Chicago | Los Angeles | Miami | New York | San Francisco | Santa Fe
Amsterdam | Berlin | Brussels | London | Paris | São Paulo | Toronto | China | India | Worldwide
 
New York

Hammer Galleries

Exhibition Detail
The Modern Muse
475 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10022


November 1st, 2013 - February 24th
 
Portrait de Sylvette (Portrait of Sylvette), Pablo PicassoPablo Picasso,
Portrait de Sylvette (Portrait of Sylvette),
1954, Oil on canvas , 81 x 65 cm (81 x 65 cm)
© Courtesy of The Hammer Galleries
> ARTISTS
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://hammergalleries.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
midtown
EMAIL:  
info@hammergalleries.com
PHONE:  
212-644-4400
OPEN HOURS:  
M - F 9:30 - 5:30 Saturdays 10 - 5pm
> DESCRIPTION

The Modern Muse focuses on the relationship between the artist and his Muse throughout the last century and will include important works by Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Raoul Dufy, Fernand Léger, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Kees van Dongen and others. Throughout the history of art, the female Muse has been ever-present. Traditionally, the female form was presented as an idealized image of beauty, or as a Saint or Goddess. Beginning in the late nineteenth-century however, many artists began to turn away from traditional religious and historical themes and instead took their inspiration from “modern” life. The Muse took on a different, more personal role. The “modern” woman, whether the hired model, the intimate lover, or the stylish woman of the Parisian beau monde, would become the artist’s foremost Muse.

The Modern Muse focuses on the relationship between the artist and his Muse throughout the last century and will include important works by Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Raoul Dufy, Fernand Léger, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Kees van Dongen and others. Throughout the history of art, the female Muse has been ever-present. Traditionally, the female form was presented as an idealized image of beauty, or as a Saint or Goddess. Beginning in the late nineteenth-century however, many artists began to turn away from traditional religious and historical themes and instead took their inspiration from “modern” life. The Muse took on a different, more personal role. The “modern” woman, whether the hired model, the intimate lover, or the stylish woman of the Parisian beau monde, would become the artist’s foremost Muse.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/66254/Virtual-interactive-tour-of-Hammer-Galleries--Modern-Muse--exhibition-now-available#.UoaKrSfm7gE[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Copyright © 2006-2013 by ArtSlant, Inc. All images and content remain the © of their rightful owners.