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A conversation between Luciana Lamothe and Alberta Pane< /em>

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A.P. \;: Talking about your next exhibition at Galerie Alberta Pane\, what's the installation you want to realize about?

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L.L. \;: One of the sculptures I want to realize is like a footpath you can cross\, a bridge you can walk on. The sc ulpture's way is made up of a wooden structure pulled by metal pipes\, a ma terial that straining\, generates forms\, ranging from symmetrical and rhyt hmic figures to the danger of crossing it. The second sculpture is a seat m ade under the same logic of construction. The act of sitting becomes reflec tive on the shape and material.

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My works' strategy often consists i n realizing a dislocation between the function and the form or the function and the context\, but at the same time ensuring the effectiveness of the f unction. For example\, a tool's use that fulfills its function but in a dif ferent context from the one it was originally made for\; or a sculpture des igned to pierce the walls of the exhibition space (&lsquo\;Funció\;n& rsquo\;\, Ruth Benzacar Gallery) but at the same time using them to be show cased.

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In this exhibition\, the dislocation occurs when the pure fo rm of a drawing\, with some patterns repeating themselves with harmony and rhythm\, gets a functional use\, in this case to walk or to sit.

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A.P. \;: Then what's the relation between for m and function in your artworks and in this one in particular?

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L.L. \;:In architecture ther e is a fundamental principle according to which "form follows function" whi ch means\, on the one hand function and form rely and depend on each other\ , but on the other hand\, architecture always has to guarantee the effectiv eness of the function. Any deconstructivist building despite the apparent c haos\, must meet all the functional aspects using as less resources and as much efficacy as possible.

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For example\, at the beg inning\, the space may be supposedly composed of empty halls and corridors\ , in order to obtain a good circulation\, and then\, gradually\, you uphols ter\, you add and aggregate to reach formal complexity.

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In the case of my sculptures\, the formal complexity expresses the fun ction\, and the simple fact of walking becomes a complex act.

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A.P. \;: Concerning your previous exhibitions\, how did you express this concept and what was the material's role in your a rtworks?

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L.L. \; : In the latest show I made at Ruth Benzacar Gallery\, I presented a long w alkway made of wooden boards hanging on a structure of tubes. Walking over it\, the boards flex due to the body weight and in this way\, everyone coul d test the material's resistance. It was a sort of act of trust\, everyone had to rely on the material.

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In this case\, as in m any others\, my interest in the ambivalence of the materials in terms of st rength and ductility could be clearly perceived. The materials I work with belong to the world of construction\; they&rsquo\;re solid\, resistant and durable\, but when all physical pressure is withdrawn\, they may become sof t and elastic.

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A.P. \;: Thinking ba ck to your first exhibition at the gallery\, what are the differences? What about the people visiting the exhibition? Do they interact with your artwo rks?

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In my first exhibition at the Ga lerie Alberta Pane\, my proposal was also to reflect on architecture\, func tion and materials\, in particular the ambiguity of the concrete\, due to i ts two opposite states\, from the liquid to the solid phase. Concrete's dry powder turns into a moist and malleable dough\, and then evolves into an h ard and dry mass. And it is exactly when it hardens\, that it can play its role in the architecture. In the installation I made at the gallery\, the v iewer had the opportunity to see it in both states\, liquid and solidified. The transition from one state to another depended on the viewer's particip ation\, supposed to bring his own wet material (saliva)\, which was crucial for carrying out the mix of the two. Once more\, the body tries personally and directly the different possibilities of the material.

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A.P. : When y ou talk about deconstructivism: which architect in particular do you refer to?

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L.L.&nb sp\;: I'm thinking about deconstructivism in general\, but I could mention Frank Gehry and the museum of Bilbao as a paradigmatic example where formal complexity can be found everywhere\, yet circulation is never interrupted\ , and all rooms and corridors are easily accessible. It&rsquo\;s an archite cture of "adding": once the functionality is guaranteed\, you take care of complexity\, and then you return to function again.

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What I want to highlight is that the architecture should always put the fu nction first\, and could never avoid it.

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In this ex hibition\, my idea is to propose a project\, geometric in this case\, initi ally conceived from lines and the idea of strain on the materials\, both in the form of sculptures' pure contemplation\, and in terms of functionality .

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In the exhibition "Prueba de tensió\;n" las t May at Ruth Benzacar Gallery\, the wood suspended in the air was flexed t o the limits by the body weight of people walking on it.

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In my next exhibition\, &ldquo\;The function of form&rdquo\;\, every piece of wood wi ll be put under pressure in order to finally generate relief\, It will tran sforme the flat surface in a volume\, thus making the space more complex.\n

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On the other hand\, I am also interested in material s belonging to the construction's field\, because they are produced in modu lar equal pieces and allow me to generate modular or different forms of the same idea. The provisional nature allows to assemble and disassemble quick ly. Changing is an inherent feature of these materials.

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A.P. : How would you include your work in the contemporary art&rsquo\;s scene in Argentina?\n

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L.L. \;: Since the 2001's crisis\, many artists of my generation and I\, we have started working directly on the c ontext\, not necessarily regarding the issue itself\, in other words\, the work area has moved from the laboratory to the street or directly to the ex hibition space.

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Materials and fragility\, consumpti on\, the crisis of institutions were the axes around which we moved. Over t he years\, everyone has matured and developed his own very personal work th rough different ways of expression.

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A.P . : What is the link among your sculptures\, your drawings\, your performan ces and your actions?

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L.L. \;: My work is bound to the ideas of &ldquo\;action&rdq uo\; and of &ldquo\;sculpture&rdquo\;. To create a sculpture is an action\, to look at a sculpture is an action. An element suspended in the air is a potential action.

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The actions recor ded in my videos often refer to the sculpture and to materials. In turn\, m y sculptural work often involves an action\, a movement. In this way\, I hi ghlight a mechanism\, a function\, a logic of thought or behavior with any material I use.

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Time becomes a decisive factor in t he artwork.

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A.P \;: What about your next projects?

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L.L.: My next project is a intervention in the public space of Buenos Aires. It is a sculpture l ocated at the confluence of two busy streets. People can go up to the large scaffolding structure and lean on a balcony overlooking the street. The vi ewer can feel the dizziness of the height and the structure's slope.

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A.P. : What do you expect from your exhibitio n in Paris?

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L.L.: I hope you&rsquo\;ll like it!

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DTEND:20150117 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141113 GEO:48.867882;2.3567971 LOCATION:Galerie Alberta Pane\,64 RUE NOTRE-DAME DE NAZARETH \n Paris\, 750 03 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Function of Form\, Luciana Lamothe UID:361549 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20141113T200000 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141113T170000 GEO:48.867882;2.3567971 LOCATION:Galerie Alberta Pane\,64 RUE NOTRE-DAME DE NAZARETH \n Paris\, 750 03 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Function of Form\, Luciana Lamothe UID:361550 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Born in 1981\, Matt hieu Gafsou is a Swiss photographer working in series. His sharp eye captur es and unveils both the beauty and the uglyness of his landscapes and portr aits. Close to drawings\, the photographs suspend time and they color its s ubjects with an oneiric touch.

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Started in 2009\, the &ldquo\;La Chaux-de-Fonds&rdquo\; series was the fruit of his time as artist in residence invited by the Swiss town in the Jura where Cendrars and Le Corbusier were born. Wandering aimlessly in the streets of La Chaux-de-Fonds\, Matthieu Gafsou shot highly constructed imag es\, sometimes funny\, always bizarre. Photographs in which the disturbing strangeness resist to his fresh and perceptive eye.

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In 2012\, Eric Mouchet\, an expert on Le Corbusie r&rsquo\;s drawing works\, discovered Matthieu Gafsou&rsquo\;s photos durin g the exhibition \;L&rsquo\;Expé\;rience de la ville at the Mus&e acute\;e des Beaux Arts of La Chaux-de-Fonds. For its inaugural exhibition\ , Galerie Eric Mouchet will show &ldquo\;La Chaux-de-Fonds&rdquo\; by Matth ieu Gafsou with the participation of Galerie C in Neuchâ\;tel.

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ABOUT GALERIE ERIC MOUCHET

\n< p class="p1" style="text-align: justify\;">Supported by a high level of qua lity and expertise\, Galerie Eric Mouchet displays an eclectic and demandin g programme\, under the influence of its founder Eric Mouchet\, an expert i n graphic arts for the Appeal Court of Paris and a specialist of Le Corbusi er&rsquo\;s drawing work.

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Collector of international artists of the 70s-80s and young emergent artist s\, Eric Mouchet made the jump in 2014 to bring together his passion for co ntemporary art and his expertise while opening his gallery\, 45 rue Jacob\, Paris 6th.

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Located in the historical cultural centre of Paris\, Galerie Eric Mouchet shows real indi viduality and contributes to the opening of Saint-Germain-des-Pré\;s to contemporary art.

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Né\; en 1 981\, Matthieu Gafsou est un photographe plasticien suisse travaillant par sé\;rie. L&rsquo\;acuité\; de son regard capte et ré\;v&e grave\;le tant la beauté\; que la laideur des paysages et portraits q u&rsquo\;il saisit.

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Proche s de l&rsquo\;art graphique\, ses photographies suspendent le temps et donn ent à\; leur sujet une dimension onirique.

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Dé\;buté\;e en 2009\, la sé\;rie & laquo\; La Chaux-de-Fonds »\; est le fruit d&rsquo\;une ré\;side nce de l&rsquo\;artiste invité\; à\; saisir le portrait de cett e ville du Jura suisse où\; naquirent Cendrars et Le Corbusier. De se s dé\;ambulations alé\;atoires à\; travers les rues de La Chaux-de-Fonds\, Matthieu Gafsou nous donne à\; voir
«\; l &rsquo\;inquié\;tante é\;trangeté\; »\; des lieux da ns des images insolites\, parfois cocasses\, toujours parfaitement construi tes.

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C&rsquo\;est fin 2012 \, à\; l&rsquo\;occasion de l&rsquo\;exposition \;L&rsquo\;Exp&ea cute\;rience de la ville où\; ses photos sont exposé\;es au Mus é\;e des Beaux Arts de La Chaux-de-Fonds\, qu&rsquo\;Eric Mouchet\, e xpert de l&rsquo\;&oelig\;uvre picturale de Le Corbusier\, dé\;couvre le travail de Matthieu Gafsou.

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Pour son exposition inaugurale\, la Galerie Eric Mouchet pré\;s entera «\; La Chaux-de-Fonds »\; de Matthieu Gafsou avec la parti cipation de la Galerie C de Neuchâ\;tel.

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À\; PROPOS DE LA GALERIE ERIC MOUCHET

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Collectionneur de jeunes artistes de longue date\, Eric Mouchet a choisi de marier sa passion pour l&rsquo\;art contemporain et son expertise en ouvrant sa propre galerie en 2014 au 45 ru e Jacob\, Paris 6e.

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Cr&eac ute\;é\;e dans une exigence de rigueur\, la Galerie Eric Mouchet prop ose une programmation é\;clectique tant gé\;ographiquement qu'e n terme d'orientation et de medium. Sous l&rsquo\;impulsion de son fondateu r\, expert en arts graphiques prè\;s de la cour d&rsquo\;appel de Par is et spé\;cialiste de l&rsquo\;&oelig\;uvre picturale de Le Corbusie r\, la Galerie Eric Mouchet pré\;sente des artistes dé\;lib&eac ute\;ré\;ment contemporains.

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Situé\;e dans le centre culturel historique de Paris\, la Ga lerie Eric Mouchet affiche une ré\;elle singularité\; en contri buant à\; l&rsquo\;ouverture de Saint-Germain-des-Pré\;s &agrav e\; l&rsquo\;art contemporain.

DTEND:20141122 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141021 GEO:48.8556263;2.332909 LOCATION:Galerie Eric Mouchet\,45 rue Jacob \nParis\, 75006 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:La Chaux-de-Fonds\, Matthieu Gafsou UID:361126 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20141018T200000 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141018T140000 GEO:48.8556263;2.332909 LOCATION:Galerie Eric Mouchet\,45 rue Jacob \nParis\, 75006 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:La Chaux-de-Fonds\, Matthieu Gafsou UID:361127 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

From October 10 to&nbs p\;December 20\, Tornabuoni Art Paris presents the first retrospective dedi cated to Turi Simeti in France.

By signing his work in the third dimension\, the artist creates a peerless plastic corpus at the i ntersection of sculpture\, bas-relief and painting.

Many Italian artists who explored ways of moving beyond the flat surface\, inexorably w ere brought back to the painting\, \;like Fontana\, Castellani\, Bonalu mi\, Castellani\, Dadamiaino or Scheggi. \;

For Turi Simeti\ , as it was for them\, the work is an alliance of vehement and radical spac e and surface\, it is the latter that Tornabuoni Art pays tribute through&n bsp\;a never seen \;exhibition in France. Simeti's is an uncompromising body of work that crosses from one century to another and refers back to t he sources of contemporary Italian art which brought an irreversible change to the history of art. \;

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La galerie Tornabuoni Art a la plaisir de pré\;senter la premi&egra ve\;re ré\;trospective en France dé\;dié\;e à\; l'a rtiste italien Turi Simeti. Une trentaine d'oeuvres significatives retracer ont sa carriè\;re artistique\, inscrite dans le sillage des artistes comme Fontana\, Bonalumi\, Scheggi\, Castellani et dé\;voué\;e à\; la volonté\; de rompre la plané\;ité\; de la su rface de la toile. L'exposition sera accompagné\;e d'un catalogue &ea cute\;crit par Bruno Corà\; qui sera disponible à\; la galerie.

DTEND:20141220 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141010 GEO:48.8707057;2.3138918 LOCATION:Tornabuoni Art\,16 Avenue Matignon Paris 75008 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Solo Exhibition\, Turi Simeti UID:361125 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20150110 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141107 GEO:48.8549835;2.3415386 LOCATION:Gaudel de Stampa\,49\, Quai des Grands Augustins \nParis\, 75006 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Relative kinematics of a passing moment\, Mihut Boscu Kafchin UID:361023 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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This place called home

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Like the t ravel notebooks of Bruce Chatwin\, whose writings offered an incredibly sen sitive and humanistic vision of an Australia forever lost\, the photographi c wanderings of Matt Wilson &ndash\; another Anglo-Saxon globetrotter &ndas h\;provide ineffable images of the different countries he has traversed. Fe w in number and extremely unique\, these modest photographs take contempora ry photography head on. Even framed\, they are so small in format\, they de mand viewers to stop and scrutinize the details\, much in the manner of a m ini-painting filling a seventeenth century cabinet of curiosity. In that sa me way\, they often seem somewhat damaged\, as if corroded by the outdated film the artist uses. The visual result is opalescent: the very visible gra in and decadent light outline areas of intimate shadows in nocturnal scenes and offer a smoky\, misty rendering in daytime landscapes. This studied te chnique of the possibilities of antiquated emulsion accompanied with a keen vision represents the core of Matt Wilson&rsquo\;s language. As a result\, what you see is tripped and a poetic sway is set in motion. This visual st ructure gradually informs an incidental narrative that reveals fictional la nds on the cusp of a lucid dream.

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The scenes captured by Wilson are located outside a precise period in time. So metimes\, they evoke a Brueghelian landscape or a Romantic description\, li ke one from a page of nineteenth century English literature. Other photogra phs are harsher\, hovering beside human fragility and its grimacing facets.

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When Wilson first started\, he photo graphed across Europe\, first in his native country\, England\, but after i n France\, a country with which he has affinity\, and then on to Eastern Eu rope\, where he often returned between more exotic stints in Cuba. From his country\, Wilson gave us popular portraits. Some\, in their mysterious bla ck and whites\, are reminiscent of Chris Killip\; others\, for example the toothless laugh of an old lady\, of Richard Billingham. Other\, more bucoli c scenes are moving: a child lets loose\, galloping through the grass\, int oxicated with innocence\; a young girl perched on a rudimentary swing poses in pensive balance\, facing the dimming light of a summer evening. The lan dscapes resemble fleeting thought\, traces of memory Wilson undoubtedly wan ted to preserve. They serve as literary citations. The fragrance of a poem by William Wordsworth emanating from a red roofed house nestled in shadowy greenery\; the words of L.P. Hartley emerge from an image of a pier in Brig hton\, blurred by drizzle. And the spirit of Thomas Hardy permeates the sho ts of a train rolling through the countryside where stands a farm in the wa shed out light of autumn.

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Yet Wilson& rsquo\;s intimist vision is not just picturesque\, since it also presents a certain harshness\, a severity of life. This viewpoint is perhaps even mor e lucid when the photographer visits Eastern Europe\, which he documents th rough scenes of faded color\, as if time were stymied\, decrepit homes alon g with it\, men and women past their prime\, cars turning to rust. As the s ole survivors of this quasi-palpable sadness\, like bearers of hope\, child ren daringly prance on the walls\, piss along fences\, shoot into a ball\, and laugh deeply.

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In the Cuban photog raphs\, William Burroughs descends with Wilson into the thick darkness of s mall streets. Between dream and reality\, the artist transports us\, almost brutally\, down a cutthroat alley gleaming in tones of bronze\, introducin g us to darkened transvestites kissing in a sensual chiaroscuro evoking Car avaggio. Elsewhere\, images of black children boxing are punctuated by the red of their gloves\, which pierces the shadows of the dark room. In other shots\, the eye attempts to catch up with the passing vision of an old Amer ican car\, or envies the profile of a handsome Cuban under a streetlamp\, w aiting for his love behind the wheel of an elegant Cadillac. The atmosphere of these various scenes and their lighting are certain to remind one of 19 60s American cinema.

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Throughout his t ravels\, bonds form between the photographer and his subjects. His portrait s are rich in colorful humanity but also attest to the forgotten. Cuba insp ires and fascinates Matt Wilson. Here he gathers together all the elements that nourish his artistic universe. Clearly\, Wilson does not so much wish to record reality as it is seen or encountered\, but instead to capture an instant he has dreamed of or felt. A kind of photographic infrathin emerges from a minute time and space.

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More r ecently\, Wilson chose to focus on his adopted home\, the United States. On e could have felt some trepidation about the American terrain\, a vast spac e occupied by the ghosts of many great photographers\, but once again his w ork escapes pre-established iconography. Here we find Wilson's wanderings c loser to those of Wim Wenders or Jim Jarmusch than those of William Egglest on or Stephen Shore. He draws away from the tenets of New Topography by len ding a picturesque\, even cinematographic aura to ordinary scenes: decrepit homes\, old and abandoned cars\, pioneer faces sucking at beers\, signs fr om the old west lying broken in tall grass. His subtle and out of the ordin ary rendering of light is white on the Grand Canyon and then impalpable on foliage vibrating with mystery.

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The w atercolor-like appearance of these images\, crafted from the chromatic capa city of the photographic medium\, is deceiving. We could call this work pic torial metaphor and even a pictorialist offspring if the characters weren&r squo\;t so anchored in their times and in their daily lives. While Wilson c olors what he sees from a poetic prism\, he takes contemporary society into account through subjects that are often hard\, sometimes even indigent\, a lthough depicted without tragedy or miserabilism. Like John Fante\, his int erpretation is as raw as it is attentive and kind. And since Wilson has rem ained English at heart\, there is added to this a discreet melancholy and i ntuition comforted by tragicomic lightness. His work could join the humanis t tradition since he captures the popular subjects he encounters through th at &ldquo\;decisive moment&rdquo\; that was so dear to Cartier-Bresson. Nev ertheless\, Wilson&rsquo\;s work is not reportage because it diverts realit y in favor of an emotional and esthetic charge that is profoundly moving. T his emotion\, however\, is fueled by numerous reminiscences. They first and foremost belong to the viewer since Matt Wilson&rsquo\;s universe was buil t by the school of life. Like all great self-taught artists\, he has been a ble to construct an artistic language that belongs to no one else but himse lf.

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Christine Ollier

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A l&rsquo\;instar des carnet s de voyages de Bruce Chatwin dont les é\;crits ont livré\; une vision incroyablement sensible et humaniste d&rsquo\;une Australie aujourd &rsquo\;hui à\; jamais perdue\, l&rsquo\;errance photographique de Ma tt Wilson\, autre globe-trotter anglo-saxon\, produit d&rsquo\;ineffables i mages des diffé\;rents pays qu&rsquo\;il parcourt selon humeur et ren contres. Peu nombreuses\, mais si particuliè\;res\, ces photographies modestes\, presque anodines par leur sujet\, sont donné\;es à\ ; voir\, à\; l&rsquo\;encontre des tendances de la photographie conte mporaine\, dans de si petites dimensions qu&rsquo\;elles obligent à\; l&rsquo\;arrê\;t pour en scruter les dé\;tails. Elles semblent souvent quelque peu endommagé\;es\, comme corrodé\;es\, du fait des pellicules hors d&rsquo\;usage que l&rsquo\;artiste utilise. Le r&eacu te\;sultat visuel est opalescent : le grain trè\;s pré\;sent et la lumiè\;re dé\;cadente provoquent des zones d&rsquo\;ombres intimistes dans les scè\;nes nocturnes ou offrent un rendu charbonneu x et embrumé\; dans les paysages diurnes. Cette technique de prise de vue «\; alé\;atoire »\; inté\;grant l&rsquo\;acciden tel du film à\; la vision photographique fonde le singulier langage d e Matt Wilson. Cela finit par troubler la vue et provoquer une bascule po&e acute\;tique. Au fur et à\; mesure\, cette trame visuelle structure l &rsquo\;ensemble en une é\;criture incidemment narrative\, ré\; vé\;lant des contré\;es fictionnelles à\; la limite d&rsq uo\;un rê\;ve é\;veillé\;.

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Les scè\;nes capturé\;es par Matt Wilson se placent en d ehors d&rsquo\;une é\;poque pré\;cise. Parfois elles é\;v oquent un paysage breughé\;lien ou une description romantique telle s erait celle issue d&rsquo\;une page de litté\;rature anglaise du XIX& egrave\;me. Entre ré\;el et onirisme\, l&rsquo\;artiste sait aussi no us transporter\, presque brutalement\, dans une rue coupe-gorge à\; l a rencontre de travestis interlopes\; nous mê\;ler à\; un combat de boxe d&rsquo\;enfants noirs\, alors mê\;me que l&rsquo\;&oelig\;il tente de rattraper la vision fugace d&rsquo\;une vielle automobile am&eacu te\;ricaine d&rsquo\;une photographie pré\;cé\;dente&hellip\; A utant de situations quasiment irré\;elles qui ne sont pas sans rappel er l&rsquo\;atmosphè\;re des films amé\;ricains des anné\ ;es soixante. A l&rsquo\;é\;vidence\, Matt Wilson ne souhaite pas tan t rendre compte de la ré\;alité\; que d&rsquo\;un instant tel q u&rsquo\;il l&rsquo\;a rê\;vé\; ou ressenti\, plutô\;t que vu ou traversé\;. Une sorte d&rsquo\;inframince photographique surgit ainsi d&rsquo\;un infime espace-temps.

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Il a photographié\;\, d&rsquo\;abord un peu partout en Europe\, &a grave\; commencer par son pays natal\, l&rsquo\;Angleterre\, mais aussi en France\, pays avec lequel il a ses affinité\;s\, sans omettre les pay s de l&rsquo\;Est où\; il retourne fré\;quemment entre deux s&e acute\;jours à\; Cuba. Plus ré\;cemment\, il a fini par d&eacut e\;sirer parcourir un vaste continent : les Etats-Unis où\; il habite depuis une dizaine d&rsquo\;anné\;es. Il aurait pu craindre de touch er à\; ce territoire-là\;\, tant les photographes amé\;ri cains s&rsquo\;en sont magnifiquement chargé\;s\, mais là\; enc ore\, son é\;tonnante vision dé\;livre des instantané\;s de paysages et d&rsquo\;hommes brulé\;s par un soleil brutal qui fini t malgré\; tout\, par se coucher sur cette rude contré\;e. La l umiè\;re est si blanche ou\, au contraire\, si té\;nue que la p erception aquarelliste de ces scè\;nes impressionné\;es en de&c cedil\;à\; des capacité\;s chromatiques du medium photographiqu e est trompeuse. Nous pourrions qualifier ce travail de «\; mé\; taphore picturale »\; et mê\;me de dé\;rive pictorialiste s i les personnages n&rsquo\;é\;taient pas si ancré\;s dans leur é\;poque et dans leur quotidien. Car si Matt Wilson livre ce qu&rsquo \;il voit selon un prisme poé\;tique\, il rend compte de la soci&eacu te\;té\; contemporaine à\; travers des sujets souvent crus\, pa rfois mê\;me indigents\, traité\;s toutefois sans tragique ni mi sé\;rabilisme. Son regard est attentif et bienveillant\, sous-tendu p ar une discrè\;te mé\;lancolie humaniste mais coloré\; d& rsquo\;une lé\;gè\;reté\; tragi-comique à\; l&rsquo \;anglaise. Il peut s&rsquo\;inscrire dans la tradition «\; humaniste »\; car il capture souvent un «\; instant photographique »\; si cher à\; Cartier-Bresson. Mais Wilson n&rsquo\;est pas reporter\, il dé\;tourne le sens du ré\;el au profit d&rsquo\;une charge é\;motionnelle et esthé\;tique telle\, qu&rsquo\;elle parvient à\; é\;mouvoir au plus profond.

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Christine Ollier

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\n DTEND:20141130 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141031 GEO:48.86282;2.3660338 LOCATION:Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire\,17 rue des Filles du Calvaire \nPa ris\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Carnets\, Matt Wilson UID:361021 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20141030T210000 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141030T180000 GEO:48.86282;2.3660338 LOCATION:Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire\,17 rue des Filles du Calvaire \nPa ris\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Carnets\, Matt Wilson UID:361022 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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Born in Arizo na\, Mike Brodie roams the American lands to offer brutal &ndash\;from time to time shocking but always fascinating- images of those four years of tra vels\, train by train\, from one encounter to the next. Covered by masks su ch as pseudonyms\, the amateur makes himself a name as the &lsquo\;&lsquo\; Polaroid Kidd&rsquo\;&rsquo\;\, the teeny-tiny child of the small format. C hild\, cause he was seventeen when he threw himself on the tracks and rails of (a) life\, in 2002\, with few personal effects and for what was suppose d to be just a short journey&hellip\; One that lasted several days soon fol lowed by a much longer journey he left for with discretion&hellip\; The mod esty of the nickname doesn&rsquo\;t fully express the striking effect those American photographs still have on a photographic scene that lacks new way s of representing a well visited and thoroughly described territory. For hi s first personal exhibit in France\, this photographic Denis Hopper present s a group of photographs published last year in the already sold-out Twin P alms&rsquo\; A Period of Juvenile Prosperity. Considering the success of hi s American exhibitions over the past two years\, the Filles du Calvaire gal lery teamed with the New-Yorker Yossi Milo to pick a substantial amount of those already rare photographs.

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It do es not imply the Polaroid pictures Mike Brodie started with in 2004\, when he found on the backseat of a car an old forgotten camera. This format\, th at gave him his name\, is the one with which he signed the tags he left alo ng his journeys\, on walls\, following railroad-tracks&rsquo\; wanderings a nd encounters. It was in 2006 that he made the standard negatives (35 mm) h is own while being confronted with the 46 American states and the 50 000 mi les he walked across. In a sort of compulsive road movie\, this series foll ows the steps of &lsquo\;&rsquo\;train hoppers&rsquo\;&rsquo\;\, youngsters from the American suburbs who took the habit of hacking trains\, jumping f rom one to the other\, travelling laid down in wagons or with their noses t o the wind\, sitting on piles of paper\, lulled by the acre sun of the prai ries and American steppes.

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From those images\, one keeps in mind friendly gazes of unknown faces\, that soon bec ome dearer to us\, of the almost punk-tough\, often grunge violence of the American sub-culture\, still dusty from the emanations of the air blown by the trains that carry them away. Like voyeurs\, we are sitting among this y outh\, with eyes maybe a little too close\, the nose drawn into its sweat a nd blood\, onto those vagabond faces that remind us of the hobos&rsquo\; po verty during the Great Depression. The poverty of those who used trains as means of communication and transport for economical reasons&hellip\; Here\, we are caught by their untamed wildness\, one that bears a sense of comple te freedom\, of not knowing boundaries\, and that seems to be exactly what Mike Brodie translates for us into images.

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Valentine Umansky

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N&eac ute\; en Arizona\, Mike Brodie arpente le territoire amé\;ricain\, no us livrant des images brutes -choquantes parfois\, surprenantes toujours- d e ces quatre anné\;es de voyages\, de trains en trains\, de rencontre s en dé\;couvertes. Travaillant masqué\;\, sous couvert de pseu donyme\, l&rsquo\;amateur est tout d&rsquo\;abord le «\; Polaroid Kidd »\;\, le minuscule polaroï\;d\, l&rsquo\;enfant du petit format. Enfant car c&rsquo\;est à\; dix-sept ans seulement qu&rsquo\;il se la nce sur les routes et les rails\, en 2002\, avec quelques effets personnels pour un simple petit voyage&hellip\; Qui s&rsquo\;avé\;ra durer quel ques jours à\; la suite desquels il partit cette fois discrè\;t ement pour un plus long voyage&hellip\; La pudeur de ce surnom ne dit pourt ant pas l&rsquo\;effet saisissant que ces photographies dessinant l&rsquo\; Amé\;rique ont encore sur un monde photographique en mal de repr&eacu te\;sentations novatrices de ce territoire dé\;jà\; tant visit& eacute\; et si bien dé\;crit. Pour la premiè\;re exposition per sonnelle en France\, ce Denis Hopper photographique pré\;sente un ens emble de photographies\, issues d&rsquo\;A Period of Juvenile Prosperity\, titre de l&rsquo\;ouvrage publié\; par Twin Palms l&rsquo\;anné \;e derniè\;re et dé\;jà\; é\;puisé\;. Face a u succè\;s de ses expositions amé\;ricaines ces deux derni&egra ve\;res anné\;es\, la galerie Les filles du calvaire s&rsquo\;est all ié\;e à\; la galerie Yossi Milo de New York afin de pré\; senter une sé\;lection consé\;quente de ces images dé\;j& agrave\; rares.

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Il ne s&rsquo\;agira pas des Polaroids avec lesquels Mike Brodie a dé\;buté\; son tr ajet photographique\, en 2004\, lorsqu&rsquo\;il trouve sur un siè\;g e arriè\;re de voiture un vieil appareil oublié\;. Ce format\, qui lui valut son surnom\, est celui avec lequel il signa les tags laiss&ea cute\;s sur son passage\, au gré\; des errances ferroviaires et des r encontres. Il recourt cependant au standard du né\;gatif 35 mm d&egra ve\;s 2006\, se heurtant aux 46 é\;tats amé\;ricains et aux 50 000 miles qui les sillonnent. Sorte de road movie compulsif\, cette s&eacut e\;rie suit de prè\;s les «\; train hoppers »\;\, ces jeune s de banlieues amé\;ricaines qui ont pour habitude de hacker les trai ns\, sautant de l&rsquo\;un à\; l&rsquo\;autre\, voyageant couch&eacu te\;s dans les wagons ou le nez au vent\, assis sur des piles de papier\, b ercé\;s par le soleil â\;pre des plaines et steppes é\;tat s-uniennes.

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De ces images\, on garde en mé\;moire les regards d&rsquo\;amis\, d&rsquo\;inconnus devenus de s proches\, de la violence de la sub-culture amé\;ricaine\, presque p unk par sa dureté\;\, souvent grunge\, encore poussié\;reuse de s é\;manations de l&rsquo\;air soulevé\; par les trains qui la vé\;hicule. Voyeurs\, nous sommes assis parmi cette jeunesse\, avec u n regard presque trop proche\, le nez collé\; à\; la sueur\, au sang\, aux visages de ces vagabonds qui nous rappellent la pauvreté\ ; des hobos qui\, lors de la Grande Dé\;pression\, utilisaient ces mo yens de transports pour des raisons é\;conomiques. On regarde aussi l eur folie sauvage\, quelque chose d&rsquo\;extrê\;mement libre\, qui n e connaî\;t pas de frontiè\;res et qui est pré\;cisé \;ment ce que Mike Brodie traduit en images.

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Valentine Umansky

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DTEND:20141130 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141031 GEO:48.86282;2.3660338 LOCATION:Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire\,17 rue des Filles du Calvaire \nPa ris\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:A Period of Juvenile Prosperity\, Mike Brodie UID:361019 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20141030T200000 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141030T180000 GEO:48.86282;2.3660338 LOCATION:Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire\,17 rue des Filles du Calvaire \nPa ris\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:A Period of Juvenile Prosperity\, Mike Brodie UID:361020 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20141223 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141108 GEO:48.8637746;2.3586505 LOCATION:Galerie Eric Dupont\,138\, rue du Temple \nParis\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Ligne de Mire\, Mathieu Pernot UID:361018 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Les Mayas de l&rsquo\;é\ ;poque pré\;hispanique\, cré\;ateurs d&rsquo\;une civil isation fascinante\, ont laissé\; à\; la posté\; rité\; des dizaines de cité\;s ré\;vé\;lant une architecture remarquable\, une sculpture d&rsquo\;une grande perfection technique\, de nombreuses fresques\, des constr uctions\, des vases de cé\;ramique et un registre dé\;taill&eac ute\; de leurs croyances religieuses\, de leurs rituels\, de leur vie en co mmunauté\;\, de leurs habitudes et de leur histoire.

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Cette exposition permet d&rsquo\;appré\;cier le legs des Mayas à\; l&rsquo\;humanité\;. Suiva nt un ordre thé\;matique &ndash\; le rapport à\; la nature\, le pouvoir des cité\;s\, les rites funé\;raires -\, elle donne &a grave\; voir les divers aspects de cette culture ainsi que son gé\;ni e cré\;atif. L&rsquo\;exposition cherche à\; la fois à\; dresser un panorama gé\;né\;ral et à\; montrer la vari&ea cute\;té\; des styles et les ré\;ussites esthé\;tiques de s diffé\;rents groupes mayas\, chacun d&rsquo\;eux avec sa propre lan gue et sa propre expressivité\;.

DTEND:20150208 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141007 GEO:48.861899;2.297441 LOCATION:Musée du Quai Branly\,37\, quai Branly \nParis \, 75007 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Mayas: Révélation d'un temps sans fin UID:361016 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20141015 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20140831 GEO:48.8644515;2.3643435 LOCATION:Galerie Bernard Jordan - Paris\,77 rue Charlot \nParis\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Les Nudistes\, Nina Childress UID:361015 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

American photographer David La Chapelle is returning to Galerie Daniel Templon with a striking exhibition centring on industrial landscapes. Known internationally f or his fashion images and celebrity portraits\, the artist has decided to p ut the light on his artistic and experimental practice. The LAND SCAPE series is based on hand-crafted scal e models and explores the notion of landscape while raising questi ons about the environmental risks of the modern-day world.

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His stunning Refineries\, < strong>temples to oil drenched in saturated colours\, paint an ind irect portrait of a society facing the challenges caused by its consumption -obsessed lifestyle. The underside of these magica l settings &ndash\; made up of fossil fuel \; by-products such as curlers\, cans and plastic objects - offers an apocalyptic vision of a system marked by the insatiability of its needs.

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His Gas Stations nest le in lush vegetation\, conjuring up the romantic spectacle of human architecture in the process of being swallowed up. The deliberat e fragility of their cardboard structures\, their isolation and their other worldly glow all bring to mind the end of a civilisation.< /p>\n

David LaChapelle puts his mastery of composition and lighting to use as he combines popular culture with art his tory references to create a fascinating allegory of today& rsquo\;s world. \;

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David LaChapel le is one of the most widely published photographers of the last two decade s. He has been focusing on the artistic aspect of his work since 2006. Over the last few years\, his work has been displayed in numer ous solo exhibitions\, including at the Barbican Museum in London (2002)\, Palazzo Reale in Milan (2007)\, Musé\;e de La M onnaie in Paris (2009) and Tel Aviv Museum of Art in Israel ( 2010)\, which named him artist of the year in 2011. His work has also been the subject of a number of major retrospectives\, at the Museum of Cont emporary Art Taipei (2010)\, Hangaram Museum in Korea (2012)\ , Galerie Rudolfinum in Prague (2011/2012) and Fotografiska Museet in Stockholm (2012). In 2014\, he took part in the Masculin-Masculin \;exhibition at the Musé\;e d&rsquo\;Orsay in Paris. His work features in a number of international collections at art institutions incl uding the Los Angeles County Museum of Art\, National Portrait Gallery< /em> in London and National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

DTEND:20141223 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141030 GEO:48.8620151;2.3540422 LOCATION:Galerie Daniel Templon\,30\, rue Beaubourg \nParis\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Land Scape\, David LaChapelle UID:361011 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20141030T203000 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141030T170000 GEO:48.8620151;2.3540422 LOCATION:Galerie Daniel Templon\,30\, rue Beaubourg \nParis\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Land Scape\, David LaChapelle UID:361012 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Il n&rsquo\;est pas insens&eac ute\; de penser que les roches au cours de leur formation aient pu enregist rer des images des temps gé\;ologiques\, et qu&rsquo\;il devrait donc ê\;tre possible de les retrouver.

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Telle est la recherche de Daniel Schlier face à\; l&rsquo\;é \;nigme d&rsquo\;un noir de Carrare\, d&rsquo\;une labradorite australe\, d &rsquo\;un portofino et d&rsquo\;un rose de Norvè\;ge.

DTEND:20141122 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141018 GEO:48.8629251;2.3560147 LOCATION:Galerie Jean Brolly\,16 rue Montmorency \nParis\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Faire germer les pierres\, Daniel Schlier UID:360958 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20141018T200000 DTSTAMP:20141020T083520 DTSTART:20141018T140000 GEO:48.8629251;2.3560147 LOCATION:Galerie Jean Brolly\,16 rue Montmorency \nParis\, 75003 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Faire germer les pierres\, Daniel Schlier UID:360959 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR