ArtSlant - Contemporary Art Network http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Feels Like Home: Andres Guerrero Opens His Home as Art Gallery <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">In a residential neighborhood on a particularly sunny day in Bayview, you wouldn&rsquo;t suspect that 1401 Thomas Ave was hosting an art opening. The one telltale sign: a bouncer at the door who asks for your name before you walk in. As he marks your name off, you walk up a staircase and find yourself in what looks like someone&rsquo;s home.</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">In fact, the space belongs to Andres Guerrero and he&rsquo;s invited quite a few art lovers to walk through his rooms. The space definitely feels like a home&mdash;on a wall near works by Cleon Peterson, you can spot a framed photo of Andres with two people who look like his parents. In one room, he sits in his office while his sister walks in with a little boy in her arms. The whole space feels welcoming even while at first it might seem strange to walk through bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room to see art. Guests take photos not only of the art but the city views from some of the home&rsquo;s corners. People relax on couches in the living room and browse the price list that sits on a coffee table across from a record player. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140728173250-GuerreroInstall_V5.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: x-small;">Installation view; &copy; Photo by R.D.</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">The gallery&rsquo;s current show &ldquo;At Home With&hellip;&rdquo; brings together an eclectic group of artists. It includes work from Victor Reyes, Cleon Peterson, Ken Davis, Shepard Fairey, Ben Venom, Richard Colman and more. The works span mediums from sculpture and painting to wool. Displaying these in a home lends an interesting twist&mdash;four silkscreen and mixed media collage pieces by Shepard Fairey, for example, feel like they belong right where they hang over Andres&rsquo; record player. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">While some of the works stick to the artists&rsquo; usual themes, some of them comment on creating a sense of home and the things we do in private. Erin M. Riley&rsquo;s wool and cotton <em>Nudes 16</em> perfectly depicts the selfie phenomena. A girl holds up her phone as she shows off her body in a tight dress; in the background you can spot her laundry hamper and messily made bed. Rendered in wool and cotton, the piece feels like a paradox: Riley depicts a modern technological habit through a craft that dates back to a time before smartphones. A shiny metal work by Steve Powers shows what looks like a pillow emblazoned with the words "Home at Last." Most of the attendees of that night could relate to that unique sentiment of finally arriving within that space they call their own; this artwork will eventually find another home besides that of Andres. Yet this piece, like many others, brings up the question of what exactly "home" means.</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140728173418-Cleon_Peterson__Brinksman__Red___Acrylic_on_wood__9.5in_x_12.5in__2014._2_000.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Cleon Peterson</strong>, <em>Brinksman (Red),</em> Acrylic on wood, 9.5in x 12.5in, 2014; Courtesy of Cleon Peterson and Guerrero Gallery</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">In the meantime, the people mingling around the space seemed to feel quite at home. Other works&mdash;like an Andrew Schoultz piece in his distinct style&mdash;didn&rsquo;t appear on the price list, perhaps actually belonging in this space as their permanent home. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Andres explained that he wanted to bring an art scene back to the Bayview area and chose to open up his home to display art. It&rsquo;s a concept that many San Francisco artists are adopting as they deal with rising rents. If art shows can&rsquo;t happen in a gallery, there&rsquo;s no reason not to stage them somewhere else. Artist evictions and redevelopment will continue to alter the artistic landscape of the city. But Guerrero Gallery proves that one positive result is seeing art in alternative spaces. The gallery isn&rsquo;t the first or last of these spaces but it definitely proves that a home can serve as a gallery and a gallery can feel like home. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Eva Recinos</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: Installation view;&copy; Photo by R.D.)</span></p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:32:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Myth of Solid Ground <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Right now, my favorite London-based fashion blogger, Susie Bubble, is on holiday in Santa Monica. &ldquo;Is it Blackpool? Great Yarmouth? No it's Santa Monica,&rdquo; she writes.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Right now, my best friend&rsquo;s plane takes off from Burbank&rsquo;s Bob Hope Airport en route to Poland by way of Israel.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Right now, Lana Del Rey&rsquo;s &ldquo;Summertime Sadness&rdquo; repeats in my ear buds.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Right now, I&rsquo;m writing from a balcony overlooking a rocky jetty in the Pacific Ocean where on July 6th a lifeguard named Ben swam out to save a swimmer and broke his neck. The swimmer survived. In one way or another, we are all "here."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> Los Angeles is where you need it to be.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Right now: Sarah Conaway, Pearl C. Hsiung, Kim Fisher, Shana Lutker, Florian Morlat, Jon Pestoni, Mungo Thomson, and Mary Weatherford are all in <em>The Outlanders</em>, an inaugural group exhibition on view at The Pit in Glendale. Right now, The Pit is one of a crop of artist-run galleries speckling your Google Maps view of the Greater Los Angeles Area, along and around San Fernando Road.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>The Outlanders</em> is an exhibition that aspires to reckon with L.A. haze, suggesting &ldquo;&hellip;the artists in The Outlanders make work with aesthetic references and influences that are part of L.A.&rsquo;s history, geography, and reputation.&rdquo; Ultimately, the formal resonances bounce around the gallery and into the limited edition Outlanders zine with white light prism rainbow leaks, lead feet, clumped color, and soft songs. With artful echos and harmonies, I am compelled to sing: L.A., "baby you&rsquo;re the best."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140728083542-l.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Pearl C. Hsiung</strong>, Still from <em>The Softest Thing</em>, 2012; Courtesy of the artist and The Pit</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Feeling something in the air, Pearl C. Hsiung presents <em>The&nbsp;</em><em>Softest Thing</em>&nbsp;(2012), a single channel "driving video," otherwise known as a series of banal hypno-dissolves with a fixed horizon. From the windshield appear distant real-life rainbows. There are animated fat white raindrops and a vignette with a rain creature singing softly to the viewer. Calming, soporific, and medicating.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Shana Lutker&rsquo;s five-footed sculpture <em>Entr&rsquo;acte</em>&nbsp;(2014) gracefully affronts Richard Serra&rsquo;s slung and poured lead. <em>Entr&rsquo;acte</em>&rsquo;s five heavy metal feet signify bones shifted to stand <em>en pointe</em>. Nobody walks in L.A. These bisected figures turn in the mind unlike memory, but like driving in L.A. The toe touch leaves rushing and halting impressions. <em>Entr&rsquo;acte</em> is an impression presupposing memory.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> When bodies couple, their hot skins change color, roughnesses and fluids exchange. All this and touch drag across Jon Pestoni&rsquo;s <em>Terminal Love</em>&nbsp;(2014), where faded pink and deep bleak blue organize a figure/ground situation, finished-off with two thick transparent white bass clefs. There&rsquo;s an elegy scale embedded in <em>Terminal Love</em>&rsquo;s littered surface&mdash;a surface that grabs colors, pushing underpainting off the mixed media panel. Right now, the moon is pulling oil soaked, rainbowed tides.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140728083745-k.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Kim Fisher and Shana Lutker</strong>, Installation shot; Courtesy of the artist and The Pit</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The Los Angeles horizon winks between banks of fog and smog. In L.A. presence is free-range and presence flows. Furthermore, in the context of art exhibitions, group show dynamics often addle one&rsquo;s sense of an edge or boundary. For a gallery to declare its inaugural exhibition as &ldquo;part of L.A.,&rdquo; is nothing short of ambitious. Go feel it, rubber-meets-road at The Pit.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Right now Susie Bubble complains about the cold Pacific Ocean on Instagram, my best friend jetlags, that &ldquo;Summertime Sadness&rdquo; plays on, Ben the drowned lifeguard is survived by a swimmer, and the artists of <em>The Outlanders</em> all pass through the myth of solid ground, beneath a single thick blanket of looming marine layer haze.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #cc00cc;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/364194-chelsea-rector?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #cc00cc;">Chelsea Rector</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Jon Pestoni,</strong> <em>Terminal Love, </em>2014 , oil and mixed media; Courtesy of the artist and The Pit)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:03:26 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Final Days: Oceanic <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">The latest intermittent gallery to tap into London&rsquo;s burgeoning commercialised urban scene is the initiative of a self-styled Parisian power couple who also run the somewhat controversial Street Art News. Oceanic is a two artist show of works by Askew One and Fintan Magee, both originally from Australasia, and the characteristics of the Pacific region are the connecting premise for this new week long show. New works, an editioned collaborative print and new murals are on show inside a beautiful space in the heart of the East End (where else).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">(Image on top: Courtesy RexRomae)</span></p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:08:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Last Day: Thésis, Jesús Benítez <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">A woman stands nonchalantly amongst creatures that look like a crocodile with giant teeth and a grasshopper with two heads. The other critters around her are less easily explained. One stands on its hind legs and seems to sport a flower with one eye as a head. This is the world of Mexican illustrator and muralist Jes&uacute;s Ben&iacute;tez. Taking inspiration from science fiction &mdash;&nbsp;and the work of Moebius and Roger Dean &mdash; Ben&iacute;tez crafts scenes that explore the possibilities of a strange future. In this new world, all boundaries are broken down within humanity, technology and nature. &ldquo;Th&eacute;sis&rdquo; is the artist&rsquo;s first solo show in North America and showcases the artist&rsquo;s strange vision. Ben&iacute;tez works in everything from painting to sculptures to murals. No matter the medium, the artist&rsquo;s dystopian visions are thrilling yet disconcerting. If the future is anything like Ben&iacute;tez creates it, it will look imaginatively created even while it feels dangerous and mysterious.</span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">For any inquiries, email </span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="mailto:gallery@fifty24sf.com">gallery@fifty24sf.com</a></span><span style="color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140726171648-luxury.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140726171716-tumblr_mqphy6aiwr1qevluqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140726171736-tumblr_mqw1hhbOa51qevluqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Eva Recinos</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(All images:<strong> Jes&uacute;s Ben&iacute;tez</strong>; Courtesy of the Artist and FIFTY24SF Gallery)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Sat, 26 Jul 2014 17:32:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Altar of Electronic Art <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Following the glamorous opening of <em>The Altar of Bling</em> in May, island6, the cutting edge Shanghai-based artist collective, is currently showing a hypnotic collection of electronic art from the archives in their cozy Hong Kong gallery space. A mix of several recent shows, the exhibition includes interactive installations, mixed media, and framed LED panels&mdash;the only thing missing is a sofa on which to curl up and observe.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The collaborative group bills itself as a &ldquo;collective of tech-geeks and creative talents&rdquo; from all over the world. Since its creation in 2006, Liu Dao 六岛 (the Chinese translation for island6) has been engaged in mastering the production of all forms of art with a technological twist, brainstorming with everyone from electricians and photographers, to art directors and painters in their Shanghai studio. With owned galleries in Phuket, Hong Kong, and three in Shanghai, the group boasts representation in Beijing, New York, New Zealand, Australia, and Singapore. One can begin to see parallels with world domination.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140726165931-TheRedChamber.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Liu Dao Art Collective 六岛</strong>, <em>"The Red Chamber" (红房子)</em>, Made in island6, Shanghai 2013, Acrylic painting, LED display, paper collage, teakwood frame, 108(W)&times;108(H)&times;9(D) cm | 42.5(W)&times;42.5(H)&times;3.5(D) inches; Courtesy island6</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Upon entering the gallery, visitors are met with <em>The Red Chamber </em>(2013), a beautifully detailed painting of an oriental vase on rice paper. Springing to life, bright neon butterflies dance across the work via an LED screen hidden in the custom teakwood frame. Mesmerizing is perhaps too weak an adjective.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In keeping with the acrylic and video blend, the collective has also produced a series of luxury vintage cars painted, again on beautiful rice paper, with the windows as the screen. The scene inside depicts an old school vibe with a cheeky flick of the nonchalant drivers. (<em>Talbot Lago Coco</em>, Liu Dao, 2014)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Perhaps the biggest crowd pleasers are the interactive videos, which feature actors with their phone numbers scribbled across the screen. <em>It Girl </em>(2012) encourages viewers to call, which prompts the phone to ring in the video. Soon a text message is received, and depending on the character&rsquo;s preprogrammed mood (and yours), the subject can range from saucy to sweet. Just be sure to delete it before your significant other gets a hold of your phone.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140726170223-ItGirl.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Liu Dao Art Collective 六岛</strong>, <em>"It Girl" (智能女孩),</em> Made in island6, Shanghai 2012, LCD screen, GSM module, Apple PC desktop, serial server, flash interface, 116(W)&times;71(H)&times;9.5(D) cm | 45.7(W)&times;28(H)&times;3.4(D) inches; Courtesy island6</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">One last installation of note, <em>Knock Knock</em> (2012), is an antique style mirror, which features a hidden motion sensor. Step close and&hellip; well, you&rsquo;ll have to find out for yourself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">These entertaining works are a welcome addition to a scene in Hong Kong that often feels dominated by traditional and <em>new traditional</em> Chinese art mixed with imported Western art. Most recent local exhibitions of Chinese art lack a new voice. They miss the mark as a true representation of a region in the world that is moving fast into the future, at the forefront of investment with a hunger for all things new and bold. It&rsquo;s nice to see something that shows off the creative power that can come from China.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Having a show dedicated to an art form like electronic art or video, something not yet totally embraced by the majority of collectors, is brave but almost expected. Especially in a city known for her beloved neon signs, who also dedicates a large budget to the love of electronic displays. (There is a nightly public light show with skyscrapers as characters set to music.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It&rsquo;s clear this group thrives on creating something that is not only meant to be loved, but worshipped. Fit for a congregation&rsquo;s attention, the collection is a futuristic mix of new media and classic techniques that allows the viewer to fall in love with modern art again, while confirming a new found faith in emerging and experimental art forms.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">True to style, the current show has no end date and will be up until the next collection of art is completed in Shanghai. And if you visit&mdash;run, don&rsquo;t walk&mdash;be sure to read the info cards placed next to each work. It&rsquo;s a show in itself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Note: In addition to the works mentioned above, more from island6 can be seen at Hong Kong&rsquo;s outpost of Opera Gallery:</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Opera Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">G/F - 3/F, W Place, 52 Wyndham St</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Central, Hong Kong</span><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> Telephone: +852 2810 1208</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #daa520;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/359091-peter-augustus?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #daa520;">Peter Augustus</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top:<strong> Liu Dao Art Collective 六岛,</strong> "<em>Silver Shadow" (银影)</em>, Made in island6, Shanghai 2014, TFT display, acrylic painting, teakwood frame, 67(W)&times;48(H)&times;7(D) cm | 26.4(W)&times;19(H)&times;2.8(D) inches; Courtesy island6]</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:53:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Being a bit too breezy about the sky <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Compiling an attractive and wholesome summer exhibition: it&rsquo;s an art form in itself. During the cultural low season, when the regular audience has migrated to southern European beaches, museums hoping to maintain healthy visitor statistics choose to cater to tourists, staycationists, and day-trippers. And that requires a special type of show. Of course, the fun factor is to be reckoned with; the subject should not be too highbrow and</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">instead</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;have a broad, preferably universal appeal. Some </span><em style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">couleur locale</em><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">, however, is an indispensable pull factor lending some urgency to visit this location&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">specifically.</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;And in times of fierce competition with other leisure activities, the quality of what&rsquo;s on show has to be top grade.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">De Hallen in Haarlem has quite a lot of experience with dog day exhibitions. This year marks the eighth time the museum has organized a large summer show. The 2014 edition is entitled <em>Lucht! (Sky!)</em> and&mdash;at first sight, at least&mdash;seems to be absolutely spot on. The subject, how artists during roughly a century and a half have represented the sky, has an immediate appeal and is Dutch to the extreme. Ever since the painters of the Golden Age started depicting altocumulus humilis and stratus nebulosus, the firmament has been a constant factor in Dutch art. Moreover, the artist credited with &ldquo;inventing&rdquo; the genre of landscapes with lots of sky, Jacob van Ruisdael, was born in Haarlem.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140724052330-2.Leickert_Winterlandschap.jpg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Charles Leickert, </strong><em>Winterlandschap bij ondergaande zon</em>, ca. 1849, Oil on panel; Collection Simonis &amp; Buunk, Ede</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Lucht!</em> does not go back all the way to the seventeenth century, so as not to become an exhibition of genre painting. The starting point is 1850, around the time paint in tubes came onto the market enabling artists to take their easels out into the fields and paint the sky while standing right underneath it. Among those working plein air were the likes of J. H. Weissenbruch and Jacob Maris, important representatives of the Haagse School whose windmills and small harbors with fishing boats are etched into the national soul. The same goes for Willem Roelofs&rsquo; pastoral landscapes with cows or Charles Leickert&rsquo;s winter scenes. Andreas Schelfhout with his romantic style and eye for detail can be seen as a direct descendent of Ruisdael&rsquo;s.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">These nineteenth century works are offset by and juxtaposed to art from all decades of the twentieth century and later. The exhibition jumps from Leo Gestel&rsquo;s impressionistically influenced <em>Herfst</em> (1909) via Pyke Koch&rsquo;s magical realism, Gerrit Benner&rsquo;s cocky neo-expressionism, and Marinus Boezem&rsquo;s conceptualist attempts to document the heavens in lead boxes or satellite images, to contemporary contributions such as Carla Klein&rsquo;s paintings, a video by Guido van der Werve and the internet-injected art of Floris Kaayk and Anne de Vries. Some work is quite cerebral&mdash;Jan Andriesse&rsquo;s <em>Primary Rainbow</em>, for example, which tries to capture light in a monochrome white painting&mdash;but there is also humor&mdash;John K&ouml;rmeling&rsquo;s polystyrene cloud with a hole in it and a spotlight shining on a doll in a deckchair never fails to bring a smile to faces.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">All media are represented. The roster of names has a respectable ring to it. And it&rsquo;s not as if De Hallen approached this exhibition as a glorified reshuffle of its own collection; for <em>Lucht!</em> a lot of works were loaned from private collections and other museums. This exhibition, in other words, pretty much ticks all the boxes for the perfect summer show. Except for one thing: the curators forgot to tell a story.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Instead of a chronological set-up, which could have yielded some insight in the historical development of skyscapes but which would probably not appeal to a larger audience, a thematic approach has been opted for. Nothing wrong with that, but in this case the idea of a theme is defined in a rather narrow and formalistic way. Basically all works dealing with horizons are stuck together, rainbows go with rainbows, there&rsquo;s a room dedicated to clouds, et cetera, et cetera. At first the resulting clash of eras, styles, and schools is refreshing and exciting but quite soon the novelty wears off and you&rsquo;re left with an empty shell of an exhibition. The only statement this large-scale show makes is: look how often the sky has been depicted in all kinds of art. It doesn&rsquo;t ponder the question why the sky is such a popular theme. Nor why it&rsquo;s popular specifically in the Netherlands.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">An answer to the latter question could be that we live in an unusually flat country offering grand vistas. The sky is a constant in every Dutchman&rsquo;s life. It is also the only part of the physical realm which is absolutely free and beyond human control&mdash;a rather appealing notion for artists living in one of the most densely populated and regulated countries in the world, I&rsquo;d reckon. Some have tried to colonize or conquer the sky, like Elspeth Diederix, who photographed a cluster of plastic bags in the shape of a cloud, or Fiona Tan, who got lifted off the ground by a large bunch of balloons, but everybody knows these attempts are fantastic or absurd and therefore on the edge of reality, the realm where art flourishes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140724052446-8.Werve-Nummer_negen.jpg" alt="" /><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Guido van der Werve, </strong><em>Nummer negen, The day I didn't turn with the world</em>, 2007<strong>, </strong>HD video on Mac mini, 9 minutes<strong>; </strong>Frans Hals Museum | De Hallen Haarlem; Courtesy the artist and Galerie Juli&egrave;tte Jongma, Amsterdam</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For a number of artists in <em>Lucht!</em> the sky acts as a kind of mirror of ideas or emotions. Romantics such as Maris considered the dramatically grey skies over meadows and sea as reflections of the soul. For an expressionist like Quirijn van Tiel, who in 1943 painted a wonderful landscape crowned with a blazing storm of orange and black, the firmament expresses the horrors of World War II. And for a younger generation the translation of earthly mishaps into celestial forms is even more direct; Raquel Maulwurf, for example, depicts the deadly clouds resulting from nuclear tests near the Russian town of Semipalatinsk.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The only section of <em>Lucht!</em> achieving some kind of an extra layer is the room dealing with horizons. In the paintings of JCJ Vanderheyden, Jan Dibbets&rsquo; serialized pictures, and Wout Berger&rsquo;s large photos of the IJsselmeer where the water at some undetectable point merges with air, the elusive nature of the sky comes to the fore. The horizon is a border that can never be reached, an ever-shifting framework to our existence. But as soon as this mystery is touched upon, the curators shift back to their easy categorization. In the case of individual works the captions sometimes dig a little deeper, but as a whole the exhibition lacks a conceptual backbone. <em>Lucht!</em> brings together a collection of great works, but that does not automatically make this a great exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS">Edo Dijksterhuis</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Leo Gestel</strong>, <em>Herfst</em>, 1909, Oil on canvas; Kranenburgh, Bergen N.H.; Photo: Arend Velsink)</span></p> Thu, 24 Jul 2014 23:29:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Field Notes Aesthetic: Heidi Norton at the Elmhurst Art Museum <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Mies van der Rohe is such an historic presence. The aftershock of his innovation is still palpable, reflecting as it does the evolution of an &ldquo;<span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3dpzWuhDI4"><span style="color: #5f0bf3;">international style after World War II</span></a></span>.&rdquo; It is hard to imagine, therefore, how one might absorb his architecture into daily life&mdash;much less install an exhibition under one of his roofs. That is the challenge posed by the <span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><a href="http://www.elmhurstartmuseum.org"><span style="color: #5f0bf3;">Elmhurst Art Museum</span></a></span>, an institution that purchased van der Rohe&rsquo;s prototype for suburban life, the McCormick House, in 1992. Chicago-based artist Heidi Norton rises to that challenge. Like a plant slowly stretching across a perfectly manicured wall, her solo show, <em>Prismatic Nature,</em> transforms the museum with increasing intensity. Norton not only grows into and through McCormick House, but revises van der Rohe&rsquo;s utopic vision while doing so. In the hybrid space that emerges, she emphasizes institutional and personal collaboration, using organic forms that soften Modernist and New Age tropes, presenting a map of her own aesthetic ideals in the process.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">To create the design of the house, van der Rohe transformed one vertical strip of windows from his iconic 860 Lake Shore Drive skyscraper into a modern, horizontal bungalow. Although the single family home was conceived as an alternative to tract houses constructed in Levittown&mdash;its own utopian vision for post-war suburban life&mdash;the McCormick house remains unique; one of only three houses that van der Rohe built in the US, it never caught on. When the museum purchased the home, it was disassembled, and paraded down the streets of Elmhurst to 150 Cottage Ave., where it was reassembled, and modified, becoming the Elmhurst Art Museum of today.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140724050455-o.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Heidi Norton,</strong> <em>Prismatic Nature</em>, McCormick House detail, Elmhurst Art Museum, 2014; Photo by Jim Prinz</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Perhaps the first instinct an artist would have when addressing such a sleek, modular structure would be to overwhelm each and every cranny with signs of personal affect. This is not Norton&rsquo;s tact, however. At least not in the beginning. Instead, she emphasizes van der Rohe&rsquo;s own mission to integrate interior and exterior architectures, applying a series of glass screens on the windows of the Hostetler Gallery, the main exhibition space within the museum. Strangely sentimental, these site-specific tableaux filter light inside and outside of the otherwise empty space with plant life, textual quotation, photographs, stones, rocks, and resin. Van der Rohe floor plans, protruding nails, swaths of dirt, or foxed old notes written by her father about what books to read to best live off the land, are collaged together in a myriad of color, with rippling textures. The sculptures stand like semi-transparent pages of a field diary, inserting a subjective presence that troubles van der Rohe&rsquo;s seemingly objective windows. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In these first impressions of the show Norton bravely emphasizes the space at hand, isolating a theme that will gather force through subsequent galleries: that of seeing through a lens. With so much space inside, one is drawn to the park outdoors, and the camera obscura Norton installed for visitors to inhabit. Three horizontal picture planes hang inside the Hostetler gallery, also compositions of plants. One in the center of the room lies at waist height with plants growing up from piles of earth. Partially obscured by that vegetation, one can just make out blueprints of landscaping intended for the original McCormick house, along with the garden map of a prominent local horticulturalist, Louisa King. The other two horizontal screens are less central, hanging just below the ceiling, with plants fixed upside down. These too are remarkable, however, sharing their own host of images&mdash;a hand pulling fruit, with an elegant diagram overtop. Here the plants grow downward&mdash;as though by some strange magic&mdash;bucking conventional expectations.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Down an adjacent hallway gallery, Norton exhibits three other artists&mdash;Spencer Stucky, Eileen Mueller, and Molly Brandt&mdash;illustrating the reflexive community she works within, and softening the traditionally unified modernist position. <em>Prismatic Nature</em> exposes processes, conversations, and contexts that Norton not only emerges from, but also contributes to. Stucky, Mueller, and Brandt similarly use quotation, via distilled framed photographs that juxtapose plants and architectural sites. A meandering wall drawing of plants creates a secondary hand drawn landscape that travels beneath the frames of the work. Along the opposite length of the hallway, Meuller presents a series of photographs from the infamous Black Mountain College Archive&mdash;another bastion of utopic vision and rare community.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">On the other side of the museum, one enters the McCormick&rsquo;s original living room. Here things begin to really pop. Norton has so fully integrated the project of <em>Prismatic Nature</em>, that it blurs the lines between whatever historic modernist furnishings remain constant and the added plants, books, research notes, and installation elements. The screen motif appears again and again here in different forms: from a stacked series of parallel glass plates reminiscent of scientific slides in a drying rack, to the low-lying coffee-table-esque plinths that present entire books, crystals, and potted plants, to museum vitrines that feature mineral selections from the <span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><a href="http://www.lizzadromuseum.org/"><span style="color: #5f0bf3;">Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art</span></a></span>. Further echoing the field notes aesthetic, Norton offers her own artist book co-written with Monica Westin. The publication features loose photographs, a built-in wooden brace for specimen collection, and pages of text including, among other things, how the artist makes her studio, and the once-vernacular language of flowers.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140724050556-oo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Heidi Norton,</strong> <em>Prismatic Nature, </em>McCormick House detail, Elmhurst Art Museum, 2014; Photo by Jim Prinz</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In an interview, Norton states, &ldquo;I am interested in the&nbsp;<span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back-to-the-land_movement"><span style="color: #5f0bf3;">back-to-the-land movement</span></a></span>&nbsp;in the &lsquo;70s, because that is the time period when my parents rejected the notions their parents raised them with&mdash;modern idealism and the perfect 1950s lifestyle. I am especially thinking of this movement and how it relates to the suburbs&mdash;what type of space that is and why it was created.<span style="color: #fb2103;"><a title="" href="#_ftn1"><span style="color: #fb2103;">[1]</span></a></span>&rdquo; The sentiment recalls an Eva Hesse/Sol LeWitt exhibition at the Blanton Art Museum I viewed a few months ago in Austin, Texas. The exhibit, <span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><a href="http://blantonmuseum.org/exhibitions/details/2286"><span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><em>Converging Lines</em></span></a></span><em>,</em> documents the influence the artists had on one another&rsquo;s practice, demonstrating a vivid dialogue between drawings, sculptures, and paintings&mdash;especially the tension between straight lines (LeWitt) and not-straight lines (Hesse). What was most exciting about the show was the evident discourse of its constituents, and the tangibility of its friendship. A similar tangibility emerges here, where Norton effectively expands van der Rohe&rsquo;s vision to integrate exterior and interior spaces: to blur traditional ideas surrounding the individualism of artistic endeavors, and the subjective lenses our communities engender.</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br clear="all" /><hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #fb2103;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1"><span style="color: #fb2103;">[1]</span></a></span> Interview with Heidi Norton, <span style="color: #5f0bf3;"><a href="http://www.insidewithin.com/HeidiNorton.html"><span style="color: #5f0bf3;">Inside/Within</span></a></span>.</span></p> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #48b77b;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/155816-caroline-picard?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #48b77b;">Caroline Picard</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Heidi Norton</strong>, <em>Prismatic Nature</em>, installation view, Hostetler Gallery, Elmhurst Art Museum, 2014; Photo by Jim Prinz)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:39:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Virtual Bodies and Real Hands <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Human sounds of drinking, whispering, laughing, and singing surround the old British Army magazine building of the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. The sounds combine from the three parts of the video work <em>Ribbons</em> (2014), which is the central piece of Ed Atkins&rsquo; solo show. The voices are as mesmerizing and disturbing as the hyper-real 3D animated films they accompany.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">The sound goes out of sync and back again. The three parts of <em>Ribbons</em> are similar and different at the same time. In all three, Dave, the avatar of the young British artist, a virtual bold character, is talking to us&mdash;always wearing his birthday suit. On the one hand, Dave is the perfect man; equipped with a six-pack and hairless skin, he looks like he was generated by one of those computer softwares that combine all the portraits of the world into one average being (although his face is based on the artist&rsquo;s portrait). But he is scary as shit; his HD liveliness becomes uncanny deathiness.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Dave drinks, smokes, and sings, and finally collapses on the bar; his head deflates like an old balloon. His words indeed sound like those of a drunken man. Similar words&mdash;Atkins&rsquo; characteristic language&mdash;feature again in the large drawings that lean against the walls. They look like enlarged pages from a notebook, with its margins covered by scribbles and doodles of what seem like unrecognizable and distorted body parts. The publication accompanying the show, "A Seer Reader," contains similar pages. Resembling long poems in form, and deprived of any narrative or coherent meaning to follow, Atkins&rsquo; words remain an enigma for me. When they are spoken by the artist&rsquo;s visual avatars they are much more communicable and compelling.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140723052437-3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ed Atkins</strong>, 
Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (11 June &ndash; 25 August 2014)
; &copy; 2014 READS</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">In his films, Atkins plays not just with syntax, but also with the form of language. The construct of subtitles is broken down when they appear all over the frame. Centered, bold titles conquer the screen as if they were trailers for blockbuster movies. Words and doodles appear on Dave&rsquo;s perfectly toned virtual skin as well. These are not carefully drawn tattoos, as they were described in various reviews of the show, but rather loosely handwritten words. The difference is crucial.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">In fact, this whole show is a struggle between a flat, linear scribble and a computer-generated 3D shape. In one of the three projections accompanying <em>Ribbons</em>, a different bold head appears, one that will be familiar to some from Atkins&rsquo; previous work <em>Us Dead Talk Love</em>, presented at Chisenhale Gallery last year. The head approaches the screen, looking as if it wants to say something to us, but each time the image fades away and disappears to be replaced by abstract lines, shapes, and drawings, opposed in style to the perfectly animated face.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">The tension between these two aesthetics is present as well in the clever installation of Atkins&rsquo; show. Scattered around the space, almost unnoticed, are small wall sculptures in the shape of strange body parts, colored by hand to achieve a bodily texture of skin. It is not just the body of the artist present here in the shape of his avatar, but also his hand in the shape of his crafts. The projections, like their sound, are a bit out of sync&mdash;their margins deviate from the white coulisses onto which they are projected, resulting in a shape of light on the wall behind them. One of the projections is pierced by a small hole, just like the one Dave is inserting his tongue and genitals into in the film&mdash;but this hole is real, and the shadows of visitors walking behind it intervene with the image.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140723052624-1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ed Atkins</strong>, 
Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (11 June &ndash; 25 August 2014)
; &copy; 2014 READS</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">All of these break the perfect illusion of Atkins&rsquo; virtual world and reveal the tangible&mdash;and vulnerable&mdash;facilities that operate it. This show is not just about the image of the body in the digital age; it is also about the body that produces it, and breaks simultaneously.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373185-keren-goldberg?tab=REVIEWS">Keren Goldberg</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: <strong>Ed Atkins</strong>, 2014, Stills from the three-channel HD video<em> Ribbons</em>; &copy; 2014 Ed Atkins
 / Courtesy of CABINET, London and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin)</span></p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:49:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Miami Marine Stadium Mural Project: Using Street Art for Architectural Change <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">The long abandoned Miami Marine Stadium in Key Biscayne has been a favorite hot spot for local and international street artists since it closed after Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Because of the ever-changing murals, the site has become an unexpected open-air gallery, adding incredible color to the secluded inlet once used for speed boat racing. Recognizing this renewed interest, the city of Miami, along with the Friends of Miami Marine Stadium and the National Trust, are planning to revamp the stadium back into use within five years. But before the stadium is restored and a lush new park is created, the site will be home to the ARTHistory Mural Project, a rotating exhibition of invited street artists, curated by one of their own: stencil artist Logan Hicks. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">The Marine Stadium, which was built by Cuban architect Hilario Candela in 1963 is a very special place for viewing art. Perched directly on the warm waters of Biscayne Bay, the stadium is a place of serenity: small boats and dolphins regularly pass by, the Miami skyline glitters in the background, and the overhanging roof of the stadium casts an unusually cool shade that provides relief from the hot Miami sun. Away from the city, the stadium is like a mirage, splattered with vibrant colors of graffiti artists, murals and tags covering just about every surface in site. These pieces, done by countless graffiti artists, inspired the idea to bring a curated roster of artists to paint together, and become inspired themselves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140723045851-risk-final.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">On June 28<sup>th</sup>, curator Logan Hicks&rsquo; first vision for the inspiring architectural structure took place with a live painting session by nine world-renowned street artists: Doze Green, RONE, Elbow Toe, RISK, Joe Iurato, Ian Kuali&rsquo;i, Abstrakt, Luis Berros and Evoca1. Each artist chose a spot among the massive concrete walls to create a site-specific work over the course of two days, which will be transformed into a line of prints for the ArtHistory Mural Project. The prints sales will directly benefit the revamping of the stadium, and also be on display in a print show at Miami&rsquo;s Gregg Shienbaum Gallery in September. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">Originally from New York, Rock Steady Crew&rsquo;s Doze Green fuses his iconic free-flowing lines, figurative abstraction and ancestral references in his piece with a bold Miami sunset, ocean and shore, which contrasts in solid, simplistic forms. Green&rsquo;s prot&eacute;g&eacute;, Ian Kuali&rsquo;i, translated his years of study under his master into delicate cut paper, creating a mural that is fit for a canvas. Leaving circles of the pieces that were painted before him, Kuali&rsquo;i hand cut two delicate subtractive pieces depicting detailed skulls. Carefully wheatpasted to the concrete wall, the colors from the previous mural are revealed, paying tribute to those who have painted there before. Brooklyn&rsquo;s Elbow Toe created a small render of a figure wading in water, paying tribute to the hurricane that dehabilitated the stadium. RONE was flown in from Melbourne to create one of his photorealistic faces, clad in blue to harmonize with the sea and endless blue sky. Out of LA, RISK continues to push the evolution of graffiti, calling Mark Rothko to mind with his vibrant color fields made with spray paint.&nbsp; Local Miami artist Luis Berro&rsquo;s lush mural pays tribute to the sweet smelling orange trees found all over the region, and local Abstrakt&rsquo;s boldly colored paint-splotched eyes give the stadium a anthropomorphic quality, watching you as you explore her. The third Miami artist, Evoca1, uses delicate chiaroscuro to create a piece symbolizing man versus beast. Stencil artist Joe Iurato created a small mural collaboration of his stenciled figures along with pattern by Logan Hicks, as well as small wooden cut outs of these figures placed around the stadium.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140723045917-rone-final.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">The incredible ARTHistory Mural Project shows the influence that street art has on culture today, holding the power to reawaken interest in a forgotten architectural gem simply by calling attention to its beauty. The murals by Doze Green, RONE, Elbow Toe, RISK, Ian Kuali&rsquo;i, Joe Iurato, Abstrakt, Luis Berros and Evoca1 will remain until September 19<sup>th</sup>, when Ron English, The London Police, Crash, Logan Hicks and Tristan Eaton will return to create a new set of murals.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">Prints of the murals can be found here <a href="http://arthistory2014.com" target="_blank">http://arthistory2014.com</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: medium;">&mdash;Lori Zimmer</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All images: Courtesy of Logan Hicks)</span></p> Wed, 23 Jul 2014 06:30:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In Field and Studio, Florian Maier-Aichen Charts Murky Terrain <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Florian Maier-Aichen&rsquo;s recent show at 303 Gallery&mdash;his fourth to date&mdash;splits into two distinct sets of photographs. One series is landscape oriented; the other is markedly abstract. Almost all of the photographs are printed on a large scale, the average size being roughly equivalent to the face of a vending machine. This may be the primary characteristic of these works; because they are large&mdash;and from a distance appear full of detail&mdash;one is naturally compelled to look closer, to inspect the surface as if tracing a road on a map. But that view is undermined by the artist. Instead his photographs function something like pointillist paintings: the details dissolve at near range.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">There are seven works in the show and they incorporate a mix of photographic processes. Maier-Aichen&rsquo;s three landscape photographs each utilize a different technique and depict radically disparate topographies from aerial perspectives. Consequentially they play off one another well and are more successful as a whole than any of them are on their own.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The artist shot the sprawling city of L.A., from its mountain range to its shoreline, with a filter that washed the city in shades of dull red. In stark contrast, <em>Untitled (Andermatt)</em>&nbsp;(2014) was photographed using the tri-color system in which cyan, magenta, and yellow filters are placed one by one over the lens as three separate exposures are made on a single frame. The idyllic country landscape of Switzerland and the spread of vibrant hues&mdash;most notably a super lush green&mdash;set this work in diametric opposition to the L.A. image.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140722161940-FMA_287.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Florian Maier-Aichen</strong>,<em> Halbes Bild</em>, 2014, Silver gelatin print, 60 7/8 x 49 1/8 inches (154.6 x 124.8 cm) framed; &copy; Florian Maier-Aichen / Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Neither is as classically alluring as the third landscape, <em>Halbes Bild</em>&nbsp;(2014), which looks like a shot of the moon or Antarctica or any other barren place on the edge of a deep black abyss. Printed as a silver gelatin, the dark half of this image has the bottomless black quality of calm pond water at night. The black is almost blue. However, the traditional character of the work is held in check by a milky splotch that drips down towards the dusty looking landforms. It doesn&rsquo;t pretend to be the light source illuminating the scene&mdash;though it does have a graphic lunar quality&mdash;but rather sits on top of it, adding a second layer and giving the composition an unexpected textural tension.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The show&rsquo;s quartet of abstract photographs is similarly process driven, though less resolved as they attempt to plumb a line between the painterly and the photographic. These works are comprised of two fundamental components: a colored background of horizontal washes that are overlaid with splashes, dribbles, and brush strokes in black and white. With the exception of the smallest work in the show, these pieces do not comfortably cohere. Maier-Aichen&rsquo;s acrylic washes have the horizontal structure but none of the luminosity of a typical Rothko canvas, and his black and white layers sit on the horizontal bands like oil on water. There is almost no integration.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140722162601-FMA_285.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Florian Maier-Aichen</strong>, <em>Untitled</em>, 2014, Dye transfer print, 27 x 20 3/4 inches (69 x 53 cm) image / 37 1/2 x 31 1/4 inches (95.3 x 79.4 cm) framed; &copy; Florian Maier-Aichen / Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">However, one of these works is superb. <em>Untitled</em> (2014) is not only the smallest work in the show, it is also the only dye-transfer print. This type of printing reproduces a much richer textural quality and far greater tonal range than can be found in Maier-Aichen&rsquo;s other abstract pieces, which are all oversized c-prints. Here the colored background takes on the chalky character of well-rubbed pastels and the two overlaid lines&mdash;one black, one white&mdash;curl through the composition like a pair of lazily winding roads. The black line looks like it could have been sprayed on; the white line is a convincing brush stroke in the most carefree style. Nothing about this piece seems generic or forced. For an artist interested in navigating the murky terrain between painting, printing, and photography, this piece represents an apotheosis.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #9400d3;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/5828-charlie-schultz?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #9400d3;">Charlie Schultz</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Florian Maier-Aichen</strong>, <em>Untitled (Andermatt), </em>2014, C-print, 73 x 92 1/4 inches (185.4 x 234.3 cm) framed; &copy; Florian Maier-Aichen / Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York]</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 23 Jul 2014 07:56:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Vice & Virtue: Stolenspace's Summer Show <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Internationally recognisable heavyweights sit alongside new names-to-watch at Stolenspace&rsquo;s Saints &amp; Sinner&rsquo;s-themed group show</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Centring a group show around the seemingly polar opposites of vice and virtue, saints and sinners, the summer group show at Stolenspace near London&rsquo;s Brick Lane area actually makes the point that the two notions: a) come loaded with religious, particularly Catholic, connotations, with Catholic iconography and angelic beings motifs that are repeatedly employed; and b) that, in fact being &nbsp;a saint or a sinner may actually be two sides to the same coin, as explored by Alessia Iannetti's dark and troubled-looking angelic beauty in <em>Just One Kiss</em>, or Asha Zero&rsquo;s <em>GHS</em>, a hand-painted work so finely detailed it looks like a photo collage sticking together human body parts to make up a new whole. Elsewhere in the show, Alex Yanes&rsquo; <em>Desaturated Totem</em> sculpture is a delirious, cartoonish take on the ancient religious imagery, while Beau Stanton&rsquo;s <em>Relic</em> is a darkly comic take on the Catholic saint and martyr portrait style, with the subject a sinister skeleton.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721185738-pixel2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Pixel Pancho</strong>, '<em>Liberum Arbitrium Hominus Mendacium Sine Libertate Donata Fortes Viros' Optio II</em>,&nbsp; Acrylic on wood, 100 x 70 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Saints &amp; Sinners is at Stolenspace gallery until August 3<sup>rd</sup>, and includes work from Broken Fingaz, C215, Charles Krafft, Joram Roukes, Pixel Pancho, Reka, Snik, Sylvia Ji, The London Police, Usugrow and many more.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190047-j.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Vinnie Nylon</strong>, '<em>Smurfette David</em>',&nbsp; Acrylic on marine ply framed in vintage frame, 60 x 45 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190240-o.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Alessia Iannetti</strong>, '<em>Just One Kiss</em>', Graphite, water colour and ink on wood, 30 x 30 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190437-k.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>C215</strong>, '<em>Peace</em>', Stencil and spray paint on canvas, tray framed, 60 x 80 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190607-u.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Curtis Kulig</strong>, '<em>LAFAYETTE LONDON V</em>',&nbsp; Ink on paper, float mounted, box framed, 57 x 75.5 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190721-y.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ryan Callanan</strong>, '<em>Saint Nozzle</em>',&nbsp; Chrome Edition of 5, Framed AP, 42 cm x 54 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190837-uu.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Shida,</strong> '<em>The Succubi Ascend</em>', Acrylic on board, tray framed, 39 x 28 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721190955-ii.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Asha Zero</strong>, <em>'GHX</em>',&nbsp; Acrylic on board,&nbsp; 60 x 45 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140721191109-Kip_assemble_dismantle.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Kip (Broken Fingaz)</strong>, '<em>Assemble/Dismantle</em>', Silkscreen and water colours on paper, framed 51.5 x 42 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Laura Havlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: <strong>Jim Houser</strong>, <em> 'SNT', </em>Acrylic &amp; collage on panel, 20.3 x 20.3 cm; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 22 Jul 2014 05:08:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Settling Unsettled Landscapes: Talking about SITElines <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At the Eldorado Hotel's Agave Lounge, over fabulous margaritas, ArtSlant's editor in chief, Natalie Hegert, met with Santa Fe art critics Hannah Hoel and Lauren Tresp to discuss&nbsp;</span></em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">SITElines<em>, the new SITE Santa Fe biennial</em>&hellip;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Natalie Hegert: A point that I want to talk about is how [<em>SITElines</em>] functions as a model for a biennial. How different is this from another themed exhibition you would encounter in any other museum, versus a biennial? Why does this necessarily need to be considered a biennial? It seems more like an investigation of a certain theme that includes artists from across the Americas. What is interesting about this show or this model that they&rsquo;re trying to put forward is it works as a long-term, intensive research project, which reminds me of the program of this one space in Utrecht called BAK, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/venues/show/19114-bak-basis-voor-actuele-kunst">Basis voor Actuele Kunst</a>. BAK chooses one theme and works with it for a period of three years, through a series of exhibitions and other programming, so they build up this trove of research through exhibition-making on whatever their chosen theme is. I wonder if this maybe might have been an inspiration on how they are approaching <em>SITElines</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Hannah Hoel: Right, which is one reason SITE is subverting the so-called biennial model, right?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Yes, rather than every two years essentially starting over anew.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: But by calling it a biennial, maybe at first, it gets the eyes of a more international community, just by virtue of its title, when in actuality they are doing a long-term research series of exhibitions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Lauren Tresp: It might be a slow burn to figure out. Because we haven&rsquo;t experienced any of the performances yet, those will be coming. And they are launching SITEcenter, which sounds like they are hosting artists-in-residence for longer periods of time than just the course of the biennial exhibitions. But again, that&rsquo;s along the same lines of an extended, extensive research project. But I think it will take some time to see how it plays out. Things could change from what&rsquo;s been planned thus far.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: So really calling it a biennial is because it happens every two years.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Irene Hoffman mentioned in the talk this morning about the &ldquo;collective restlessness&rdquo; they have with the status quo of biennial-making and that drove the impetus of <em>SITElines</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: Which puts them at the forefront of innovation, which is what they claim to be.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: But their commitment to showcasing innovative contemporary art from the international community is visible, not necessarily by the work that they&rsquo;re showing, but by the model of the biennial as a recognized structure.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Which proves the point that the biennial-system has become so entrenched, which is kind of what they are bucking against. One of the things mentioned in the catalogue essay and in this morning&rsquo;s introduction is the emergence of what could be known as &ldquo;biennial art.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m acquainted with a couple of scholars that did a statistical survey of biennials, over the course of I don&rsquo;t know how many decades, finding that there are certain artists who show at biennials over and over again, making this genre of biennial art, which is something that <em>SITElines</em> is actively trying to go against. As a result, [here] we didn&rsquo;t know more than half of the people on the artist list. So it was a real process of discovery, which is great.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: It feels like something an institution should be doing, supporting unknown artists and bringing them to the attention of the international community.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: On the website for the &ldquo;Unsettled Landscapes&rdquo; they have a map showing where all the artists are from, and it&rsquo;s amazingly diverse. They are from all over North, South and Central America.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: That&rsquo;s a huge accomplishment. And I wonder how many artists will go on to do other biennials, or what their careers will look like after <em>SITElines</em>. Grounding SITE&rsquo;s biennial in geography so specifically is also really new for the biennial model that usually has pavilions from each country [for instance]. And I actually did feel, even during the press conference this morning, that there was this united identity of the Americas that I felt for the first time, which is cool to see everyone coming together to express our history as a continent, as opposed to divided by borders and politics.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: I like that the written materials on the website and in the galleries don&rsquo;t really emphasize where the artists are from; it&rsquo;s understated. This is the artist. They stand on their own two feet with their artwork and aren&rsquo;t forced to represent the place they are coming from.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: I was just remembering the incident with the guy that smashed Ai WeiWei&rsquo;s vase in protest of local artists being ignored in Miami&rsquo;s contemporary art scene. Santa Fe has its own very specific artistic identity, which is sometimes really far off the mark when it comes to contemporary art&mdash;globalized contemporary art&mdash;and I&rsquo;m wondering if you think Santa Fe artists will enjoy this exhibit or will they feel like they were&hellip;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: I think that&rsquo;s been one of the biggest criticisms of SITE Santa Fe in the gossip mill, that they haven&rsquo;t supported the local community enough. I know that there are four artists that are based in New Mexico and a curator who lives in Albuquerque. The artist-in-residence was here on and off for eighteen months, so I think they are trying to incorporate the community more. I give them props for that because it has been a source of gossip.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: When I was listening to the curators' talks they talked about looking not only towards underrepresented or unrecognized artists but towards underrepresented genres and mediums, for example landscape as a genre. I expected to see more of that, or more of a pointer to it in some way. There were the globes, which directly referenced the genre of landscape painting, by Yishai Jusidman...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: Those were some of my favorite pieces. The sphere of the globe mimics the eye and embodies the concept of the gaze, the gaze of the painter, specifically referencing the painters whose works are reproduced in those images. Also you have to walk around the sphere; you can&rsquo;t see it in its entirety, it references the distortion not only the artists&rsquo; gazes but our gaze as well. It represents an equalizer when looking at the landscape from different perspectives.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: They also talked about the landscape and how it inherently suggests hierarchy in territorial disputes. I thought of that when I looked at the globes. I thought of the New World&rsquo;s tension with European hierarchy, that [Jusidman] used Jos&eacute; Mar&iacute;a Velasco G&oacute;mez from Mexico, Monet, and John Constable as the three painters.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: In the curator&rsquo;s introduction this morning, Janet Dees said they didn&rsquo;t look for work that fell into one of the categories of landscape, territory, or trade, they focused on works that combined elements of all three, and I think these globes are successful in doing that.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140721041635-2_Installationshot_EricSwanson.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jason Middlebrook</strong>, <em>Your General Store</em> (detail), 2014, Shipping container, wood, paint, reclaimed barn windows, glass, concrete, native plants from New Mexico, steel, leather, plastic, canvas, yarn, thread, soil; SITE Santa Fe commission; Courtesy of the artist, Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin, and Monique Meloche, Chicago.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: So maybe we can talk about the social responsibility aspect of certain works?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: Lucy Lippard wrote in the opening essay that the show privileges social responsibility over aesthetic joy. So I&rsquo;m wondering if people are going to walk away with a sense of social responsibility. Are they more engaged with the artwork? And the SITEcenter program is also trying to get audiences to engage long-term.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Which is challenging for any institution. How do you engage an audience in that way; how does art spur you to action? Was there anything that stood out to you that encompassed that?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: The only piece that really made me feel compelled to act was the shipping container by Jason Middlebrook.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: This is a shipping container with a lot of [artist-made] objects which are offered up for the audience to barter for.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: It is set up on the model of the general store. There are specific instructions as to what will be accepted as equal and comparable value for the items. And all of the items initially came from the East Coast, with the apparent hope that now items from the Southwest will be exchanged and added to the space.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: In a way that particular project is one that may engage the Santa Fe artistic community the most. Because I feel like a lot of the prerequisites for what kinds of items are worth trading would fit into what artists could make or produce here. So in a way it&rsquo;s this interesting potlatch that happens with that. It certainly got my attention. I starting thinking, What could I make to get this particular piece? My eye is on the Ellen Harvey bird cage, but it specifies that I would need to present them with another homage to a dead bird, somehow [in exchange].</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">All laugh</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Maybe I could take a picture of a dead pigeon? I&rsquo;m going to be thinking about it for a few days...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: I like how it taught me something about trade. I came in thinking I could just come in with an object and drop it off and get a different one, but they want something very specific: like for like.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Some of them are pretty general. You can get a teapot for a teapot.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: Right, but you can&rsquo;t bring green chile for a teapot.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">All laugh</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: But it has more concern for the economy of art, and the monetization, or potential de-monetization of art. Is that really a call for social action? It&rsquo;s a call for action, but I'm not convinced that social responsibility applies.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: But it is interesting to talk about the nature of a new biennial as something that incites social change or responsibility, not monetization. Those pieces are hard when they&rsquo;re fun and whimsical, and you&rsquo;re not sure if you take them seriously.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: Humor in the show, however, was conspicuously absent. There was only a few pieces that involved humor, including the trade show, and the Future Farmers piece with the nail. There was also the Kent Monkman diorama piece with the &ldquo;Miss Chief&rdquo; character, which is this portrait of the artist as a drag queen in this diorama with wild buffalo, astride a motorcycle. There&rsquo;s a lot of stuff going on in this piece!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140721042152-9_Monkman.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Kent Monkman</strong>, <em>Bête Noir</em>, 2014. Installation view. Mixed media. Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Sargent&rsquo;s Daughters Gallery, New York.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: It was really kitsch.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: There&rsquo;s a lot of elements in it, but it&rsquo;s pretty straightforward. I don&rsquo;t know that there&rsquo;s a lot of subtlety or nuance involved.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: That&rsquo;s a good way to put it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: Right outside of that room were the Mayan images by Leandro Katz. They were photographs that showed 19th century illustrations of Mayan ruins and sculptures alongside the objects themselves. They referenced this blurring between object, art and artifact.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: And to me it spoke to the issue of accurate history, as well.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: That piece was interesting too because it took place over such a long period of time, so that time was an element. Walking through the exhibit I counted a lot of pieces that were, perhaps, first performed or made in the 1980s, but are revisited now. Like the Agnes Denes piece, the &ldquo;Wheatfield&rdquo; in Battery Park, which was revisited. Oh, and the Mount Rushmore piece [by Matthew Buckingham]. That went back to 66 million years ago and in [extended into] the future, to AD 502,002.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: I liked the presentation of that piece as a timeline and its culmination in a single image. At first I thought they had not yet hung the artwork, because there was just text. But that spaciousness drew me in to read.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">NH: I was surprised by that. I thought that was going to be the pre-historic view of what Mount Rushmore looked like before, but it ended up being the future projection. Scary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: The text covered the history of the territorial battles over rights to the land. The image we&rsquo;re left with, the future projection of the sculpted fa&ccedil;ade eroding beyond recognition, takes the struggle full circle. The issue of land ownership is superseded by the course of nature and it makes all of those battles obsolete. The piece was more focused on land as nature than as territory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The group discusses getting more fabulous margaritas, but decides against them because they are getting cocktails later.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: Lippard&rsquo;s essay opens with how the title, "Unsettled Landscapes," is ironic because all the themes arise from the settling of landscapes, so in a way, by settling we&rsquo;re un-settling it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: Unsettling in a psychological sense.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">HH: And physically, we&rsquo;re literally unsettling or disrupting the landscape.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/11505-natalie-hegert?tab=REVIEWS">Natalie Hegert</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394156-hannah-hoel?tab=REVIEWS">Hannah Hoel</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/341566-lauren-tresp?tab=REVIEWS">Lauren Tresp</a><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image at top: <strong>Agnes Denes</strong>, <em>Wheatfield - A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan - With Statue of Liberty Across the Hudson</em>, 1982. Two acres of wheat planted and harvested by the artist on a landfill in Manhattan's financial district, a block from Wall Street and the World Trade Center, summer 1982. Commissioned by Public Art Fund, New York City. Copyright Agnes Denes, Courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York.)</span></p> Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:33:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Opposite Parts of the Same Whole <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Zez&atilde;o may not have patented his blue like Yves Klein did, but to anyone who has wandered around the streets of S&atilde;o Paulo, the Zez&atilde;o blue is unmistakable in both its nuance, purpose and language. Made manually, his light blue is consistently used to color his flops &ndash; the name he has given to the arabesque drawings which are a kind of stylization of his signature, deriving from letters distorted so intensely that they started looking abstract. What few people realize is that these now iconic images are reminiscent of the times when Zez&atilde;o was strongly involved with the <em>pixa&ccedil;&atilde;o</em>* movement. He was already a recognized <em>pixador</em> when he came across a documentary on Basquiat, which awakened his desire to start experimenting with abstraction. The flops represent then a shift in his production.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140721061451-IMG_8161.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>, <em>exhibition view</em>; Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This new attitude caused estrangement to other <em>pixadores</em> and it was this incomprehension and the desire to experiment that led him to the undergrounds of the city where he found space and freedom to develop his new language. Against the predominant discourse, Zez&atilde;o himself never put street art and graffiti in contradiction though, for him, both deal with the idea of transgression, and his biggest transgression might have been precisely attempting to blur the separation between these two movements. His flops may be seen as a synthesis between the typography and graphism of the <em>pixa&ccedil;&atilde;o</em> and the aesthetic and appeal of street art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Choosing a color to identify his work was an influence of the graffiti duo &ldquo;Os Gemeos&rdquo;, who have consistently used yellow and red to mark their production. For Zez&atilde;o, blue was a desire to convey peace, hope and possibility in the abandoned and degraded city spaces where the flops were painted. Placing his works in these locations has also set him even more apart from other graffiti and street artists who commonly choose places of high visibility for their works. By throwing color and art into the marginal spaces, he gave his work a socio-political dimension calling attention to urban issues such as abandonment, urban decay, violence, pollution and poverty.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140721061547-IMG_8190.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o,</strong> <em>exhibition view</em>; Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Decay, violence, and poverty are part of Zez&atilde;o&rsquo;s everyday, after he set up a studio in the heart of an area known as Cracol&acirc;ndia &ndash; a district located downtown next to historical buildings and museums, but considered the crack capital of Brazil with hundreds of drug addicts wandering around. Called &ldquo;Overground Art Studio Gallery&rdquo;, the space is part of the revitalization wave which is taking over S&atilde;o Paulo&rsquo;s center. It serves as a studio for Zez&atilde;o but also as a space for collaborations and for introducing emerging street artists, such as Indio, a former homeless man who was called to help on the cleaning of the place and surprised everyone with his artistic vein.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">But Zez&atilde;o&rsquo;s flops also inhabit other spaces. At Zipper Gallery, in a noble area of S&atilde;o Paulo, the light blue graffiti of his entrance piece contrasts with the bright yellow of the building fa&ccedil;ade and invites the passersby to come in. The gallery&rsquo;s location and its ascetic ambience are radically different from the context where his graffiti first proliferated &ndash; in potholes, manholes and sewers. And to differentiate it from the work that he still does on the streets he calls all objects done in the context of exhibitions or enclosed space: fine art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140721061412-IMG_8171.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>,<em> exhibition view</em>; Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Most of the pieces on show at Zipper are site-specific assemblages built with materials harvested in dumpsters, such as old pieces of wood, frames and urban road signs. They are put together directly on the white wall in an instinctive process which dispensed any previous design, and with the exception of one, all of them have a flop graffitied over. These pieces seem to be informed by the aesthetic language of the Brazilian favelas, the <em>gambiarra</em>, which can be loosely translated as &ldquo;to make do&rdquo; or &ldquo;quick-fix&rdquo;. Outside of favelas, this aesthetic has been also informing a great deal of Brazilian contemporary art production, becoming pervasive in the Brazilian imagination and quotidian, even.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In the realm of the fine arts Zez&atilde;o has also found space to experiment and develop other languages. In the opposite side of the exhibition room, we find another assemblage, also made of repurposed wood but in direct contrast with the previous pieces. This time the wood was completely standardized, sanded and painted black, completed with black tape applied directly on the wall. No flops grafittied, just black wood and tape spreading on the white wall. The image that emerges seems to represent a metropolis, its skyline and also its subterranean connections. When seen from distance it forms such a schematic image, a graphical abstraction.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720150206-bb.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>, <em>Exhibition View;</em> Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The curatorial text suggests that these seemingly conflicting depictions represent the city seen from near and from far. Close are the favelas: their disorder, their creative chaos and abundance. Far is the geometry, sobriety and functionality of the metropolitan city. None of these depictions is completely accurate, but none can be said inaccurate either. They are like opposite parts of the same whole, contradictory and complementary at the same time. They live in intense dialogue and tension with each other, and it is just when put in perspective together that one can make sense of both, and thus make sense of the city they portray. Nobody better than Zez&atilde;o, who lives these two facets of the city so intensely, to put them in perspective for us and make us walk out of the gallery with a renewed view of S&atilde;o Paulo.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">* Pixa&ccedil;&atilde;o is a form of graffiti tagging native to S&atilde;o Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, consisting in wall writings made of tar, and is distinctive for its cryptic style and unique typography.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720150233-b.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>, <em>Exhibition View;</em> Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720150322-v.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>, <em>Exhibition View;</em> Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720150446-vv.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>, <em>sem t&iacute;tulo, </em>acrylic on wood, 70 x 100 x 4 cm, 2013; Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720150549-u.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>,<em> untitled</em>, acrylic on wood, 155 x 260 x 12 cm, 2014; Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Vivian Mocellin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: <strong>Zez&atilde;o</strong>, <em>Exhibition View;</em> Courtesy of The Artist and Zipper Galeria)</span></p> Mon, 21 Jul 2014 06:17:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list SITElines 2014: A Veteran Biennial Lays Down New Roots <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">SITE Santa Fe&rsquo;s new biennial series, <em>SITElines</em>, signals a new format for recurrent exhibitions that reduces the term &ldquo;biennial&rdquo; to its simplest definition: every two years. For almost twenty years, the institution was faithful to the timely concentration of international artists and rising curators served in a publicized melting pot. After all, SITE lays claim to the first international biennial of contemporary art in the United States: <em>Longing and Belonging: From the Faraway Nearby</em> (1995). Its innovative past made Santa Fe a site of artistic relevance distinct from historic Canyon Road, which is why, after a measured and tactful single-cycle hiatus (the last biennial was in 2010), SITE&rsquo;s new agenda is causing such a stir.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Last summer, SITE Santa Fe emerged having completely rethought the &ldquo;purpose and structure of the large-scale perennial format.&rdquo; It delivered an ambitious, subversive, and innovative solution with <em>SITElines</em>: &ldquo;a six year commitment to a series of linked exhibitions with a focus on contemporary art and cultural production of the Americas.&rdquo; The announcement of a biennial series that focused on the landscape, territory, and trade of North and South America felt simplistic, nostalgic, and anticlimactic&mdash;grounding at the apex of globalization. A year later, this sobriety could be the remedy for today&rsquo;s art fair fever. SITE has a history of imparting the importance of place and this summer&rsquo;s premiere exhibition, <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em>, continues that agenda by emphasizing not just the site <em>of</em> Santa Fe but also the site of the entire continent. <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em> is a declaration of identity and <em>SITElines</em>, riffing on &ldquo;sight lines,&rdquo; immediately relays an intention for the long view with a clear, confident, and unobstructed projection.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720052627-1_Installationshot_EricSwanson.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jason Middlebrook</strong>, <em>Your General Store</em>, 2014, Shipping container, wood, paint, reclaimed barn windows, glass, concrete, native plants from New Mexico, steel, leather, plastic, canvas, yarn, thread, soil; SITE Santa Fe commission; Courtesy of the artist, Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin, and Monique Meloche, Chicago With (trees) /&nbsp; <strong>Glenda León,</strong> <em>Esperanza (Out of Season),</em> 2014, Artificial leaves, trees, glue; Courtesy of the artist and MagnanMetz Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In-house curators Irene Hofmann and Janet Dees additionally had to ask: Why come <em>here</em> amid various often-exotic locations that now host biennials? The solution was to focus on the land. Through new works by over forty artists, many unknown, who represent fourteen countries, three generations, and live as far north as Nunavut and as south as the tip of Tierra del Fuego, <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em> examines our continent&rsquo;s history with emphasis on the impounded, undocumented, or as Lucy Lippard wrote in <em>SITEline</em>&rsquo;s opening essay, our &ldquo;silenced and censored histories.&rdquo; In order to facilitate new work stressing place, Pablo Helguera was tapped as SITE&rsquo;s first artist in residence while additional artists invested in New Mexico&rsquo;s past and present are proudly included, namely Jamison Chas Banks, Rik Lum, Patrick Nagatani, and Florence Miller Pierce.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Guest curators Candice Hopkins (who lives in Albuquerque) and Luc&iacute;a Sanrom&aacute;n (from Mexico City) obligingly spent significant time in Santa Fe. The exhibition also includes many site-specific installations including a functioning water well at Santa Clara Pueblo by I&ntilde;igo Manglano-Ovalle, Glenda Le&oacute;n&rsquo;s artificial leaves on SITE&rsquo;s nearby deciduous trees, and Lum&rsquo;s community dinners along the Rio Grande River. SITE Center (The Center) promises social and cultural edification that aims to offer internal continuity across all three exhibitions. Notably usurping &ldquo;the &lsquo;parachuting&rsquo; curator and artist, who &lsquo;drop in&rsquo; at one location and deliver essentially the same type of exhibition and work as at others,&rdquo; SITE&rsquo;s hard work also marks a possible reparation of one of the community&rsquo;s most gossiped pet peeves: SITE&rsquo;s inability to fully service its community and more specifically, its artist community.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720052438-8_Katz.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Leandro Katz</strong>, <em>Uxmal--Casa de las Palomas, (Uxmal--House of the Doves)</em>, 1993, Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Lucy Lippard suggests in her opening essay for <em>SITElines</em> that, &ldquo;Works such as those in <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em> are opening up territory where the aesthetic joys expected from art merge with socially responsible steps beyond the market.&rdquo;&nbsp;Many works in the exhibition arose from social practice, political activism, and historical excavation&mdash;displayed as explorative trips, static landscapes, and coquettish histories. Juicy eye candy is mostly absent but the social responsibility of the viewer is not necessarily demanded. However, SITE&rsquo;s desire to meaningfully engage audiences for the next six years redefines the responsibilities of the perennial exhibition and could forge the way for a broader redefinition of art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">SITE Santa Fe remains committed to &ldquo;presenting the most daring, innovative contemporary art&rdquo; to Santa Fe, national, and international audiences. With <em>SITElines</em>, art may slowly cease to arbitrarily exchange cities.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #dc143c;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394156-hannah-hoel"><span style="color: #dc143c;">Hannah Hoel</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <span style="font-family: Arial;">Foreground: <strong>Miler Lagos</strong>, <em>The Great Tree (detail)</em>, 2014, Newsprint, steel SITE Santa Fe commission; Courtesy of the artist and MagnanMetz Gallery, New York / Rear: <strong>Johanna Calle</strong>,<em> Perímetros (Ceiba) / Perimeters (Ceiba),</em> 2014, Typewritten text on found notary registry sheets; Courtesy of the artist)</span></span></p> Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:26:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Nostalgia and Gratitude, Brokenness and Redemption <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I only need one song to explain how I feel about country music: George Strait&rsquo;s <em>So Much Like My Dad</em>. A modest hit in 1992, the tune&rsquo;s not nearly as recognizable as Strait&rsquo;s other classics. You&rsquo;ll likely run into <em>All My Exes Live in Texas</em>, but probably not <em>So Much Like My Dad</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A few keys of the piano walk you into the song&rsquo;s weather: the first few drops of an icy rain, a first snowfall. A brush hits the drumhead and somehow it&rsquo;s cold. It hits a few more times and it&rsquo;s been cold a long time. The guitar picks up, string by string. Seasons, days, minutes, and seconds spring to life and then pass away. The singer&rsquo;s returned home to his mother, but it&rsquo;s &ldquo;not his usual time of year.&rdquo; He has a problem and is seeking an answer.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The music brightens like a mother&rsquo;s smile. I can&rsquo;t help but think that his mother blushes with the flattery of being sought out by her boy. The son goes one better; he is ready to reminisce and begins recalling memories of his father and the mutual things that mother and son could share about the man, the good times so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">We are hearing, through the son&rsquo;s words, the story the mother tells herself to live; we see through her rose colored glasses, the song letting all the sentiment in with reckless abandon: &ldquo;Remember when I was dad&rsquo;s pride and joy, and your little man?&rdquo; The son then uses the mother&rsquo;s own words, &ldquo;Boy, you&rsquo;re getting more like him, each and every day.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">We are lulled into this story, we move to the one-two, one-two of the beat, which makes the song great for two-step. The conversation is also a bit like a dance, form and content perfectly united. We feel like the son is glancing over to his mother after each phrase and it is almost as though she is nodding in agreement.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Then Strait takes a big breath. The son, in fact, is not at ease talking to his mother. The breath is important. He needs to courage to launch into what all of this is really about, and what it is really about is that he actually <em>is</em> like his dad, not the dad they&rsquo;ve enjoyed recalling, but what his dad was really like:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;She&rsquo;s says she gonna leave me, Momma, and nothing on God&rsquo;s green earth can make her stay. I can&rsquo;t live without her, Momma, but this time you can&rsquo;t kiss the hurt away, but if I am so much like my Dad, there must have been times you felt her way. So tell me word for word, what he said, that always made you stay.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Her son has become the monster. Though they talk pleasantries about the past, the real father returns like a ghost. The son not only knew about his father&rsquo;s sins, but also, despite the mother&rsquo;s efforts at protection, has re-created them. The sentimentality early in the song only serves as a way of making this generational pain a sharper twist of the knife. No, the past wasn&rsquo;t better. People weren&rsquo;t stronger. For each of those years together that was hard fought, there is a clear argument that perhaps they shouldn&rsquo;t have fought at all.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The complicated humanity of this song, in my opinion, rivals Robert Frost&rsquo;s <em>Home Burial</em>, the stories of Alice Munro or William Trevor, or even Paula Fox&rsquo;s <em>Desperate Characters</em>. There is deep mystery at the heart of it, and the mystery comes from a verifiable lineage of individual choices.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">We stand, along with the son, awaiting the answer. The answer never comes.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720050342-ASP-Leverett-June-Carter.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Earl Scruggs and June Carter on the set of the Flatt &amp; Scruggs Grand Ole Opry Show</em>, 1961,&nbsp; Paul Warren (in background), fiddler, Foggy Mountain Boys; &copy; Les Leverett; Courtesy Annenberg Space for Photography, LA</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I&rsquo;ve always wanted to express my admiration for that song, for country music in general, and there has never been a good moment. Now, having seen the Annenberg Space for Photography&rsquo;s exhibition of country music portrait photography, it is as good a time as any, though in this impressive collection of photos you won&rsquo;t find a single snap of George Strait.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">What you do find is an attempt to present the idea of country music through images, and, surprisingly, this works like a charm up to a point. Henry Diltz, Henry Horenstein, Les Leverett, David McClister, Raeanne Rubenstein, Leigh Wiener and Michael Wilson are among the photographers presented and they are all quite good. They build the stories of their musicians, all while being on the fabled quest of every portrait photographer, that legendary journey into the <em>reality</em> of their subject. Country music takes the same road; musicians, songwriters, singers, and record companies create themselves in the image of what sells and what sells in country music is authenticity. It is a fascinating paradox.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The photos come across loud and clear. Basically as soon as the African banjo met the American fiddle, country music was popular and sold well. It exploded in the 1930s, and quickly becomes the story of people changing out of suits into overalls and back into suits. When Hollywood sold cowboys, country singers put on hats and starred in Westerns. When the sixties wanted long hair and artists on the fringe, country music revived the outlaw (look to Willie Nelson in the RCA years for proof and subsequently later, when, by his own admission, he was more like himself). In the eighties, country stars aligned themselves with high fashion, brought in synthesizers, and laid it on as thick as hair metal and glam (Tanya Tucker&rsquo;s album cover for TNT is all you need to see). In the late eighties and nineties, the cowboy hat returned. There is even a moment in the Annenberg&rsquo;s film on country music where a country record producer jokes that Keith Urban looks like the guy that comes with the picture frame. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At the same time, the truisms about country music are present as well. &ldquo;Three chords and the truth,&rdquo; said Harlan Howard, a sentiment along the lines of &ldquo;Country people talking about country things.&rdquo; There is country music as the &ldquo;cry of the heart.&rdquo; There is the common advice to budding musicians is to &ldquo;hang onto your roots and branch out.&rdquo; And let&rsquo;s not forget the decree of the stage manager at the Grand Ole Opry for singers to keep it to &ldquo;One song per hillbilly.&rdquo; However, my favorite quote remains Johnny Cash&rsquo;s description of Merle Haggard: &ldquo;Merle Haggard is the man you think I am.&rdquo; What better way to show the tension between the expectations for country music to be authentic and the reality of the situation?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">And what are some of those expectations? Well, the photos in the installation again tell the story. Leigh Weiner has some very expressive, almost campy, photos of Cash in a confederate uniform or underneath the watchful eye of the cross while dressed in black. There are many superficial markers of &ldquo;country&rdquo;: trucks, beer, sadness, loss, drunkenness, cheating, forgiveness, and church. However, Weiner&rsquo;s best one of Cash gets to the heart of it: simply Cash with his guitar placed in front of him, as pensive as a boy about to meet his girl&rsquo;s parents or as someone who wants to be seen a simple songsmith, nothing more nothing less. Michael Wilson&rsquo;s portrait of Lyle Lovett in the snow is posed in a similar manner, doused with a big dose of lonesomeness, &ldquo;a wanderer in the world&rdquo; mystique. Country musicians must appear simple; they must have an &ldquo;aw shucks&rdquo; gratefulness to their demeanor. There is an air of perpetual nostalgia and gratitude, brokenness and redemption, and the country music industry goes to great lengths to make sure the spell is not broken. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720050440-ASP-Wilson-Emmylou-Harris.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Emmylou Harris,</em> <em>Sunday School Room, Nashville</em>, 2000; &copy; Michael Wilson; Courtesy Annenberg Space for Photography, LA&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">However, I am not even remotely cynical about this, though this simplicity can often be right wing, hostile to any sort of intellectual sophistication. The reason is that there is something deeply and intrinsically true about Americans in this tension between self-creation and its paradoxical taste for foundation values that may or may not exist. In country music the rigidity of its image can often make the humanity of its content come forward in surprising, even forceful, ways. Country music is like the neighbor that has said hello to you a hundred times, even done you favors, only to hide real, unbelievably intense trauma and suffering just under the surface. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Maybe that is what is lacking in the Annenberg show. We get the image, we get the history, but, unfortunately, it is hard to get to the mystery of country music, difficult to dive into the real meat of country, which are the songs themselves and their ability to speak to individuals.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">To make an attempt at what I mean, perhaps we should return to <em>So Much like My Dad</em>. After all, I just described the beginning of the song, and for a while, I thought the ending was boring, just George Strait repeating the earned chorus, &ldquo;If I&rsquo;m so much like my dad,&rdquo; after a long solo on piano and guitar.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Strait did not write <em>So Much like My Dad</em>. Strait has never written any song. You should also know that Strait&rsquo;s career has made most of its hay by selling authenticity. In a world of stadium shows and massive bands, the introduction of synthesizers and new levels of production value, Strait came out on the stage alone in jeans and a white hat. On his farewell tour this year, thirty-three years later, Strait continued to come out on the stage in jeans and white hat. That&rsquo;s what it always is with Strait: he&rsquo;s just a simple man with a good voice. He can&rsquo;t write but is very happy that others can. Even though he is not a singer/songwriter, he is as authentic as it gets. He loves his fans, he loves his job, he loves America.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But then there is the song, with that chorus, repeating over and over, asking the mother for advice that she doesn&rsquo;t have. Strait even pauses once between the chorus to make the silence between the narrator and the mother more punishing and more present. Strait&rsquo;s song, as mirror for life, begins to fracture into mirrors: some show us personally, others attempt universals. Is the mother quiet because the memory of her horrible husband is too much? Is she in denial about the truth of the past? Is she disinclined to offer because she knows the consequences? Does the fact that the chorus goes on and on allude to the chain of this pain, that sons will be fathers and fathers will be sons and there is no answer?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140720050708-ASP-Rubenstein-Nudie-Cohn-and-Gram-Parsons.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Gram Parsons (standing),</em> adopting the rhinestone look of his country music heroes, in a personalized suit designed by Nashville&rsquo;s favorite tailor, <em>Nudie Cohn (seated),</em> at Nudie&rsquo;s Rodeo Tailors shop, Los Angeles, 1968; &copy; Raeanne Rubenstein; Courtesy Annenberg Space for Photography, LA</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">George Strait is not Gram Parsons, he doesn&rsquo;t have any indie credibility or Nudie suits. He is not Loretta Lynn, made solid by a well-publicized and painful past. Nor is he Buck Owens, who came to embody the Bakersfield sound and therefore is seen as a trailblazer. He is not Taylor Swift, the newest in a long line of singers who brilliantly bridge the trickle between country and pop. All told, Strait is boring, boring enough to have more number one country hits than anyone else in history. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">However, that is the mystery of country music. Its images fracture into pie pieces and the assemblage of the pieces is our broken, collective selves, which, in turn, are also made from pieces. Through the cracks, we find haunting stories and it can be scary if we listen closely. It deals with nothing less than the silence of things we don&rsquo;t know. Country music knows that each of us speaks with a thousand voices. It is never surprised when it recognizes one of them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/8010-ed-schad?tab=REVIEWS">Ed Schad</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<em> Johnny Cash<strong>;</strong></em> &copy; Leigh Wiener; Courtesy <a href="http://annenbergspaceforphotography.org/"><span style="color: #525552;">Annenberg Space for Photography</span></a>, LA)</span></p> Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:54:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list We are all waiting for Godot in Paul Chan’s dark world <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">Paul Chan, born in 1973, is a child of his time. He has cast aside modernism&rsquo;s Big Ideas and is free of any kind of canon. He refers just as easily to French philosopher Charles Fourier (1772-1837) as he does to hip hop star Jay-Z. The Old Testament, hardcore porn, Samuel Beckett, daytime TV, the Black Panthers, Guy Debord and his Society of the Spectacle&mdash;for Chan this is all source material of equal value and utility.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">Chan is beyond postmodernism as well, though. He does not play non-committal word games, showing off his cleverness and bubbling with irony. He is a man with a mission, a man who cares, acts, and takes responsibility. He is politically engaged in a passionate and personal way. Although backing away from the role of figurehead, he sympathizes with the Occupy Movement. In New York he was a co-founder of the local chapter of Indymedia, a network of independent media. And in 2002, right before the US invasion of Iraq, he was invited by human rights group Voices in the Wilderness to visit Baghdad and, as part of a so-called Peace Team, he illegally imported medicine and food.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">Although Chan insists on keeping his life as an activist separate from his work as an artist, a lot of politics seeps through in his art. It&rsquo;s not without reason that Hans Ulrich Obrist identified him a couple of years ago as &ldquo;one of the main protagonists of a new political art movement in the USA.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s maybe not so obvious for whomever sees only a single work by Chan as part of a group show&mdash;his lighter works are rather popular in the international biennial circuit&mdash;but there is no escaping it in a solo show such as the one currently at Schaulager.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140719080632-chan_1a_happiness_l.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Paul Chan</strong>, <em>Happiness (Finally) After 35,000 Years of Civilization (after Henry Darger and Charles Fourier)</em>, 2000-2003, digital video projection (color, sound), 17'20'', The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Fractional and promised gift of David Teiger; &copy; Paul Chan, photo: Paul Chan</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><em>Paul Chan &ndash; Selected Works</em> has an almost perfect build-up that only reveals itself after one has gone through the entire exhibition and adequately digested what&rsquo;s on show. Starting point for the zigzagging journey through Chan&rsquo;s complex world is the animated video <em>Happiness (Finally) After 35,000 Years of Civilization (After Henry Darger and Charles Fourier)</em>. In this key work dating from 2000-2003 the artist paints a picture of the 21st century world as a man-made hell. Girls are beaten and subsequently set on fire; soldiers routinely empty machineguns on crowds; houses are destroyed while businessmen rush by talking into cell phones and priests pretend to be deaf. Aesthetically the coarse imagery is somewhere between vintage Super Mario and <em>South Park</em>, but the atmosphere is akin to the Chapman brothers&rsquo; horror shows. Artistic references abound&mdash;from Diane Arbus (some of the girls) to Hans Bellmer (the creatures constructed out of mutilated body parts) and photojournalist Nick Ut&rsquo;s iconic image of a girl running naked after a napalm attack during the Vietnam War.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">The Henry Darger and Charles Fourier in the title are respectively an American artist and a French socialist philosopher. Darger&rsquo;s 15,000-page manuscript, discovered shortly before his death in 1973 and nowadays qualifying as one of the finest examples of outsider art, brings to life a fantastic children&rsquo;s world where all is not well. Fourier came up with a theory of human evolution that identifies our era as one of &ldquo;perfidy, injustice, constraint, poverty, revolutions and bodily weakness.&rdquo; Chan obviously takes after Darger and Fourier. His worldview is dystopian to the bone.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140719080502-chan_4d_my_birds_trash_l.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Paul Chan</strong>, <em>My birds... trash... the future</em>, 2004, Two-channel digital video projection on screen (color, sound), 16'36'', Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, gift of the president, 2012, on permanent loan to the &Ouml;ffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel; &copy; Paul Chan, photo: Paul Chan</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">But Chan does not settle for a fantasy world or theoretical construction. The concrete focal point of his criticism is US foreign policy, especially in the Middle East. He processes the war on terror in many different ways. In <em>1st Light</em>, Chan&rsquo;s very first light work, falling bodies remind us of 9/11. His wonderfully executed charcoal drawings of Saddam Hussein, Abu Ghraib, the White House, and lots of vultures tell a story of all sides being wrong. This fundamental and inevitable failure of man is spelled out to the extreme in the downright depressing, but fascinating, animation <em>My birds&hellip;. trash&hellip;. the future</em>. In front of thick, black clouds of smoke and underneath a dead tree a group of soldiers pass the time, not unlike the protagonists in <em>Waiting for Godot</em>, while the world falls apart.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">There is no mistaking Chan&rsquo;s intentions but a certain ambiguity cannot be denied; beauty and the apocalypse go hand in hand, judgment is never clear cut, solutions are suggested but also rejected. And this uneasy combination of opposites is fundamental. The artist localizes its source in language, the tool we have to name and identify the world but which never truly coincides with the reality it signifies. Language is very important in Chan&rsquo;s art and books are its archetypical carrier. References to the Bible, the book of books, probably harken back to his upbringing in Nebraska. Chan invents revolutionary new fonts, trying to uncover the real emotional meaning behind words. His press, <a href="http://badlandsunlimited.com/" target="_blank">Badlands Unlimited</a>, publishes a wide range of texts, including the sculpture <em>Holiday</em>, which is a parable carved into a slab of stone not unlike the tablets of the Ten Commandments.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">In his latest series of sculptures Chan tries to capture the social systems underpinning the construct of language. They consist of large numbers of shoes connected to each other with electrical cords&mdash;a rather straightforward but powerful depiction of the societal network. Adjacent to these sculptures are the video installation <em>Sade for Sade&rsquo;s sake</em> and <em>My laws are my whores</em>, comprising portraits of Supreme Court justices hung upside down. Again, Chan displays a low esteem for the institutions governing the human chaos. Corruption is inevitable. We as humans are bound to fail.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">It is in this finale of the exhibition, on the basement level, that the presentation becomes somewhat unbalanced. The shoe-and-electrical-cord sculptures have been made specifically for this show and one gets the impression that if Chan would have given this work some time to mature, he would have shown less of it. Now it&rsquo;s just a bit repetitive and slows down the pace. And that&rsquo;s a shame, since on the whole this is an extremely well-conceived presentation, which expounds a complex system of thought but at the same time is visually attractive.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS">Edo Dijksterhuis</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Paul Chan</strong>, <em>The argument: Antietam</em>, 2013, <em>Volumes</em>, 2012 and <em>Tablet 3</em>, 2014, exhibition view; &copy; Paul Chan, photo: Tom Bisig)</span></p> Tue, 22 Jul 2014 05:15:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Realized, Unrealized, and Unrealizable: Everything Loose Will Land at the Graham Foundation <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In the sprawling exhibition <span style="color: #ff6633;"><a href="http://www.grahamfoundation.org/public_exhibitions/5119"><span style="color: #ff6633;">Everything Loose Will Land</span></a></span>, currently on view at the <span style="color: #ff6633;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/venues/show/23825-graham-foundation"><span style="color: #ff6633;">Graham Foundation</span></a></span>, curator Sylvia Lavin deftly tells the story how the worlds of art, architecture, and urban design came together in fantastical and bizarre ways throughout the 1970s. The title comes from a supposed quotation by Frank Lloyd Wright: &ldquo;Tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.&rdquo;<span style="color: #00bfff;"><a title="" href="#_ftn1"><span style="color: #00bfff;"><sup><sup>[1]</sup></sup></span></a></span> The exhibition is packed with architectural models, building plans, sculptures, films, publications, works on paper, publicity material, prototypes, and building materials in a swirling scope that is as impressive for its wild eclecticism as it is for its subtle argumentation. Lavin presents an admirably messy picture of cultural production in flux where canons and traditional sources of inspiration were up in the air and new modes of critique and protest were opening all around.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140718074747-24.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">View of &ldquo;Everything Loose Will Land,&rdquo; 2014; Courtesy Graham Foundation, Chicago. Photo Robert Chase Heishman.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition, which has been shown in LA and at Yale, draws some incredible vitality in its Chicago iteration from Judy Ledgerwood&rsquo;s immersive wall painting <em>Chromatic Patterns</em> for the Graham Foundation. Much of the work on display is housed in vitrines made of belly-like plastic protrusions, and in Ledgerwood&rsquo;s rooms these reflective cases look fluorescently doused and sparkling. It is a fortuitous overlap that speaks directly to the joyous intermingling of art and architecture that makes up the main thrust of the exhibition&rsquo;s argument.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">On the surface, the title of the exhibition points us toward different and new &ldquo;loose&rdquo; definitions of artistic and architectural practices among a diverse crowd of creators during the period. Here, Richard Serra buddies up with Frank Gehry to make a glass and wood material study, and Judy Chicago gets together with Miriam Schapiro to publish and enact the feminist cooperative/publication Womanhouse. Other collectives swarm left and right: LA Fine Arts Squad, Gruppo 9999, Archigram, Architects of Morphosis, EAT, SITE. The diverse and prolific output of these collaborations makes it immediately clear how fused the spheres of building-making and art-making became during this period, to the point where parsing them apart can be immediately seen as artificial and absurd.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140718074938-11.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Leonard Koren</strong>, <em>17 Beautiful Men Taking a Shower</em>, 1973. Photographs for accordion-folded book, 6 &frac12; x 25 inches; Copyright Leonard Koren / Courtesy of Hodgetts + Fung / Photo Joshua White, 2013.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">To this end, it is significant that the first image you encounter might be Leonard Koren&rsquo;s <em>WET Magazine</em> or his <em>17 Beautiful Men Taking a Shower</em> photo series. These opening images tip us off to another, perhaps more vital, meaning of the looseness on display.<span style="color: #00bfff;"><a title="" href="#_ftn2"><span style="color: #00bfff;"><sup><sup>[2]</sup></sup></span></a></span> Through a lens of sexual revolution, the many pairings and collaborations come into view as coital or orgiastic metaphors of social togetherness, pleasure, rebellion, and production. Hedonism-as-critical-response prevails throughout <em>Everything Loose</em>, from the sensual enjoyment of a cloud captured in polyester resin by Peter Alexander to the hypnotic mandala effects of the Whitney brothers' films.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140718075121-21.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ron Herron (Archigram)</strong>, <em>Instant City: Typical Configuration Santa Monica &amp; San Diego Freeway Intersection,</em>&nbsp;1969, Collage, photographic print, ink, pencil on mountboard, 8 x 10 inches; Copyright Ron Herron (Archigram) / Courtesy of Simon Herron.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This is where the subtlety of Lavin&rsquo;s argument plays an important role. While the exhibition material points in many different directions, one recurring form is the rough plan, like Bruce Nauman&rsquo;s pencil-scrawled poster design for a gallery show, or Robert Smithson&rsquo;s unrealized Dearchitecturized Project planned for LACMA. These variously realized, unrealized, and unrealizable plans emphasize that the revolutionary potential of these works lies not in their finalized forms, but rather in their imaginative possibilities. If anything, an understated critique of this same hedonism recurs frequently in the exhibition, most entertainingly in a snippy conversation between Nancy Holt, &lsquo;repping the New York Spare &amp; Critical Conceptualist wing of &lsquo;70s art, and Smithson, who tells her that she is &ldquo;thinking too much&rdquo; and that the &ldquo;Indians&rdquo; have it all figured out. The conversation is cringe inducing, and gives us pause to consider the ideological underpinnings of&mdash;and the limits to&mdash;the models of protest on display. Lavin deserves credit for assembling a collection of artifacts and objects that celebrates and at the same time critiques the oddball utopianism, naive promise, and fascinating potential of LA looseness. With <em>Everything Loose Will Land</em>, Lavin presents a story made up of odds and ends, where pleasure confronts repression, and where even buildings participate in sensual expression. A story, in other words, that sounds a lot like the Los Angeles it seeks to represent.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140718075316-13.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="line-height: 26px; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;"><strong>Sheila Levrant de Bretteville,</strong> <em>Women in Design</em>, 1975, Poster, 15 x 21 inches; Copyright Sheila Levrant de Bretteville / Courtesy of David Lieberman. Photo Joshua White, 2013.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p class="FootnoteText1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #00bfff;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1"><span style="color: #00bfff;"><sup><sup>[1]</sup></sup></span></a></span> I cannot find attribution for this quotation anywhere. It&rsquo;s just cited over and over again as Wright&rsquo;s &ldquo;famous&rdquo; quip. I call apocryphal.</span></p> </div> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p class="FootnoteText1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #00bfff;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref2"><span style="color: #00bfff;"><sup><sup>[2]</sup></sup></span></a></span> It also serves us well to take a look at the books Sylvia Lavin&rsquo;s published, including <em>Kissing Architecture</em> (Princeton University Press, 2011) and <em>Form Follows Libido</em>: <em>Architecture and Richard Neutra in Psychoanalytic Culture </em>(MIT Press, 2004). In the latter, she drops this gem on page 95: &ldquo;Hot rather than cool, Neutra&rsquo;s houses were pleasure palaces, and some of them had a G spot.&rdquo; Clearly the psychosexual dimensions of architecture are not to be discounted here.</span></p> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #87bc43;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/392403-gan-uyeda?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #87bc43;">Gan Uyeda</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">For more on&nbsp;<em>Everything Loose Will Land</em>, check out Troy Pieper's first impressions of the exhibition for ArtSlant from May 2014 <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/39548">here</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">Image on top: </span><em style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">View of &ldquo;Everything Loose Will Land&rdquo; , </em><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">2014; Courtesy Graham Foundation, Chicago / Photo Robert Chase Heishman)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:40:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Celebrating Uniqueness: Chayo Frank's Wild Styles and Freeform Aesthetics <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As I left for the infamous Amertec building in Hialeah&mdash;a twenty-minute drive from Miami&mdash;worrying about the coming rain, a friend warned me: &ldquo;Check first, the weather&rsquo;s different there.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Designed by Chayo Frank in 1969, when he was fresh out of the University of Oklahoma&rsquo;s College of Architecture, the building is a curvy, organelle-shaped, surreally tropical structure. Depending on one&rsquo;s perspective, it&rsquo;s a futurist masterpiece or bizarre opus, a work of unique vision or zany accomplishment. Without question, it defies convention, both locally and, perhaps, in a broader way.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Frank was given the job by his father, who owned Amertec-Granada Inc. and needed an office space. The building sticks out amongst the barbershops, body shops, and botanicas, the Hialeah Italian Tile store, and the Mr. Neon. Its carnivalesque curling and extraterrestrial formation were made using a spray concrete method. I checked the door and found it locked; the inside looked real creepy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140717083221-Amertec_building.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Chayo Frank</strong>, Amertec Building; &copy; Photo by Rob Goyanes</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Frank, who markets his brand of art as &ldquo;<a href="http://chayofrank.com/">Wild Style Aesthetics and Concepts</a>,&rdquo; recently opened a show of sculptures, spanning 1969 to 2012, at the Miami-based gallery Guccivuitton. The small-scale ceramics are simple, masterfully crafted sci-fi creatures, multi-textured, genetically diverse.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Abstractly psychedelic, they assume the typology of other modernist organic sculptors such as Ken Price, yet they&rsquo;re more mutated and appendaged. And like the Amertec Building, the sculptures are saying something about individuality, uniqueness, and the possibility for originality in unreal places and times (e.g. South Florida in a post-apocalyptic present that faces massive, near-term infrastructural issues due to flooding while billion-dollar condo buildings sprout up along the skyline).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Frank studied under Bruce Goff at OU. Highly influential, Goff was an early zealot of organic architecture, and heavily indebted to Frank Lloyd Wright&rsquo;s advocating of site conditions and client desires as primary motives for building design. Goff influenced Frank&rsquo;s aesthetic direction as well as his ideas about the singular role of the artist/architect. In an email correspondence with the artist, Frank wrote about Goff:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;He instilled in me to desire to&nbsp;delve within myself, to find, develop, and express my personal aesthetic proclivities, as a means for original self-expression. His influence nurtured my self-confidence to believe in&nbsp;the uniqueness of my aesthetic results.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Elsewhere in our exchange I&rsquo;d asked Frank about his involvement in the counterculture of Miami during the late 1960s. He says he wasn&rsquo;t directly involved, but there are aspects of his work that strike the same chords: freeform philosophies, as they&rsquo;re relegated to psychedelia genre tropes (biotic paraboloids and the like), and the idea that every individual, given the right circumstances, might flourish as a creative, self-actualizing organism.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140717083352-Chayo_Frank___12B__2012__at_Guccivuitton.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Chayo Frank</strong>, <em>#12B</em>, 2012, at Guccivuitton; &copy; Photo by Rob Goyanes</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In a time when the belief in originality and uniqueness might be considered pass&eacute; or moot (and for good reason: individuals and their creations are, after all, socially conditioned, materially situated, and historically enslaved), it&rsquo;s good to remember that the circumstances for change and adaptation do occasionally come, whether spurred by individuals, groups, environments, or some combo thereof.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Frank&rsquo;s sculptures at Guccivuitton say a lot about the aesthetics and political economy of tropical living; they illuminate the hierarchy of the exotic pastel object over a socially functional common, and signify the anachronistic idea of an individuated culture propelling a working, democratic ecology/society.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Despite this, seeing Frank&rsquo;s Amertec Building and sculptures, one can&rsquo;t help but suspect that these tropical conditions have in fact fostered strong individuality, culturally and socially. At last look, Chayo Frank&rsquo;s sculptures are manifested possibilities for radical distinction, even if just for a moment, and if just for fresh style points.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #ff7f50;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/343478-rob-goyanes?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #ff7f50;">Rob Goyanes</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Chayo Frank</strong>, <em>#04D , </em>2004; &copy; Photo by Rob Goyanes)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:21:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Threadless Patchworks and Seamy Fabrications <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">Here, the process and patterning of quiltmaking multifariously inspires. The repetitive tattoo of the sewing machine, the lush and rough textures of fabrics, and the echoing generational symbols of the tradition thread their way through varied works. Each artist concentrates upon, refines, or abstracts individual facets of the rich history of the quilt-as-medium, using it as a launching point for experimental explorations in the present.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">At its simplest, the mathematical construction of the quilting star in <span style="color: #795dbf;"><a style="text-decoration: none;" href="http://www.mccallsquilting.com/Block_Reference.html" target="_blank"><span style="color: #795dbf;">blocking patterns</span></a></span> allows beginners an entry point, and at its most complicated, advanced makers can create their own unique designs. Lena Wolff crafts <em>Radiant Star</em> (2014) out of pieces of hand-painted birch, shaping and seaming the pieces like fabric into that familiar shape. The visible seams of the star&rsquo;s fabrication draw attention to the hand-cut texture of the birch and each piece's perfection and whiteness. They simultaneously contrast the multi-colored, soft-fibered nature of quilts with the rough texture of bark. This quilts together an affinity between the advanced viewer of art and the advanced quilter, who both must be able to notice subtle shifts in color and texture in fine craftsmanship of material. Just across the gallery hangs Wolff&rsquo;s <em>O San Francisco</em> (2014), a framed paper quilt comprised of red crosses, each with a hand-written name of a space or organization, still extant or not, making up the cultural fabric of San Francisco. It&rsquo;s a mandala-like homage, a humble offering to our fair, changing city.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140716104244-02_GRABNER_Untitled.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Michelle Grabner,</strong> <em>Untitled</em>, 2011, Canvas on gesso on panel 18 x 12 inches; Courtesy of the artist and CULT | Aimee Friberg Exhibitions, San Francisco</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">The small rectangular panels of Michelle Grabner&rsquo;s <em>Untitled</em> (2011) and <em>Untitled (white)</em> (2011), located nearby, each contain a gessoed-over piece of canvas. Creating a stark white textured composition, the pieces don&rsquo;t harness the perfection of Wolff&rsquo;s <em>Radiant Star</em>;&nbsp;the roughness of the canvas still comes through as do the imperfect, fraying edges of the material. Together</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">, with welcome intimacy,</span><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;they draw the viewer near, not entirely unlike a blanket might. Several additional works by Grabner also experiment with the aesthetic abstraction and tactility of fiber, while other pieces shift focus from the material to the laborious process of sewing and creating patterns. </span><em style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Untitled (dot tondo)</em><span style="color: #525552; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> (2014) is a circular panel containing a pattern of dots that meticulously swirls around the surface creating an op-art/Yayoi Kusama-ish motif. The interaction of black and white specks comes together in a way akin to weaving; the distinctness of individual fibers become blended to create a something wholly new.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">In the small, dark room between the front gallery and the back gallery space, Angie Wilson&rsquo;s <em>Entrance</em> (2014) comprises a hanging tapestry and a small rug made by the artist. One might enter the room and consider the prayer rug. The formation of cut in the center of the woolen tapestry, with its architectural presence, welcomes one in rather than shrouding what may lie behind it. Something sacred is felt when in the room&mdash;how, magically, wool and linen can come together to create a beckoning, spiritual presence. In the next room, Wilson&rsquo;s <em>Traditional Queer Double Wedding Quilt</em> (2014), created by sewing together women&rsquo;s undergarments, blends symbolism of the traditional quilt with that of queer history, creating a new pattern for the books, as if one could navigate to McCall&rsquo;s now to find it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140716104348-03_WILSON_Entrance.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Angie Wilson,</strong><em> Entrance</em>,&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">2009-2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">Linen and wool yarn, hanging panel: 38 x 72 x 3/8 inches, floor panel: 38 x 62 x 3/8 inches; Courtesy of the artist and CULT | Aimee Friberg Exhibitions, San Francisco</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">Near Wilson&rsquo;s quilt is a small framed piece by Wolff, depicting several celestial shapes. While her other works embody the formation of star as traditional quilt block, <em>One and Other</em> (2014) represents stars as small circles, the way we see them dotting our night skies. It&rsquo;s a playful twist, abstracting her appropriated quilt block star shape into stars' actual representational form. The phrase &ldquo;under a blanket of stars&rdquo; further extrapolates the twist in Wolff&rsquo;s piece, highlighting her astute navigation between form, process, and representation. Stitched together, this trio of artists makes for an impressive array: a harlequin blanket of diverse visions, no less warm for its patchwork.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #46b86d;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/186890-kara-q-smith?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #46b86d;">Kara Q. Smith</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: <strong>Lena Wolff</strong>, <em> Radiant Star, </em>2014, painted birch, 60 x 60 inches; Courtesy of the artist and CULT | Aimee Friberg Exhibitions, San Francisco)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 16 Jul 2014 12:30:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Public Art in the Metropolis: The Polarizing Power of London’s New Commissions <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Public art has to strike a difficult balance in a city like London that is constantly evolving. It carries with it associations of permanence but its presence isn&rsquo;t always welcome and, perhaps worse than being openly disliked, works <em>in situ </em>over long periods of time can turn into street furniture, invisible to those that pass by day in day out&mdash;the &lsquo;public&rsquo; for whom the work exists. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><em>Tilted Arc</em> (1981), Richard Serra&rsquo;s public commission for the Foley Federal Plaza in New York is a great example of how these difficulties can play out. It was a huge rolled steel wall, which, after 1300 local employees signed a petition for its removal and a few high profile complaints about having to walk round it were lodged, ended in a lawsuit that resulted in its removal in 1989. Recently, Tower Hamlets made headlines with its plans to sell off its Henry Moore sculpture, nicknamed <em>Old Flo,</em> to pay for new services. Danny Boyle wrote an open letter to save it and a flash mob of people dressed up as Old Flo herded into the council offices as a protest. Art is public places is clearly polarizing.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715142950-1409_TDO_TheRightToFlight_Aerial.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">Bold Tendencies' <em>Right to Flight</em> commission by James Bridle. Aerial view from the helikite showing the structures made by TDO; Courtesy Bold Tendencies.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Two current temporary exhibitions in London this summer are daring to situate new work in public&mdash;The City of London&rsquo;s &lsquo;Sculpture in the City&rsquo; program throughout the square mile, and Bold Tendencies&rsquo; solo commission of James Bridle's work <em>The Right to Flight</em>, at the top of a car park in Peckham, South London. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">I first came across the City Corporation&rsquo;s Public Arts Program through an encounter with one of Angus Fairhurst&rsquo;s gorilla sculptures at the foot of the gherkin a couple of years ago. <em>A Couple of Differences Between Thinking and Feeling</em> (2000) is a large bronze sculpture of a sad gorilla clutching a huge dead fish. The gorilla&rsquo;s empty hand was shiny, and I paused to imagine the hands that held his, polishing up the metal. Even in the middle of the financial district the work induced human empathy and a moment of pause. It asked to be interacted with. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">This year the city is showing fourteen works in and around Great St Helens and 30 St Mary Axe. The stand-out works break away from the norms of public work (large metal sculptures); Cerith Wyn Evans&rsquo; neon sculpture in two parts <em>Time here becomes space, Space here becomes time</em> hangs from the roof of Leadenhall market. I saw it twice. In the early morning it glowed weakly above solemn looking commuters clutching coffees, and in the evening, more brightly, hovering in the hubbub of the post-work drinkers. Set against the 1881 roof structure its conversation to itself happily ignores the goings on below, reflecting more on the longer-term, on the space as it might once have been and will be in the future. However, the majority of the works on show do tend towards the large metal sculpture variety; Jim Lambie&rsquo;s <em>Secret Affair</em>, a large silver keyhole, blends in to the London landscape already littered with many similar works.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715143429-Time_here.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><em>Time here becomes space, Space here becomes time</em> by Cerith Wyn Evans located at Leadenhall Market; Image (c) the artist, courtesy The White Cube.</span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Bridle&rsquo;s project reworks the idea of public art from inside out. On top of the car park are a series of corrugated metal structures, from which a black helikite flies occasionally. The kite is fitted with data collecting technologies, and with the results, Bridle can experiment and make his artwork. When the balloon flies, it is very public, but its results get personalized&mdash;an email is sent to followers of the project updating them on new works being produced and other relevant actions across the globe, such as Greenpeace and the Electronic Frontier Foundation flying a large blimp over the NSA data collection center in Utah to make it visible. <em>The Right to Flight</em> is a balanced look at surveillance&mdash;the works being made deal with the aesthetic as much as the political. The kaleidoscopic <em>Rorschroof</em> video celebrates the aesthetic of the birds eye view, so ubiquitous now that we need to be reminded that it&rsquo;s revolutionized how we place ourselves. Throughout the project there are a series of free talks with exciting titles like &lsquo;Dark Matter&rsquo; and &lsquo;Killer Robots&rsquo;. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Both public art commissions are to some extent about visibility, but Bridle&rsquo;s project, through its use of technology, totally reworks the public/private conundrum. Through a diverse program that encompasses talks, presented research, a regular email and a large helikite in the skies above Peckham, Bridle&rsquo;s project, rather than assuming a certain form of &lsquo;public art&rsquo;, seems to be actively deciding and reshaping what that might mean for a city mediated by technology and surveillance, where we are able to see more of and interact with space in greater ways than ever before.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/377935-phoebe-stubbs?tab=REVIEWS">Phoebe Stubbs</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Bold Tendencies' <em>Right to Flight</em> commission by James Bridle.The helikite flying above Peckham; Courtesy Bold Tendencies)</span><br /></span></p> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:22:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Floating World: Part One: KEFE at Shooting Gallery <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">The Japanese art form ukiyo-e is centuries-old but today it still influences artists in various genres. Something about the colorful scenes and carefully rendered details inspired by this art form breathe new life into contemporary art, like that of art duo Kefe. Kelly Tunstall and Ferris Plock combine their knack for portraying characters like enigmatic female figures and fantastical creatures in acrylic painting, murals and more. The couple works both as a unit and individually. Kelly even painted a mural at one point while pregnant with their son. The duo&rsquo;s whimsical works oftentimes use a variety of materials like spray paint, gold leaf, pencil, collage and more. They&rsquo;re no strangers to San Francisco&mdash;you might have caught their work earlier at FFDG, 111 Minna Gallery and previous shows at Shooting Gallery. Their upcoming show &ldquo;Floating World Part 1&rdquo; showcases a few of their enchanting works with a second part coming later in the month. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715134419-_MG_0535.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ferris Plock,</strong> <em>Claude</em>, Acrylic on wood panel, 17x23"; Courtesy of The Artist and Shooting Gallery</span><br /></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715134616-_MG_0615.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Kelly Tunstall,</strong> <em>Up</em>, Graphite &amp; acrylic on wood panel, 14x17"; Courtesy of The Artist and Shooting Gallery</span><br /></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715134856-_mg_0583.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Kelly Tunstall,</strong> <em>Blown</em>, Graphite &amp; acrylic on wood panel, 18x24"; Courtesy of The Artist and Shooting Gallery</span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715135025-i.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Kelly Tunstall,</strong> <em>Sweets</em>, Graphite &amp; acrylic on wood panel, 5x6", 2014; Courtesy of The Artist and Shooting Gallery</span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140716053847-_MG_0574.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ferris Plock &amp; Kelly Tunstall,</strong> <em>Toy Boat, </em>Graphite &amp; acrylic on wood panel, 36 x 36"; Courtesy of The Artists and Shooting Gallery<br /></span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715135413-_mg_0850_m.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Ferris Plock,</strong> <em>4 Eyes</em>, Acrylic on wood panel, 16 x 20in; Courtesy of The Artist and Shooting Gallery</span></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Eva Recinos</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: <strong>Ferris Plock &amp; Kelly Tunstall,</strong> <em>Sea Fox,</em> Graphite &amp; acrylic on wood panel, 36x72"; Courtesy of The Artists and Shooting Gallery)</span></p> Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:08:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list From Zagreb to London: An Interview with OKO <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Croatia's capital city Zagreb does not boast a big scene for street art; as is the case in most more alternative approaches to arts in relatively smaller cities, it usually depends on certain individuals to keep the scene alive. In Zagreb, one of those individuals is OKO. She built up her name on the streets of her hometown, even though it might not have been her intention. From the simple motif of an eye patched around the facades of buildings that started to appear in 2005, up to the recent showcases of her work in museums, galleries or festivals, her style evolved during the years and today she is best known for two different visual tropes: the black-and-white old school graphics of well-dressed animal creatures and the other full-color childish ghosts and beasts. For her, all of them are alive and have unique personalities. Guardian energy and protection symbolism are an essential part of her drawings. She simply and honestly loves drawing&mdash;which might be the reason she's become one of the main figures and most prolific street artists to emerge from Zagreb. <br /> </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715090550-In_the_streets.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong><strong>OKO, </strong></strong><em>in the streets;</em> Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>We all know what OKO means (in Croatian,"eye") but what does it mean to you?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There is a story from my childhood connected with a drawing of the eye which is following me ever since. So the whole thing started as a symbol that represents the opening of the eye and seeing everything with the inner being, to not judge on first sight.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>You&rsquo;ve now taken your drawings into many different media. You do skateboards, tattooing, design for Adidas / Nike / Puma, your work was shown at many music &amp; art festivals and finally in the museums. Did it all start in the street? Was the street the first media where your work started to appear?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I have been drawing from an early age. I used to illustrate a school magazine in primary school and that was basically my first job (trust me, it's really funny when you're 10 and spend your weekends in school drawing different stuff for all the text you get to read as a preview for a magazine). Art high school just led more to that direction. I used to be amazed with theater. That&rsquo;s why I chose scenography in high school, but after I finished it times and situations were weird and life takes you to different directions... I started to work so I could support myself and didn&rsquo;t think I would ever do art as a profession. Like I already said, life takes you weird places... So after 7 years I just figured out I need to try the Art Academy. It was a mystical place for some "other" humans who perceive life on a higher level (well, at least that was the idea in my head). Happily I got in, and the whole "saint" idea started to fall apart. You figure out they are just regular humans with all their humanly behavior and for me that was a shock. I expected something bigger, something more holy. That&rsquo;s when I started to draw a lot, and everywhere. In trams, in class, at home, just to be in my head, to keep my "holy" idea safe. Along with that I started to put things in the streets. I don&rsquo;t know how it started to happen, but little by little things were going somewhere. I have no plans for where or how high, but I try to keep myself on the ground and "just draw" like I used to. Everything else will happen by itself, like always in life.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091802-Warehouse_skate_park_Zagreb_2" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><strong><strong><strong>OKO,</strong></strong></strong> </strong>Warehouse skate park Zagreb; Courtesy of the artist</span><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Where did it go from there? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">For a few years I didn&rsquo;t want to be part of museums or any other exhibition. In those times I started to get depressed about art: what does it mean, what&rsquo;s the purpose, why are we doing it, is it completely useless? I stopped drawing for 6 months and decided I wouldn&rsquo;t do art anymore, never again in my life. But, like always, when you try to run away from something that is your being, you just keep bumping into it. So I figured out&mdash;that&rsquo;s me, that&rsquo;s who I am and I can't escape it, at least not in a peaceful way. So I just started to draw again, growing up little by little, level by level. I realized museums are not bad. If you don&rsquo;t let anybody influence you, or any other "job" for any company, if you don&rsquo;t make compromises against your own idea, then it's fine. When you can stand in front of your work afterwards and not feel ashamed, that means you made a good decision. Every time the "painting" wins over you. You feel it. There is no faking in that. And if you leave your battlefield losing the battle, you can't walk like a hero. And everybody can see that.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715090735-Wall_of_Zagreb_squat_Medika" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><strong><strong>OKO,</strong></strong></strong> <em>Wall of Zagreb squat Medika</em>; Courtesy of the artist</span><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Can you tell a bit more about the street art scene of Zagreb, how it was before and how it looks like now?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The street art scene in Zagreb&hellip; Well, I moved to London 6 months ago, so for the moment I don&rsquo;t know. It was always a small scene. It used to be a good group of people in one moment that had great energy and that "punk" attitude around it. Then I think something went quiet for a bit, and now it seems that it's getting up again. I don't know honestly. I used to be a part of a group: energy was up, chilling was up, drawing was up, sk8 was up&hellip; It was just street life. Now I usually go alone. It started to be something private and I like it that way. I do hang out with other artists. When I travel around Europe and do big festivals, we all hang out, everybody drawing on their own machine, big walls... There's good working energy around it. And a lot of laughs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Who influenced you and what was your motivation to go out into the streets?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Well, I always wanted to do it, and just one typical day over a beer things started. I went with my friend to copy my image, cut it and start. It was a great feeling to walk around at 4am and put stickers around. The city is empty, it's quiet and you just feel alive. When you walk 'till dawn and you see the sun setting up, you just can't have a bad day after that...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715090909-Victoria_and_Albert_Museum.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><strong><strong><strong>OKO,</strong></strong></strong></strong><em> Victoria and Albert Museum</em>; Courtesy of the artist</span><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>You moved to London recently, how was that? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Yes, I moved few months ago. It was just a natural urge to see bigger things. And I did... London is a killer. All big cities are. You need to fight with them. It's a constant battle. Sometimes you feel alive, sometimes you just want to be under your blanket. It's a natural thing. All in all, it's a growing experience. I know I leveled up, and I will see how much probably when I go back to Croatia for a bit... I'll figure it out. Artists really don't have an address. You live everywhere. I'm not a person that likes changes, but at the same time I feel that&rsquo;s life, hitting you all the time. So probably I will be everywhere...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Will you continue your work there? I see you exhibited already in some London museums. Where &amp; how was that? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I always live in my studio, always [do], probably always will. So surely I paint or draw there. Do I plan to stay there? Who knows&hellip; I try not to plan. That&rsquo;s what I learned. You need to let go and let life flow, to not be too tight, and because I'm quite a control freak and usually always work like a machine, it's not always easy for me to let go. That's probably a lesson I need to learn now. Regarding exhibitions in London, how it turns out I have one exhibition every month. It's not that I planned it like that, it's just happening. When I moved I had the Victoria and Albert Museum thing, it was amazing&hellip; It's a huge space, a huge museum, and it's full of art of people around the world that you sometimes feel you don&rsquo;t belong here and that you are a part of the whole humanity. It was packed. I never had anything with so many visitors around. It was about 6000 people there and it's weird. The good thing is that people don&rsquo;t know how I look like, so you can always pretend you're one of the visitors and then it's easier.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Any plans for the future?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">A lot of them, but I'm trying not to force myself. I have ideas what I want to achieve. Will I do it or not is just on me, so it's better not to talk about it too much. For sure I will try to draw and travel everywhere. The world is really a massive space to paint. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091033-Hand-painted_skateboards.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><strong><strong><strong><strong>OKO,</strong></strong></strong></strong> </strong>Hand-painted skateboards; Courtesy of the artist</span><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>What I first think of when I think of your stuff now is the monochromatic animal-headed well-dressed people. Are they humans or animals? Why are they so well dressed?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I have 2 different styles of drawing. One is those black and white animals and the other is full of colors childish doodles. Both work for me so I just follow how I feel when I take the ink. Why are they well dressed? Because I love to dream about a better world, about justice "giants" that do stuff according to early human and moral ways, a better version of humanity.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Did you have the intention to make it your trademark? Even if not, I'm sure a lot of people equate you with it. Do you feel good or bad about it?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I never planned to make it my style. People think what they want. Sometimes it's weird because people start to expect something from you, put you in some box and start to talk to you, give you advices and directions you should take. Art is not illustration. No matter how illustrative it can look sometimes, it's your own personal story and perception of the world. In that way sometimes, probably almost always, those "images" are quite fragile, because all of us know how fragile our inner world is. We are all giants, but we don&rsquo;t have courage to show that most of the time.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091206-Drawings_2" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong><strong>OKO, </strong></strong>drawing; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>What are your other motives? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Motives in drawing&hellip; Who knows... Life... For the last few months I'm really interested in medical herbs and all ancient medicines that old cultures used to make to heal themselves, probably to try to heal humanity on some other level than just with big guardians. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>What's the last piece you did? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Last big one I did on 9x30m wall in Toulouse in France. It was a big show and a lot of artists from around Europe were there. It was fun, great people, great artists. For the moment I'm painting new paintings in my studio because I have an exhibition in 2 weeks, so I need to try to make them by then. They&rsquo;re big canvases. The battle between them and me is on. Some days they win, some days I do. We will see who will win in the end&mdash;will I exhibit a painting or an empty ripped canvas.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>Is drawing kind of therapeutic for you? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Drawing is always therapeutic. I think all art is. It's kind of an escape from life around us. When you don&rsquo;t live, you don&rsquo;t have anything to &ldquo;say&rdquo; or &ldquo;paint&rdquo;.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091310-Brainimal_for_Vizkultura.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><strong><strong>OKO,</strong></strong></strong> <em>Brainimal for Vizkultura</em>; Courtesy of the artist</span><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>How do you deal with all the ideas/research/decision making or simply said mental work? How do you choose the theme? Do you research for that? Is there some deeper metaphoric meaning, some history involved?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Don&rsquo;t know. We're probably more complex beings than just one layer humans, so our minds have a world for themselves which is sometimes working for us, sometimes against us. Hearts have other ways. And &ldquo;real&rdquo; life around us has its own ways also. So sometimes you feel like you're standing in the middle of some crossroads and yelling like crazy, at least in your head. It's hard to explain how you do what you do. You're just doing it. Probably the whole thing is trying not to overanalyze it, otherwise you kill it even without starting it. When I get some kind of idea what&rsquo;s happening, then I research. Depending on what idea it is, sometimes it requires old medicine study, sometimes old religions, sometimes science, poetry, music, geography, humanity or nature. I love science. I can't fail to be surprised by it. It's magical&hellip; Particles... One of the giants I really admire is Nikola Tesla. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>I'm sure you went through a lot of phases in your work. After all the thinking and (probable) changes where are you now with your work and what did you learn? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Phases&hellip;. Surely it brings you up in the air and then slams you on the floor. I think art is a constant surviving mode on. What did I learn? To try to free myself from expectations, from others and then from myself. Because that&rsquo;s the killer, that&rsquo;s the one that keeps you tied and your brain can't breathe. You don&rsquo;t feel anything except constant frustration. Probably that&rsquo;s the biggest thing I've learned, in my opinion&mdash;to keep myself free, not to be a prisoner of my own mind. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091453-Drawings.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong><strong>OKO, </strong></strong>drawings; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>What do you do except drawing? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Drawing and painting is what I do. Every day. Everything else comes out of it. So skateboard or tattoo or any other design comes from that.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><strong>You don't want your face to be really seen in any pictures that appear. Does it mean people should focus on the work? </strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I hide my face because I think it's not important. I show it partly on some pictures. Lately I'm doing a lot of photo-shoots that actually show my face but covered in white paint or in glitter or who knows what's it going to be in the future. In that context it makes sense to show it, painted like that&hellip; It represents something in a particular moment. But otherwise I think it's not important because my ideas don&rsquo;t have a body. It's one of those collective energies floating around and when you try to put a face on it, it loses the magic in my opinion, it becomes human. There are a few artists that I really admire, and despite the idea that I know how their face looks like, I hope I will never meet them in real life. Somehow it makes more sense when their ideas and things they say belong to a collective energy (gaia). That way everybody feels it personally, it's part of you, part of me. It's not mine, or yours...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091548-In_the_streets_3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong><strong>OKO, </strong></strong><em>in the streets;</em> Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715091951-Warehouse_skate_park_Zagreb" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong><strong><strong><strong>OKO,</strong></strong></strong> </strong>Warehouse skate park Zagreb; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715092041-OKO_portrait_photo_by_Kristijan_Smok.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>OKO portrait;</em> photo by Kristijan Smok</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715092131-OKO_in_her_room.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>OKO in her room;</em> Courtesy of the artist</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">OKO is part of a group exhibition at Loud &amp; Western Building London, Until 25th July 2014<br /> </span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.deal-big.biz/" target="_blank">http://www.deal-big.biz</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">She will also be in Switzerland soon to promote her skateboard designs for Faust Skate Company. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">&mdash;Maja Milic</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Courtesy of the artist)</span><br /></span></p> Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list 2501: “Nomadic Experiment Anatomy of Restlessness” <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Italian born artist 2501 recently graced the LA scene with his latest exhibition, &ldquo;Nomadic Experiment Anatomy of Restlessness.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The cryptic title is all too fitting for a man with a fair bit of mystery surrounding his persona. From the gallery to the streets&mdash;hitting display cases to stucco walls&mdash;2501 has kept manically busy in his creative efforts ever since hopping on the scene. The man never stops; mural campaigns, major art exhibitions to endless design projects, he&rsquo;s become a valued player in the art of never letting creativity go flaccid or stale. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714193434-2501.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>2501</strong>; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Like many artists who&rsquo;ve utilized routes of success that deviate from institutional education or the projected norm, 2501 broke the creative seal with graffiti. At the age of 14, he dropped his first tag as a youth in his homeland of Italy under the pseudonym Never. From there, the itch grew. He became a fixture in the graffiti scene of Brazil where he lived for three years, a place where his skills were honed alongside artists such as </span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=prozak+graffiti&amp;rlz=1C1CHMO_enUS554US554&amp;espv=2&amp;source=lnms&amp;tbm=isch&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=GBDDU-qvCc6woQTW5IHYBg&amp;ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&amp;biw=1455&amp;bih=727" target="_blank">Prozak</a></span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"> and <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=prozak+graffiti&amp;rlz=1C1CHMO_enUS554US554&amp;espv=2&amp;source=lnms&amp;tbm=isch&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=GBDDU-qvCc6woQTW5IHYBg&amp;ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&amp;biw=1455&amp;bih=727#q=ciro+graffiti&amp;tbm=isch" target="_blank">Ciro</a></span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In more ways than one, he is an intimidatingly versatile artist. His ability to do justice to the often parallel worlds of &ldquo;low&rdquo; and &ldquo;high&rdquo; brow art makes him hard to peg and/or pigeon-hole. From every brush stroke to every dot stippled, from every commissioned mural to every illegal wall hit, he modifies his style to complement the task at hand, allowing the viewers a chance to experience his workspace and the environment with him. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714193503-2501-4.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>2501</strong>; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">He speaks on the dynamics of working with the streets vs. working in a gallery setting during an interview with Crist Espiritu of </span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.dozecollective.com/this-is-2501/" target="_blank">Doze Collective</a></span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">: &ldquo;I think street and gallery are two different environments, that&rsquo;s why I have developed another kind of style that I use all the time that I make and exhibit. These two styles can seem really different, but in reality are like the yin and the yang of the same concept: 'gestuality.' In the street it is pure instinct, short time to paint big walls. You are in the middle of the people. You paint like you walk&hellip; without thinking. In the gallery, your instinct is diluted with the time so it is a different moment and is more intimate. Months of preparation, the loneliness of the studio&hellip; it is completely different.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">With his latest exhibition, 2501 has stretched his limbs in a linear direction. Seen throughout his international murals over the last two years, he&rsquo;s adopted a style of painting that freely allows line formations to create patterns and textures as a foundation for the overall work. It&rsquo;s partially abstract and rustically animalistic. Notes of zebra-esque creatures frolic over the fa&ccedil;ade of ceramic vases while somewhere in Italy, Poland or Russia, the foundation of those same lines are alive on a wall taking a completely different form. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714193539-mural_in_poland.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>2501</strong>, mural in Poland; Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Somehow, the series ranges from feeling tribal, to illustrative, from minimal to highly involved. These are likely symptoms of an artist reaching a unique point in his career; striving for layered work that is both fulfilling to the artist and the viewer, but also offering a sense of chaos in its consistency.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">While the artist loves to leave his work open to interpretation by the audience, he can pinpoint the representation of those infamous wavy back lines as the &ldquo;constant changing of perception.&rdquo; For 2501, &ldquo;nothing that you look at is exactly the same twice,&rdquo; acknowledging the lines as being figurative examples of vibration, energy, and movement. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714193606-ill_protettore.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>2501</strong>, &ldquo;<em>il protettore</em>&rdquo;, 2014, Ceramic color on ceramic twice fired and hand pulled gold leaf, 8 x 5 inches; Courtesy of the artist</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There&rsquo;s something slightly romantic waiting to be pinpointed here: possibly the lack of static truly experienced in the art world, but most notably the streets. Things disappear altogether, alternate with time and fade with the sun. Art, like man, is multifaceted and transformative. Through observation and interpretation, we can enjoy the value and beauty in the complexities of both.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">2501&rsquo;s &ldquo;Nomadic Experiment Anatomy of Restlessness&rdquo; will be on view at LA&rsquo;s </span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.sozegallery.com/" target="_blank">Soze Gallery</a></span><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> till July 17. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714193628-2501-6.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714193646-2501-5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>2501</strong>; Courtesy of the artist</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">&mdash;Kimberly B. Johnson</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">(Image on top: <strong>2501</strong>, <em> &ldquo;la macchina&rdquo;, </em>2014 , Ceramic color on ceramic twice fired and hand pulled gold leaf $1300 framed, 12 x 12 inches; Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:31:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Top Picks from ArtHamptons 2014 <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Thursday night heralded in the brigade of well-dressed fair-flockers for the opening night of ArtHamptons. A celebrity studded event&mdash;Moby sighting included&mdash;it&rsquo;s no wonder these single lane country roads congested into a veritable parking lot in a matter of several short hours. This year's theme of &ldquo;escapism from the everyday&rdquo; is fair director Rick Friedman&rsquo;s call to curate with color and levity, an appropriate agenda for collectors looking to don the walls of their seasonal beach homes with blue-chip quality investments. As to be expected, there was a sprinkling of pop-iconography, metallic beach prints (&agrave; la Massimo Vitali, only not), and your standard color-coded ab-ex paintings. A pithy little anecdote to note are the artwork d&eacute;j&agrave; vus when you get the distinct feeling you&rsquo;ve seen that work, or at least that style before. Chances are, you probably have. On a wall not several booths over the same artist is probably exhibiting a piece from the same series with another gallery&mdash;a&nbsp;gentle reminder that the art world is smaller than you think and originality is often the most valuable commodity.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The real standout of the fair is the integration of <em>Korea Contemporary</em>, formerly the Korean Art Show. Dispersed through out the exhibitors are fifteen South Korean galleries sponsored by the Korean Galleries Association, highlighting the country&rsquo;s contemporary art scene. A welcomed breath of fresh air, you can recognize the South Korean artwork even before confirming via the label or price list. The most adventurous in medium and the most progressive in subject matter, the Koreans really hit the nail on the proverbial head with their contribution to the canon of contemporary art. Even the galleries that were not a part of the Korean curation included works from independently represented South Korean artists amongst their international artist rosters.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Following our second glass of free champagne and our third walk down the pop-up aisles, here&rsquo;s our selection of top five artists from ArtHamptons 2014.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">#1: <strong>Sungchul Hong</strong> at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/25749-anthony-brunelli-fine-arts">Anthony Brunelli Fine Art</a>, New York</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714095745-image.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="color: #525552;">Sunchul Hong, </span></strong><span style="color: #525552;"><em>Perceptual_mirror, </em>2013,<em> S</em>olar LCD units, acrylic, 21.65 x 21.65 inches;&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist</span></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">South Korean mixed-media artist Sunchul Hong utilizes LCD solar panel systems to create a kinetic sculpture of modern mastery. Each panel contains an independent charger and display unit creating a beautifully choreographed flickering of rest and activation. Much like the individual window units of a soaring highrise, each panel represents the presence, or lack thereof, of a particular entity or body. Suspended in customized plexiglass boxes, each amalgam of energy packets is assembled in a sleek geometric shape, cleverly forming cohesion amongst the independent cohorts.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">#2:<strong> Park Seung Mo</strong> at <a href="http://www.keumsan.org/gallery.php" target="_blank">Keumsan Gallery</a>, South Korea</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714100538-PARK_SEUNGMO.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="color: #525552;">Park Seung Mo, </span></strong></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Another Wall 527</em>, 2014,&nbsp;Stainless Steel Mesh, 189 x 95cm; Courtesy of the artist</span><em><br /></em></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">These life-sized sculptural works give their subjects a weightless effect. Sculpted from several layers of steel mesh, each layer is rotated slightly to give a sense of dimensionality and depth to the subject matter. The industrial quality of the medium is balanced gracefully with its corporeal volume and the almost skin-like texture of an otherwise violent or aggressive material. Suspended from atop, the work commands a dominating presence in physical space.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">#3: <strong>Carla Groppi</strong> at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/38388-alicia-david-contemporary-art">Alicia David Contemporary Art</a>, London</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714100749-o.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="color: #525552;">Carla Groppi, </span></strong></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>After Atget (32) Parc de Saint-Cloud 8</em>, 2014, Pastel on paper, 61 x 49 inches; Courtesy of the artist</span><br /></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Carla Groppi&rsquo;s work is an homage to art history with a contemporary twist. Attracted to cool colors, the artist often works in blue hues recreating scenes from French daguerreotypes that highlighted scenes of urbanism and modernity. The artist reduces the original image to its most basic lines and forms, capturing the freneticism of the city without the literal narrative. Her drawings often mimic the piece from the past, synthetically replicating a print, all the while being done by hand. With painstaking attention to detail, Groppi&rsquo;s work communicates the ideals of art history with a modern vernacular.</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">#4:&nbsp; <strong>Elisabeth Lecourt</strong> at <a href="http://www.enviedart.com/envart_bureau.php?sDic_p=en_us" target="_blank">Envie d&rsquo;Art Gallery</a>, Paris</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714101324-13_pierre-verte-rubis-rouge.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="color: #525552;">Elizabeth Lecourt, </span></strong></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Pierre Verte, Rubis Rouge,</em>&nbsp;2012, Voyage of Sir Francis Drake Saint Augustine map rep. 1585, Signed and sealed E.L.&nbsp;Elisabeth Lecourt; Courtesy of the artist</span><em><br /></em></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">These clever little constructions of history catalog the history of fashion, commerce, and imperialism in a quaint and sweet motif. Folded to perfection, this series of &ldquo;geographic clothing&rdquo; captures the domesticity of capitalism and the results it has on culture. Combining the meticulous fabrication of a French fashion designer and the research of a seasoned historian, Lecourt&rsquo;s work contains a history of modern civilization wrapped into a neat little bow (literally).&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">#5: <strong>Jong-wan Choo</strong>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/42393-shin-gallery">Shin Gallery</a>, New York</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140714101111-artist_more_51d75695d280c.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong><span style="color: #525552;">Jong-wan Choo, </span></strong></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Emergence</em>, 2012, Acrylic, colored pencil on canvas, 74.8 x 87.8 in /190 x 223 cm; Courtesy of the artist</span><br /></span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="FreeForm" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This Michelangelo rendition is the finest of Choo&rsquo;s charcoal-colored creations. Constructed painstakingly from colored pencils and sized to monumental scale, this series is an example of human diligence. An homage to the master himself, Choo influences form with the finest etch of a pencil, with a touch as delicate as Michelangelo&rsquo;s must have been when striking the edge of his chisel.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">Like sand slipping through a loosely formed palm, e</span><span style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">ach figure begins to dissolve into origami-like forms, breaking down the modern human psyche into a million disparate pieces of crumpled refuse. Choo's figures are both human and metaphor simultaneously.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/121595-allyson-parker?tab=REVIEWS">Allyson Parker</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Carla Groppi</strong>, <em>After Atget (33) Parc de Saint-Cloud 9, </em>2014, Pastel on paper, 61 x 49 inches; Courtesy of the artist]</span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:46:10 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list RexRomae at Scoop London, 13th – 15th July 2014 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">If you ever needed proof that street art is in vogue &ndash; this is it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Scoop London presents a group exhibition featuring work by Alexis Diaz, Askew, Borondo, Bicicleta Sem Freio, 2501, Vinz, Agostino Iacurci, Jaz, Martin Whatson and Fintan Magee.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The 12-strong show opens for just two days (13 to 15<sup>th</sup> July) as part of fashion trade show Scoop, held at the Philips Gallery and Saatchi Gallery space at Howick Place, in chichi Southwest London.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Directed by Rom Levy and curated by Charlotte Dutoit, the showcase was put together for nomadic gallery project RexRomae &ndash; who hosted Puerto-Rican artist Alexis Diaz (who handpaints his surrealistic murals) and Argentinian Jaz in London earlier this year for their debut exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The Scoop project brings these two buyers&rsquo; favourites, with a mix of high-octane artists from around the globe, who will present new works on canvas alongside the trade show&rsquo;s high-end contemporary womenswear booths.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Charlotte Jansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: Courtesy the author)</span><br /></span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:16:40 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Banksy did it for nothing then we sold it for thousands: Julien's Street Art Auction Beverly Hills <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Any doubts about the broad appeal and ongoing vitality of street art were wiped out by the pre-auction scene at Julien&rsquo;s last Thursday: more Palm Springs than Park Avenue. A fashionable crowd brought an exuberance, only partially fueled by a collective anticipation for six figure Banksy sales. An auction of nearly 100 pieces of street art featuring an array of Banksy works, which drew bidders from 15 nations and which had a high estimated value of one million dollars, fell far short of that mark in total sales but earned a record-setting price for a Banksy that had never before been on the market. <br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Among eight works by elusive British-born artist Banksy offered by Julien&rsquo;s Auctions at their June 26th sale, <em>Bomb Hugger</em> (2003)&mdash;a two color spray paint stencil on brown cardboard depicting a pig-tailed young girl in skirt and sweater embracing a black iron bomb&mdash;sold in the evening&rsquo;s most dramatic bidding war among 10 bidders for $34,375, &ldquo;which was 430% above the low estimate,&rdquo; said Michael Doyle, street art director at Julien&rsquo;s Auctions, &ldquo;and we set a new record for what one of these placards sold for at auction.&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140714204850-20140626_180610.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Banksy</strong>, <em>Bomb Hugger</em></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Bomb Hugger</em> was crafted by the artist to function as a protest sign for a February 15, 2003 London street rally, one of the co-ordinated worldwide demonstrations that drew millions to the streets in opposition to a looming Iraq, but failed to halt the United States-led military invasion of that nation the following month. &ldquo;At the London protest it was passed around, then found on the ground,&rdquo; explained Doyle, saying the piece came to the art market after &ldquo;a woman who picked it up, on her way home on the [London] Tube and someone on the train said &lsquo;that&rsquo;s a Banksy.'&rdquo; She kept it and only now has it been offered for sale.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another work, <em>Mariachi Player</em> (2001), a wall stencil of the type more commonly associated with Banksy&rsquo;s street oeuvre but rare since it was made in Mexico, was expected to go for a quarter million dollars (it did not). Painted while the artist toured as a team member of the Easton Cowboys and Cowgirls soccer club, Banksy left the image on a street corner in San Cristobal De Las Casas, a town in the conflicted southern Mexican state of Chiapas, which continues to see tensions between indigenous groups and the Mexican military. <em>Mariachi Player</em> depicts a clich&eacute; mustached, sombrero-wearing Mexican guitar player stenciled in black onto concrete and features a cartoon word balloon filled with bombs&mdash;where graphic convention would display musical notes&mdash;falling from above. It sold below a low estimate for $140,000.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140714205534-20140626_190816.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">At the auction the designer-dressed attacked hors d'ouvres eating like they just got out of LA&rsquo;s Twin Towers jail, and even as lots went to auction, the clang clanging cocktail chattering grew. In an out-of-the-way corner an unassuming man, white hair and white sport coat, open collared, went unnoticed; only the auctioneer remained attentive to his silent nods. &ldquo;Final warning&hellip;&rdquo; intoned the lively host and talk stopped on a dime; you could hear a pin drop before the auctioneer dropped an impressive &ldquo;SOLD!&rdquo;, drawing an extended applause. The white-haired man won the <em>Bomb Hugger</em>, and a few other Banksys too. He is Terrence Cole, a London based partner in Marcol, a multi-billion Euro international property developer. For a collector who buys chains of hospitals and shopping centers at a swoop, a few Banksys may be small change, but it was a purchase he relished, he told ArtSlant Street. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s instinctive of Banksy to try and depict his feelings, we must appreciate that,&rdquo; Cole said after his applauded win, adding that he was attracted to the <em>Bomb Hugger</em> not for its war protest context but for an appreciation of the artist&rsquo;s street strategy: &ldquo;he did it for nothing, he never expected it to sell for this, and that&rsquo;s what it&rsquo;s all about.&rdquo;&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140711173916-O.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Retna</strong>, <em>Scarlet Heart</em></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Other artworks that sold included <em>Scarlet Heart</em> (2009), a work on paper by Retna that was bought for $19,000, falling near its estimate. Retaining the graphic presence the artist is known for&mdash;larger than life portraits of sexy women layered in pre-Columbian-like decorative marks&mdash;the multi media photo collage is a studio version of the artist&rsquo;s mural sized pieces which dot the Hollywood streetscape. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We noted Canadian-American artist collective Faile&rsquo;s <em>10 Ways to Make Him Notice You</em>&mdash;a sizable slab of concrete torn from a railway arch in Berlin, Germany which displays all the indicators of a first wave of classic street art, enigmatic and challenging graphics simply stenciled for multiple applications&mdash;went for $9,500 surpassing a low estimate for the sale. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140711172257-4149.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Mear One</strong>, <em>Graffiti is the Voice of the Dissatisfied Soul</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Two paintings by Mear One&mdash;the artist whose 2012 East London mural depicting a conspiratorial meeting of world bankers <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2213536/Banking-protest-mural-resembling-Nazi-anti-Semitic-propaganda-removed-East-End.html" target="_blank">drew condemnation</a> for being derivative of Nazi propaganda and was painted over&mdash;sold above expected prices. <em>Graffiti is the Voice of the Dissatisfied Soul</em> (2013) awkwardly displayed in the plaza at the Wilshire Blvd gallery entrance, was installed like a scenic flat with exposed 2&rdquo; x 4&rdquo; lumber bracing, and evoked a movie set painter's sensibility, appearing as a parody of graffiti. While one can appreciate the irony of this pro-vandal message flaunted on the white pavement of Beverly Hills, where a tossed cigarette can earn a $1000 fine, this doesn&rsquo;t make up for formal failings. Mear One remains challenged when depicting the human image, neither satisfying as anime cartoon nor formal portraiture&mdash;his piece up in Silver Lake&rsquo;s Sunset Junction resembles its subject, Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, as much as it does the label on a bottle of Newman&rsquo;s salad dressing. And here, a figure resembling a hoodie-wearing Gelfling from &ldquo;the Dark Crystal&rdquo; who, in lieu of a crystal shard unconvincingly clutches an aereosol can to his heart, is statically composed aside the sentimentally sophomoric epigraph. Someone paid $1250 for it. <em>Do Not Block</em> (2007), a charmless painting of a slingshot wielding man/boy, brings up familiar imagery, not because it evokes the poetic "slingshot&rsquo;s stone&rdquo; line from the Brazilian samba &ldquo;Waters of March&rdquo;, but because it bites Banksy&mdash;this is the identical pose of Flower Thrower that&rsquo;s everywhere on the cover of &ldquo;Wall and Piece&rdquo;&mdash;it sold for $2250. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The LA artist Shark Toof was taking in the auction, signing tag books. He expressed ambivalence toward the event. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s gross. Over on the outside, what you&rsquo;re doing is illegal but when it&rsquo;s attached to money, then people think it&rsquo;s important.&rdquo; Would he like to see his work auctioned off? &ldquo;Oh hell yes.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Howie Stier</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All photos by the author)</span><br /></span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:11:29 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The House of Illustration Opens Its Doors with Works by Quentin Blake <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The physical home of the Illustration organisation opens its doors with founding member Quentin Blake&rsquo;s <em>Inside Stories</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The new home for illustration talent, emerging and established, British and international, opened its doors in London last week. The House of Illustration, which has been established as a group championing illustration talent since 2002, putting in group shows and running education initiatives, was originally established by illustrators Quentin Blake and Emma Chichester Clark. Situated near King&rsquo;s Cross, in central London, the venue archives and exhibits everything from picture books, animations, fashion illustration, scientific drawings and advertisements.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140715081658-candide.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Quentin Blake</strong>, From 'Candide'; &copy; Quentin Blake</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The first physical residency for the organisation opens its doors with a celebration of the iconic cartoons of Quentin Blake. Blake, who, in 2003, pledged his back catalogue of 4,000 original drawings and 250 books, now comes good on his promise with a showcase of some of the highlights from his extensive archive. <em>Inside Stories</em> features Blake&rsquo;s illustrations for iconic books, such as Roald Dahl&rsquo;s <em>The Twits</em> and <em>Danny the Champion of the World</em>; David Walliams&rsquo; <em>The Boy in the Dress</em>; illustrations for books by John Yeoman, Russell Hoban and Michael Rosen; as well as previously unseen and unpublished illustrations and sketches. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140711100103-i.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Quentin Blake,</strong> From '<em>The Wild Washerwomen</em>'; &copy; Quentin Blake</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">House of Illustration director Colin McKenzie says, &lsquo;<em>Inside Stories</em> is the perfect show to open our new gallery. Quentin Blake is an illustrator of world renown whose work is instantly recognisable to millions.&rsquo; Blake added, &lsquo;Illustration has been one of the most distinctive strands in the history of British art and I&rsquo;m delighted that there will now be a dedicated space where everyone can view, discuss or learn about illustration; British and international; past, present and future.&rsquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140711100449-k.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Quentin Blake,</strong> From<em> 'How Tom Beat Captain Najork and his Hired Sportsmen'</em>; &copy; Quentin Blake</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140711101003-b.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Quentin Blake</strong>, From '<em>Clown</em>'; &copy; Quentin Blake</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Inside stories</em> runs until November 2, 2014.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><a href="http://www.houseofillustration.org.uk" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium;"><strong>http://www.houseofillustration.org.uk</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Laura Havlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: <strong>Quentin Blake</strong>, <em>From 'The Twits'; </em>&copy; Quentin Blake)</span></p> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 22:14:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Static Schtick: Owen Kydd at Cooper Cole <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Sifting through the biographical information sent to me by the gallery regarding the small (two works total) solo show by Canadian, Los Angeles-based artist <a href="http://coopercolegallery.com/exhibitions/67/owen-kydd/profile" target="_blank">Owen Kydd</a> at <a href="http://coopercolegallery.com" target="_blank">Cooper Cole</a>, I am unable to find a single page or press snippet that does not contain the information that Kydd studied under and worked for Jeff Wall. If one did not know Kydd's work, or the context in which the information was made available to me, it would be easy to mistake much of this written material as part of a project describing the influence and importance of Wall himself. From what I was supplied, this much is clear: Kydd studied with and worked for Wall.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">He also studied under Stan Douglas.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">And then he moved to California and studied under Catherine Opie and James Welling.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I am naturally suspicious when artists, their galleries, or admirers feel the need to mention whom they studied under. Whether in a press release, an interview, or a cocktail party, namedropping still seems to serve the same function: validation by association.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Having lived in Vancouver for ten years myself, I have become used to Wall and his function as homage/explication/tribute/influence/grandmaster/sui generis catch all. However, in Toronto, Wall does not retain the same baroque air of overlord, or his center-of-the-universe status.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In Kydd&rsquo;s case, I would have just liked to see the work. But in typical Vancouver fashion, the work is offered through the multiform filters and justifications that begin with Wall, traveling through fashionable sound bites like &ldquo;durational photography,&rdquo; the still apparently real &ldquo;photo conceptualism,&rdquo; and of course the eventual return to Wall. If you do not enjoy this work&mdash;if you do not <em>get</em> why it should make you happy&mdash;it is really just because you do not appreciate the carpet of approval laid down by Wall and his myriad acolytes, students, and admirers.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140710123514-West_Jefferson.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Owen Kydd,</strong><em> West Jefferson Wall</em>, 2013, Video on digital display with media player; Courtesy Cooper Cole, Toronto.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Ordinarily I would not be mentioning another artist so often in a review, but ordinarily other artists are not mentioned as unrelentingly in the support material for an exhibition as they are for this one.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition is this: two wall mounted monitors with cords that fall elegantly to the floor and plug into a socket near by. This was the work I had seen many years ago in Vancouver, and was interested in at the time. Kydd makes videos that look like photographs. Kydd makes photographs that look like videos. A camera is fixed on a still life:&nbsp;a vantage point, a storefront, a bird, an assemblage of objects. At first glance, the items appear to be the subjects of photographs mounted in lightboxes (Jeff Wall). However, if you look longer than the few seconds viewers may typically afford an artwork, you will see things start to move. Slight shadows are cast, a bird ruffles its feathers, the breeze moves an object. The work is interesting because photography is a problem now. Though it is also possible that this work signals that it is all over for photography&mdash;that the medium has been solved, wrapped up, perfectly started, and finished by other artists such as William Eggleston, Nan Goldin, and Lee Friedlander. It is very difficult to exhibit a photograph in 2014 and offer viewers anything new. This work almost succeeds in that.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The term <em>durational photography</em> is in fact a very apt description of what Kydd's work may be. But it is also a two-word neologism that is basically devoid of meaning, and could describe nearly anything related to a camera. To hold a camera in your hand with your finger hovering above the shutter, waiting for a moment worth capturing, is also durational, and also photography, and so also durational photography. One piece, entitled <em>West Jefferson Wall</em>, looks like an abstract painting from a distance. It is a collection of ephemera&mdash;paper, white, light blue, one red piece of something, on an Yves Klein Blue colored background. When watching the piece, little scraps of composition move. The second work features a hand, and the reflection of the same hand, perhaps in a store window, which includes one of those cheap Chinatown plastic flowers, with its happy eyes that rocks back and forth.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">But I get it, they look like photos. They are not. But perhaps they can just as easily be classified as videos where not much happens, with no panning or jump cuts. Though the work begs the question: does a distinction between the two mediums really matter at all?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140710123724-CC_Owen_Kydd_Mirror_Still_Life.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Owen Kydd</strong>, <em>Mirror Still Life</em>, 2014, Video on digital display with media player; Courtesy Cooper Cole, Toronto.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The draw of the work in this exhibition is also the weakness of the work. These photograph/videos contain a schtick. Many good artists have a schtick. A schtick is a thing to work with and expand on. And as far as schticks go, this is an interesting one that Kydd has carved out for himself, and which no one else is doing. That alone in 2014 is interesting, though I left this exhibition feeling somewhat disappointed that after more than a few years into making work like this, the schtick had not become more complex, more interesting, more confusing, or strange. This is a nice pleasant show of photographs that look like videos, or videos that look like photographs, but it does not extend very far beyond that tenet.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/6978-brad-phillips?tab=REVIEWS">Brad Phillips</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Owen Kydd</strong>, Installation view (from left)<em> Mirror Still Life,</em> 2014, Video on digital display with media player; <em>West Jefferson Wall,</em> 2013, Video on digital display with media player; Courtesy Cooper Cole, Toronto)</span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:20:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list An invitation to re-draw conclusions; the editing of Karl Larsson <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In October 2013, Joanna Kamm hosted the Karl Larsson exhibition <em>Twelve Hours</em> at her Berlin-Mitte gallery, Galerie Kamm. In 2014, a metaphorical twelve months later, the title has appeared in the gallery once again, playing host to a familiar roster of works save for select new additions. One such alteration is a shallow scratch in the plaster wall at the gallery&rsquo;s entrance. The gash, <em>Form Was Not Born From An Idea, It Was An Idea Vanishing</em>, sets the tone for this re-visitation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition&rsquo;s accompanying text, an excerpt from G&eacute;rard Petitjean, explains <em>Twelve Hours</em> as the time allotted to French philosopher and philologist Michel Foucault every year to explain in a public university course his research and direction in the year that has just ended. It is a period of re-visitation, but inevitably too, a reinterpretation by both the thinker and the students who play witness to the lectures.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140709182723-01-KL_any_idea.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Karl Larsson</strong>, <em>Any Idea What It Costs To Fill A 160GB Ipod With Legally Purchased Songs?,</em> 2014, Framed ink jet print, 58 x 103 x 4.5 cm, 1/3 + 1 A/P; Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Kamm, Berlin.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The Swedish-born artist&rsquo;s exhibitions are collections of &ldquo;objects that turn the act of reading into the act of dwelling.&rdquo; The search to link meaning to disparate, pared down bodies seemingly bobbing aimlessly in the gallery space lends the entire construction a sense of poetry that draws a direct line from the artist&rsquo;s own anthologies. References often stem directly from Larsson&rsquo;s written words, as in <em>Any Idea What It Costs To Fill A 160GB iPod With Legally Purchased Songs?</em>, a question that first arose in his book of poems, <em>Parrot</em>, printed by Paraguay Press in 2010. The words were only later translated into physical idea within the gallery space. Here, in the &ldquo;cage&rdquo; of the gallery, the poetic phrases are picked apart and incarnated as investigations of the circumstances of the artistic process, the search for reason in individualized interpretation, and reductions of the everyday occurrences that parallel and come to make up Larsson&rsquo;s artistic practice. All of it is completely and perfectly fleeting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">After the original installation of <em>Twelve Hours</em> last year, explains gallerist Joanna Kamm, the artist came to realize that only after the work had been installed, after the show had already commenced, did the show really seem to be &ldquo;ready to exhibit.&rdquo; Therefore the idea of review emerged. Not only <em>poetic review</em> through the installation of the physical bodies in the gallery space, but an invitation to edit the original interpretation of the &ldquo;gallery (&hellip;) as a document&rdquo; subject to revisions. This tactic takes on additional significance with the recent announcement that Galerie Kamm will be closing this September after a thirteen year run making <em>Twelve Hours</em> its penultimate exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140709182911-KL_Twelve_Hours_view_3.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Karl Larsson</strong>, <em>Twelve Hours, </em>2013, Installation view; &copy; Photo: Andrea Rossetti; Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Kamm, Berlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">To revisit is to explore anew, to re-examine, to tempt a whole host of conclusions or perhaps even reconstruct original premises. The re-installation of <em>Twelve Hours&mdash;</em>with the same press release, nearly identical imagery, and a reconfiguration of almost the same work&mdash;a year after its inception is precisely the type of reflection Larsson habitually constructs.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In 2014, Larsson's exhibition does not call upon the viewer to reinterpret the differences between spaces then and now; it puts forth the poem of a space as an ever changing circumstance, a value which can only live in the memory of the idea which created it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/147418-nicole-rodriguez">Nicole Rodriguez</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Karl Larsson</strong>, <em>Twelve Hours, </em>2013, Installation view; &copy; Photo: Andrea Rossetti; Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Kamm, Berlin)</span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:19:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list No Edge of Canvas Remains Untouched: SEN2 at 1AM Gallery <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Neighborhoods might be imaginary divisions based on street names, but they hold a real effect over our lives. If we stay in one neighborhood during our entire childhood, it ultimately shapes our world views. If we travel to a new one, we might come back with a shifted perspective. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Out of all art forms, graffiti and street art especially emphasize place and space. For graffiti writers tagging trains in New York in the 1980s, the rush was knowing other neighborhoods would see your tag. You didn&rsquo;t have to travel because your tag did. And you would be proud to be a part of the New York scene. Today, artists everywhere from Los Angeles to S&atilde;o&nbsp;Paulo can collaborate with each other and see each other's work in person <em>and</em> online. It's a moment that speaks to the growing cross-pollination of street art.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140709180106-nas.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Growing up in Puerto Rico, Sen2 found his artistic voice by connecting with local artists but also by traveling. After a visit to New York in the 1980s &mdash; an important time and place in the history of graffiti &mdash; he returned with a serious passion for the art form. Over time, Sen2 gained notoriety; he joined Tats Cru in New York and began working with celebrities like Nas and Missy Elliot. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">In his current solo show, "A Declaration of Color," this trajectory comes together. The show pays homage to New York graffiti while displaying the colorful twist Sen2 puts on the style.&nbsp; </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Cutlures collide in the artist&rsquo;s dynamically composed pieces. "Estados Unidos" shows the Statue of Liberty looking regal while a print called "South Bronx" portrays a tagged train with the American flag in the background. Many of his pieces use titles written in Spanish like "Miradas" &ndash; a lively mixed-media portrait of an anonymous woman. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">The strength of Sen2's artistry shines the most in these mixed media pieces. The artist hides little visual clues everywhere on the canvas &mdash; illegible writing in thin cursive, splatters of spray paint that almost fade into the background, crisp geometric shapes that appear where you least expect them. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140709180443-cypres.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Despite being on canvas, many of the works hold onto the unique tactile qualities of spray paint. In some pieces, spray paint drips in streaks across the entire composition and pools at the bottom in small globs. It's as if the canvases were freshly painted. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Though the black-and-white prints are a beautifully nostalgic nod to the budding New York graffiti scene, the pieces with color ultimately make a more lasting impression. Faithful to the show&rsquo;s title, Sen2 boldly declares that no edge of the canvas should remain untouched. He crafts pieces with layer upon layer of color. The juxtaposition of so many bright colors in the same intensity on one canvas sounds overwhelming, but in person, it&rsquo;s hard to look away. </span></p> <p class="Normal1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: medium;">Outside of the gallery, the artist created a mural with his tag. The spray paint spills out onto a bit of the sidewalk, almost as if it's a mirror image of the mural's bright colors. Sen2 commented that onlookers gladly kept him company and shared the history of the buildings nearby. For this particular neighborhood &mdash; one with its own colorful characters &mdash;&nbsp;Sen2 brought something to brighten up that corner. And perhaps a bit of San Francisco will leave with Sen2.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Eva Recinos</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(All images: <strong>Sen2</strong>; Courtesy of The Artist and 1AM Gallery)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:DoNotRelyOnCSS/> <o:DoNotOrganizeInFolder/> <o:DoNotUseLongFilenames/> <o:PixelsPerInch>0</o:PixelsPerInch> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:EnableOpenTypeKerning/> <w:DontFlipMirrorIndents/> <w:OverrideTableStyleHps/> </w:Compatibility> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="--"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="false" DefSemiHidden="false" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="371"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal Indent"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="header"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footer"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="caption"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of figures"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope address"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope return"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="line number"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="page number"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of authorities"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="macro"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toa heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Closing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Signature"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Default Paragraph Font"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text Indent"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Message Header"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Salutation"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Date"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text First Indent"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text First Indent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text Indent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text Indent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Block Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Hyperlink"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="FollowedHyperlink"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Document Map"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Plain Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="E-mail Signature"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Top of Form"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Bottom of Form"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal (Web)"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Acronym"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Address"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Cite"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Code"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Definition"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Keyboard"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Preformatted"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Sample"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Typewriter"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Variable"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal Table"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation subject"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="No List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Outline List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Outline List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Outline List 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Simple 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Simple 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Simple 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Colorful 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Colorful 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Colorful 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Columns 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Columns 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Columns 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Columns 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Columns 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 3D effects 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 3D effects 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 3D effects 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Contemporary"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Elegant"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Professional"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Subtle 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Subtle 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Web 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Web 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Web 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Balloon Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="Table Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Theme"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" Name="Placeholder Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" Name="Revision"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" QFormat="true" Name="Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="41" Name="Plain Table 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="42" Name="Plain Table 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="43" Name="Plain Table 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="44" Name="Plain Table 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="45" Name="Plain Table 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="40" Name="Grid Table Light"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="Grid Table 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="Grid Table 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="Grid Table 4 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="Grid Table 5 Dark Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="Grid Table 6 Colorful Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="Grid Table 7 Colorful Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 6"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"; mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} </style> <![endif]--></span></p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 16:57:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Light, Linen, Formica, Wax <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In their two-person exhibition, Ryan Lauderdale and Jessica Sanders present work that takes various approaches to creating physical objects through systematic processes. What&rsquo;s remarkable is how their works seem to dialogue through the diversity of the basic forms and materials each artist prefers. Lauderdale presents hard-edged, technological lamp-like wall sculptures while Sanders is showing two focused groups of paintings that use the properties of beeswax over linen. Their works are displayed side by side in each of the cavernous rooms at Kansas and their remarkable coherence is a testament to the savvy eye of the gallerist that paired them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Black Lamp </em>(2014) is Lauderdale&rsquo;s most arresting work. In this piece the slick black curve of an open cylindrical wheel merges with the vertical base that houses a pair of tubular fluorescent bulbs. Every side of the well-crafted structure is finished in black, glossy Formica. High-contrast reflections of white light streak the surface and highlight nuances in the sculpture&rsquo;s form. With a portico-shaped hood and hidden sockets, the fluorescent tubes are pinned upright into a recessed base pedestal with trapezoidal sides. It&rsquo;s as decadent and appealing as the specialized shapes of a customized car.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140709145144-2_Kansas_JS_RL.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Ryan Lauderdale / Jessica Sanders,</strong> <em>Installation View;</em> Courtesy Kansas Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The three-piece installation that occupies the back room,<em> Interior with Cornice</em> (2014), is like an opulent mise-en-sc&egrave;ne. Here, freestanding triangular structures mirror each other across an attached glass platform. The pieces are furniture-scaled, but their skeletal structure does not invite participation with the body in any way. There&rsquo;s a sense of theatricality to the luxurious-looking forms that are actually made of readily sourced, low-cost materials. This theatrical characteristic is equally present in Lauderdale&rsquo;s <em>Hall Monitor</em> (2014). Its sporty blue and white two-tone exterior bulges as if it were adjusting to accommodate the dimensions of mechanical or electronic equipment inside. Lauderdale doubles this theatrical effect by leaving black power chords exposed and incorporating Elfa shelving unit components (vis-&agrave;-vis The Container Store) into other works. The pieces smartly toy with the passage of style where over time high design is knocked down to its cheaper iterations; it&rsquo;s why <em>Interior with Cornice</em> has the specific look of a 1980s re-interpretation of Bauhaus rather than just Bauhaus.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Lauderdale mines the utopic narratives embedded in the history of design to build his own vocabulary of form. Consequentially, his work slips between associations of Modernist furniture and architecture into other realms where similar codes have been borrowed and particularized such as the aspirational marketing of exercise equipment, transcendental meditation, and the faux-fancy gaudiness common to cheap casinos and strip clubs. His combination of design nostalgia with minimal art just works. It amounts to a precisely observed American Mannerism that is simultaneously earnest and cheeky.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140709144958-5_Kansas_JS_RL.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Jessica Sanders,</strong>
 <em>Crumple A39</em>, 2014,
 Beeswax on stretched linen with artist frame,
 35 x 27 in/ 88.9 x 68.6 cm; Courtesy Kansas Gallery</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">By contrast, Jessica Sanders' minimal works reinforce the natural forms of organic materials such as bee&rsquo;s wax. In both her <em>Saturation</em> and <em>Crumple</em> paintings, Sanders sets up a regulated action that displays a given material&rsquo;s characteristics more so than the artist&rsquo;s hand. To create her <em>Crumple</em> works, Sanders stretches fine suiting linen in different shades of indigo and grey before coating the linen in hot wax. The coated linen is then unstretched, crumpled, and re-stretched. The result is a &nbsp;mini-geology of wrinkles and stress cracks in the wax along with a crust of tiny, sugary particles of broken material. The accumulation of varying thicknesses of the semi-opaque beeswax over the colored linen creates an intricate marbled pattern and an impressive tonal array. Alongside stretches of pure beeswax or uncovered linen, slightly saturated sections look darker and wax-coated areas appear chalky, desaturating the color of the linen underneath.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In the <em>Saturation</em> series, Sanders makes sensual wax pours onto raw linen. They are beautiful but with her interest in fixed interventions, I&rsquo;m more interested when the parameters are set where the material <em>behaves</em> rather than when the material is composed. Sanders' works are sensitive, absorbing, and finely executed with handmade frames with unpredictably placed and particular-seeming nails along their edges.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It&rsquo;s a satisfying contrast to see 1980s hyaloid set pieces up against tactile and unpretentious process works. Both Sanders and Lauderdale engage a sort of period style, and each are able to use the attending associations from the strong historical quotations to expand their work. These artists manage to be truly inventive inside what would seem like a tight framework to work with.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #e5195a;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/352054-megan-liu-kincheloe?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #e5195a;">Megan Liu Kincheloe</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Ryan Lauderdale</strong>
, <em> Hall Monitor, </em>2014
, Formica, wood, hardware, fluorescent, and spray paint on glass
, 106.7 x 248.9 x 18.4 cm; Courtesy Kansas Gallery)</span></p> Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:35:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list ArtHamptons: Looking to Korea and Beyond <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">This year, ArtHamptons returns to the Sculpture Fields of Nova&rsquo;s Ark bringing a unique focus on contemporary Korean art. Citing a growing fascination in New York with contemporary Korean art, ArtHamptons will feature fifteen Korean art galleries bringing with them over 150 artworks.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Fittingly, Korean-born, New York-based multimedia artist Jayoung Chung will open the fair with her performance, <em>Performing with You</em>. Developed in part during her residency at Robert Wilson&rsquo;s Watermill Center, Chung&rsquo;s piece weaves together drawing, technology, and sound to create a full sensory experience.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Bringing together so many elements and mediums, Chung&rsquo;s piece isn&rsquo;t easy to describe (best watch the video of her performance at the Watermill Center below). Using conductive charcoal, Chung will draw on paper she&rsquo;s embedded with twelve strings of conductive wire. As she touches the paper with the charcoal, the strings produce digitized images and sound, with the sound, in turn, further affecting the digitized images. Drawing inspiration from her audience as they come and go, Chung will continue to draw until the paper becomes black with charcoal. The result is a multi-dimensional artwork created in real time. Modified for ArtHamptons, Chung's piece will be staged in front of the pavilion with two smaller monitors on the ground alongside her canvas.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/92474265?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" frameborder="0" width="700" height="394"></iframe></p> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/92474265" target="_blank">Performing with YOU</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user846070" target="_blank">Jayoung chung</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com" target="_blank">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Chung&rsquo;s work reflects her training as a painter, a programmer, and a musician. After receiving two BFAs in Seoul, one in painting and another in design, Chung moved to New York City where she earned an MPS in Interactive Telecommunication Programming from NYU in 2010. As a child she learned three traditional Korean instruments. In her work she attempts to marry these interests, using her eye for visual art and design to create connections between traditional arts and new technologies. If you&rsquo;re lucky enough to hold a Black Card, you can see her show outside the pavilion at 7pm.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Another highlight this year is the fair's retrospective of Jane Freilicher, who&rsquo;s been named this year&rsquo;s recipient of ArtHampton&rsquo;s Lifetime Achievement Award. Exhibited by Tibor de Nagy Gallery, <em>Near the Sea: A 60 Year Retrospective</em> highlights the artist&rsquo;s long career painting the landscapes and cityscapes of her native New York.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Freilicher came of age with the Abstract Expressionists and informal New York School of the 50s, belonging to circle of prominent painters and poets including Helen Frankenthaler, Frank O&rsquo;Hara, Joan Mitchell, and Larry Rivers (whose work was a major focus <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/35631">last year at ArtHamptons</a>). Painting from her homes in Manhattan and Water Mill, Long Island, her distinctive pastel color palette, brushy paint strokes, and always-prominent vase of flowers reflect her technical skill and sustained commitment to a simplistic beauty and a &lsquo;painterly realism.&rsquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/684523/tcd3/20140709003015-Harper_Avenue__2014__c-print__110_x_154_cm.jpg" alt="" width="700" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">Kim Woo Young, Harper Avenue, 2014, c-print, 110 x 154 cm; courtesy of Park Ryu Sook Gallery</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">While never quite reaching the fame of some of her friends and contemporaries, Freilicher&rsquo;s work has earned her a place as one of America&rsquo;s most esteemed artists of the 20<sup>th</sup> century, and her paintings are in the collections of America&rsquo;s most important art institutions including The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, among others. On Saturday, Freilicher will be at ArtHamptons for a book signing.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Two additional artists making appearances I can&rsquo;t go without mentioning are LA ROC and Lady Bunny. The Haring-dubbed &ldquo;Graffiti King of the Lower East Side,&rdquo; LAII aka LA ROC aka Angel Ortiz will be showing at the Lawrence Fine Art booth as one of ArtHamptons&rsquo; spotlight artists. As for Lady Bunny, the legendary drag queen is returning to the Hamptons this year to DJ the annual Empire State Pride Agenda Tea Dance supporting LGBT issues.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As for outside events, except for a bit of cloud cover, it&rsquo;s going to be high 70s and sunny. Perfect for sharing war stories of your recent acquisitions at Saturday&rsquo;s party hosted by the &ldquo;elite and prestigious&rdquo; Young Presidents Organization/World Presidents Organization (invite only) or experiencing the &ldquo;thrill of social and economic exclusivity&rdquo; at Sunday&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.arthamptons.com/artpolo/" target="_blank">polo match</a>&nbsp;(open to all ticket holders). &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">See the full schedule for ArtHamptons <a href="http://www.arthamptons.com/events-at-a-glance/" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Jayoung Chung</strong>, <em>Performing with You</em>, multimedia performance,&nbsp;Photo by Caterina Verde; Courtesy of the Watermill Center]</span></p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 17:16:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Hampton Happenings: Your Guide to Summer Art in the Hamptons <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It&rsquo;s official! This past 4th of July celebration greeted the summer season of New York City&rsquo;s art scene. Hordes of urbanites will trade in their metro cards for polo mallets as the Hamptons Art Fairs kick into full swing. Troupes of art aficionados will flock to this east-end mecca of white beaches and even whiter ensembles. The Hamptons Art Fairs are known for their trendy parties, trendier market swings, and art collectors who have a penchant for scooping up big ticket items at the drop of a well-coiffed hat. Opening this weekend are Art Hamptons and Art Market Hamptons followed by Art Southampton in late July. As most New Yorkers are avoiding the scorching city heat, we&rsquo;ll be turning it up as red dots and auction paddles fly. Here&rsquo;s our itinerary on things to come out east. &nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Art Market Hamptons</strong> [July 10-13] specializes in connecting art dealers with collectors. Their market friendly focus helps expand the platform of arts appreciation within the context of networking and investments. Located in Bridgehampton and produced by veteran dealers Max Fishko and Jeffrey Wainhause, this fair is sure to contain the front runners of market friendly art investments.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artmarkethamptons.com/" target="_blank">www.artmarkethamptons.com</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #ff1493;"><span style="color: #ff1493;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708140012-Art_Southampton.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><em>Art Hamptons opening night, </em>2013; Courtesy ArtHamptons</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>ArtHamptons</strong> [July 10-13] is known for its boutique style exhibitions featuring the top galleries in post-war and contemporary art. This year, they&rsquo;re hosting a line up of galleries, events &amp; lectures culminating in their annual Art Polo game in a merger of all things art and affluence. Special events include a John Chamberlain Auction, Expert-Led Guided Tours and ArtKids -collaboration with Free Arts NYC- hosting special family friendly programming. And don&rsquo;t forget the annual Hamptons Tea Dance on Saturday July 12th with none other than DJ Lady Bunny!&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.arthamptons.com/" target="_blank">www.arthamptons.com</a> </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #ff1493;"><a href="http://www.arthamptons.com/"><span style="color: #ff1493;">&nbsp;</span></a></span></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The Herzog &amp; de Meuron designed <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/2167-parrish-art-museum"><strong>Parrish Art Museum</strong></a>&mdash;a recent recipient of the &ldquo;Best Museum&rdquo; in <em>Travel + Leisure</em>'s International&nbsp;Design Competition&mdash;is following the formula for art world acclaim. Along with exhibitions from the museum&rsquo;s permanent collection and sculpture garden, this weekend will feature the museum&rsquo;s Midsummer Party on Saturday, July 12<sup>th,</sup> and closing reception for Jennifer Bartlett&rsquo;s <em>History of the Universe</em>. If you&rsquo;re looking for an opportunity to stretch out after a long weekend at the fairs, the museum even offers a yoga class on Sundays. </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://parrishart.org/programs" target="_blank">parrishart.org/programs</a><br /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #ff1493;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #ff1493;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708134948-121010_Parrish_Museum_Shoot_2-0012.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">Photo by Matthu Placek; Courtesy of <a href="http://parrishart.org/about/architecture" target="_blank">Parrish Art Museum</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Later on in July, <strong>Art Southampton</strong> [July 24-28] features 80 modern and contemporary art galleries from around the globe. With a preview benefitting the Parrish Art Museum and Southampton Hospital, this year's fair is estimated to attract over 16,000 collectors, curators, and professionals in the field of contemporary art.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.art-southampton.com/" target="_blank">www.art-southampton.com</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/34124-the-watermill-center"><strong>Watermill Center</strong></a>&mdash;a self-proclaimed <em>laboratory for performance&mdash;</em>is an exploratory research center for the creative disciplines including art, dance and theatre. On July 26<sup>th</sup>, the center will host its 21<sup>st</sup> annual summer benefit supporting the center's artist residency program which hosts 100 artists from over 30 nations each summer.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.watermillcenter.org" target="_blank">www.watermillcenter.org</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For ongoing exhibitions in the Hamptons area during July, one we&rsquo;re looking forward to is Genieve Figgis&rsquo;&nbsp;<em>Yes Captain,</em> now on at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/40994-harpers-books"><strong>Harper&rsquo;s Books</strong></a> in East Hampton. This will mark the first public presentation of the Irish painter&rsquo;s work in the U.S. </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.harpersbooks.com/exhibitions/26/genieve-figgis-yes-captain" target="_blank">www.harpersbooks.com/</a><br /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Established in 2012, the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/47180-east-hampton-shed"><strong>East Hampton Shed</strong></a> is exactly that. A shed in East Hampton, but one that shows a host of really great artists. Right now you can catch<em> I Never Called You A Dream</em>, a project by Hector Arce-Espasas and Lewis Teague Wright in the diminutive space. </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://easthamptonshed.com" target="_blank">easthamptonshed.com</a><br /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For a short exhibition (July 5-17) you can catch the latest project by artist Zachary Armstrong at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/47177-robert-blumenthal-gallery"><strong>Robert Blumenthal</strong>'s</a> <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/47178-blumenthal-east-hampton">East Hampton space</a>. Let's just say it's dinosaur-themed. </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.robertblumenthal.com/" target="_blank">www.robertblumenthal.com/</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/47179-dan-flavin-institute"><strong>Dan Flavin Institute</strong></a>, a Dia adaptation located in Bridgehampton and established in 1983, hosts nine permanent installations of Flavin&rsquo;s work created between 1963 and 1981. The institute is housed in a converted firehouse originally built in 1908 and couldn&rsquo;t be a more appropriate resting place for the infamous light artist. </span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="%20http://www.diaart.org/sites/main/danflavinartinstitute" target="_blank">www.diaart.org/sites/main/danflavinartinstitute</a><br /></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/121595-allyson-parker?tab=REVIEWS">Allyson Parker</a></span></p> <p class="Body" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;<em>Editor's Note: This article has been corrected; our previous figure for Art Southampton's attendance was incorrect and has been updated accordingly.</em><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <em>Art Market Hamptons 2013; </em>Courtesy Art Hamptons)</span></p> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 23:25:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Basically Obsessed: Haunted Euth <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Heavy metal, drugs, moral decay&hellip;Yes, please! We&rsquo;re loving what we&rsquo;re seeing from L.A. artist Haunted Euth. Working across mediums, you can find his hard-core zombie character all over L.A. Euth cut his teeth on the streets with self-made stickers and wheat pastes after graduating high school in 2004. Since then he&rsquo;s graduated from Otis College of Art and Design and to a host of other mediums including spray paint, acrylics, and woodcarving. Most recently, Euth has been working with poured concrete to create blocks of his work, which he then cements into place. They have by far the greatest lifespan out of all his pieces, but the best thing is that the pieces can actually become a functioning part of the environment.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708125533-tumblr_mkri8y5DkC1qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #000000;">Lately, Euth has also been working on an acrylic and enamel series titled &ldquo;Basically Obsessed,&rdquo; that highlight his love for pattern, repetition, and the L.A. street scene. You can check out how he makes his stickers in 30 hardcore seconds here: </span><a href="http://vimeo.com/98877229" target="_blank">http://vimeo.com/98877229</a><span style="color: #000000;">. Also, be sure to look out for Euth&rsquo;s woodcarvings. These he creates out of found and reclaimed wood and then leaves on the streets for the taking.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #000000;">You can see more from Haunted Euth on his <a href="http://www.hauntedeuth.com" target="_blank">website </a></span><span>and<a href="http://www.hauntedeuth.tumblr.com" target="_blank"> tumblr.</a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708125610-tumblr_n79tqlZWF71qf40aqo1_500.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708125709-tumblr_mvlwybET1z1qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708125743-tumblr_mlycusJt801qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708125831-tumblr_mx7ib4d0hb1qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708130002-tumblr_mxdjqrFcZp1qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708130125-tumblr_n0smbjGFY11qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708130230-tumblr_n4voq7Ykuk1qf40aqo1_500.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708130302-tumblr_mzberl2QAj1qf40aqo1_500.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708131218-tumblr_n0ie6vaSJu1qf40aqo2_1280.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp; <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708131910-tumblr_n14cpfRGTH1qf40aqo1_1280.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708130727-tumblr_n5u2n40CnQ1qf40aqo1_500.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #000000;">Submit your work for a </span><a href="http://www.artslantstreet.com/articles/show/36948">spotlight feature!</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 21:23:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Standard Book of Color: Obsidian Black #161928 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Surely black, but so lively one cannot catch its true hue. Volcanic glass cooled too fast to crystalize, scientists never can quite call it a mineral or capture its color too closely. Depending on the angle of shimmer however, approximates exist.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Named by Pliny the Elder as <em>Obsius Lapsis</em>, after a dubious claim that it was discovered by a Greek of that name, the gem gained its "d" from a printer&rsquo;s error. The Aztecs called obsidian <em>itzli</em>, a force that found form in the macahuitl.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">A wood sword brandished by Aztec warriors, but unfortunately not well enough. Set with prismatic blades laid into a finely carved wooden shaft, according to Bernal D&iacute;az del Castillo, the macahuitl could chop the head off a horse with a single blow. Many drawings exists, but the only surviving macahuitl burned in a fire in Spain in 1884, a last obliterating kiss from the conquistadors to an annihilated people.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Wielded like a club but sharp, and when pulled back, serrated. Handy for capturing sacrificial victims, the blunt side could knock them unconscious while the blade could do the rest. The highest level of Aztec heaven was reserved for warriors and sacrifices, either side of the black stone sword.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708085231-Macuahuitl.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><em>Drawing of the last&nbsp;macuahuitl&nbsp;destroyed during the fire of the Real Armer&iacute;a of Madrid in 1884</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Some scholars think obsidian kept Americans from learning advanced metallurgy, but it was not this but surprise, bad timing, and disease that destroyed the Aztecs, their obsidian blades gleaming even in the moonlight as they marched in loose formation, animal skinned, and armed with a cruelty only matched by the Spaniards. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Though often black in your hand, if shaved right, the slivers of obsidian shine clear. The stone is too lively to catch a perfect color, but in the low spectrum, a few shades from pure black exists a flicker of its fire, far enough to glow with the softening impurities of other colors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Obsidian is the color of soothsayers. The Aztecs peered into it as a portal to other worlds, sacred caves, reading prophesy through its starless gleam with darkling perfection. Obsidian is the smoking mirror, the English name and symbol of the fearsome Tezcatlipoca, god of the night sky, the north, the earth, enmity, dark winds, hurricanes, discord, divination, temptation, beauty, war, strife, and most fully, the divine embodiment of obsidian. At the founding of the world, he traded his right foot for an obsidian mirror. The deity of rulers and sorcerers, the personification of change through conflict, he is the lord of the night and its creatures&mdash;above all, the jaguar, capable of crossing between the earthly realm and the underworld.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140708084608-smithson1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div class="gmail_default"><span style="background-color: #ffffff; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small;"><br /> </span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Robert Smithson<em>,</em></strong><em> Yucatan Mirror Displacements (1-9),</em> 1969, Nine chromogenic prints from 35mm slides, 24 &times; 24 inches (61 &times; 61 cm) each; Courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Though wandering far from the Aztec dominion in the Yucatan, Robert Smithson came to the Yucatan in 1969 trailing Heizer&rsquo;s dad and John Lloyd Stephens, both chasers of myths and monuments. In his rearview appeared Tezcatlipoca.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&ldquo;All those guide books are of no use,&rdquo; said the god. &ldquo;You must travel at random, like the first Mayans; you risk getting lost in the thickets, but that is the only way to make art.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Smithson placed mirrors around the peninsula, near Mayan ruins, in the jungle, and beside the sea&mdash;&ldquo;mirror-travel&rdquo; between his and the ancient world. He took photographs of his &ldquo;Mirror Displacements,&rdquo; and carrying their glass back with him to New York, documented his visions in <em>Artforum</em> magazine.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="color: #161928;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">"It was in the black mirror of anarchism that surrealism first recognised itself," says Andre Breton.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Art is a poor reflection of life, its colors shine best only momentarily, the objects as lively as skeletons. The color here is not obsidian, a printer&rsquo;s blunder, but it perhaps has beauty too. There is however no future to be found in plumbing its depths.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">The reflected light has been erased. Remembrances are but numbers on a map, vacant memories constellating the intangible terrains in deleted vicinities. It is the dimension of absence that remains to be found. The expunged color that remains to be seen. The fictive voice of the totems have exhausted their arguments. Yucatan is elsewhere.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini?tab=REVIEWS">Andrew Berardini</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #161928; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">(Image on top: <em>Tezcatlipoca from the Codex Borgia</em>.) </span><span style="color: #d32bc9;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #d32bc9; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><br /></span></span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:06:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Graffiti Writer to Gallery Owner: The Story of the Unassuming Mr. Steven Daily <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The latest conversations between Steven Daily and myself left the overwhelming impression of a busy man. One jam-packed with the commonalities of adulthood: homemaking, career, the works. He&rsquo;s currently in the middle of uprooting from his home in Hollywood&mdash;the one he lived for nearly 10 years&mdash;to lay new roots in Pasadena 30 minutes Northeast of LA. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In between receiving texts reading &ldquo;Just finished the kitchen,&rdquo; or &ldquo;Hi Kim, just got home. Had to pick up a desk,&rdquo; I wondered how he&rsquo;d have time between unpacking his life and the duties of his profession to humor me. Challenged with the task of delving back into his mind some 20 years ago, he resurfaced with the stories that explain the unforeseen past and unexpected experiences of the highly unassuming Mr. Steven Daily.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707175425-Steven_Daily.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As an accomplished fine artist, having done work for the likes of Lucas Films, Disney, HBO, Sony and Darkhorse Comics, Daily has a handsome list of creative accomplishments strewn throughout his repertoire. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In the midst of loading and transporting his life in and out of boxes, coordinating knick knacks to be set throughout his home&mdash;not to mention simultaneously juggling those never-ending obligations of an artist looking to avoid starvation&mdash;he&rsquo;s knee deep in the consuming task of meticulous event preparation for <a href="http://marcasgallery.com/" target="_blank">Marcas Contemporary</a>&mdash;the Downtown Santa Ana gallery co-owned by Daily and Costa Mesa&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.asissued.com/" target="_blank">As Issued</a> owner, Dana Jazayeri&mdash;set to formally open its doors in mere days.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707175558-Jeff_Soto__Max242_and_Steven.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Jeff Soto, Max242 and Steven</em>; Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a working artist, Daily knows the task of juggling roles and responsibilities. There are few people willing and prepared to accept 16-hour work days as a normality and acknowledge that getting paid likely entails catching up on sending invoices while on the toilet. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I hear it&rsquo;s a life of wonder, excitement, plenty of pros and no shortage of cons, consistent struggles, satisfying successes&mdash;but above all&mdash;the option of living life on one's own creative accord. For Daily, it&rsquo;s a life lived out of sheer carnal creative necessity. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s always been about the art.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">However, the art that consumed a college-aged Steven Daily doesn&rsquo;t end with his intrigue of acrylic on canvas. This is the tale of a kid&mdash;50 miles east of LA&mdash;with a backpack full of aerosol cans, a skateboard, and a bad, bad case of the graffiti bug. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707175658-RG__Steve__Max242_and_Jeff_Soto_after_a_day_of_painting_in_LA.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>RG, Steve, Max242 and Jeff Soto after a day of painting in LA</em>; Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The year was 1991. Nirvana&rsquo;s <em>Nevermind </em>had just been released while a disinterested Steven Daily sat in his Riverside apartment watching a B-list movie on his tiny black-and-white portable TV. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The film was <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083854/?ref_=ttpl_pl_tt" target="_blank"><em>Dreams Never Die</em>,</a> the story of a New York graffiti writer and his harmless albeit drug-peddling love interest as they jointly handle their scandals with the type of plot twists you only receive from solid made-for-TV movies. Somewhere stuffed inside the film&rsquo;s 100 minutes of &lsquo;80s cult classic bliss, something happened: a fever, a need, a sickness. Something swelled inside Daily and permeated his mind with the need to paint. Not just dabble. Not take a tentative interest in. He wanted to piece: multiple colors, productions on walls, painting heavy and painting hard. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Before ever witnessing the flick that ignited his fire, his interest in tagging and graffiti was nurtured several years earlier as a teen skating the streets of Orange County. Born in Riverside, CA, transplanted to south Georgia, then Atlanta, Illinois and eventually back to the OC, Daily got his dose of the teenage experience cruising city streets. &ldquo;As a skater,&rdquo; he explains &ldquo;you end up crossing paths with writers.&rdquo; The intersections are pretty well documented within the cultures. &ldquo;Every skate video I&rsquo;d ever seen to that point had graffiti in it for sure.&rdquo; Daily found a friend in a young OC writer named Donny. From there, he was exposed to the style, structure and flow of the elite personalized signature, the &ldquo;tag.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707175809-Steven_Daily_painting_during_Scribblejam_2002.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Steven Daily painting during Scribblejam 2002;</em> Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Exhausted from his parent&rsquo;s gypsy-esque lifestyle, an 18-year-old Daily&mdash;fresh out of high school, the fourth he&rsquo;d attended in his school career&mdash;returned to his hometown of Riverside, CA in &rsquo;91. He moved into a small apartment off of La Sierra and Vineyard with his tiny monochrome TV, bored and curious, awaiting something to fill the void. &ldquo;When I saw <em>Dreams Never Die</em>, I just felt like it was the story of a kid struggling with being an artist. That&rsquo;s the year I started painting.&rdquo; From here, vital characters were added to his saga, creating his own story of plot twists and a layer of youth drama.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&ldquo;Randy was kind of a hooligan,&rdquo; he recalls. Stories of a character with a knack for trouble and a passion for testing the limits seeped in over the telephone. Randy sounded like the type of loving lunatic with explosive energy directed at unexpected targets. But most importantly, Randy was the type of hooligan willing to steal Henry Chalfant&rsquo;s <em>Spray Can Art</em> from Barnes and Noble as a tender gift for a friend. &ldquo;I looked at that book like it was the Bible.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707175910-Pilor_character_by_Steven_when_he_was_still_writing_PR._Character_done_in_LA_s_Commerce_Yard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Pilor character by Steven when he was still writing PR.</em> Character done in LA's Commerce Yard; Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The progression of classic graffiti art flicks soon ensued in Daily&rsquo;s life: <em>Beat Street, Wild Style, Style Wars</em>, the Holy Trinity if you will. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">1991 saw the birth of KUEST, then RSIN, and later GHETO, RUKUS, PR and eventually, STEVEN&mdash;a decision made after getting caught writing in Los Angeles&rsquo; Commerce Yard in &lsquo;96. &ldquo;I remember walking out of court after receiving my fine and that being the exact moment I decided to write STEVEN. I&rsquo;d gone through so many names and been caught writing PR three times and realized I might as well be caught for writing my own name.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Through the closeknit culture of graffiti, Daily&rsquo;s database of friends expanded. Fellow writers Deph, Max242 and Trek One (known professionally as Jeff Soto) were added to his circle. The team would go on to create the Riverside graffiti crew BASHERS and later boast professional art careers to rival any kid&rsquo;s living life on the straight and narrow.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707180026-Glory_One__Steven__Unknown_writer_and_Spine_in_Downtown_LA.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Glory One,</em> Steven, Unknown writer and Spine in Downtown LA; Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">And so the legend of STEVEN began: Riverside to Los Angeles, Long Beach and beyond. The boys got around heavily and in style. &ldquo;We had high aspirations,&rdquo; jokes Daily. He recalls these times as vital points to his humble story&mdash;memories that would be hard to forget. &ldquo;I remember the first time I hit a billboard, my first time jumping down from a heaven spot and definitely my first time running across a freeway at 3am to catch a tag on the side of an overpass.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">It&rsquo;s kind of the experience of art unhinged. Many romanticize it&mdash;simply fantasizing about creating an alter ego and stamping that identity around the world&mdash;but not many can stomach it: the legal woes, the injuries, the narcissism.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707180319-image__1_.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">Courtesy Steven Daily</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Daily acknowledges the aforementioned cons, but never denies the pros. &ldquo;Graffiti taught me to be crafty, to be persistent, to be meticulous, to be observant. In some ways, it helped me prepare for the world of fine art.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Two decades later, the unassuming Steven Daily&mdash;the one with a list of vandalism, defacement and trespassing charges as long as his repertoire of fine art successes, is opening a gallery in the same community where he learned the art of tagging years before. And while his activity in the streets has without a doubt reduced throughout the years&mdash;&ldquo;The risks are too high&rdquo; and &ldquo;I&rsquo;m too old&rdquo; being his most prominent justifications&mdash;Daily knows the art form never dies due to a need for caution or age. &ldquo;A graffiti writer never actually stops. He either just slows down a little, or slows down a lot.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707180508-Max242_and_Steven.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Max242 and Steven;</em> Courtesy Steven Daily</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In that same breath, his &ldquo;art is art&rdquo; ethics are heard clear&mdash;same emphasis on the action no matter the medium or feats taken to refine the skills. &ldquo;Even though we painted on walls, we were still painting at home on canvases too. People sometimes get caught up in the destiny and forget the journey. What we&rsquo;re trying to do [with Marcas Contemporary] is create an &lsquo;artist first&rsquo; gallery. Galleries these days have become more about the spectacle whereas Dana and I wanted to create a space that was more like a church; it&rsquo;s not about the building, but what goes on inside.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The opening reception of &ldquo;Corrective Course,&rdquo; a 40 person group show and Marcas Contemporary&rsquo;s inaugural exhibition, opened on 5<sup>th</sup> July. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #000000;">&mdash;Kimberly B. Johnson</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 12:13:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Getting It <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">Galerie Allen is a run by the Australian team of independent curator Joseph Allen Shea and artist Mel O'Callaghan, and is situated just west of Gare du Nord, in the tentatively gentrifying ninth arrondissement. These things are a departure from standard Paris format; they&rsquo;ve eschewed the Marais, the (admittedly awful) left bank, and the more obvious cluster of new galleries centered in Belleville. Plus, there&rsquo;s the involvement of an artist. The space itself is also something of a hybrid; the very light front gallery backs onto a small courtyard, behind which is the artist&rsquo;s studio.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In line with this, they offer something a little different, promising a focus on contextual, off-site, curatorial and academic enquiry and reinvention, while also understanding the needs of artists: in their words, "a solution for our times." Lofty claims&mdash;and again&mdash;not the norm for Paris. On the evidence of this first exhibition they don&rsquo;t necessarily disappoint, albeit maybe within the limited scope of a successful art show. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707141756-F1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Colin Snapp</strong>,<em> IRND Coral1-2</em>, 2014, Infared ND lens filter and 35mm konica print, 63x44 cm (framed), Unique;&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Colin Snapp is a young American artist whose interest is in the mediative effects of the image and image production. Here he produced a coherent, successful show, my only disappointment being that, due to a slightly late arrival at the opening I failed to see the longer video work he was showing. I don&rsquo;t know whose fault this is, but I&rsquo;m definitely blaming someone other than myself. The first thing I liked was that it had me second-guessing from the second I walked in. When I&rsquo;d received the email and press release and all that stuff and matter in advance of the show, I&rsquo;d looked through it and commented to myself on what a shame it was that they&rsquo;d had to flip the video stills 90 degrees to make it work in the pdf. Then, upon entering the gallery I realized I wasn&rsquo;t looking at videos, but high quality c-prints of video stills, and they were, indeed, flipped through 90 degrees. More fool me. But this is one of those neat little tricks that lets you see again, in this case the&mdash;and I use this word with some hesitation given my previous form&mdash;beauty that can be found in the material reality of these images, if you like. This is a reflection and inversion of the subject of the images&mdash;beautiful natural things, like flowers&mdash;which, in this instance, are not as beautiful as they are in real life. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20140708122049-IRND_Tobacco_StormBlue.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Colin Snapp</strong>, <em> IRND Tobacco/StormBlue, </em>2014, Infared ND lens filters and 35mm konica print, 63x44 cm (framed), Unique;&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Other than these works, the&nbsp;<em>TC Studies</em>,&nbsp;we also have a four channel video work, <em>Deluxe Automatic</em>, in a late seventies color palette I particularly appreciated, where a studio lamp advances and retreats to a pulsing rhythm, plus the exhibition's eponymous series <em>IRND</em>, where we see images mediated by different IRND lens filters, again giving multi-layered images that both distort and re-make. They are all strong, arresting images. But this brings me back to the element of this show I really appreciated, asides from the images themselves, and one I feel is often overlooked for whatever reason: coherence. If you take your time and look at what is in front of you, the artist&rsquo;s interests become clear; there is a progression and exploration taking place that feels neither contrived nor forced. I know this probably sounds terrible in a certain way, but it's great to be able to "get it," and for this getting it to not take anything away from what we are seeing.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #60b04f;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/273879-james-loks?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #60b04f;">James Loks</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Colin Snapp</strong>, <em>TC00032426,</em> 2013, c-print, 177 x 115.5 cm (framed), Unique; Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris]</span></p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 12:23:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Everything is Near: Culture Softens Violence in Manifesta 10 <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The Cossacks are an East Slavic ethnic group who have long retained independence from the Russian territorial zone. They exist in Crimea, Ukraine, South Caucasus, and even China. Brutally persecuted in Soviet Russia, Cossacks have now reassumed their legitimacy in the Russian national identity, building on their previous historical role as paid militia for the Russian Empire. A 2005 law reinstated this role under Putin and it has been <a href="http://time.com/95898/wolves-hundred-ukraine-russia-cossack/" target="_blank">ascertained</a> that Cossack paramilitary activities in East Ukraine and Crimea constitute a form of proxy warfare under the implicit blessing of the Russian state.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">On the evening of the 29th of June, 2014, however, bathed in cool, pink light, the Cossacks are not at war&mdash;they are onstage and singing. Upon the invitation of Lithuanian artist Deimantas Narkevičius (*1964), members of the St. Petersburg Academic Choirs performed a repertoire of traditional Cossack songs for the audience of Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In the case of <em>Sad Songs of War</em>, Narkevičius' invitation is a clever move to push a stereotype around a corner, presenting us with the cultural face of a group internationally associated with parochial values and violence. The clip of Cossack guards <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=comFkRgPB3c" target="_blank">whipping Pussy Riot sympathizers</a> at the Sochi Winter Olympics is still fresh in our memories and this particular choir often receives performance requests from nationalist political groups. Here, however, they resist having their cultural tradition co-opted by the rising tide of Russian nationalism. Their performance for Manifesta 10's local and international audience channels a wish to present a peaceful and proud image of their culture to the world.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For me, this allows a quick collapse of one stereotype into another, since I know next to nothing about the Cossacks' rich cultural traditions and cannot understand the words of their songs or the significance of their costumes. I appreciate the bluntness of Narkevičius' gesture; the performance is enjoyable precisely <em>because</em> it is uncomfortable. What is going on here? The smoothness of the experience seems to slip up on a misunderstanding between the art world's fetishization of the authentic, on the one hand, and these Cossacks' desire to correct our assumptions, on the other.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Sad Songs of War</em> points us towards a broader question about the relationship between culture and violence. I find it very difficult to locate this particular performance in relation to the above-described Cossack involvement in Crimea and Ukraine. There's an ambivalence at the heart of this dichotomy that cannot be ignored, an ambivalence that also sits at the heart of Manifesta 10 itself. Does the framework of art turn the viewer away from the local violence playing out nearby, just on the other side of the stage? Since both things exist in the same world, and indeed here uncomfortably overlap, how can we learn to recognize where one wavers into the other, and to be wary of where they cancel one another out?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When it comes to events like Manifesta, the art world can no longer lie to itself about the role it plays in broader geopolitical and economic contexts&mdash;this is becoming clear from the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/articles/show/39249">calls to boycott this, and other, global art events</a>. In a context where Russian territorialism is causing untold suffering, Manifesta's current presence in St. Petersburg runs the risk of becoming a form of cultural whitewashing for nationalism under Putin. International events such as Manifesta and the Sochi Games become platforms to promote openness to the outside world, while Putin's regime maintains a claustrophobically conservative and territorially expansionary civic space within. As a post-Cold War European institution, Manifesta itself brings the ideological clout of the West, preaching values of openness and dialogue to an increasingly patriotic society where homophobia is legally sanctioned and territorial aggression implicitly supported. Try scanning through <a href="http://english.pravda.ru/" target="_blank">Pravda</a> and you will find some fine examples. The Western media is no better, and one rarely addressed side effect of Manifesta's attempt at cultural dialogue is the fact that the West comes out feeling culturally smug. But in reality, Western Europe is still antsy about the situation in Ukraine. Nobody wants to see, for example, a repeat version of the 2006 gas crisis, which led to a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005%E2%80%9306_Russia%E2%80%93Ukraine_gas_dispute#Cut-off" target="_blank">four-day cut</a> in European gas supplies in the middle of winter. Had Manifesta withdrawn from St. Petersburg two months ago, after Russia's annexation of Crimea, this move would certainly have contributed further to the political escalation of the situation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In other words, the <em>absence</em> of Manifesta 10 from St. Petersburg would most certainly have made a difference to both regional and global geopolitical stakes. What of its presence? On the ground, things are always more complex, and of course every artwork that makes use of the highly politicized platform of Manifesta carries the potential to open a deeper awareness. My colleague Manus Groenen has written an article <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/39977">taking a closer look</a> at some of the works in the Hermitage and General Staff Building that attempt to do just this.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707031713-Pavel_Braila_01.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Pavel Braila</strong>, <em>Another Noon</em>, 2014, Performance; Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg; With the support of the Institut fur Auslandbeziehungen e.V. Stuttgatt</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Sad Songs of War</em> is a part of Manifesta 10's <a href="http://manifesta10.org/en/public-program/" target="_blank">Public Program</a>, which is curated by Joanna Warsza and intervenes in the public, and sometimes private, spaces of St. Petersburg. For example, a series of week-long exhibitions in a charming artists' apartment on Marata Street give a nod to Leningrad's historic use of domestic space for political resistance; Russian/Estonian Kristina Norman will replicate Euromaidan&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.litopys.com.ua/upload/medialibrary/518/518309ff2e0a7dad5168f3ec4d04a7d5.jpg" target="_blank">half-finished Christmas tree</a> in the square outside the Winter Palace; and Moldovan artist Pavel Braila has organized the traditional noon cannon shot from Petropavlovsk Fortress to be repeated at 12pm Eastern European time, referring to St. Petersburg's geographical affinity to Eastern Europe, rather than Russia proper. The Public Program thus introduces politically charged complications into existing &ldquo;public&rdquo; space, which in Russia <a href="http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/german-observers-criticize-new-demonstration-law-in-russia-a-837509.html" target="_blank">is increasingly controlled</a> (although it must be made clear that &ldquo;civil security&rdquo; measures such as anti-protest or homophobic legislation are not uniquely Russian). In these and other works, the Public Program openly attempts to engage with both the Soviet legacy and present geopolitical position of Putin's Russia. This engagement stands in contrast to Manifesta 10 more generally.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Upon my own second visit to the main exhibition of Manifesta 10 in the General Staff Building, I encountered an obstacle. The central part of the entrance had been annexed by a corporate display and fancy dinner promoting the yet-to-be-completed St. Petersburg Expo building. Showcased in digital 3D imaging, the streamlined Expo structure will be located next to a wondrous high-tech reconstruction of a historical Orthodox church, all proudly paid for by Gazprom (Russia's state-owned natural gas monopoly recently engaged in deadlocking Ukraine over unpaid bills). Also included in the display was a prominent mention of the Sochi Winter Olympics.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In her 2011 essay <a href="http://www.e-flux.com/journal/art-as-occupation-claims-for-an-autonomy-of-life-12/" target="_blank"><em>Art as Occupation</em></a>, artist and cultural critic Hito Steyerl writes that &ldquo;art is part of an uneven global system, one that underdevelops some parts of the world, while overdeveloping others&mdash;and the boundaries between both areas interlock and overlap.&rdquo; She argues that in the last two centuries, artists pushed for autonomy from any form of value production, attempting to separate their work from artificial use-value systems and hierarchical power, collapsing it, instead, into life itself. The Director of the Hermitage, Mikhail Piotrovsky, also claims an autonomous (albeit institutional) <a href="http://manifesta.org/2014/03/interview-dr-m-piotrovsky-on-manifesta-10/" target="_blank">&ldquo;territory of art&rdquo;</a> where works might play out their complexities freed from external economic or political factors. This, however, simply perpetuates a myth of the autonomy of culture that has long since come to an end. Rather than art occupying life, Steyerl asserts, life has become occupied by art, in the sense that creative capital is an integral part of every transaction and exchange. It's no accident that the temporary showcase for St. Petersburg's new Expo building was located inside the EU Biennale. The openness that contemporary art brings with it is also a trump card when luring investors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140707032028-domestic_resistance.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><a href="http://cal.manifesta10.org/en/event/221" target="_blank"><em>Apartment Art as Domestic Resistance</em></a>, 2014, Curated by Olesya Turkina and Roman Osminkin; Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It is not that the works on display in Manifesta 10, some of them very fine works indeed, must all directly justify their presence by addressing the political situation on the ground, though it is interesting that there is so much pressure for them to do so. This has a lot to do with the curatorial framing of the Biennial. Vague and contradictory statements about the &ldquo;complexity&rdquo; art brings to politics, the need to respect local laws whilst avoiding censorship, or the push for &ldquo;cultural dialogue&rdquo; <a href="http://manifesta.org/2014/03/manifesta-10-will-stay-in-st-petersburg/" target="_blank">do not go nearly far enough</a>,&nbsp;as Chto Delat, the Russian collective who withdrew their work,&nbsp;<a href="http://chtodelat.org/b9-texts-2/vilensky/chto-delat-withdraws-from-manifesta-10/" target="_blank">pointed out</a>. The onus has moved to the art itself to address the political situation precisely because the curatorial structure of the Biennale lacks a focused, honest, self-critical framework that thoroughly analyzes its own complicity within a highly ambivalent and unstable geopolitical context.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">No platform is ever &ldquo;clean&rdquo; and the best artists possess a keen sensibility to address such tangled situations. The strangeness of art can and will always open a certain breathing space for some careful thinking, as Narkevičius' performance piece <em>Sad Songs for War</em> has done. But here's the rub: culture can be co-opted at any point in time to present a clean image of the brutality that exists just on the other side of the stage. This is both the potential and the danger for any human: you can pass, so easily, through the thin separation from one side to the other. The division hinges on illusion only, the cardboard walls of the cultural institution. The wonder is that, in such situations, art is still possible; the danger is that it can so easily become a means to render violence opaque. Everything is near.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/336198-sonja-hornung?tab=REVIEWS">Sonja Hornung</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: <strong>Deimantas Narkevičius</strong>, <em>Sad Songs of War</em>, 2014, Musical performance of Cossack choirs, LenDoc Documentary Film Studio, St. Petersburg, Thursday, 26 June, 2014; Commissioned by MANIFESTA 10, St. Petersburg)</span><br /></span></p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 23:26:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Circling Time <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In <em>Rati Chakravyuh</em>, filmmaker Ashish Avikunthak presents several conceits. A single take of 102 minutes in a 105-minute film, screened as a very large projection at Chatterjee &amp; Lal, has Rati, the Goddess of Love in Hindu mythology explored as the notion of desire through the ages, and Chakravyuh (a military formation mentioned in the Hindu epic Mahabharata that consists of a labyrinth of concentric circles) used as a defense mechanism. It&rsquo;s a gauntlet that Avikunthak throws down from the start&mdash;a tight exercise in filmmaking that pits a circling camera against performers seated in a circle.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A camera tracks relentlessly around a group of six recently married couples and a priestess seated in discussion. In Alexander Sokurov&rsquo;s <em>Russian Ark</em>, another single take narrative, the narrator, ghost-like, meanders through the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg, eavesdropping on conversations, inserting information, traipsing through the grandeur of ages, the camera following him from room to room. In Avikunthak&rsquo;s film the field size is restricted to a single space, the courtyard of a temple; pillars have the speckled blur of trailing blue lights and a dying day is imagined in the gaps. The camera is confined, the protagonists stationary. What is animated is conversation&mdash;105 minutes of unceasing rememberings. As in&nbsp;<em>Russian Ark</em>, time is muddled, the real and fictive interwowen, myth and contemporary recounted in personal and collective histories.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140706065806-FLM_3346.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A single take demands rigour&mdash;behind and in front of the camera. Cuts and edits help progress a story; here the edit is the shot. It&rsquo;s been an allure that directors haven&rsquo;t been able to resist&mdash;Hitchcock, Welles, Tarkovsky&mdash;a test of the craft within the process. Hitchcock perfected suspense; Tarkovsky explored space, translated time into other dimensions. For a viewer, one suspends one&rsquo;s breath, gets carried along in an immersive experience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Avikunthak, using a similar procedure (with cameraman Basab Mullick), seems to aim for more than just the cinematic. Luminously lit, the focus stays on the performers. In enunciating from &ldquo;in the beginning&rdquo; to the &ldquo;end,&rdquo; performance art, theatre, film, and literature are interlaced. Like the repetitive warp and weft on a loom, a tapestry is woven. The circling never stops, the camera orbits, and staying on track, sometimes slows down, sometimes holds a face, sometimes pans to the non-speaker. This is the only variation a viewer is allowed. Removing surprise from within the visual, &ldquo;now listen,&rdquo; he seems to say, "there is no end to this shot."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">And it&rsquo;s much like what you hear: there is no end, no beginning, stories start/end/continue on themes that traverse time&mdash;desire, love, death, war. Through absurdities, nuance, and retelling, symbols from the past get incorporated into contemporary trajectories; the cycle of man and time just plays the same tread on different roads. In <em>Vakratunda Swaha</em> (2010), a previous work, the elephant-headed God Ganesha is similarly explored (the deity immersed in the sea, a gas mask as trunk). The ritual, the form, emergence and submergence, are thematically and technically explored.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>Rati Chakravyuh</em> is a rollercoaster ride. Vahanas (carriers) change humorously in stories; Hanuman, the monkey God from past tales becomes the red Maruti (monkey), the name of India&rsquo;s first indigenous car that transported millions in the first wave of liberalization. Former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi&rsquo;s death throws up quotidian remembrances, easily forgotten, but now marked for posterity:&nbsp;&ldquo;I started my menstruation,&rdquo; &ldquo;I was waiting for a car,&rdquo; &ldquo;I was cycling on the terrace,&rdquo; &ldquo;my sister was born &hellip;&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">An idea is mooted by one, then added onto by the next, recalled by a third in a later conversation. This symbolic looping of meaning within the dialogue&mdash;as reiteration, as recall&mdash;turns out to form an unintended device: that of a &ldquo;loop&rdquo; so intrinsic of video art within a gallery. This may be a long take and a film screened at fixed times, but one can walk in and out of the conversation, like one would catch a looped video.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140706070019-FLM_3586.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Gender travels time, too: a bride recalls her days as a son; protagonists speak of characters they were in the past; and like the Buddha, they are always dying. Sometimes it seems like a past life regeneration session. With multiple karmas spoken of simultaneously, it&rsquo;s just &ldquo;seasons of rioting.&rdquo; &ldquo;In the season of rioting&rdquo; is a particularly engaging sequence; Avikunthak&nbsp;brings in the issues of the day: rape, infanticide, patriarchy, &ldquo;the madness of sane men.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;Ancient scriptures&rdquo; are evoked repeatedly by right-wingers, to prescribe what is the ideal for Indian women. Avikunthak, irreverently, proscribes the orthodox claim of the submissive and virtuous; the women spoken of here are sensuous and confident. In an alternative take on the Ramayana (the epic tale of the abduction of Sita, by the ten-headed Ravana, and her rescue by her husband Rama), he overthrows the traditional narrative and inserts the 21<sup>st</sup> century into Sita. A Sita who enjoys Ravana as much as she loves Rama; the good she perceives in Rama is needed as much as she needs the evil Ravana&rsquo;s ten heads and arms to arouse her. In the gravitas of ancient retold myths, Avikunthak gives the subaltern her due; Sita shines as the ancient world&rsquo;s ultimate feminist. The ambivalence of today&rsquo;s world contests a straight-jacketed tale handed down through the ages. Who is to say if Avikunthak or Valmiki is the Ramayana&rsquo;s correct interpreter? At this <em>adda </em>(a gathering to discuss), all live multiple lives. Interpretations abound.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">From Rama and Krishna, Gods of the past reinterpreted in the present, we hear of the frailties of today&rsquo;s Gods&mdash;a&nbsp;cricketer (who scores consecutive ducks) or a filmstar (whose many women turn up at his funeral). The immediacy of a crowd&rsquo;s criticism or comment in our times keeps these Gods mortal. (Sita was called a whore by a merciless crowd; the cricketer's wife, is called a whore by a merciless crowd, the symbolic reiteration of a word is constantly reinterpreted.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At the end of it all, there is death (we are told of a mass suicide, the reason or the means not needed to be known), the death of time, the death of the shot. It&rsquo;s an endurance test for the performers as well as the viewer, a philosophical exploration of craft and concept, history, religion, and the contemporary. As a formal exercise, the rigor is well maintained both in front and behind the camera. His is a refreshing use of an &ldquo;Indian&rdquo; non-exotic, combined with precise formal structures in filmmaking.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">After the whirlpool of thoughts one is put through, one wishes that like in an Edward Yang film the camera would have lingered that extra two seconds after the end of a take where thoughts can mull a little longer &hellip; one needs to dive one&rsquo;s head into Albus Dumbledore&rsquo;s Pensieve, leaving the muddled mind to unravel and decipher at leisure, before coming up for air. Perhaps the void in the center of the circle is Avikunthak&rsquo;s Pensieve, the nothingness from which all things start, the black as the camera dies.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #f95305;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/364333-deepika-sorabjee?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #f95305;">Deepika Sorabjee</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images:<strong> Ashish Avikunthak,</strong> <em>Rati Chakravyuh, </em>2013, single channel video, 105 minutes; Courtesy of the artist &amp; Chatterjee &amp; Lal Gallery)</span></p> Sun, 06 Jul 2014 09:30:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Multifarious Henrik Vibskov <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Henrik Vibskov has a lot going on. Between playing drums for Trentem&oslash;ller, designing avant-garde fashion for his own eponymous fashion label, and doing costume and set design for clients ranging from the ballet to Bj&ouml;rk, Vibskov makes art. True to his multifarious creative output, his visual art leans in many different directions, from photographs to prints, to textiles, woodcuts and objects. Aesthetically these objects seem bound by their shared explorations of line and color, simultaneously sketch-like and refined. As the gallery mentions, "art remains Vibskov's raison d'&ecirc;tre - the purest expression of his ideas," and that's clearly true. You can see his wide ranging solo show at Ruttkowski 68 in Cologne, Germany, until July 20th.<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143241-Henrik_Vibskov___Moon_nuts___2014.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Henrik Vibskov, </strong>'<em>Moon nuts</em>', 2014; Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>More on Henrik Vibskov:</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The name Henrik Vibskov is most commonly associated not only with a fashion label, but a multitude of twisted yet tantalising universes created in relation to each collection.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&ldquo;The Transparent Tongue&ldquo;, &ldquo;The Spaghetti Handjob&ldquo; and &ldquo;The Shrink Wrap Spectacular&ldquo; are just a few titles of shows Henrik Vibskov has produced lately, each title referring to a different but equally mesmerising world and set of logic. As a fashion designer Henrik Vibskov has produced over 25 mens (and later also women&rsquo;s) collections since he graduated from Central St. Martins in 2001, and as a member of the Chambre Syndicale de la Mode Masculine he is currently the only Scandinavian designer on the official show schedule of the Paris Mens Fashion Week, which he has been since January 2003.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(text source: <a href="http://www.henrikvibskov.com/index.php?/about/biography">Artist's Website</a>)</span></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143428-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_2.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143512-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_1.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143538-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_3.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143615-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_4.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143723-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_7.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143808-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_8.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705143840-Henrik_Vibskov___Vibskovski_72___Ruttkowski_68_6.jpeg" alt="" /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Henrik Vibskov,</strong><em> Installation views;</em> Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68</span><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140710101955-Henrik_Vibskov_Thomas_Jessen___Fragile_Soap_Bodies___2013.jpg" alt="" /></strong><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </strong></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Henrik Vibskov</strong>, <em>Thomas Jessen, 'Fragile Soap Bodies', </em>2013; Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">For further information...</span><span style="font-size: medium;">(</span><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslantstreet.com/artists/show/127894-henrik-vibskov">ArtSlant Profile</a>) (<a href="http://www.henrikvibskov.com">Artist's Website</a>) (<a href="http://www.ruttkowski68.com">Gallery</a></span><span style="font-size: medium;">)</span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><br /></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #000000;">(Image on top:</span> <strong>Henrik Vibskov,</strong><em> Installation view;</em> Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68)</span></p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 10:21:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list An art festival salutes Rockaway! resilience <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Last weekend Rockaway Beach&rsquo;s Fort Tilden opened its gates to a crowd of art connoisseurs, local creatives, and bronzed beach goers for a day of art and activism supporting Rockaway Beach. The <a href="http://www.rockawayartistsalliance.org/">Rockaway Artists Alliance</a> and the National Parks Service hosted the hordes of art lovers who came to witness the opening of the site specific art installations (on view through September 1st), a free open-air performance by rock legend Patti Smith, and a Walt Whitman poetry reading by hipster heartthrob, James Franco.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Curated by MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach in collaboration with photographer/musician and long time Rockaway resident Patti Smith, the exhibition&mdash;appropriately titled <em>Rockaway!&mdash;</em>is an effort to support the victims of Hurricane Sandy and the artists who live and work in the community year-round. Smith, along with artists Janet Cardiff and Adrian Villar Rojas, installed site-specific artworks into the newly restored landscape in the most culturally sensitive and artfully impactful ways while the Rockaway Artists Alliance took the opportunity to host a day of family friendly activities and workshops.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705094755-4.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Smith, who has been making art since the 1960s, took over two of the repurposed art galleries for a site-specific installation and an exhibition of her photography, which reaches back more than fifty years. The 107 black and white photographs, titled <em>Resilience of the Dreamer </em>showcases the artist's career through her travels, relationships, and inspirations. The series begins with a collection of personified portraits like the typewriter of Herman Hesse, the paint brushes of Duncan Grant, the corset of Frida Kahlo. The works seem to credit the most influential characters in her life by anthropomorphizing the most powerful tools of their physical and creative expression.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition continues in an adjacent building by way of a humble sculpture garden featuring the repurposed remnants of domestic objects displaced by Hurricane Sandy. The recycled path winds towards a dilapidated building formerly used as a locomotive repair facility that houses piles of damaged and discarded emphemera, re-contextualized graffiti, and a bed frame inserted into the middle of the exhibition&rsquo;s floor plan. The gilded bed frame sits slightly raised above the ground on a white platform, painted gold and draped in soft white curtains that billow with each gust of sea breeze. According to the work&rsquo;s description, the sculpture is to remain in place and decay over time, referencing the instability of time and the impact of Hurricane Sandy on both the families and homes of its victims.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The other stand out installation is Janet Cardiff&rsquo;s <em>The Forty Piece Motet, </em>installed appropriately in the Fort Tilden Chapel. The chapel, which was severely damaged in the storm, was restored to host the exhibition of Cardiff&rsquo;s forty audio speakers organized in a circle around the building&rsquo;s interior. The speakers are raised on simple metal poles to stand at average human height, each one carrying the voice of one choral member. The auditory piece is a reworking of a sacred sixteenth century motet created by Tudor composer Thomas Tallis, and most commonly believed to be composed for Queen Elizabeth I&rsquo;s 40th birthday in 1573. The eleven-minute piece is played on a continuous loop and is so awe inspiring that most members of the audience stood motionless for the piece&rsquo;s duration with eyes closed and ears pressed against a favored speaker. With voices so rich and a sound so melodically unified, their presentation as digital audio tracks is almost forgotten as one&rsquo;s ear recognizes the corporeality and weight of their choral harmony.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140705094839-7.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The final installation is Adrian Villar Rojas' homage to the Hornero<em>, </em>an iconic bird of Argentina known for building its nests out of found materials. The installation, entitled <em>From the Series Brick Farm, </em>features synthetically created birds&rsquo; nests that Rojas made by hand using mud, straw, grass, and clay&mdash;a credit to the power of perseverance and ingenuity. By incorporating the natural architecture and materials of the landscape, Rojas makes a direct connection to the power and impact of geography on the lived environment. The nests, which are scattered throughout the grounds, also serve as a reference to the former use of Fort Tilden as a military base whose ward was to provide protection against potential aerial and nautical attacks.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The day concluded with an evening as impactful as the art it supported. Actor/artist James Franco recited a selection of Walt Whitman poems with assistance from Smith, who wrapped up the evening with a free outdoor concert of her most beloved songs. The duo was introduced by a host of arts supporters and cultural program coordinators without whom the day and exhibition would not have been possible. Their speeches were remarkably humble and heartwarming, reminding us that devastation can happen at any time and when it does, we should all be so lucky to have the friends and family that a close knit community like the Rockaways can enable. With the dollars from corporate sponsors and the hearts of the 500+ volunteers that helped restore the coastline, Rockaway Beach is positioned to become an even stronger residential community and a more relevant arts district than ever before.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #cd22dc;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/121595-allyson-parker?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #cd22dc;">Allyson Parker</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images: Courtesy of MoMA PS1)<br /></span></p> Sat, 05 Jul 2014 11:56:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Major Modernist What-If <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Chicago has a special claim to a Bauhaus lineage. It makes sense that the legendary German school of design relocated to the city in 1937, given that Chicago&rsquo;s own selfhood story mixes industrial utopianism, innovative architecture and design, and a persistent can-doism&mdash;all qualities that mesh well with Bauhaus philosophy. Beyond the idealist affinities, though, it is hard to resist adding the prominence of the advertising and marketing industry in Chicago to the list. After all, despite its gargantuan prominence in your average history-minded designer/design-minded historian, the OG Bauhaus produced a relative paucity of actual mass-market products, or objects in general for that matter. The Bauhaus was rather first and foremost an excellent and savvy media organization, and its efforts at collecting and disseminating images far outpaced its production of things.<span style="color: #cc3333;"><a title="" href="#_ftn1"><span style="color: #cc3333;"><sup><sup>[1]</sup></sup></span></a></span> The Chicago extension likewise holds true, and is best embodied in Walter Gropius and Adolph Meyer&rsquo;s 1922 <span style="color: #2bb42b;"><a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/en/atlas/werke/chicago-tribune-tower"><span style="color: #2bb42b;">Chicago Tribune Tower competition entry</span></a></span>, a building that ultimately went unmade but has had a long and lingering shadow as a major Modernist what-if. While the building itself remains absent, its image has surfaced again, this time in Jeff Carter&rsquo;s solo exhibition <em><span style="color: #2bb42b;"><a href="http://themissionprojects.com/exhibition/46/astudyinlostopportunity"><span style="color: #2bb42b;">A Study in Lost Opportunity</span></a></span></em> currently on view at <span style="color: #2bb42b;"><a href="http://themissionprojects.com/"><span style="color: #2bb42b;">THE MISSION</span></a></span>.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703144705-Untitled__5__Chicago_Tribune_Tower__Carter.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jeff Carter,</strong> <em>Untitled #5 (Chicago Tribune Tower)</em>, 2014, Modified IKEA products (laminated MDF, aluminum, hardware, fabrics), fans, custom electronics, 51.5 x 24 x 12 inches; Courtesy of the artist and THE MISSION</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The show consists of four sculptures made from materials sourced entirely from Ikea. Each of the works repeats the Gropius/Meyer Tribune Tower in overall structure, with its three asymmetrical tiers and freely positioned balconies. These balconies, indicated in the sculptures by a variety of materials&ndash;&ndash;wood panels, paunchy beanbags, or L-shaped levels&ndash;&ndash;ping-pong your eyes up and down and disrupt the starkness of the gridded forms. Other variations show Carter playing with negative space, color, and humor. <em>Untitled #1</em> is populated by cacti and succulents, little analogs for human inhabitants or their precariously maintained office plants. A naked soft-glow lightbulb tops <em>Untitled #4</em>, while <em>#2</em> wears a slowly spinning drill replica in the same blond wood it rests on/in. The monumentality of the Gropius/Meyer building plans is shrunk down to bookshelf scale, each sculpture threatening to become as functional as a piece of household furniture.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In terms of interpretive significance, it feels important to draw attention to Gropius and Meyer&rsquo;s perspective drawing that accompanies the exhibition in the print material offered at the door. For someone who does not have the Gropius/Meyer building up for immediate mental recall (like your reviewer here), a repeated back and forth between the drawing and each of the objects&ndash;&ndash;comparing balcony placement, height ratios, repetitions, and points of departure&ndash;&ndash;produces a feeling of empty reference. This realization is not necessarily negative. After all, the perspective and elevation plans were the only parts of the building that were actually published; the floor plans were never distributed. The building is all surface, just lines on a page, an image. As a result, the exchanges that happen between the fantasy building on the page and its domestically-scaled Ikea iterations mirror and muse on the heavy mediation that was the Bauhaus project.</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703144906-Untitled__2__Chicago_Tribune_Tower__2009_Carter.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jeff Carter,</strong> <em>Untitled #2 (Chicago Tribune Tower)</em>, 2009, Modified IKEA products (pine, steel), plastic levels, electric motor, 82 x 48 x 16 inches; Courtesy of the artist and THE MISSION</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="BodyA" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In turning over the components of <em>A Study in Lost Opportunity</em>, we have to ask just what that lost opportunity entails. Through the lens of a Bauhaus ideology celebrating the egalitarian potential of mass production, Ikea becomes a very ambiguous object of study. On the one hand, its products are relatively cheap, (for the most part) well designed, and make the promise of a harmonious life through design. But on the other hand, these promises are delivered as pure advertisement, and the huge box stores exemplify a type of consumerist too-muchness. The idea of living in one of LandProp Service&rsquo;s <span style="color: #2bb42b;"><a href="http://strandeast.com/"><span style="color: #2bb42b;">all-Ikea-all-the-time communities</span></a></span>, like those in London and Sweden, are more fear-inducing and nerve-wracking than anything else. The big Lost Opportunity, then, starts with the Gropius building that never was, and telescopes out to the Bauhausian human harmony that industrial utopianism could never deliver. Carter&rsquo;s sculptures admirably condemn neither Ikea and its symbolic associations, nor the perpetuation of Grand Myths in architecture. Rather, they toss this network of associations up in the air, and appreciate the arrangements the pieces make as gravity takes hold. Whereas Gropius wanted buildings to be the &ldquo;conquest of gravity, the balancing of opposites,&rdquo; Carter gives us sculptures that live by the fall.</span></p> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br clear="all" /><hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"> <p class="FootnoteText1" style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #cc3333;"><a title="" href="#_ftnref1"><span style="color: #cc3333;"><sup><sup>[1]</sup></sup></span></a></span> <span style="font-size: small;">See Bauhaus B&uuml;cher #1-14, <span style="color: #a52a2a;">[<a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/en/atlas/werke/bauhaus-books"><span style="color: #a52a2a;">http://bauhaus-online.de/en/atlas/werke/bauhaus-books</span></a></span>]; also Maholy-Nagy&rsquo;s <em>Painting, Photography, Film, </em>and so on.</span></span></p> </div> </div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #2894d7;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/392403-gan-uyeda"><span style="color: #2894d7;">Gan Uyeda</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Jeff Carter</strong>, <em>Untitled #1 (Chicago Tribune Tower),</em>&nbsp;2009, Modified IKEA products (laminated MDF, steel, casters, live cactus plants), 62 x 24 x 24 inches; Courtesy of the artist and THE MISSION]</span></p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 19:45:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Bike Without Brakes: Interview with Brazilian trio Bicicleta Sem Freio <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Brazilian trio Bicicleta Sem Freio describe themselves as a design and illusration collective, and hail from a small town in the centre of Brazil, but recently they&rsquo;ve caught the eye of international audiences since their work was selected by Charlotte Dutoit (curator JustKids and Pow Wow Hawaii) and they have branched out into painting walls too &ndash; hitting up London&rsquo;s East London for the first time. Only their second ever mural is now reported to be the largest of its kind in Los Angeles, [source, Upper Playground] and was completed over a tireless ten days. With visual roots pulled from the pyschedelic music scene of the 70s, old comics and posters, it&rsquo;s their salient use of colour that makes the group&rsquo;s work stand out, with an added twist of cynical pop. We caught Douglas de Castro, Victor Rocha and Renato Reno while they were on a rare break from traveling, chilling back in Brazil.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062022-RIO.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Have you been following the World Cup?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Yes! We&rsquo;re not addicted to soccer like most people here but the World Cup is always fun.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>You guys have been touring lately, where are you right now, and where have you been?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We&rsquo;ve been in Lisbon and in London, we&rsquo;ve made some very fun murals and got together with our friend Vhils. We launched a poster with the guys from Underdogs. That experience was a lot of fun to do and enriched us as artists. Today we&rsquo;re at our headquarters, in the center of Brazil in a town called Goiania, our homeland.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We&rsquo;re working on some personal projects and making new plans.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Estivemos em Lisboa e em Londres, e fizemos murais bem divertidos e nos reunimos com nosso amigo Vhils e lan&ccedil;amos um p&ocirc;ster junto com o pessoal do Underdogs.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Foi uma expedi&ecirc;ncia bem divertida e que nos agregou muito como artistas.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Atualmente estamos na nossa sede, que fica no centro do Brasil, na cidade chamada Goi&acirc;nia, nossa terra natal. Estamos trabalhando em alguns projetos pessoais e fazendo novos planos.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062106-rotulo2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>A lot of Brazilian artists I&rsquo;ve met find it hard to go beyond Brazil. Do you like to travel?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">For us, the greatest high about working with murals and art in general is that we can travel and find cultures and countries completely different from ours. I guess for Brazilians is very difficult because of the huge difference in the exchange rates and specially with the bureaucracy that makes impossible to get any support from our government&nbsp;&ndash; or even the prejudice of many private companies that think that the impalpable return that art brings is worthless.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Para n&oacute;s o grande barato de trabalhar com murais e arte em geral, &eacute; poder viajar e nos deslocarmos para culturas e pa&iacute;ses completamente diferentes do nosso.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Para o Brasileiro &eacute; bastante dificil devido a diferen&ccedil;a da cota&ccedil;&atilde;o da moeda e principalmente pela burocracia que impossibilita conseguir qualquer apoio do governo ou pelo preconceito que muitas empresas privadas tem, de achar q o retorno n&atilde;o palp&aacute;vel que a arte traz n&atilde;o tem valor. Mas seguimos felizes fazemos o que gostamos, com muito ou pouco dinheiro para realizarmos, isso n&atilde;o importa, o que importa &eacute; concluir cada miss&atilde;o e gravalas tamb&eacute;m nas nossas mem&oacute;rias, experi&ecirc;ncia de vida!</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062151-ambientepista.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>What are your backgrounds/training?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We come from graphic design, but we&rsquo;ve always been more illustrators than designers per se. I think that design made us lose our fear of going into the world of psychedelic, of the ludic, and to create and look up to things that go way beyond classic art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Nos viemos do design gr&aacute;fico, mas sempre fomos mais ilustradores do que designers propriamente ditos. Acho q a escola do design nos fez perder o medo de entrar no mundo da psicodelia, do l&uacute;dico e cria e admirar coisas que v&atilde;o bem al&eacute;m do desenho cl&aacute;ssico.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062229-bsf_slider.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Main influencers on your style?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We&rsquo;ve always admired many close friends really, and also famous artists. Illustrators like James Jean, Jo&atilde;o Ruas, Mike Grant, Cooper, R. Crumb, etc. But today we&rsquo;re very influenced by photography too. Sometimes looking at photographs or real images and this brings us solutions to more original and personal illustrations, rather than getting influenced by another illustration, that is, in itself, a solution that&rsquo;s already been found. We search for new ways of translating all that, for ourselves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Sempre admiramos muitos amigos pr&oacute;ximos mesmo, e artistas famosos tamb&eacute;m, ilustradores como James Jean, Jo&atilde;o Ruas, Mike Giant, Cooper, R. Crumb&hellip;, mas nos influenciamos , hoje, fortemente pela fotografia tamb&eacute;m.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As vezes nos inspirarmos em fotografias, ou em imagens reais nos traz solu&ccedil;&otilde;es de ilustra&ccedil;&otilde;es mais originais e pessoais do que nos influenciarmos por outra ilustra&ccedil;&atilde;o, que por si s&oacute;, ja &eacute; uma solu&ccedil;&atilde;o encontrada.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">N&oacute;s buscamos maneiras novas de traduzir tudo isso, para n&oacute;s mesmos.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062310-BOORARINS.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em><strong>What&rsquo;s your working method?</strong> </em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We&rsquo;re an old school gang, we love some paper and pencil, we draft a lot by hand before getting things rocking. Then we use the brush, ink&hellip; If it's in a wall or in the paper the brush was a great marriage to what we are today, it has broadened our horizons.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I guess that&rsquo;s why we don&rsquo;t use spray paint on our murals. We love colours, especially when they&rsquo;re disconnected with the real world.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Somos ta turma do papel, adoramos um l&aacute;pis e um papel, esbo&ccedil;amos muito antes de por a m&atilde;o na massa&hellip; Depois vamos para o pincel, tintas, sendo em parede como em papel, o pincel casou muito legal com o que somos hoje, ampliou nossos limites.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Acho q por isso que acabamos que n&atilde;o usamos spray nos murais.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Adoramos cores, principalmente quando elas n&atilde;o tem liga&ccedil;&atilde;o alguma com o mundo real.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062336-01_bsf_comp.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>How does it work, day to day, as a collective? Do you work exclusively as a group?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We&rsquo;re always together, but we draw separately.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The idea, however, the solutions and discussions always happen so that everyone can enjoy each other&rsquo;s work and so that it speaks for the group. Sometimes we work for the advertising market too, but it doesn&rsquo;t matter if it's for a gallery, for the streets, for an outdoor, for a commercial, what gives our high of working is evaluating each case and feeling that it will really be a fun and enriching experience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Nos sempre estamos juntos, mas desenhamos separados.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Por&eacute;m a ideia, as solu&ccedil;&otilde;es e as discuss&otilde;es sempre acontecem para que todos curtam o trabalho de cada um e que isso fale pelo grupo.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As vezes trabalhamos com o mercado publicit&aacute;rio tamb&eacute;m, n&atilde;o importa se &eacute; para um galeria, para as ruas, para um outdor, para um comercial, o que nos da barato de trabalhar &eacute; avaliar cada caso e sentir que realmente sera um experi&ecirc;ncia divertida e engrandecedora.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062416-photo-6.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Tell us a bit about your hometown, Goiania? How well known is your work inside Brazil, and how is it to live there compared to elsewhere in Brazil?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">At our hometown we&rsquo;re more known for illustrating for the local music and rock scene. Our first jobs were posters for local rock gigs, for rock labels, etc. Our city is the capital of the state of Goias, but is relatively simple and unexpensive like a country town. A lot of people ask us why we don&rsquo;t move to a bigger city but we love it here and as we travel a lot it's very nice coming back to a peaceful place. Our work in Brazil in general is more well know in the areas of design, advertising and music, because that&rsquo;s where we&rsquo;ve started.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062508-londres.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>You recently completed LA&rsquo;s reportedly largest mural. How did this project come about?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The guys from Instagraffity contacted us and invited us to that project through Do Art Foundation. Later we sent them a drawing of our idea for it and they really digged it. It was an incredibly hard job, sometimes we thought we could not do it, but we pushed through it and we still had time to paint a mural on the Do Lab Stage on Coachella, making our dream of coming to Coachella true.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Brazil has such a rich heritage in street art and graf<strong><em>,</em></strong> yet you&rsquo;re described as graphic artists and illustrators, more than street artists. When did you start putting your work onto murals?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We&rsquo;ve always made smaller stuff &ndash; except on rare occasions, but we&rsquo;ve always had friends that did street art and we&rsquo;ve always admired that line of work and art. Our break came when we were invited by the curator of the Life is Beautiful Festival in Las Vegas, Charlotte Duboit, to paint there. We grabbed that opportunity and liked the experience a lot. Things just developed from there!&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062558-iemanja10.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Where does the name come from (bike without brakes &ndash; it&rsquo;s dangerous by the way, I broke my elbow because of this just now!)</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Damn, we&rsquo;re sorry about that!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Well, in 2003 we went to a Graphic Design Conference, we were in college at the time, getting to know the design profession. There we got to know a lot of studios like us with fun names, for example, the Buraco de Bala (Bullet Hole) from Brasilia. So we named our studio with this crazy name so that no one would take us seriously (lol).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>You use colours really nicely &ndash; where do the colour combinations come from?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In the beginning we were very influenced by the pyschedelic music posters from the Seventies. They had a lot of uncommon colour combinations. We love to try them on our illustrations.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>Who are your favourite current artists? Any Brazilian artists you can recommend?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">We were fortunate enough to get to know a great Brazilian illustrator called Jo&atilde;o Ruas (S&atilde;o Paulo) and we also admire the work of the street artist Mateus Dutra (Goiania) and the tattoo artist and illustrator Gregorio (S&atilde;o Paulo). Also, our great friend the comic book illustrator, Raphael Gramp&aacute;. We&rsquo;re fortunate enough of having them as close friends.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140703062630-sobre.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>You also have a music project &ndash; can you tell us a little about this, and how you connect this with your visual art?</em></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I (Victor) and Douglas have a band called Black Drawing Chalks and we created it about 10 years ago more as a fictitious client we could experiment our illustration on. But how we actually do love playing the band became a real thing and our work got well known in the Brazilian independent rock scene and we ended up spliting our time and life between band and studio.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Charlotte Jansen<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All images: Courtesy of the artists)</span></span></p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 02:34:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Lisbon Street Art and Urban Creativity Conference <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">This weekend at the <span style="color: #2a2a2a;">auditorium of the&nbsp;Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Lisbon, scholars and researchers will convene for the <a href="http://www.urbancreativity.org" target="_blank">Lisbon Street Art and Urban Creativity Conference</a>. Organized by <span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Daniela V. de Freitas Sim&otilde;es</span> of the <span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Art History Institute/line of Contemporary Art Studies <em>(IHA/CASt)</em> of The Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities<span style="color: #2a2a2a;"> &ndash; NOVA University of Lisbon</span></span>, and&nbsp;<span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Pedro Soares Neves</span> of the&nbsp;<span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Artistic Studies Research Centre (<em>CIEBA</em>) of the Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Lisbon</span> and of the <a href="http://issuu.com/unidade/docs/crono_lisboa_2010-2011?e=2421722/2662502" target="_blank">CRONO Project</a> of 2010-11, the conference is a juggernaut, with a packed 3-day schedule of papers and keynote speakers.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140702225439-4309341_orig.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Lisbon</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;">The conference aims to look at street art and urbanity through a contemporary lens, and the topics are wide-ranging, including such session titles as <span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Semiotics, Visual Arts and Media;</span> <span style="color: #2a2a2a;">City-branding, Economy and Urban Art; and Tactical Urbanism.</span> Some of the paper titles are consumately intriguing: <span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><em>&ldquo;The thing about walls is they became big murals&rdquo;: The rise of legal graffiti writing cultures</em></span>; <span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><em>Stealing from the public: on the removal of street art from the street</em></span>; <span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><em>Graffiti and New Media: the correlations between the two cultures</em></span>.<span style="color: #2a2a2a;"> While the bulk of the presenters appear to be representing Portuguese institutions, there are a number of international participants. Keynote speakers include curator and writer Cedar Lewisohn, Nuart founder Martyn Reed, and Marcus Willcocks of the UK-based Design Against Crime Research Centre. The full program can be found <a href="http://www.urbancreativity.org/programme.html">here</a>.</span> <br /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140702230208-13046007744_4875021615_h.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Lisbon street art, by SAM3, part of the CRONO Project. Photo by <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/boscdanjou/13046007744/in/photolist-kSQcA1-9hDcS6-agdqrh-9X1BCD" target="_blank">Bosc d'Anjou</a>.</span><br /></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;">Despite its long history, worldwide ubiquity and impact on visual culture, urban art and street art largely remain understudied in academia. The Urban Creativity Conference is undoubtedly a promising step in the right direction.<br /></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;"><span style="color: #2a2a2a;">&mdash;Natalie Hegert<br /></span></span></span></p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 23:04:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">High hopes for this seductively titled show: a subject that is rarely examined in depth in a museum context, with all the resources at their disposition. Added to this was the idea of discovering some of the British Library&rsquo;s comprehensive archive at the UK&rsquo;s biggest ever exhibition of comics. This was going to be fun.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The thing that this show does well is to highlight how key the role of comics has been in propagating political change. Presenting comics from the late Victorian era onwards, the exhibition successfully demonstrates the function of comics in Britain as a fundamental vehicle for political expression: for the emancipation of women and homosexuals, for freedom of speech for subcultures and extreme groups. Being an editor of such publications was a risky business &ndash; something that is hard to appreciate now - and publishing houses were in a constant battle with the State over what could and should be published. Yet they persisted, and their influence, particularly on the nation&rsquo;s youth, was feared &ndash; they were even held accountable for the spreading of &lsquo;evil&rsquo; ideas and immoral behavior.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702171908-Jack_the_Ripper__Illustrated_Police_News__1888__c__British_Library_Board.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>Jack the Ripper's victims,</em> Illustrated Police News, 1888; &copy; British Library Board</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">But in looking at the socio-political impact, this show miserably overlooks another important purpose comics have: to entertain. Their visual appeal, their artistic element, and their humor makes up the power of comics &ndash; added to the enjoyment to be had in thumbing through their pages &ndash; and this just doesn&rsquo;t come through in this presentation. The problem is that all of the comics on display here are wearily enshrined in vitrines, so that they are already only presented as a synecdoche that is never experienced as its whole &ndash; you can glimpse a page of <em>Oz</em>, a cover of <em>Heroine</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The Robert Crumb exhibition two years ago at the Palais de Tokyo faced a similar problem which Crumb himself spoke of, but it was maneuvered with aplomb, displaying entire comics, albeit still protected in frames or cases - but at least visitors could look at &ndash; read, actually - the whole comic, not just get a vague idea from a fragment. Surely the excitement of comics and their irreverent spirit is lost in this kind of conventional museum setting, and therefore this show is deeply disappointing for any fan of paper publications. Moreover, the works themselves seem to have been selected according to their historical merit rather than their aesthetic allure, which seems to also be quite an archaic, rather than anarchic, approach. It would have been great to see more of those scintillating artists such as Aubrey Beardsley, seen fleetingly, on display. The vibrant colors, the delicacy of the print making, are all lost under the institutional boxes, and as the show rambles on, you begin to wilt, rather than imbibe all that supposedly gung-ho energy. The point of comics is that they were able to stir chaos firstly because of their format - their message was almost secondary, or else they would just be newspapers, or pamphlets, or books.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702172043-Heroine__1978__c__Suzi_Varty.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>Heroine,</em> 1978;&nbsp;&copy; Suzi Varty</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">It looks as if the BL have spent all the money on splashing lots of hi-tech looking props and lighting &ndash; particularly jarring were the randomly placed Anonymous mannequins whose direct connection to comic books is never revealed &ndash; all which came across as an attempt at reinserting the fun that has been robbed from the comics themselves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In all, the show provides a pedagogical overview of the &lsquo;anarchy&rsquo; of comics, rather than making a selection that unmasks their &lsquo;art&rsquo;.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Charlotte Jansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: <strong>John Bagnall,</strong> <em>Punk Memories, Escape 9; </em>&copy; John Bagnall)</span></p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 19:37:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list How to Depict the Invisible Man? <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">One of the most remarkable images in the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/38792">Jeff Wall exhibition</a> currently at the Stedelijk Museum is the constructed photograph <a href="http://www.moma.org/collection/object.php?object_id=88085" target="_blank"><em>After "Invisible Man" by Ralph Ellison, The Prologue</em></a> (1999-2000). Ellison&rsquo;s nameless protagonist sits in his underground hideaway, surrounded by 1,369 light bulbs illuminated by currents rerouted from Monopolated Light &amp; Power. To counter his invisibility he surrounds himself in light. And if the world doesn&rsquo;t want to see him, he&rsquo;ll exploit that, thumbing his nose at the authorities, stealing their &ldquo;power&rdquo; without them being any the wiser. The novel prefigures his return from this underground hole, but he is, for now, getting by unseen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Not far away, in Amsterdam Noord, there are photographs of another Invisible Man, one whose geography and milieu differ, but whose visibility is also thrown into question, not&mdash;as Ellison writes&mdash;by any biochemical accident to the epidermis, but simply because others refuse to see him.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Mohammed&mdash;or Karim Ramtani, depending on circumstance&mdash;fled his native Algeria during the civil war and lived illegally in North Amsterdam on and off for the past twenty years. Throughout this time, he and artist Michiel Voet regularly crossed paths, including periods when Mohammed lived in Voet&rsquo;s North Amsterdam studio and even collaborated on photographs with him.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702164831-installation_view.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Michiel Voet,</strong><em> The Invisible Man, Installation view at Nieuw Dakota, Amsterdam</em>, June 2014; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>The Invisible Man</em> at Nieuw Dakota culminates a four-year collaboration probing the immigrant condition, including an intensive month of studio photography earlier this year. These are not documentary images; following his long relationship with Mohammed, who was at turns friendly and evasive, Voet knew he could neither understand nor fully capture his subject&rsquo;s complexity. Instead, with Mohammed as model, Voet staged surreal photographs evoking the sense of rootlessness, disenfranchisement, uncertainty, and invisibility experienced by illegal immigrants in Europe today.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Ellison&rsquo;s protagonist was invisible both because of his skin color&mdash;that particularly stubborn brand of invisibility&mdash;and his defenselessness at the hands of those fighting to maintain power. In the sixty years since the book was written many more have become invisible pawns in political structures equally invested in maintaining the status quo. The most recent EU elections saw a reactionary swing to right, characterized by nationalistic sentiments and widespread suspicion, while across the Atlantic immigration policy has already played a large role leading up to the midterm elections. Invisibility is not inherently linked to race or any other signifier of difference; it&rsquo;s a manipulative strategy. It&rsquo;s easy to close off minds and borders when you won&rsquo;t see the humanity in what you&rsquo;re afraid of&mdash;be it poverty, nationality, race, or religion.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><a href="http://www.michielvoet.com/index-content.html" target="_blank">Voet&rsquo;s images</a>, shot head-on with the staged precision and sensibilities of fashion photography, show a man hidden in plain sight. We never see Mohammed&rsquo;s face. His limbs emerge from cabinets and upholstery; his face is obscured by masks, clothing, and blankets; his body is mummified in plastic wrap or swallowed by a couch; he disappears behind a curtain, inside a mattress cover. In one series of photographs, he hovers unnaturally in the air, hugging a suitcase as if he and all his possessions could simply float away unseen on a passing breeze.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As much as they consider invisibility, these images, constructed by a white, Dutch man, also document Voet confronting his&mdash;our&mdash;blindness. It would be paternalistic to say the photographs grant illegal immigrants visibility&mdash;it cannot be granted&mdash;and to some extent they gloss over the struggle for agency so important to Ellison&rsquo;s work. Once his narrator identifies his invisibility, he tries to exploit it. &ldquo;It is sometimes advantageous to be unseen,&rdquo; he writes, &ldquo;although it is most often rather wearing on the nerves.&rdquo; Voet&rsquo;s photographs rarely allude to this subversive side of invisibility. If it&rsquo;s there, it&rsquo;s overwhelmed by a sense of emptiness and dispossession.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Yet this is not entirely true of Mohammed&rsquo;s experience. In a book published in conjunction with the exhibition, Voet offers a more nuanced picture of Mohammed&rsquo;s story. Invisibility has advantages and complications: for example, the ability to assume someone else&rsquo;s identity. Mohammed adopted the identity (and residency card) of Karim Ramtani (and was deported briefly to Morocco and later arrested for another Ramtani&rsquo;s crimes). Ghanaian immigrants confided to Voet how they pretend to be Surinamese, ostentatiously disguised to avoid police attention. In one of many similarities, Ellison&rsquo;s invisible man spends a night exploiting his likeness to a man called Rinehart, navigating the complexities of assuming another man&rsquo;s deeds along with his face.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702165013-Onzichtbare_man___4_-_Michiel_Voet.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong> Michiel Voet</strong>, <em>The Invisible Man</em>, 2010-2014, Photograph; Courtesy of the artist and Nieuw Dakota, Amsterdam</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Exercising heavy-handed metaphors, Voet&rsquo;s photographs show these forced-chameleons at once hiding in and undergirding society. Immigrants are woven into the social fabric; they are hunted prey; they are building blocks and glue. The installation&rsquo;s labyrinth of large prints suggests the bureaucracy endured by immigrants filtered in and out of an opaque system. Throughout, Voet&rsquo;s compassion and sincerity balance the scales, keeping the project from leaning toward caricature.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In addition to the exhibition, a theatre project with <a href="http://orkater.nl/?subID=298&amp;itemID=426" target="_blank">Orkater</a> commences this week as part of the <a href="http://www.overhetij.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Over Het IJ Festival</a>, plus two large billboards featuring Voet&rsquo;s photographs overlook the IJ river. I caught a glimpse of one as the ferry pulled away from Nieuw Dakota, taking me back to central Amsterdam. Despite its size&mdash;6 x 3 meters&mdash;it quickly faded away, consumed by the industrial surroundings until I couldn&rsquo;t see it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS">Andrea Alessi </a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Michiel Voet</strong>, <em>The Invisible Man</em>, 2010-2014, Photograph; Courtesy of the artist and Nieuw Dakota, Amsterdam)</span></p> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:47:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rethinking Regional: An Interview With the Curators Who Are Shaking Up SITE Santa Fe <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">SITE Santa Fe was founded in 1995 as an institutional platform for the only international biennial in the United States, and one of only a few dozen internationally. Since then the number of biennials worldwide has proliferated. In 2011, SITE took a strategic hiatus from the biennial model in order to re-imagine what the SITE Santa Fe biennial could be. In July 2014, SITE returns with <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em>, the first of the exhibition series <em>SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas</em>, a six-year commitment to three thematically linked biennials. ArtSlant was able to catch up with three members of the curatorial team of <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em>: Irene Hofmann, Phillips Director and Chief Curator of SITE Santa Fe, Janet Dees, Curator of Special Projects, and visiting curator Luc&iacute;a Sanrom&aacute;n.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Lauren Tresp: SITElines marks a return to SITE's biennial mission after a strategic hiatus. Can you talk about the genesis of SITElines and particularly the focus on geography as a framework?</strong></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Irene Hofmann:</strong> At SITE, we had done a lot of thinking about the biennial and what its future might be. In studying our own history, and acknowledging the importance of the curators that had come before us, we recognized that the art world was quite different now than when SITE first launched.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It was so important and bold to bring an international contemporary art biennial to Santa Fe, and the format and the players that were part of SITE&rsquo;s beginning served SITE well and really put the institution on the map. However after nearly twenty years and a totally changed contemporary art landscape, the very format that we had adopted was feeling like it had been exhausted. And we were not the only institution that was asking these kinds of questions about the nature of biennials, how they fit into an institution, how they fit into a place, a community, and their relationship to the community.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">So we set out on a process where everything was open for discussion and consideration, and as we began to look at what SITE&rsquo;s future might be relative to staging biennials, we began to really focus on two areas: one was the decision to rethink the biennial model, and the other was the decision to give it a geographic focus. That came very early on in my time in Santa Fe, and it came from being here and this cultural mix. I&rsquo;ve been in many very <em>diverse</em> cities in the past, and diversity is not what I am talking about. I am talking about a population here that still exists and that tells the very story of the Americas.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In this place there is this vibrant mix of Native peoples, of Spanish people, of Mexican people. Each here from a time when this land was, for lack of a better word, <em>theirs</em>. New Mexico was, and in large part still remains, Native land. And then it was a Spanish kingdom, and there are many people who live here that trace their families back to when this was Spain, and then a Mexican province, and there too, there are so many families that trace their history back to that critical moment.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">That is one piece of it, and the other piece is the simple fact is that Santa Fe sits very close to the Pan-American Highway. When we talk about the continent we are not talking about North America or South America, but a shared continent. This is evidenced by the fact that there is this road that more or less links Alaska to Argentina. We are physically connected from here to the north, and from here all the way to the southern end of South America, by a network of 30,000+ miles of road.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">All of these factors came together to inspire an exhibition series that has a geographic focus. It allows us to bring much greater focus, and at the same time have a much broader area of inquiry and research than our biennials ever had.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702132320-USA_V_TIM_DECHRISTOPHER_05.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Andrea Bowers,</strong> <em>The United States vs. Time de Christopher</em>, 2010, video still; Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Projects</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>LT: One of the challenges of the international biennial is making a case for the regional to an international audience. Why bring that audience to Santa Fe? </strong></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Luc&iacute;a Sanrom&aacute;n: </strong>Today we have hundreds of biennials, and some of them are in very exotic locales that are more attractive, frankly, than coming to Santa Fe, but we are not competing with that. That is not what we are trying to do. What we are trying to do is in every way create a deeper form of biennial: a biennial that really delivers on a kind of regional focus, and not just of Santa Fe, but every region across the Americas, that is both regional <em>and</em> international. We don&rsquo;t want to get lost in this: the moment you say something is international, the local is diminished. We don&rsquo;t even want to use that language; we want to think about what we can bring to this location that resonates here but also resonates elsewhere.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In the context of contemporary artists we are really focused on what people are doing, rather than searching for something that is brought here. We are establishing a platform here for presentation, for conversation, for production of really interesting work that is being done all over our continent. Each project and exhibition has the ability of articulating that by looking carefully and critically at landscape, per se.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>IH: </strong>What we are trying to argue is that the contemporary art world and contemporary art biennials have also had a hemispheric focus, but on the Northern hemisphere. And those notions of "regional" don&rsquo;t seem to apply to these Northern-hemispheric biennials. Also notions of homogeneity don&rsquo;t seem to come up. And it&rsquo;s fascinating, in thinking about what an exhibition focused on the Americas looks like, in some ways we are also trying to break down a lot of the assumptions and stereotypes and judgments that have been made about work from a particular part of the world.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">If regional seems in opposition to international, that is something we really hope to upend. The artists we represent are, in fact, international, working in locations in the hemisphere that perhaps are more remote than so much of the art world understands. The kind of places we have visited have amazing and quite robust art scenes, and yet curators from the United States and Europe are not visiting them so much. I think we are bringing to light artists and art centers that certainly can operate in a dialogue with the international art world. I want to stress the notion that with this show we are shifting what is traditionally an East-West, Northern hemispheric focus of the art world to one that is North and South.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">LT: One of the themes of </span></strong></em><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Unsettled Landscapes</span></strong><em><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> is the representation of "lesser-known" narratives and challenging or disrupting the function of picturing the landscape in support of certain dominant experiences or values. Can you touch on this as a theme and how artists are engaging with it?</span></strong></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Janet Dees</strong>: All of the projects from the exhibition are really generated from the kinds of work we have been seeing. These thematics of the exhibition sprung from the work artists were doing. Particularly in thinking about other ways of engaging with landscape as a genre, one example is the indigenous narrative of history. If you think about traditional painting and the depiction of the West as a vast empty landscape, or highlighting natural beauty, this is something that is based upon an erasure of earlier settlements of indigenous populations. There are artists, both native and non-native, who engage with this. The show looks at both different approaches to the landscape and also artists who are critiquing a particular mode of picturing the landscape that is very much tied to the western tradition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>IH: </strong>So many of the artists that are in our show are mostly known from shows that frame them geographically. In other words, an exhibition that is "art from the Caribbean." So many artists from the Caribbean just seem to be invited to shows when they are looked at together as a group, or from Mexico, or even "art from Latin America." For us, those labels are not part of this. We are not selecting artists to represent countries, but rather looking at artists throughout the region, and putting together a very tightly curated exhibition where we have selected both the artist and particular works that bring out all of the different ideas about <em>Unsettled Landscapes</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702132452-A_Sign_in_the_NW_Passage_12inch.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Kevin Schmidt,</strong> <em>A Sign the Northwest Passage</em>, 2010, Light Jet print, cedar framed. 64 1/4 x 49 inches; Courtesy of the artist and Catronia Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>LT: What is SITEcenter, and how will it bolster the experience of </strong></span></em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Unsettled Landscapes</strong></span><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong> and </strong></span></em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>SITElines</strong></span><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>?</strong></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>JD: </strong>One of the critiques of the biennial format that we uncovered in our dialogues with colleagues in different fields is this idea of a discontinuity, that each exhibition has very separate narratives.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">SITEcenter is a structure that was generated out of this desire to work against this discontinuousness. So what that means is that the programming&mdash;public programs, dialogues, as well as artist projects that are housed within SITEcenter&mdash;is about the experience of these biennial exhibitions being present throughout the year, not only throughout the run of the exhibitions, but also in between. People who are visiting but also our local constituency will be continually engaged with the ideas of the exhibition and have more opportunities to have deeper engagement and deeper knowledge.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">With the artist residency program, this means you may view programming in November of this year that engages with the theme of an upcoming exhibition, and then you come to the exhibition in the following year. It builds these layers of engagement that are happening for the visitors.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">It is also beneficial for the artist; it gives them a longer timeframe to develop a project. Often biennials are created on very short time lines, so artists have maybe six months to do a project, and if you are someone that is interested in doing something that really engages with the place, that&rsquo;s very difficult. With the artist-in-residence program there is the possibility to develop projects over the course of two or three exhibitions that allows artists that are interested in working in this way to really have the time to develop their work. The Center works to promote continuity on both these levels for the artist's practice, but also for the institution and the larger constituency.</span><strong style="color: #525552; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>LT: Reading Lucy Lippard&rsquo;s essay</strong> &ldquo;<strong>Invasive Species, Restlessness, Disturbances, and Other Events,&rdquo; one of her comments is that there is a pervading feeling of both loss and resiliency throughout the biennial. Does that notion resonate with you?</strong></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>IH</strong>: She&rsquo;s great with words, isn&rsquo;t she? Absolutely, and it&rsquo;s great to have her perspective, because issues related to the land certainly speak about loss. Loss of resources, loss of water&mdash;these are especially powerful here. All of these notions related to the use of land and natural resources are particularly poignant here in the Southwest. But at the same time, this notion of resilience is the hopeful side. While so many of the artists in this exhibition are challenging past notions about land, land use, and landscape, they are also replacing those images of the land, the stereotypes of the West or of the landscape, with something new. That adds something quite hopeful. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;">&mdash;</span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="color: #0876f6;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/341566-lauren-tresp?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #0876f6;">Lauren Tresp</span></a></span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Patrick Nagatani,</strong> <em>Bida Hi /Opposite Views, Northeast. Navajo Tract Homes and Uranium Tailings Southwest. Shiprock, New Mexico, </em>1990, Chromogenic print, 27 3&frasl;4 x 35 3&frasl;4 inches; Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 21:41:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Mallrats <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">With exuberance and dark wit Walter Robinson has explored America&rsquo;s fascination with the seedy underbelly of urban life for more than three decades. His work has drawn from Film Noir, pop advertising, and trash literature; in the 1980s he dipped into a pool of film stills, paperback book cover art, and pinups (in that age before digital porn), in line with artists such as Robert Longo, David Salle, and Cindy Sherman. Unlike Longo and Salle, who made their images more distilled and sanitary through large-scale studio production, or Sherman, who dove headfirst into making the noir-schlock masterpiece <em>Office Killer </em>(1997), Robinson steadily kept his hand in the mix, developing a painterly touch that belied the appropriationist strategies of the decade.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The eleven new paintings and works on paper in Robinson&rsquo;s show at Lynch Tham are based on middle-income, middle-American store advertising for Target, JCPenney, Macy&rsquo;s, and Lands' End, source material particularly relevant to Robinson&rsquo;s work. Through simple depictions of clothing such as the neatly folded <em>Long Sleeve Plaid</em>, (2014) or the van Gogh inspired <em>Lands' End Boots from $25</em> (2014)&mdash;items that Warhol might have said everyone would wear&mdash;Robinson creates an eerie darkness. The shirts are precisely tucked in, like police evidence; the boots kicked asunder. These paintings suggest that in our current moment in time both school shooter and victims might be shopping at Marshall&rsquo;s.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702072453-Land_s_End_Boots.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Walter Robinson</strong>, <em>Land's End Boots from $25</em>, 2014, Acrylic on linen, 30 x 24 in.; Courtesy of Lynch Tham Gallery</span> </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Robinson&rsquo;s figurative paintings address the audience they are &ldquo;selling&rdquo; to. The implicit stance in <em>Lands' End</em> <em>Swimming in Confidence</em> (2014) and <em>Target Dresses Cardis and Wedge Sandals</em> (2013) is utopian, proposing a happy, healthy, and harmonious world of ever-changing patterns, seasonal colors, and interchangeable, endlessly consumable product. Robinson&rsquo;s brushwork is integral, informing his ability to draw from these ready-made images a sense of painterly depth that transforms the banality of the advertising image into something seductive on a deeper level.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In <em>Target-D Signed and Shaun White</em> (2013), the strongest work in the exhibit, four boys with skateboards and Beatz headphones smile out at the viewer. The imagery on two of the boys t-shirts is carefully abstracted, drawing our focus into the painting, and we don&rsquo;t notice right away how staged and frozen the boys&rsquo; expressions and postures are. The contrast between the potential menace of a group of young Justin Biebers, and the delight that Robinson takes in the painting of them creates what Marcel Duchamp called a &ldquo;delay&rdquo; in painting&mdash;we are drawn into the image, but our eyes wander the paths of the brushwork and color. Robinson wrings poetry out of pandering of advertising. It is as if he were a forensic cultural detective, using his brush like a lab scientist dusting for fingerprints. In this case Robinson is using paint, gently probing for the clues and meanings imbedded in the images he reproduces.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20140702133218-Land_s_End_Plaid.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Walter Robinson,</strong>&nbsp;<em>Long Sleeve Plaid,&nbsp;</em>2014, Acrylic on linen, 28 x 28 inches; Courtesy of Lynch Tham Gallery</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">All the most avant-garde of movements, from the Impressionists to the Pop Artists, eventually ended up, to some degree, kitsch decorations. To be "Post-Modern," especially in the 1980s, was a high-wire act, walking a tightrope between aesthetic cynicism and irony; dabbling in kitsch, was, out of necessity, a net. Robinson&rsquo;s works on paper are an appeal to pleasures of consuming, in particular <em>Lands-End Sleeve Flannel</em> (2013) which shows three plaid shirts, folded and neatly arranged in a row, suggesting that they might be small, medium, and large. Here Robinson is both critical and complicit in this bid for pleasurable consumption. He has often trafficked in kitsch, and in this show in particular, his critical relationship toward the iconography of commerce and his love/hate relationship with popular imagery adds up to a success in measures that few painters working today can match.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216789-bradley-rubenstein?tab=REVIEWS">Bradley Rubenstein</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top: <strong>Walter Robinson</strong>, <em>Land's End Swimming in Confidence</em>, 2014, Acrylic on linen, 36 x 60 in.; Courtesy of Lynch Tham Gallery)</span></p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 23:54:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Larry Clark Photograph Sale <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Oh London. With your unending ability to hype a party in a shoebox into <em>the event of the summer</em>. If you&rsquo;ve lived in London for any amount of time, you&rsquo;ll have to develop a discerning eye for what&rsquo;s genuinely meritorious of hype, and what&rsquo;s just flotsam.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702070252-LC_2014___100_Photograph_Sale_Simon_Lee_Gallery_Installation_View_P__6_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">From today until Saturday, epic photographer and filmmaker <a title="Review of Larry Clark, Tulsa &amp; Teenage Lust" href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/39892?utm_source=06242014&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=Eslant" target="_blank">Larry Clark</a>, aged 71, is unloading some of his life&rsquo;s detritus, and will be selling off original photographic prints from his humungous archive of work, out of crate in a fancy London gallery (Simon Lee, at 12 Berkeley Street). Each photograph has a price tag of &pound;100, which is being touted as a decent buy for a little piece of an artist who has defined a decade underground youth culture with indelible films Kids, Bully and Ken Park. The NYC edition of the sale already took place earlier in the year &ndash; with coverage from the <em>New York Times</em> ensuring a frenzy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702070122-LC_2014___100_Photograph_Sale_Simon_Lee_Gallery_Installation_View_P__3_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Clark could&rsquo;ve taken it one step further and done the sale in a backyard, but his motives &ndash; making his work affordable to the new generation of young fans, as well as sharing out a very personal collection &ndash; will hopefully set a precedent for more artists. It&rsquo;s not all about the hype.&nbsp; But if queues and crowds make you nervous, avoid.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702070459-LC_2014___100_Photograph_Sale_Simon_Lee_Gallery_Installation_View_P__5_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702070605-LC_2014___100_Photograph_Sale_Simon_Lee_Gallery_Installation_View_P__1_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702070659-LC_2014___100_Photograph_Sale_Simon_Lee_Gallery_Installation_View_P__2_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702071035-LC_2014___100_Photograph_Sale_Simon_Lee_Gallery_Installation_View_P__4_.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Charlotte Jansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(All images: <strong>Larry Clark, </strong><em>Photograph Sale, installation view</em>; Courtesy of The Artist and Simon Lee Gallery)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 13:10:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list TACO TRICYCLE TIMBUKTU <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">From the pleasing alliteration of this trichotomous show at Hackney Wick&rsquo;s canalside arts space you might surmise the infantile irreverance these artists share for the <em>art world etc </em>and reading the somewhat silly press release you&rsquo;ll be not much wiser as to what the exhibition is about. Taking animals and absurdity as shared visual motifs, the London-based trio work in illustration and graphic design, but for their first collaboration on an exhibition, the emphasis is on screen prints alongside 3D pieces and originals.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702063221-GBF-BobMotown-IG-copy1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Bob Motown</strong>; Courtesy of The Artist</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There will be cats, and also pandas (Hin is originally Chinese) alongside a collaborative print produced by all three artists, released to inaugurate the show, plus artist workshops running up to and during Hackney WickED, the annual community arts festival which takes place across multiple venues in the formerly industrial, virtually pedestrianised and almost gentrified neighbourhood between 1-3<sup>rd</sup> August 2014.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702063518-J-A-portrait-1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>John Atherton</strong>; Courtesy of The Artist</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Thursday&rsquo;s opening night is part of <em>Time Out</em> and The Whitechapel Gallery&rsquo;s First Thursdays initiative, with the aim of attracting more people to the free art (booze) of East London&rsquo;s art venues. Well worth checking out not only for the handmade, humourous details of these playful artists but for the beautiful soaring ceilings of Stour Space with its adjoining Counter Caf&eacute;.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702063607-Walk_into_my_life_small.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><strong>Hin, </strong><em>Walk into my life</em>; Courtesy of The Artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702064152-photo.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;Hin, Courtesy of The Artist</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140702064340-TTT_50x70_s.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">Collaborative print: Hin, Bob Motown, John Atherton, Courtesy of The Artists</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Charlotte Jansen</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Image on top: <strong>Hin</strong>; Courtesy of The Artist)</span></p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 21:55:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Displacements: the real and surreal photographs of Kati Horna <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Despite being at the forefront of documentary photography during the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s and the Mexican Surrealist movement of the 1940s, Hungarian-born Kati Horna (n&eacute;e Deutsch) has remained relatively unknown outside of her adopted country of Mexico. Yet the art world has an ever-growing appetite for unearthing overlooked or forgotten perspectives that wind alongside the dominant Western masculine narratives of the twentieth century, and Horna is a perfect candidate. The focus on her work is entirely deserved; in this first retrospective at Jeu de Paume, Horna's photographs reveal a dynamic practice that was both highly experimental and explicitly political, coupling the social responsibility of the activist with the aesthetic playfulness of the artist.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A photojournalist, war photographer, artist, anarchist, teacher, and chronicler of the mid-century Mexican avant-garde, Kati Horna covered a lot of territory&mdash;both physical and creative. This attentive, neatly composed exhibition spotlights Horna's versatility, the series of migrations that took her from Hungary to Mexico via Paris and Spain, and the humanist thread linking both facets of her creative output: photojournalism and fine art photography. Curated by anthropologist &Aacute;ngeles Alondo Espinosa and historian of the image Jos&eacute; Antonio Rodr&iacute;guez, the retrospective diligently ties each of Horna's works to its time and place, at the risk of imposing a purely biographical reading. But this is a show about looking, not reading; and as Horna was first and foremost a photojournalist, context must be kept in sight.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The unusual composition of Horna's practice&mdash;a mix of &ldquo;straight&rdquo; documentary photography, staged shots and narrative series, and photomontage&mdash;places her between two major visual languages of the 1930s: photojournalism, which had entered its golden age; and Surrealism, which was gaining international notoriety in its second decade. Though Horna was also in contact with other European avant-garde movements such as Russian Constructivism, the Bauhaus, and Neue Sachlichkeit, it was these twin influences that shaped her work from 1933 through to the 1970s. The pairing is not as incongruous as it might first seem. Surrealism had a notable political agenda&mdash;attempting to place &ldquo;the psychic life of the artist in the service of a broad social rebellion,&rdquo; as Andy Grundberg has termed it&mdash;while some documentary photographers represented the anxieties and detachment of Modern life by locating absurdity and the uncanny in the everyday. Furthermore, the boundary between photographic "truth" and fiction was dissolving as artists and advertising men explored the medium's capacity for manipulation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The exhibition features over 150 prints. None of them are large or famous or flashy, but all of them quietly demand attention, and hold it. This is partly because of Horna's ability to compose and frame shots that are bold and striking, but with odd, intriguing details that keep the eye occupied and trigger the mind's desire for narrative. Her strong visual storytelling is at work both in single images such as<em> Untitled, Carnaval de Huejotzingo, Puebla </em>(1941) and photo series like <em>Mujer y m&aacute;scara </em>(Woman with Mask, 1963). Both works express the Surrealist fascination with exoticism, performance, theatricality and ritual, and contain a mythic dimension that appears to have strengthened during Horna's Mexican period.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140630072550-KatyHorna_II_56.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Kati Horna</strong>,<em> Los Paraguas, mitin de la CNT, [Les Parapluies, Meeting de la CNT],</em>&nbsp;Spanish Civil War, Barcelona, 1937, Gelatin silver print, 24.2 x 19.2 cm; 
Archivo Privado de Fotograf&iacute;a y Gr&aacute;fica Kati y Jos&eacute; Horna; &copy; 2005 Ana Mar&iacute;a Norah Horna y Fern&aacute;ndez</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Whether incidental or staged, Horna's images display a high regard for human resourcefulness, resilience, and creativity. Commissioned by the Spanish Government to document the Civil War from 1937&ndash;1939, Horna eschewed frontline spectacle as covered by her childhood friend Robert Capa, and instead focused on the human angle: personal stories of dislocation and dispossession, told through both candid shots such as <em>Los Paraguas, mitin de la CNT </em>(Umbrellas, Meeting of the CNT, 1937) and lyrical photomontages such as the ghostly double exposure <em>Subida a la catedral </em>(Ascending to the Cathedral, 1938).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">People&mdash;whether visible or not&mdash;are always at the center of Horna's photographs. Her prints demonstrate both the social concern of the documentary photographer, and the Surrealist fascination with the human form. The early works on display at Jeu de Paume demonstrate a propensity for tight cropping, dramatic composition, and unconventional perspectives, as well as the beginnings of Horna's lifelong interest in bodies and body-substitutes. People are photographed covering their faces in sleep, or from very high or low vantage points that foreshorten, lengthen, or otherwise distort their forms. An early photojournalism series, <em>March&eacute; aux puces</em> (1933) depicts the readymade assemblages of the Parisian flea markets: things of the home displaced and rearranged in the street. Here, too, bodies are always present&mdash;dolls, painted portraits, busts, dressmakers' mannequins, statuettes&mdash;though not the stallholders themselves.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Dolls and masks are a recurring motif in Horna's work, as are other human surrogates characterised by abruptness and fixity: waxworks, skeletons, statues. People's relationship to the places, things, and surfaces around them is another central concern. A 1938 series, <em>Childhood</em>, depicts children isolated amidst ruinous urban landscapes; by 1939's <em>Mu&ntilde;ecas del miedo</em> (Dolls of Fear), the children have themselves become ruins&mdash;dolls with detached limbs. Although Horna's photography is decidedly Surrealist, she fleshes out this backbone with a rich range of visual expression: illustrative, symbolic, metaphoric, literal, narrative, propagandistic, Modern, abstract, vernacular, Gothic, romantic. Her retrospective darts between the absurd masquerade of beastliness and creativity that is <em>Pedro Friedeberg disguised as Zebra </em>(1968) and the clean, Modernist forms of a series documenting Mathias Goeritz's Automex Towers for an architectural journal.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Accompanying the prints at Jeu de Paume are a selection of cultural, political, and news periodicals that Horna edited or contributed to, such as <em>Umbral</em>, <em>Libre-Studio</em>,<em> S.nob</em>,and <em>Dise&ntilde;o</em>. It's wonderful to have a chance to see these rare magazines, especially the Salvador Elizondo-headed venture <em>S.nob</em>, which only ran for seven issues in 1962 but is now regarded as one of Mexico's most innovative publications. Horna edited the <em>Fetiches</em> section, in which she published three series of photographs including <em>Oda a la Necrophilia </em>(Ode to Necrophilia) and <em>Para&iacute;sos Artificiales </em>(Artificial Paradises). The first series depicts a strange theatrical encounter between a veiled woman and a white, bed-ridden mask; the latter is a series of portraits of a dark-haired woman, impressionistically distorted through a large glass jar, a fogged window, etc.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140630072741-KatyHorna_13.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Kati Horna</strong>, <em>El botell&oacute;n [La Bouteille], s&eacute;rie "Para&iacute;sos artificiales" [Paradis artificiels]</em>, Mexico, 1962, Silver gelatin print, 24.4 x 18.9 cm.
; Collection Museo Amparo; &copy; 2005 Ana Mar&iacute;a Norah Horna y Fern&aacute;ndez</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Displaced and dispossessed several times herself, it seems as if Horna sought other fragmented lives to photograph&mdash;psychiatric inmates, the homeless, soldiers, civilians uprooted by war. She also used her lens to further splinter previously whole bodies, by cropping, excessive foreshortening, substituting masks or dolls, covering with fabric to conceal and distort physique, double exposure, or photomontage. There is an inevitable vein of the unconscious sexism that accompanied Surrealist photography's disfiguring tendency towards the female body. Yet somehow Horna's photographs never feel malicious or aggressive. There is violence, but it's not of Horna's making; her people and places are always treated with respect.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<span style="color: #cc0066;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/229458-marianne-templeton?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #cc0066;">Marianne Templeton</span></a></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Kati Horna</strong>, <em>Sans titre - Carnaval de Huejotzingo, Puebla, </em>1941, Silver gelatin print, 19.5 x 21.5 cm; &copy; 2005 Ana Mar&iacute;a Norah Horna y Fern&aacute;ndez / 
Archivo Privado de Fotograf&iacute;a y Gr&aacute;fica Kati y Jos&eacute; Horna)</span></p> Tue, 01 Jul 2014 09:25:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list ROA's Projectum 06 Installation at Stolenspace Gallery <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Tapping into the slightly sinister-edged Victorian freak show stalwart, the hall of mirrors, street artist ROA&rsquo;s installation at Stolenspace Gallery in London&rsquo;s East End, <em>Projectum 06</em>, is an unsettling experience designed with a surprise around every corner. Salvaged materials, doors, mesh panels, odd displays of found objects and danger signs give the maze-like structure an off-limits feel, as if visitors have had to break into some specially quarantined area to access the space; or, when visiting during a particularly quiet and empty time on a weekday, the effect is that quarantined beasts have broken out leaving the viewer with a sense of unease as to what they might find as they explore. As it happens, they are faced with screaming rabbits and rats multiplied by mirrored panels. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140622183850-19.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">ROA wanted to create something the viewer had to completely physically immerse themselves in in order to experience multiple angles, viewpoints and reflections. The animals etched onto the walls, all native to the UK, aggressively bare their teeth, with some renderings revealing skulls and organs. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140622183929-28.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The popular Belgian artist&rsquo;s aim was to encourage visitors to reassess their relation to wildlife, and with the animals depicted oversized in ROA&rsquo;s easily identifiable, detailed, black-and-white style dwarfing visitors, and the rat-run configuration of the installation feeling like a human-sized cage, there is a none-too-subtle nod to the fragility of the human being&rsquo;s standing amongst the beasts of nature, coercing them into a state of vulnerablity. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140622184004-17.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Laura Havlin</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(All images: <strong>ROA</strong>, <em>Exhibition view;</em> Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery)</span></p> Mon, 30 Jun 2014 21:41:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Exposing Visual Rhymes: An Interview with Mario Ybarra Jr. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><em><strong>This interview was <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/450" target="_blank">originally published</a> way back on ArtSlant Chicago, in May, 2008, on the occasion of&nbsp; Mario Ybarra Jr.'s exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The LA-based artist is known for his installations drawing from pop and street culture, including a recent solo show examining the mythos of Scarface at LA's Honor Fraser Gallery. Right now his work can be found <a href="http://nomadicdivision.org/exhibition/mario-ybarra-jr/" target="_blank">on a billboard in Mobile, AL</a>, part of Los Angeles Nomadic Division's Manifest Destiny Project.</strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"> Mario Ybarra, Jr. is a LA-based visual and performance artist who has created room-sized installations all over the world and most recently right here in Chicago for the Art Institute of Chicago. This year Ybarra was also selected to participate in the Whitney Biennial. Beneath Ybarra's friendly demeanor lies a keen observer who is quick to expose visual rhymes in seemingly unrelated sources and to expand and build upon those connections until a cohesion is reached, or as he might say, a story. Ybarra graciously met with ArtSlant's Abraham Ritchie while putting the finishing touches on his installation at the Art Institute. Ever the raconteur, Ybarra talked about his native LA, baseball and King Arthur. Below is an excerpt of our conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px auto; vertical-align: middle; display: block;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0018.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Abraham Richie: I think a lot of Chicagoans, and everyone, might want to know what the connection is between Southern Los Angeles, Catalina Island and Wrigley Field? It&rsquo;s kind of funny to think that Wrigley Field had a &ldquo;secret brother&rdquo; or something like that on the West Coast, because I am not sure that many people remember or know about this other Wrigley Field.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>Mario Ybarra, Jr.:</strong> Well that&rsquo;s where this whole project started for me. About a year ago Lisa Dorin, the Assistant Curator in the Contemporary Art Department, asked me if I wanted to come up with a proposal to do a Focus project here at the Art Institute of Chicago, and I said I would think about it a little bit. The way that I try to work is that I try to make some kind of relationship between a personal experience, or my personal understanding or knowledge and the place that I show. I don&rsquo;t like the idea of coming in and claiming an expertise on a place that I know nothing about. I&rsquo;ve found that doing something that starts in the realm of the personal and then taking it out to another place and trying to make relationships between those two places is the most successful tactic for me. . . I try to make bridges, so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a kid we would take trips out to Catalina Island, which is part of the Channel Islands, about 26 miles off the coast of Los Angeles. I remember part of the tour was the local history. They&rsquo;d always tell us that William Wrigley, Jr. owned Catalina Island and he had famous movie stars of the time going out there, like Clark Gable. His Chicago Cubs would go out and have their spring training there. The main town there is called Avalon and it gets its name from [Wrigley&rsquo;s] niece, who told [Wrigley] to name it that after the Avalon of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and those stories. So it has this mythological side of it too. It has real histories, the local histories, of it being owned by Wrigley, and it has this mythological history through the King Arthur association. My studio back in LA is on Avalon Boulevard and they named [the street] that because that&rsquo;s where the boats used to take people out to Avalon Harbor on the island. I started doing research about that, I&rsquo;m like a de facto historian, and I found that Wrigley, along with owning the island, owned this other Wrigley Field that was in South Central Los Angeles on Avalon and 66th street. So we had the Avalon Harbor on Catalina Island, my studio on Avalon, this field that Wrigley owned was also on Avalon, I just kept following the line. I thought I could take this story from Avalon, to Avalon Boulevard, to my studio, to Avalon were the stadium was, to all the way down Highway 66 to Chicago and the Art Institute.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I&rsquo;m figuring out ways to make these relationships between historical figures like William Wrigley, who was important to historical cities like Los Angeles and Chicago, and bring these stories together somehow, make bridges between the stories. Between what I know and my experiences and the places that I go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Sports are the site of an obvious physical conflict and throughout the exhibit are interesting juxtapositions: the Mexican flag and the U.S. flag, the sword and the baseball bat, the fist of the Revolution and an image of a capitalist&rsquo;s private island. The history of the island reflects conflict as well, in the seventies it was occupied by the Brown Berets. How are sports, especially baseball, viewed both literally and metaphorically for this project, and the issues it raises?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Well I have always thought of the history of baseball as particularly related to the United States. It&rsquo;s billed as &ldquo;the American Game;&rdquo; it&rsquo;s not really played around the world at all other than some Latin American countries, like the Dominican Republic where all these new players are coming from and where young people are specifically groomed to be ball players. But in relation to the United States, and this comes from the different things that I have watched or read, the developments of social movements in the United States almost always came ten years later than in the ball game itself. Baseball has been very slow to change, and it hasn&rsquo;t changed really over the few centuries its been played here. But it still has these kind of leading edges. Let&rsquo;s take for example the story of integration and civil rights. Jackie Robinson starts playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950's and certain places, like schools, weren&rsquo;t integrated until the early sixties or late sixties. Baseball reflects a little bit in advance the kind of social movements that will happen in the United States.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another thing that I think is very interesting in terms of conflict and it being a spectator sport, even though there are rival teams and most big cities have their own team, [there is a sense of unity]. Before professional baseball, each little town would have a team, even though there was a sense of rivalry or competition, the people were brought together as spectators to cheer on their team. So even though there was a site of conflict, it wasn&rsquo;t like it was Rome and gladiators were getting fed to lions [laughter]. There is a sense of sportsmanship [. . .]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Related to issues of capitalism and revolution, or acts of civil disobedience, there is a sense of teams. I play off that with the posters, we have here a baseball with two bats crossed, but instead of a regular team you have the Brown Beret guys who tried to occupy the island in 1972 so they&rsquo;re like &ldquo;the team.&rdquo; The idea of &ldquo;the team&rdquo; is important too and the metaphor of a team. The idea that everyone has their positions but also act as a unit is very important and is a metaphor for myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="/userimages/3151/PICT0019.JPG" alt="" width="338" height="443" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: The idea of teams is also apparent in this wall of flags you have installed. What are the flags we have here?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> This is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag. The flags are also stadium-esque, they always have them. The other thing, again about making relationships, is this is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag, which has an eagle perched on a rock holding a shield and in his mouth is a banner. I thought that is very interesting, because over here is the Mexican flag, and again we have the eagle, this time perched on the cactus, and the snake in his mouth pretty much mimics the banner in the Illinois flag. Those kinds of aesthetic relationships and symbolic choices are very interesting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px; vertical-align: middle;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0015.JPG" alt="" width="430" height="328" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Even looking at the Illinois flag, that&rsquo;s more of an Aztec style eagle than a typical American-style eagle.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Yeah. Those are the kinds of things I noticed in my visits to Chicago to prepare for this show, last year and earlier this year. I started seeing these kinds of relationships, like the Illinois flag&rsquo;s similarity to the flag of Mexico.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This row of flags will start off with the U.S. flag, the state of Illinois flag, Chicago flag, Los Angeles flag, state of California flag, and the Mexican flag. We have these different relationships between these two places starting with the cities and then going to the states. We have the state of Mexico flag, even though California is not part of Mexico, it used to be part of Mexico, but it&rsquo;s related to the histories that we have here. Catalina Island was occupied by the Brown Berets because in the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which separated the Southwest from Mexico after the Mexican-American War, the island wasn&rsquo;t specifically mentioned. This is why the Brown Berets tried to occupy it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There are interrelationships between the two places [Chicago and LA]. I thought that was another kind of metaphor for the show, in terms of Wrigley being this character and starting with him, saying no man is an island, or no city, or no country or land is an island. They&rsquo;re all in relationship, in context, to their neighbors. Imagine if we thought that we could do everything, under our own power, we&rsquo;d get ourselves in trouble. We can talk about it in relationship to land, in relationship to people. Or no island is a man, we could even switch it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I wanted to draw these kinds of relationships together, one between Los Angeles and Chicago, two between Mexico and the States, three between baseball and mythology. Different symbolic orders, things like ships or bubble gum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Mario Ybarra, Jr., Jenny Gheith and Lisa Dorin for their assistance in making this interview possible. Additional thanks to the Anna Helwing Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">-<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16747-abraham-ritchie?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #000000;"> Abraham Ritchie</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Top image: <strong>Mario Ybarra Jr</strong>, Manifest Destiny Project billboard, 2014; Courtesy of LAND. All other images are installation views of <em>Take Me Out. . . No Man Is an Island</em>, 2008; Courtesy of the Artist)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:52:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my &ldquo;tag&rdquo;: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my mark in muscle memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140558-me_tagging.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Yours truly, tagging the graffiti wall, <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>; Photo: Ben Harvey.</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> <br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I was in Eindhoven attending the Free Art and Technology (F.A.T.) Lab&rsquo;s exhibition <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>&nbsp;at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/" target="_blank">MU</a>, which ended in January. The show, which also took place in April last year at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/335-eyebeam?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a> in New York, was a sort of five-year anniversary round up of the Internet collective&rsquo;s practice. (F.A.T. Lab has now entered its seventh year, but the originally scheduled retrospective was put on hiatus in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.) But back to the incident at hand. Why, at an exhibition dedicated to a network ostensibly operating online, was I contributing my meager tag to a sanctioned graffiti wall?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140845-installation_view1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The connection isn&rsquo;t so far fetched. Some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s twenty-five <a href="http://fffff.at/people/" target="_blank">members</a>&mdash;an international network of artists, engineers, scientists, lawyers, and musicians&mdash;are themselves graffiti artists. Their core values, which include &ldquo;spreading open source and free ideals into popular culture&rdquo; through DIY entrepreneurship, open source, and activism, have more than a few intersections with street art. On the one hand, art on the Internet can be viewed through a street lens: it can bypass normal distribution channels, appealing directly to viewers. Turning the comparison on its head, street art can be seen as a form of &ldquo;hack&rdquo;&mdash;an unendorsed appropriation of space, medium, or idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302135918-ideas_worth_spreading.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Evan Roth</strong><em>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank">Ideas Worth Spreading</a> (TED Talks)</em></em>, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In his recent book, <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/" target="_blank"><em>Viral Art</em></a>, <a href="http://blog.vandalog.com/" target="_blank">Vandalog</a> blogger RJ Rushmore looks at how the future of street art, with its focus on &ldquo;unmediated distribution,&rdquo; might find a natural home in the digital domain. He uses the term &ldquo;Viral Art&rdquo; to describe both shareable and invasive online practices that have an affinity, if not a direct evolutionary line, to street art (n.b. &ldquo;Viral&rdquo; here implies a level of approachability that excludes some older forms of Internet Art. The pioneering duo JODI, for example, have a great exhibition at <a href="http://www.showroommama.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Showroom MAMA</a> in Rotterdam right now that isn&rsquo;t particularly accessible or viral). F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">projects</a> don&rsquo;t always fall within the categories Rushmore outlines either&mdash;viewers may seek out content rather than encounter it serendipitously&mdash;yet they do open onto notions of self-dissemination, egalitarianism, activism, and anonymity. In fact, there are examples at MU of some of the <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/google-bombs/" target="_blank">very</a> <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/katsu-getting-up-in-digital-space/" target="_blank">works</a> discussed in Rushmore&rsquo;s text&mdash;namely, <a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank"><em>Ideas Worth Spreading</em></a>, a mock-up TED Talk stage where visitors can record images of their own &ldquo;talk&rdquo; to share online, and <em>40,000 GML Tags</em>, a massive screen showcasing graffiti gestures in <a href="http://fffff.at/tag/gml/" target="_blank">GML</a>, or Graffiti Markup Language, &ldquo;a file format designed to be a universal structure for storing digitized graffiti motion data.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140719-kopyfamo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Geraldine Juarez, <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://fffff.at/kopyfamo-free-copyright/" target="_blank">Kopyfamo'</a>, watermark on mirror, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Some F.A.T. Lab projects exist in the real world, others are strictly manifest online, and many straddle the two&mdash;that is, projects shaped in the real world and shared online. The MU exhibition, curated by <a href="http://www.lindsayhoward.net/" target="_blank">Lindsay Howard</a>, highlighted them all, offering documentation, online viewing stations, and even physical objects and artworks. Where <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> differed from the typical exhibition was that most works were not autonomous objects, but rather reproducible examples of a wider practice. Motivated viewers could (and can) recreate many of these works on the web or at home*, and the materials for some projects, like an <a href="http://fffff.at/obama-google-glass-prism-mask/" target="_blank">Obama PRISM mask</a>, were even available at the exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140049-free_universal_construction_kit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view with&nbsp;<a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank"><em>Free Universal Construction Kit</em></a>, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Good fun is always on the menu: in <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> there was a sub-genre of works touting the douchiness of Google Glass and its adopters, and a presentation of Greg Leuch&rsquo;s viral Add-on <a href="http://fffff.at/shaved-bieber/" target="_blank"><em>Shaved Bieber</em></a>, which censors all mentions of Justin Bieber online (earning Leuch more than a little hate mail from teenage fans). But some of the best and most shareable projects are greater than their capacity for the lulz. The <a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank">Free Universal Construction Kit</a> is a set of adapters that makes ten brands of children&rsquo;s construction sets, like Lego and K&rsquo;Nex, interoperable. It&rsquo;s eminently cool/novel/clever, but it also visualizes the ways in which childhood playthings ostensibly meant to spark creativity are limited by proprietary measures. The F.U.C.K. undermines these protective implements, removing barriers to cross-trademark creativity. The exhibition featured a complete set of adapters, a construction/play station, and a 3D printer that staff members kindly set to printing new pieces whenever visitors turned up. (3D models of the adapters in .STL format are available online for <a href="http://www.thingiverse.com/uck/designs" target="_blank">free download</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140151-facebook_id_card.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/tag/fb-bureau/" target="_blank">Facebook Identity Card</a></em>, video presentation of ARTE Creative, <em><a href="http://fbbureau.com/" target="_blank">Social ID Bureau</a></em>, 2012,&nbsp;portrait of Mark Zuckerberg,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s perspective seems carefully poised between an irreverent techno-optimism (&ldquo;look at these cool things we can do!&rdquo;) and deep skepticism at the ways in which technologies can be regulated, marketed, and used for power and control. Given these positions, in which use of certain technologies seems self-evident, it&rsquo;s easy to forget that not everyone has access to the distributional paradigm shift that is the digital domain. Rushmore&rsquo;s account also overstates viral art&rsquo;s present accessibility: an encounter with this type of work is more likely to be spread within specific enclaves of Internet activity, with limiting factors being not geography, but usage. The case for &ldquo;unmediated&rdquo; distribution is further undermined by the cryptic algorithms used by Facebook and Google for post placement and search results&mdash;the very systems F.A.T. Lab exploits when images of their fake TED Talks turn up in search results. In a destabilizing twist, F.A.T. Lab often coopts the very technologies and systems it protests (or defends).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140313-skatekeyboard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/skatekeyboard/" target="_blank">Skatekeyboard</a></em>, keyboard attached to skateboard deck,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In a way, that&rsquo;s why it was such a treat to see some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s works in physical form, Away From Keyboard as it were. <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> did a great job of making works and ideas accessible to people who might not be tech-savvy or know what terms like &ldquo;net neutrality&rdquo; and &ldquo;Open Web&rdquo; mean. Or those who aren&rsquo;t necessarily ready to accept or understand this sort of practice as &ldquo;art.&rdquo; The exhibition was forward looking, but also rooted in the past and present&mdash;a thought-provoking bridge between time, technologies, and disciplines. Be it in a subway tunnel or on a homepage, a mark on the wall is a sign of presence; it can be a declaration of ego, of resistance. Or like my clumsy signature, it can be an affirmation, a &ldquo;Like&rdquo; or an &ldquo;upvote&rdquo;: I was here, with so many others, and I want to be counted.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140303002936-compubody_interface.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Becky Stern</strong>,&nbsp;<em><em><a href="http://fffff.at/knitted-compubody-interface/" target="_blank">Knitted Compubody Interface</a>&nbsp;</em>(<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop-Compubody-Sock/" target="_blank">knit one</a> yourself!), at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; </em>&copy; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">*The MU exhibition ended on January 26th, but interested readers can see the projects <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">online</a> or in the new <a href="http://fffff.at/the-fat-manual/" target="_blank"><em>F.A.T. Manual</em></a> (available for purchase or <a href="http://www.lulu.com/shop/domenico-quaranta-and-geraldine-ju%C3%A1rez/the-fat-manual/ebook/product-21251172.html" target="_blank">free download</a>), released on the occasion of the exhibition and the collective&rsquo;s five-year anniversary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302141000-installation_view3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">Image on top: <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.<span style="color: #000000;">]</span></span></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list