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New York

Projekt722

Exhibition Detail
See-Through
Curated by: Hilary Doyle, Reid Hitt
722 Metropolitan Ave
Second Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11211


February 8th - March 2nd
Opening: 
February 8th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
, Tamara GonzalesTamara Gonzales
> ARTISTS
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.projekt722.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
williamsburg/greenpoint
EMAIL:  
projekt722@gmail.com
TAGS:  
abstract, realism
> DESCRIPTION

Projekt722 is pleased to present "See-Through", a group exhibition featuring Jessica Bottalico, Wendy Edwards, Tamara Gonzales, Stefan Gunn, Collin Hatton, Meredith Iszlai, Karen Lederer, Rebecca Litt, Kimo Nelson, and Rob de Oude. The exhibition is curated by Hilary Doyle and Reid Hitt. The exhibition runs from February 8th through March 2nd, with public viewing hours on weekends 1–6pm. Please join us for the opening reception on Saturday, February 8th from 6–9pm. An edition of screen-printed posters by Stefan Gunn and Karen Lederer is available in the gallery.

The artists included in "See-Through" create ambient spaces that exist between abstraction and representation. Layers of pattern and veils of color obscure our view—we look beyond the immediate surfaces of the works to depth within. Many of the artists apply paint using methods more associated with screen-printing or commercial painting, which hides the evidence of handmade brushwork.

These paintings contain semi-pictorial spaces that block and obscure our view, shielding us from what lies beyond. These transparent barriers call to mind real world veils such as curtains, lace, window screens, nets, torn posters, cells, blankets, spider webs, stockings, etc.

What does it mean to paint a veil? In our homes, a drawn curtain is a barrier that keeps us shielded from the outside world, hidden and also within. This literal delineation of space between neighbors can be seen as a larger metaphor for the social, economic, geographic barriers between us. Several artists suggest their work is informed by memory—the barrier between our present and past.


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