwdown</a>'s Facebook page)</span></p> Fri, 05 Dec 2014 07:25:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list New London Exhibition to Showcase Contemporary Middle Eastern Satire <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">A group exhibition opening this week at&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" href="http://www.eoaprojects.com/exhibitions/type/london-gallery/never-never-land">EOA Projects London&mdash;</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">a 400 square metre commercial space in London dedicated to Middle Eastern contemporary art</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&mdash;sees six artists from the region tackle some of the vital social questions for modern Middle Eastern culture, from repression and economy to surveillance and ideology. Crucially, the art here introduces a component that is often missing from much contemporary political art: humor.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Curated by Amal Khalaf, the show reminds us of the importance of satire in challenging the status quo: in Arab culture, it has been a prevalent force against malevolent regimes, from the ancient poetry traditions to the Arab Spring revolts. Now more than ever, laughter has a currency.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141125090233-yc_p_5_copy_3__large.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ahmed Mater</strong>, <em>Yellow Cow Performance</em>, Pigment Print, 140 x 210 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Looking at the biographies of some of the artists themselves shows how well-equipped they are to take down stereotypes. Ahmed Mater, for example, works as an artist and a medical doctor in Saudi Arabia, and is the cofounder of&nbsp;<a href="http://edgeofarabia.com/">Edge of Arabia</a>, a collective cross-border cultural iniative founded in 2003 during the last Gulf War. Bahrain-born&nbsp;Hasan Hujairi is a composer and sound artist who is studing traditional Korean music in Seoul.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Aesthetically, the show looks super fresh: it will present photographs and animations alongside appealing video works including Monira Al Qadiri's 4-channel installation inside a beautiful wood and screen structure in which Japanese influences can be traced (the artist was educated in Tokyo)&nbsp;and emerging Saudi artist&nbsp;Arwa Al Neami's 7-minute short film <em>Never Never Land</em>, about the&nbsp;Mahrajan Abha theme park in Abha, where screaming and shouting on rides is banned (pictured above).&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141125155124-img_7206-img_7214__large.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;"><strong>Monira Al Qadiri</strong>, <em>Muhawwil (Transformer)</em>, 2014, 4-channel video installation with wooden structure and screens, 350 x 350 x 260 cm</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><em>Never Never Land</em> opens on Friday 28 November and runs through January 11 2015 at EOA Projects,&nbsp;40 Elcho Street, London.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Char Jansen</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: <strong>Arwa Al Neami,</strong> <em>Never Never Land</em> (video still), 2014, Digital Video, 07:35)</span></p> Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:01:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Invisible Politics: The Problem with the World's Tiniest Sculptures <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Earlier this month, London-based artist Jonty Hurwitz made headlines with his <a href="http://www.jontyhurwitz.com/nano/" target="_blank">3D-printed "nano" sculptures</a>. Each sculpture is approximately 80 x 100 x 20 microns&mdash;so small that they can only be viewed using an electron microscope.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The sculptures are an impressive, ambitious use of 3D printing technology in fine art. With help from the Weizemann Institute of Technology, Hurwitz used over 200 cameras and a groundbreaking 3D printing technique referred to on his website as &ldquo;Multiphoton Lithography.&rdquo; The process took ten months to complete. Photos on Hurwitz's website show the tiny sculptures, most depicting female nudes, on the head of an ant, in the eye of a needle, and on a human hair.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141124212946-human_hair_intensity-01.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although Hurwitz certainly pushes the limits of an exciting new technology, I wonder if the sculptures themselves are anything but click-bait novelty items. Size isn't everything, and the sculptures themselves, of idealized female nudes, are both generic and unconsidered. In one sculpture, <a href="http://www.jontyhurwitz.com/trust/" target="_blank"><em>Trust</em></a>, a woman steps forward, her feet firmly planted, one arm reaching boldly in front of her. Her body appears striated in the photos, which show her traversing a human hair and the eye of a needle. Another, <a href="http://www.jontyhurwitz.com/intensity" target="_blank"><em>Intensity</em></a>, depicts a group of nude women, completely bald, whose feet appear to be disintegrating, liquefying. A third sculpture,<a href="http://www.jontyhurwitz.com/cupid-and-psyche-gallery" target="_blank"> <em>Cupid and Psyche</em></a>, is modeled from the Antonio Canova work of the same name. What does it mean that Hurwitz has shrunken the human body to the point where it is beyond human perceptual abilities and thus effectively invisible? And what does it mean when a male artist makes <em>female</em> bodies invisible? The implications are troubling to say the least.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141124213229-Trust-needle-full-heavenly-01.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">So much of contemporary art is about drawing our attention to what is hidden. It's about revealing the invisible, the secret, the misrepresented&mdash;that which is deemed unfit for human eyes by news outlets, advertising agencies, and governing bodies. To reverse that trend, to make art that cannot be seen except with the aid of a screen, is thus a highly political act; in a world dominated by imagery, an art of intentional invisibility could be very powerful. But only if the subject matter and site-specific placement were more carefully considered. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the surprisingly perilous world of skin cells and dust particles, the stakes are quite high: soon after the sculptures were created, as Hurwitz and one of his colleagues rotated the sculptures on a glass pane to better see them beneath the microscope, they were accidentally crushed, destroyed because they could not be seen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409204-emily-greenberg?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Emily Greenberg</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images: <a href="http://www.jontyhurwitz.com/nano/" target="_blank">Jonty Hurwitz</a>)</span></p> Tue, 02 Dec 2014 21:16:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Why Gillian Wearing Should Have Won the Vincent Award <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">To be talked about&mdash;positively or negatively, it hardly matters&mdash;is the principle aim of every art prize with an exhibition attached to it. Of course, reward or encouragement are the motivational labels attached to them but PR is the true driving force. For a good many years the Turner Prize was the prime example of a "successful" art prize exhibition. All of Britain would be talking about the nominees and the winners, down to the proverbial cab driver, who wouldn&rsquo;t need a lot of encouragement to air his own <em>Sun</em>-informed opinion about Tracey Emin&rsquo;s unmade bed, Martin Creed&rsquo;s flickering lights, or Grayson Perry&rsquo;s transvestite act.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This has never been stated out loud, but secretly the biennial Vincent Award was set up in 2000 as a sort of continental Turner Prize. The Broere Foundation sponsoring the award left little to chance: t</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">he nominations committee and jury consist of topnotch art world professionals and the 50,000 euro prize money places the award amongst the biggest in Europe. But the fact that the award was on hold for six years and that the exhibition has restlessly moved first from the Bonnefanten Museum (2000-2004) to the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (2006-2008) and subsequently to the GEM in The Hague, doesn&rsquo;t engender the feeling of establishment a prize of this stature needs. Moreover, previous winners&mdash;Wilhelm Sasnal and Neo Rauch among them&mdash;are of solid quality but haven&rsquo;t been able to whip up any kind of debate or real public enthusiasm. And the 2014 edition and its winner, Anri Sala, aren&rsquo;t going to change this.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141124161426-anri_sala_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Anri Sala,</strong> <em>RAVEL RAVEL</em> (Still), 2013, HD video projection on 2 screens, colour, sound: multichannel Duration: 20 min 45 sec. each; Installation view, <em>Ravel Ravel Unravel</em>, French Pavilion, 55th Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy, 2013; &copy; Anri Sala Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Hauser &amp; Wirth, Zurich / London; Photo: Marc Domage</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Don&rsquo;t get me wrong, Anri Sala is a world class artist; his videos, with their long static shots and often deeply melancholic undertone, are instantly recognizable. Every biennale of some importance has included them; last year Sala represented France in Venice. His oeuvre is informed by the social and political context of his home country Albania, but with the exception of documentary works such as <em>Dammi I Colori</em> (2003) in which Sala interviews the mayor of Tirana, Edi Rama, this usually remains implicit, wrapped in a thick blanket of poetry and music.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The installation that has landed Sala the Vincent Award combines three earlier works. The videos deconstruct the punk classic "Should I Stay or Should I Go?" by The Clash, which is played here by barrel organs and music boxes. Despite their mechanical nature the renditions all sound different because of the varying speeds at which the machines operate, but together the choppy fragments weave into a dreamlike sound tapestry. It&rsquo;s quite mesmerizing and easily gets stuck in your head, spinning around for hours. But although poetic and playful, the work lacks a sense of urgency. It does not really transcend the direct sensory experience. The filming locations, a derelict modernist concert hall in Bordeaux and the historical site of Tlatelolco in Mexico City, are supposed to underline the end of ideology and herald a new era of individuality, but this is not very convincing. All in all, Sala has done better before.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141124161531-pierre_huyghe-4.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Pierre Huyghe,</strong> <em>Untilled</em>, 2011-2012 (detail); Courtesy the artist; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Paris; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Commissioned and produced by dOCUMENTA (13) with the support of Colecci&oacute;n CIAC AC, Mexico; Fondation Louis Vuitton pour la creation, Paris; Ishikawa Collection, Okayama, Japan; Photo: Pierre Huyghe</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">And that&rsquo;s true for all nominees of this year&rsquo;s Vincent Award. It makes visiting the exhibition a bit of an anti-climax: the stellar line-up raises expectations that aren&rsquo;t fulfilled. Manfred Pernice&rsquo;s sculptural installation <em>Plateau_Cassette (Fontainbleau)</em> ticks all the thematic boxes for contemporary sculpture &mdash;it&rsquo;s about interior-exterior and public-private, blurs the line between plinth and work, acts like an architectural environment inviting the viewer to become part of it&mdash;but feels a bit stiff. Willem de Rooij&rsquo;s sound installation <em>Illulissat</em> relies too much on contextual information to be convincing; without the text explicitly referring to Mondrian&rsquo;s <em>Lighthouse at Westkapelle</em> and Bas Jan Ader&rsquo;s ocean travels all you&rsquo;re left with is the eerie sound of sleigh hounds. And Pierre Huyghe&rsquo;s film <em>A Way in Untilled</em>, featuring bees, weird fungi, and a dog named "Human" presented exotically in Kassel&rsquo;s Documenta park, is very entertaining. But like Steve McQueen&rsquo;s <em>Giardini</em> (2009), of which it is reminiscent, it divides the audience into avid fans and sceptic non-believers&mdash;either you love it or you hate it and there is not much to argue about.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141124162005-wearing.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Gillian Wearing</strong>, <em>BULLY</em>, 2010, Color video for projection with sound, 7'55";&nbsp;Courtesy the artist and Maureen Paley, London. Photo: Daniel Nicolas</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Gillian Wearing&rsquo;s presentation in The Hague is not her best ever either, but it is the best of all the nominated works on show. In her self-portraits as Robert Mapplethorpe or a generic photographer she plays with archetypes and addresses the issue of identity and belonging. Even more topical is the video in which she has victims and perpetrators of bullying confront their demons through roleplaying. After the more formal portraits which always keep the viewer at arm&rsquo;s length, the video really hits home emotionally. Wearing truly presents an artistic position combining conceptual depth, evocative power, and social relevance. It&rsquo;s the kind of art that makes you want to go out and discuss it with friends, colleagues, maybe even a cab driver.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<strong>Gillian Wearing,</strong> <em>Me as Cahun Holding a Mask of My Face</em>,&nbsp;2012, Framed bromide print, 157.3 x 129 x 3.3 cm - 61 7/8 x 50 3/4 x 1 1/4 inches; &copy; Gillian Wearing, courtesy Maureen Paley, London)</span></p> Mon, 24 Nov 2014 16:27:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Who's Still Afraid of Video Art? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A few years ago, I was working for a not-for-profit art space in Tel Aviv. One of the most successful shows there was a group exhibition of video works. One afternoon, a woman entered the dark space of the gallery, stopped at the reception desk and asked me: &ldquo;Are there only video works?&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;Yes,&rdquo; I replied. She turned her back and walked away.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since this incident, I often encountered sentences such as &ldquo;I hate video art,&rdquo; &ldquo;all video works are bad,&rdquo; and &ldquo;video art annoys me.&rdquo; These unequivocal declarations come from educated people, most of them with a background in art or design and a general artistic tendency. What makes them feel such a strong antagonism towards this harmless medium? Considering the fact that we are surrounded all day every day by moving images&mdash;for most people the best part of the day is when they are at last seated in front of their TV in the evening&mdash;this is especially surprising. But of course, there's an essential difference between television shows, or movies, and video art, both in content, and more importantly, in their display conditions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Video art, established toward the end of the 1960s, is a time-based medium, which has a very different relationship with its viewer from the one established in painting or sculpture. In his essay &ldquo;On the Aesthetics of Video Installation,&rdquo; Boris Groys argues that time-based art takes hold of the viewer&rsquo;s time, and he becomes a victim of the works&rsquo; timing.&rdquo;<a title="" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/edit/41380#_ftn1">[1]</a>&nbsp;When you stand in front of a painting, you decide how much time to watch it (<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/12/travel/the-art-of-slowing-down-in-a-museum.html?_r=0">an average of 15-30 seconds</a>, apparently) and when to move on. But when entering a dark room in which, god forbid, a moving image is&nbsp;<em>projected</em>, you are denied this privilege. If you wish to fully experience the work, you need to watch the whole thing&mdash;be it 3 minutes or 5 hours long.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When you don&rsquo;t see the whole thing, a sense of missing out and frustration comes into play. Instead of being a quiet space, reserved for concentrated pondering, video works turn the sacred white cube into a hectic black box that simulates the fast-changing pace of everyday life, in which most of us are constantly burdened by a sense of FOMO (that's Fear of Missing Out, for those not up-to-date with the lingo). Groys reminds us that together with the lack of control comes responsibility&mdash;the viewer is responsible for what he will see; he needs to make a decision when to move forward, when to abandon the artwork. Time is money, and some people are just not prepared to spend 3 hours in a gallery, when they intended to stay there for 5 minutes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141126180501-Campbell_s_Soup.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Duncan Campbell</strong>,<em> It for Others</em> 2013,<strong>&nbsp;</strong>16mm film transferred to digital video,&nbsp;Courtesy of Duncan Campbell and Rodeo Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This brings up another aspect: installation conditions. As when exhibiting a painting, and trying to find the best possible lighting and location for its size or colors, when displaying video works one should take into consideration their specific characteristics. Other than the obvious need for comfortable seating (which is being addressed more of late, as black boxes are increasingly lined with cozy carpets or sofas), a very basic principle should be followed in the relationship between the viewer and a video work: information. By a quick glimpse at the work&rsquo;s label, the viewer can learn exactly how long it is before starting to watch it, a knowledge which can enormously enhance the viewing experience and the viewer's decision-making process. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The display conditions also depend on the content of the piece&mdash;works based on a more concrete narrative demand to be seen from beginning to end, while less strictly constructed works can be picked up at any point during the loop. In the case of longer pieces, specified screening times may be published, so the viewer can plan his visit, as if he was going to the cinema. Video works present a new way of consuming visual art, which simply requires some adjustments form the displayers, as well as from the viewers.&nbsp;For example, at the current Turner Prize show at Tate Britain in London, most artists included video in their installations. While <a href="http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2014/turner-prize-2014-artists-james-richards">James Richard&rsquo;s</a> formalist single-channel video work <em>Rosebud</em> (2013) is shown on a small screen in a loop, Duncan Campbell&rsquo;s 54-minute-long film <em>It for Others&nbsp;</em>(2013) is specified to start every hour on the hour. This may apply to shorter works as well: at the Hirschhorn Museum in Washington D.C. right now, visitors approaching to see David Claerbout&rsquo;s 12-minute-long work <em><a href="http://www.hirshhorn.si.edu/collection/home/#collection=days-endless-time&amp;detail=htt">Travel</a></em> (1996&ndash;2013) first encounter a small screen outside the viewing space, on which the artist&rsquo;s recommendation to watch the work from the beginning appears, followed by a clock counting down to the next screening.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141126180759-rosebud_still_4.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>James Richards</strong>,<em>&nbsp;Rosebud </em>2013,<strong>&nbsp;</strong>HD Video,&nbsp;13 minutes; Courtesy the Artist, Cabinet, London and Rodeo, Istanbul</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="text-align: left;">I am referring here mainly to one- or two-channel video works, rather than moving image installations. Installations and multiple screen works, which involve the movement of the spectator in space, bring up another aspect of decision making, and, as a result, frustration&mdash;the viewer must decide not just when to look, but also where to look. The FOMO is enhanced. Fredric Jameson, in his&nbsp;</span><a style="text-align: left;" href="http://xroads.virginia.edu/~drbr/jameson/jameson.html">famous theorization of postmodernism</a><span style="text-align: left;">, mentions the works of one of the first video art practitioners, Nam June Paik, who used multiple, scattered televisions screens. According to Jameson, &ldquo;the postmodernist viewer ... is called upon to do the impossible, namely, to see all the screens at once, in their radical and random difference...&rdquo;</span><a style="text-align: left;" title="" href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/edit/41380#_ftn2">[2]</a><span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;However, rather than a sense of frustration, Jameson argued that these kind of works create a new mode of relationship through difference, that may achieve a new and original way of thinking and perceiving. In short, there are works in which partiality is inherent, and that can be perceived only by fragmented understanding.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Instead of comfortable, passive sitting at the movie theatre, some of these multi-screens works demand us to use our legs&mdash;and to move in space. Take, for example, Philippe Parreno and Douglas Gordon's <em>Zidane, a Twenty-First-Century Portrait</em> (2006) in its Palais de Tokyo incarnation, which surrounded the visitors with numerous screens showing the famous soccer player in action. Hito Steyerl <a href="http://www.e-flux.com/journal/is-a-museum-a-factory/" target="_blank">has written&nbsp;that</a> multi-channel installations like this &ldquo;explode into space... while cinema is a mass medium, multi-screen installations address a multitude spread out in space, connected only by distraction, separation, and difference.&rdquo; Sometimes, it&rsquo;s easier to be part of a mass; but it&rsquo;s certainly less satisfying.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141126181137-5._C_Phillips_-_Neues_Museum_2013.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ciara Phillips</strong>, Neues Museum 2013, <em>Things put together</em> (detail),&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">2013,&nbsp;Courtesy the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: left;">Video art is not all good or all bad. It includes countless techniques, styles, and modes of display, and, as with any other medium, there are plenty of lesser quality works&mdash;but some are exceedingly good. And it is not &ldquo;easier to make bad videos than to make bad paintings,&rdquo; another argument I often hear. It only takes longer to realize that you are looking at a bad video than to realize you are looking at a bad painting. And of course, there is always the chance that it might get suddenly better once you leave the room.</span></span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373185-keren-goldberg?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Keren Goldberg&nbsp;</a></p> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373185-keren-goldberg?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a></span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1">[1]</a> Boris Groys, &ldquo;On the Aesthetics of Video Installation&rdquo;, in: Exhibition Catalogue: <em>Le Detroit, Stan Douglas</em>, Kunsthalle Basel, 2001.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref2">[2]</a> Fredric Jameson, <em>Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism</em>, Duke UP, 1991.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <strong>Nam June Paik,&nbsp;</strong><em>Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii</em>&nbsp;by Nam June Paik, 1995. 49-channel closed circuit video installation, neon, steel and electronic components approx. 15 x 40 x 4 ft.; Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture, National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; Photo via Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/afagen/2411637349" target="_blank">Adam Fagen</a>)</span></p> </div> </div> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 15:05:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list A FB Chat with the Creator of SAIC Secret Admirers <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/saicsecretadmirers">SAIC Secret Admirers</a> was started in March of 2013. The Facebook page for anonymously posting amorous yearnings quickly took off, garnering likes from over 50% of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago student body. While speculation swirled as to who was behind the page, the secret was kept until just recently when artist Anna Russett came forward as the administrator behind the page. We sat down over Facebook to chat about Secret Admirers, butt stuff, and social media as a platform for contemporary art.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121172824-001.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121172839-002.jpg" alt="" />&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121172850-003.jpg" alt="" /> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121172902-004.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121172917-005.jpg" alt="" /> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121172940-006.jpg" alt="" /> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121173015-007.jpg" alt="" /> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121173306-008.jpg" alt="" /> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20141121173321-009.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You can follow Anna on instagram <a href="http://instagram.com/annarussett">@annarussett</a>, twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/annarussett">@annarussett</a>, and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/arussett">youtube</a>.</span></p> Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:49:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Do We Need Galleries Anymore? The Utility of Online Exhibitions <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Making the art world accessible to anyone with an internet connection. </span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 300px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Artsy</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Visual art is rarely understood unless it is reckoned with in person. Even then, it is often difficult to really see what an artist is trying to express, especially with the many abstract works that have come out of modernism. A huge part of the viewing experience involves being able to face works that artists created in real time and in real space. Being able to comprehend and feel what Mark Rothko felt when he painted his large color fields is something that can only really be considered in the physical presence of his work; one fails to actually comprehend the emotion when encountering his works&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">in a book or on the internet</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. At the same time, the digital age has allowed art to become more accessible in many ways. We learn about art through slides, books with glossy pictures, and the endless stream of images on Google, Flickr, Tumblr, and Instagram (to name but a few). With these new (and old) systems of visual dissemination in full effect, is there a need for museums and galleries anymore? I'd argue that there is plenty to be learned from online exhibitions and resources, but that the brick and mortar custodians of art and material culture provide an essential service that cannot be replaced by immaterial facsimiles in the digital domain.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the spring of 2014, the Guggenheim hosted a major James Turrell exhibition. Most of the works were light sources that transformed various spaces throughout the museum, most notably the main atrium. At the very top of the spiral walkway you encountered the final room of his show. Standing in line for 45 minutes, I fell into a conversation with an older woman and her son behind me. They asked me about the artist, and though I'm no expert, I explained that the significance of a light installation is typically how it manipulates the appearance&mdash;the size or atmosphere&mdash;of a room or space.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141118194359-James_Turrell.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo and curatorial information provided from James Turrell&rsquo;s exhibition website on the Guggenheim Museum exhibition page.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Through a dark haze in that final room I could identify a black rectangle painted on the wall with two dim lights shining onto it. The more I looked at the rectangle, the more I was able to see images from my imagination come into play. It was almost like looking at the sun, blinking and encountering bright images; these illusory silhouettes seemed magical. Upon leaving <em>Iltar</em> (1976), that final installation, the family I had spoken with in line exclaimed that they didn&rsquo;t get it, that they didn&rsquo;t see anything at all. What I am curious to know is, would unmoved viewers understand these works if they were to see them elsewhere? Can a book or the internet really tell people all of the information they seek to know or feel about a work of art?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Turrell's light works are experiential and notoriously unreceptive to photographic reproduction, but that doesn't mean they haven't joined the legions of images of artworks online. In the last few years, the internet has boomed with infinite resources to provide images, context, and information about art. Various social media platforms have made it their goal to exhibit all visual works. The upside to these digital resources is that they make the art world available for educational purposes and in depth personal exploration. Additionally, they make artwork available to people who cannot afford to visit far-flung artworks and museums in person. With online materials, viewers are able to learn about art without leaving their computers, smartphones, or electronic resources provided in libraries and some museums. The internet is undoubtedly a valuable resource for viewing, learning about, and perhaps even democratizing art, yet the <a href="http://www.aam-us.org/docs/center-for-the-future-of-museums/demotransaam2010.pdf" target="_blank">American Alliance of Museums has observed</a> that the internet is also responsible for removing spectators from viewing art in traditional spaces because of the convenience of their digital devices.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Are online exhibitions a benefit or a detriment to artworks?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In his famous essay "A Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," Walter Benjamin writes about art reproduction, and focuses on the importance of a work&rsquo;s authentic aura and essence. The aura is sacred, specific to every work of art; it might reveal the artist&rsquo;s touch or intent. When an admirer purchases a print of Picasso&rsquo;s <em>Les Demoiselles d'Avignon</em> at the MoMA gift shop, she is not purchasing the actual work but a copy of it. While that print might remind an admirer of past experiences with this painting or Picasso&rsquo;s oeuvre more generally, it is distant and removed from the original. It does not express the same feeling or power as Picasso&rsquo;s authentic painting, rather a likeness to it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141118194417-picasso_MoMA.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Pablo Picasso</strong>, <em>Les Demoiselles d&rsquo;Avignon</em>, 1907, Oil on canvas;&nbsp;&copy; 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This is the problem with reproduction and viewing artworks on alternative forums. While viewers are able to take home memories and view their favorite artists on the internet, the images they favor are pulled farther and farther away from their intended in-person encounter. The same could be said for watching films. Seeing a movie in a theatre is a unique experience: the darkness, the projection shining brightly onto the large screen, the sound blasting to fully encapsulate the audience. It can be a surreal experience to be part of or surrounded by a film. Taking a movie home and watching it on a laptop or TV changes the experience and atmosphere, often allowing life&rsquo;s distractions to interrupt and draw your attention away from the main attraction. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Not everyone agrees, and perhaps some mediums are more suited to digitization than others. For example, Jonathan Jones argued in an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2014/nov/13/why-photographs-dont-work-in-art-galleries" target="_blank">article</a> in <em>the Guardian</em> last week that photography should <em>only</em> be viewed on the internet and not exhibited as a lifeless image in a gallery. Jones writes: &ldquo;It just looks stupid when a photograph is framed or backlit and displayed vertically in an exhibition, in the way paintings have traditionally been shown. A photograph in a gallery is a flat, soulless, superficial substitute for painting.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Indeed, online exhibitions of digital works are a different story, especially because the computer screen is the interface in which such works are created.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Whether interactive or virtual, there are plenty of d</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">igital native works that are not made for gallery walls, but are meant to exist solely within the cyber world. There's no argument that these are best viewed on screen. There are other digital works, however, that&nbsp;use the computer to create and manipulate imagery which will then be printed on paper and exhibited in a real world art space.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Viewing this sort of work online might provide the illusion of a digital artist's experience when working in this paradigm. For example, MoMA held an exhibition in 2008 called </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2008/elasticmind/#">Design and the Elastic Minds</a>, </em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">which was installed within the museum but also contained a digital component that added a more interactive approach to the traditional show. The website not only provided further information about the exhibition, but it also squared with the exhibition concept more broadly. MoMA and the <em>Design and the Elastic Mind</em> artists explained their mission as a way to showcase the importance of designers:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Designers have the ability to grasp momentous changes in technology, science, and social mores and to convert them into objects and ideas that people can understand and use&hellip; Designers give life and voice to objects, and along the way they manifest our visions and aspirations for the future, even those we do not yet know we have.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141118194434-MoMA_Design.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Screenshot of MoMA's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2008/elasticmind/" target="_blank"><em>Design and the Elastic Mind</em> website </a></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Likewise, the Smithsonian American Art Museum has a portion of their <a href="http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/">website</a> devoted to online exhibitions which act as extensions or perhaps even stand-ins for their physical shows. Their online platform allows spectators to peruse and learn about current and travelling shows without being at the gallery.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Exhibitions like these, which contain an added digital component to a physical show can be helpful and convenient; they educate and provide further information for viewers. It&rsquo;s when the online exhibition exists on its own that it threatens to remove the greatest power and emotion from physical works of art, providing a false illusion of meaning to spectators.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141118194502-Smithsonian.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Screenshot of <a href="http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/estes/" target="_blank"><em>Richard Estes&rsquo; Realism</em> online exhibition</a> as displayed on the Smithsonian American Art Museum website</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As museums and galleries continue to grow and expose more and more artists to the greater public, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/41187" target="_blank">they often cater to their audience</a>. What does the public look for when they engage with a work of art? Often, they look for truth, familiarity, something which is moving, or even a representation of the real. If spectators rely solely on the imagery found on online exhibitions, physical art objects become skewed and slowly disappear into the infinite domains of the internet; art loses its meaning. Without a gallery or a museum to exhibit physical works, would viewers be able to truly fathom the power and presence of these physical objects? Where would they live? Without art spaces to exhibit work, art objects will slowly lose their power and presence to the cyber world, shifting the artworld deeper into a digital paradigm&mdash;when there is plenty of room for both. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409890-andrea-zlotowitz" target="_blank">Andrea Zlotowitz</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: <a href="http://instagram.com/artsy" target="_blank">Artsy's Instagram homepage</a>)</span></p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 16:41:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Gallerist Head to Head: Bea de Sousa, Christopher Kulendran Thomas, and Kristin Luke in Conversation <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Christopher Kulendran Thomas is an artist/art strategist whose approach I have long admired. When&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I invited him to realize a project at my London gallery&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theagencygallery.co.uk/" target="_blank">the Agency</a>, he brought me <a href="http://theairinnvenice.com/" target="_blank">The Air Inn Venice</a>&nbsp;(TAIV) and its&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">creator, LA artist Kristin Luke. Christopher met Kristin when she originally curated him at TAIV, along&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with her own practice and contributions by Ed Fornieles and Renzo Martens, in her California pad.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Now Christopher is curating TAIV for the Agency. A three-way dialogue ensues as the exhibition is about&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">to happen: <em>The Air Inn Venice - Winter 2015/14&nbsp;Fuck It All Sunrise Getaway</em>&nbsp;opens at my space on Evelyn Street on 19 November.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I asked Christopher and Kristin some questions that were on my mind.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Bea de Sousa, November 2014</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141114105259-IMG_4042.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Documentation from&nbsp;<em>Art In The Face Of Radical Evil&nbsp;</em>at The Air Inn Venice</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Bea de Sousa:</strong> What is The Air Inn Venice for you?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Kristin Luke</strong>:&nbsp;The Air Inn Venice could be understood as a hyperobject. It is an ongoing, intermittent project&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">space in the format of a beach-side vacation home, located in Venice Beach, Los Angeles.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Originally a painter&rsquo;s studio, then an Airbnb vacation rental, now The Air Inn Venice, its multi-</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">functional architecture and interior design are deployed as a way to rethink divisions between&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">producer, product, spectator, participant, guest, host, actor. It is an artwork, which includes&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">others&rsquo; artworks and its widely dispersed audience as its material.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Christopher Kulendran Thomas:</strong>&nbsp;The philosopher Timothy Morton coined the term "hyperobjects" in 2010 to describe entities&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">that are so massively distributed in time and space as to transcend localized comprehension at&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a human scale. A different more <a href="http://www.academia.edu/4779183/Beyond_the_Contemporary_round-table_discussion_with_Amanda_Beech_Robin_Mackay_and_Suhail_Malik_as_part_of_the_series_21st_Century_Theory_">rationalist</a></span><span style="font-size: medium; text-align: left; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">understanding of this type of <a href="https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/hyperobjects">object</a>&nbsp;presents a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">challenge to Contemporary Art as a paradigm today. In the television age art as a cultural form is&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">specifically intended for spectatorship, requiring the viewer to complete the artwork with their&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">own interpretation of it. However today&rsquo;s most ubiquitous networked media platforms (like Google&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">or Facebook) take us not simply as spectators but as their very materials for algorithmically data-</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">processed purposes that remain mostly invisible. Just as Morton understands ecology without&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a distinction between <a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ecology-without-Nature-Timothy-Morton/dp/0674034856">nature and technology</a>&nbsp;these networks can be understood as sites of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">intersection between human and non-human materiality.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20141114105401-IMG_3201.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Documentation from&nbsp;<em>Art In The Face Of Radical Evil</em>&nbsp;at The Air Inn Venice</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BdS:&nbsp;</strong>What is the value of deliberate and consensual collaborations between artists?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>KL:&nbsp;</strong>For me making work is always a collaboration, and not just with people who would call&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">themselves artists. I&rsquo;m currently looking at cooperative structures in premodern societies,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">such as idiorrhythmic monasteries and even Neolithic social formations as attempts at using&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">collaborative structures to initiate societal shifts. The way in which the historical precedents&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">include dispersion, network, and embeddedness as the very material of the movement, deserves&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a deeper comparison with art practices and social dynamics that blur the boundaries between&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artist and spectator. You couldn&rsquo;t achieve alternative social structures and ways of subsisting&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">them as a sole author.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>CKT:</strong> It seems to me that the underlying category distinction that is being dissolved here is the phony&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">binary between subject and object upon which the fantasy of autonomy is based. Beyond the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">humanist myth of authorship, a distributed "hyper art object" like The Air Inn Venice might itself&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">be understood not in terms of either artistic or interpretational autonomy but rather in terms of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">negotiating agency within its contiguous ecologies of interdependencies.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BdS:</strong> Where is the value in the reappropriation of works?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>KL:</strong> I would prefer the term reinstrumentalization&mdash;a conscious wrenching of an artwork, or any&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">kind of object, from its original context. In <em>The Social Life of Things</em>, Arjun Appadurai describes the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">mutability of a society&rsquo;s relationship to objects, or "things," as the network around them changes,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">that it is "things-in-motion that illuminate their human and social context." Objects are engaged&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">in "encoding"&mdash;they act as a kind of delivery service for a legible social text, an ideological force, the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">syntax and vocabulary of which is determined prior to the message.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In <em>Struggle and Utopia at the End Times of Philosophy</em>, Francois Laruelle supports a radical vacancy,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">a negative, non-philosophical future. The only way to talk about the future is to assume that an&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">aspect of it will always be unknown to us in the present. In these instances of non-identification, of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">illegibility, material culture creates a glimmer of possibility for the radicalization of utopian thought.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>CKT:</strong> This type of strategy takes affective experience as part of its materiality (or as part of the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">process) rather than as its sole purpose. Like Facebook itself, emotions are processed as fuel for&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">dispersed operations. But whilst both Facebook and Google have populations of users bigger than&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">any democratic nation, neither is particularly good at producing discursive space toward its own&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">democratic accountability. It is in this unregulated terrain that art might be mobilized to redirect&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">flows of attention to scrutinize the structuring of power. I'm interested in this interrogation of&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">biopolitical ethics as an examination of <a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Birth-Biopolitics-Lectures-1978-1979/dp/140398655X" target="_blank">how authority is collectively distributed</a> and how governing&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is dispersed.<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20141114190640-IMG_3491.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Christopher Kulendran Thomas (works from the series&nbsp;<em>When Platitudes Become Form</em>), May 2014</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>BdS:&nbsp;</strong>Do art concepts need exhibition spaces?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>KL:</strong> When the materials which make up an artwork include the exhibition space itself and all its&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">possible functions, as is the case with The Air Inn Venice, the concept breaks down under such&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">metonymic restructuring. The expanse of the networks along which TAIV is dispersed could not be&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">contained solely within a physical space. TAIV exists through taking up live broadcast, promotion,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">virtual models, business, and advertising as its materials. The exhibition space is incidental to the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artwork, not the reverse.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>CKT:&nbsp;</strong>Beyond the exhausted logic of the "readymade" (bringing artefacts of the commercial world into&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">the context of art for gallery-bound interpretation), we've been talking about strategies of doing art&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">through commercial processes, where spectatorship becomes part of art&rsquo;s materiality rather than its&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">purpose. The context of art here opens up discursive space within platforms of capitalization. It is in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">this space that we can ask where political agency might lie when it&rsquo;s rooted not in a fantasy of critical&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">distance but in the actuality of navigating or redirecting ecological entanglement.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Bea de Sousa</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Bea de Sousa is a curator and the Founder/Director of the <a href="http://www.theagencygallery.co.uk/">Agency Gallery,</a> London.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images: Courtesy of <a href="http://theairinnvenice.com/post/101675650603/art-the-in-the-face-of-radical-evil-ethical" target="_blank">The Air Inn Venice)</a></span></p> Tue, 18 Nov 2014 14:22:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Marina Abramovic to Help Others Sit Really Still for a Really Long Time and Count Rice <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">Legendary performance artist Marina Abromovic announced today her next public workshop aimed at helping others push beyond their own physical and psychological limits of sitting really still for a really long time while doing something really boring.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">In partnership with the Italian furniture maker <a href="http://www.moroso.it/morosoworld/news/counting-the-rice-table-marina-abramovic/?lang=en" target="_blank">Moroso</a>, the <a href="http://www.immaterial.org/" target="_blank">Marina Abromovic Institute (MAI)</a> will present "Counting the Rice" at this year's Art Basel Miami in December. Participants will try to sit these scary-looking modernist torture tables designed by Daniel Libeskind for a minimum of six hours while they count and separate rice from lentils.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The project also has a new twist: you can buy it. As part of the project, Moroso will release a limited edition of 30 "Counting the Rice" tables along with a collection of other designed objects, the proceeds of which will go to supporting the MAI. (The irony of Abromovic's immaterial art institute releasing a collection of designed objects is not lost on us.)&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The first iteration of this project was presented earlier this year in the Cortile d'Onore cloister at Milan University during Design Week 2014, where they used Italian art students as their rice-counting, concentration-building victims. Subsequently, the project was opened up to the public at Centre d'Art Contemporain in Geneva in May. A four-hour long YouTube video on that <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaXBLwuq7Uc" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">While both earlier iterations used wooden versions of the design, Moroso will present a new design development at Art Basel Miami: "high-performance cement."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">Of the design, Moroso writes: "The slab of cement folds over itself, enfolding and pushing the body to carry out the performance"&mdash;or confess to a crime you didn't commit&mdash;"while the vigorous gestural expressiveness of the form is embossed across its surface with complex geometries that give a sense of visual fragmentation." &nbsp;</span><span style="color: #000000; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">In keeping with the newly developed strong artistic ties between Abromovic and the Italian furniture manufacturer, "the seat takes on a dialectical dimension that goes beyond function to become the metaphor for the virtual union between the visionary genius of Marina Abramovic, the creativity of Daniel Libeskind, and the leading producer of Italian-made design that is Moroso."&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">The first table in the limited edition was <a href="https://paddle8.com/work/marina-abramovic/38274-counting-the-rice-table" target="_blank">auctioned off</a>&nbsp;at the Fondation Beyeier in Basel last month.&nbsp;Along with the cement "Count the Rice, Bitch" collection, Moroso announced plans to release yet another version at Art Basel Miami designed by Patricia Urquilo.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; text-align: justify;">(Image at top:&nbsp;The "Counting the Rice" Chair Designed by Daniel Libeskind for Moroso in cooperation with the Marina Abromovic Institute)</p> Fri, 14 Nov 2014 05:50:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list Exposing Visual Rhymes: An Interview with Mario Ybarra Jr. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><em><strong>This interview was <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/450" target="_blank">originally published</a> way back on ArtSlant Chicago, in May, 2008, on the occasion of&nbsp; Mario Ybarra Jr.'s exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The LA-based artist is known for his installations drawing from pop and street culture, including a recent solo show examining the mythos of Scarface at LA's Honor Fraser Gallery. Right now his work can be found <a href="http://nomadicdivision.org/exhibition/mario-ybarra-jr/" target="_blank">on a billboard in Mobile, AL</a>, part of Los Angeles Nomadic Division's Manifest Destiny Project.</strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"> Mario Ybarra, Jr. is a LA-based visual and performance artist who has created room-sized installations all over the world and most recently right here in Chicago for the Art Institute of Chicago. This year Ybarra was also selected to participate in the Whitney Biennial. Beneath Ybarra's friendly demeanor lies a keen observer who is quick to expose visual rhymes in seemingly unrelated sources and to expand and build upon those connections until a cohesion is reached, or as he might say, a story. Ybarra graciously met with ArtSlant's Abraham Ritchie while putting the finishing touches on his installation at the Art Institute. Ever the raconteur, Ybarra talked about his native LA, baseball and King Arthur. Below is an excerpt of our conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px auto; vertical-align: middle; display: block;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0018.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Abraham Richie: I think a lot of Chicagoans, and everyone, might want to know what the connection is between Southern Los Angeles, Catalina Island and Wrigley Field? It&rsquo;s kind of funny to think that Wrigley Field had a &ldquo;secret brother&rdquo; or something like that on the West Coast, because I am not sure that many people remember or know about this other Wrigley Field.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>Mario Ybarra, Jr.:</strong> Well that&rsquo;s where this whole project started for me. About a year ago Lisa Dorin, the Assistant Curator in the Contemporary Art Department, asked me if I wanted to come up with a proposal to do a Focus project here at the Art Institute of Chicago, and I said I would think about it a little bit. The way that I try to work is that I try to make some kind of relationship between a personal experience, or my personal understanding or knowledge and the place that I show. I don&rsquo;t like the idea of coming in and claiming an expertise on a place that I know nothing about. I&rsquo;ve found that doing something that starts in the realm of the personal and then taking it out to another place and trying to make relationships between those two places is the most successful tactic for me. . . I try to make bridges, so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a kid we would take trips out to Catalina Island, which is part of the Channel Islands, about 26 miles off the coast of Los Angeles. I remember part of the tour was the local history. They&rsquo;d always tell us that William Wrigley, Jr. owned Catalina Island and he had famous movie stars of the time going out there, like Clark Gable. His Chicago Cubs would go out and have their spring training there. The main town there is called Avalon and it gets its name from [Wrigley&rsquo;s] niece, who told [Wrigley] to name it that after the Avalon of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and those stories. So it has this mythological side of it too. It has real histories, the local histories, of it being owned by Wrigley, and it has this mythological history through the King Arthur association. My studio back in LA is on Avalon Boulevard and they named [the street] that because that&rsquo;s where the boats used to take people out to Avalon Harbor on the island. I started doing research about that, I&rsquo;m like a de facto historian, and I found that Wrigley, along with owning the island, owned this other Wrigley Field that was in South Central Los Angeles on Avalon and 66th street. So we had the Avalon Harbor on Catalina Island, my studio on Avalon, this field that Wrigley owned was also on Avalon, I just kept following the line. I thought I could take this story from Avalon, to Avalon Boulevard, to my studio, to Avalon were the stadium was, to all the way down Highway 66 to Chicago and the Art Institute.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I&rsquo;m figuring out ways to make these relationships between historical figures like William Wrigley, who was important to historical cities like Los Angeles and Chicago, and bring these stories together somehow, make bridges between the stories. Between what I know and my experiences and the places that I go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Sports are the site of an obvious physical conflict and throughout the exhibit are interesting juxtapositions: the Mexican flag and the U.S. flag, the sword and the baseball bat, the fist of the Revolution and an image of a capitalist&rsquo;s private island. The history of the island reflects conflict as well, in the seventies it was occupied by the Brown Berets. How are sports, especially baseball, viewed both literally and metaphorically for this project, and the issues it raises?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Well I have always thought of the history of baseball as particularly related to the United States. It&rsquo;s billed as &ldquo;the American Game;&rdquo; it&rsquo;s not really played around the world at all other than some Latin American countries, like the Dominican Republic where all these new players are coming from and where young people are specifically groomed to be ball players. But in relation to the United States, and this comes from the different things that I have watched or read, the developments of social movements in the United States almost always came ten years later than in the ball game itself. Baseball has been very slow to change, and it hasn&rsquo;t changed really over the few centuries its been played here. But it still has these kind of leading edges. Let&rsquo;s take for example the story of integration and civil rights. Jackie Robinson starts playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950's and certain places, like schools, weren&rsquo;t integrated until the early sixties or late sixties. Baseball reflects a little bit in advance the kind of social movements that will happen in the United States.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another thing that I think is very interesting in terms of conflict and it being a spectator sport, even though there are rival teams and most big cities have their own team, [there is a sense of unity]. Before professional baseball, each little town would have a team, even though there was a sense of rivalry or competition, the people were brought together as spectators to cheer on their team. So even though there was a site of conflict, it wasn&rsquo;t like it was Rome and gladiators were getting fed to lions [laughter]. There is a sense of sportsmanship [. . .]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Related to issues of capitalism and revolution, or acts of civil disobedience, there is a sense of teams. I play off that with the posters, we have here a baseball with two bats crossed, but instead of a regular team you have the Brown Beret guys who tried to occupy the island in 1972 so they&rsquo;re like &ldquo;the team.&rdquo; The idea of &ldquo;the team&rdquo; is important too and the metaphor of a team. The idea that everyone has their positions but also act as a unit is very important and is a metaphor for myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="/userimages/3151/PICT0019.JPG" alt="" width="338" height="443" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: The idea of teams is also apparent in this wall of flags you have installed. What are the flags we have here?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> This is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag. The flags are also stadium-esque, they always have them. The other thing, again about making relationships, is this is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag, which has an eagle perched on a rock holding a shield and in his mouth is a banner. I thought that is very interesting, because over here is the Mexican flag, and again we have the eagle, this time perched on the cactus, and the snake in his mouth pretty much mimics the banner in the Illinois flag. Those kinds of aesthetic relationships and symbolic choices are very interesting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px; vertical-align: middle;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0015.JPG" alt="" width="430" height="328" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Even looking at the Illinois flag, that&rsquo;s more of an Aztec style eagle than a typical American-style eagle.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Yeah. Those are the kinds of things I noticed in my visits to Chicago to prepare for this show, last year and earlier this year. I started seeing these kinds of relationships, like the Illinois flag&rsquo;s similarity to the flag of Mexico.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This row of flags will start off with the U.S. flag, the state of Illinois flag, Chicago flag, Los Angeles flag, state of California flag, and the Mexican flag. We have these different relationships between these two places starting with the cities and then going to the states. We have the state of Mexico flag, even though California is not part of Mexico, it used to be part of Mexico, but it&rsquo;s related to the histories that we have here. Catalina Island was occupied by the Brown Berets because in the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which separated the Southwest from Mexico after the Mexican-American War, the island wasn&rsquo;t specifically mentioned. This is why the Brown Berets tried to occupy it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There are interrelationships between the two places [Chicago and LA]. I thought that was another kind of metaphor for the show, in terms of Wrigley being this character and starting with him, saying no man is an island, or no city, or no country or land is an island. They&rsquo;re all in relationship, in context, to their neighbors. Imagine if we thought that we could do everything, under our own power, we&rsquo;d get ourselves in trouble. We can talk about it in relationship to land, in relationship to people. Or no island is a man, we could even switch it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I wanted to draw these kinds of relationships together, one between Los Angeles and Chicago, two between Mexico and the States, three between baseball and mythology. Different symbolic orders, things like ships or bubble gum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Mario Ybarra, Jr., Jenny Gheith and Lisa Dorin for their assistance in making this interview possible. Additional thanks to the Anna Helwing Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">-<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16747-abraham-ritchie?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #000000;"> Abraham Ritchie</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Top image: <strong>Mario Ybarra Jr</strong>, Manifest Destiny Project billboard, 2014; Courtesy of LAND. All other images are installation views of <em>Take Me Out. . . No Man Is an Island</em>, 2008; Courtesy of the Artist)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:52:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my &ldquo;tag&rdquo;: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my mark in muscle memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140558-me_tagging.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Yours truly, tagging the graffiti wall, <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>; Photo: Ben Harvey.</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> <br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I was in Eindhoven attending the Free Art and Technology (F.A.T.) Lab&rsquo;s exhibition <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>&nbsp;at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/" target="_blank">MU</a>, which ended in January. The show, which also took place in April last year at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/335-eyebeam?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a> in New York, was a sort of five-year anniversary round up of the Internet collective&rsquo;s practice. (F.A.T. Lab has now entered its seventh year, but the originally scheduled retrospective was put on hiatus in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.) But back to the incident at hand. Why, at an exhibition dedicated to a network ostensibly operating online, was I contributing my meager tag to a sanctioned graffiti wall?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140845-installation_view1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The connection isn&rsquo;t so far fetched. Some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s twenty-five <a href="http://fffff.at/people/" target="_blank">members</a>&mdash;an international network of artists, engineers, scientists, lawyers, and musicians&mdash;are themselves graffiti artists. Their core values, which include &ldquo;spreading open source and free ideals into popular culture&rdquo; through DIY entrepreneurship, open source, and activism, have more than a few intersections with street art. On the one hand, art on the Internet can be viewed through a street lens: it can bypass normal distribution channels, appealing directly to viewers. Turning the comparison on its head, street art can be seen as a form of &ldquo;hack&rdquo;&mdash;an unendorsed appropriation of space, medium, or idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302135918-ideas_worth_spreading.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Evan Roth</strong><em>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank">Ideas Worth Spreading</a> (TED Talks)</em></em>, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In his recent book, <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/" target="_blank"><em>Viral Art</em></a>, <a href="http://blog.vandalog.com/" target="_blank">Vandalog</a> blogger RJ Rushmore looks at how the future of street art, with its focus on &ldquo;unmediated distribution,&rdquo; might find a natural home in the digital domain. He uses the term &ldquo;Viral Art&rdquo; to describe both shareable and invasive online practices that have an affinity, if not a direct evolutionary line, to street art (n.b. &ldquo;Viral&rdquo; here implies a level of approachability that excludes some older forms of Internet Art. The pioneering duo JODI, for example, have a great exhibition at <a href="http://www.showroommama.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Showroom MAMA</a> in Rotterdam right now that isn&rsquo;t particularly accessible or viral). F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">projects</a> don&rsquo;t always fall within the categories Rushmore outlines either&mdash;viewers may seek out content rather than encounter it serendipitously&mdash;yet they do open onto notions of self-dissemination, egalitarianism, activism, and anonymity. In fact, there are examples at MU of some of the <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/google-bombs/" target="_blank">very</a> <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/katsu-getting-up-in-digital-space/" target="_blank">works</a> discussed in Rushmore&rsquo;s text&mdash;namely, <a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank"><em>Ideas Worth Spreading</em></a>, a mock-up TED Talk stage where visitors can record images of their own &ldquo;talk&rdquo; to share online, and <em>40,000 GML Tags</em>, a massive screen showcasing graffiti gestures in <a href="http://fffff.at/tag/gml/" target="_blank">GML</a>, or Graffiti Markup Language, &ldquo;a file format designed to be a universal structure for storing digitized graffiti motion data.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140719-kopyfamo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Geraldine Juarez, <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://fffff.at/kopyfamo-free-copyright/" target="_blank">Kopyfamo'</a>, watermark on mirror, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Some F.A.T. Lab projects exist in the real world, others are strictly manifest online, and many straddle the two&mdash;that is, projects shaped in the real world and shared online. The MU exhibition, curated by <a href="http://www.lindsayhoward.net/" target="_blank">Lindsay Howard</a>, highlighted them all, offering documentation, online viewing stations, and even physical objects and artworks. Where <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> differed from the typical exhibition was that most works were not autonomous objects, but rather reproducible examples of a wider practice. Motivated viewers could (and can) recreate many of these works on the web or at home*, and the materials for some projects, like an <a href="http://fffff.at/obama-google-glass-prism-mask/" target="_blank">Obama PRISM mask</a>, were even available at the exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140049-free_universal_construction_kit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view with&nbsp;<a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank"><em>Free Universal Construction Kit</em></a>, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Good fun is always on the menu: in <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> there was a sub-genre of works touting the douchiness of Google Glass and its adopters, and a presentation of Greg Leuch&rsquo;s viral Add-on <a href="http://fffff.at/shaved-bieber/" target="_blank"><em>Shaved Bieber</em></a>, which censors all mentions of Justin Bieber online (earning Leuch more than a little hate mail from teenage fans). But some of the best and most shareable projects are greater than their capacity for the lulz. The <a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank">Free Universal Construction Kit</a> is a set of adapters that makes ten brands of children&rsquo;s construction sets, like Lego and K&rsquo;Nex, interoperable. It&rsquo;s eminently cool/novel/clever, but it also visualizes the ways in which childhood playthings ostensibly meant to spark creativity are limited by proprietary measures. The F.U.C.K. undermines these protective implements, removing barriers to cross-trademark creativity. The exhibition featured a complete set of adapters, a construction/play station, and a 3D printer that staff members kindly set to printing new pieces whenever visitors turned up. (3D models of the adapters in .STL format are available online for <a href="http://www.thingiverse.com/uck/designs" target="_blank">free download</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140151-facebook_id_card.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/tag/fb-bureau/" target="_blank">Facebook Identity Card</a></em>, video presentation of ARTE Creative, <em><a href="http://fbbureau.com/" target="_blank">Social ID Bureau</a></em>, 2012,&nbsp;portrait of Mark Zuckerberg,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s perspective seems carefully poised between an irreverent techno-optimism (&ldquo;look at these cool things we can do!&rdquo;) and deep skepticism at the ways in which technologies can be regulated, marketed, and used for power and control. Given these positions, in which use of certain technologies seems self-evident, it&rsquo;s easy to forget that not everyone has access to the distributional paradigm shift that is the digital domain. Rushmore&rsquo;s account also overstates viral art&rsquo;s present accessibility: an encounter with this type of work is more likely to be spread within specific enclaves of Internet activity, with limiting factors being not geography, but usage. The case for &ldquo;unmediated&rdquo; distribution is further undermined by the cryptic algorithms used by Facebook and Google for post placement and search results&mdash;the very systems F.A.T. Lab exploits when images of their fake TED Talks turn up in search results. In a destabilizing twist, F.A.T. Lab often coopts the very technologies and systems it protests (or defends).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140313-skatekeyboard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/skatekeyboard/" target="_blank">Skatekeyboard</a></em>, keyboard attached to skateboard deck,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In a way, that&rsquo;s why it was such a treat to see some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s works in physical form, Away From Keyboard as it were. <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> did a great job of making works and ideas accessible to people who might not be tech-savvy or know what terms like &ldquo;net neutrality&rdquo; and &ldquo;Open Web&rdquo; mean. Or those who aren&rsquo;t necessarily ready to accept or understand this sort of practice as &ldquo;art.&rdquo; The exhibition was forward looking, but also rooted in the past and present&mdash;a thought-provoking bridge between time, technologies, and disciplines. Be it in a subway tunnel or on a homepage, a mark on the wall is a sign of presence; it can be a declaration of ego, of resistance. Or like my clumsy signature, it can be an affirmation, a &ldquo;Like&rdquo; or an &ldquo;upvote&rdquo;: I was here, with so many others, and I want to be counted.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140303002936-compubody_interface.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Becky Stern</strong>,&nbsp;<em><em><a href="http://fffff.at/knitted-compubody-interface/" target="_blank">Knitted Compubody Interface</a>&nbsp;</em>(<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop-Compubody-Sock/" target="_blank">knit one</a> yourself!), at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; </em>&copy; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">*The MU exhibition ended on January 26th, but interested readers can see the projects <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">online</a> or in the new <a href="http://fffff.at/the-fat-manual/" target="_blank"><em>F.A.T. Manual</em></a> (available for purchase or <a href="http://www.lulu.com/shop/domenico-quaranta-and-geraldine-ju%C3%A1rez/the-fat-manual/ebook/product-21251172.html" target="_blank">free download</a>), released on the occasion of the exhibition and the collective&rsquo;s five-year anniversary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302141000-installation_view3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">Image on top: <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.<span style="color: #000000;">]</span></span></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/par/Articles/list