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New York

Open Source Gallery

Exhibition Detail
Our Children Today
306 17th street
New York, NY 11215


October 12th, 2013 - November 6th, 2013
Opening: 
October 12th, 2013 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
, Miho SuzukiMiho Suzuki
© Courtesy of the artist & The Open Source Gallery
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> DESCRIPTION

 Open Source is pleased to announce “Our Children Today,” an exhibition by Miho Suzuki on view from October 12 – November 6, 2013. Please join us for a reception with the artist on Saturday, October 12, from 7 to 9pm.

Kids at play is spontaneous theater, each child playing the starring role. They are filled with a joy and wonder that adults can no longer comprehend. Child’s play lacks the strict rules, conventions, and social pressures of the “adult” world. For most, spontaneous play is only for children. As we “mature” and create inviolable personal spaces that are only punctured by our families and closest friends, we envy the absolute freedom and abandon of the very young.

The exhibition at Open Source expands Suzuki’s body of work of children at play. She sequestered adults to recreate the playful poses she has captured when photographing the children. In recreating the scenes with adults she has sought to investigate the nature of play itself.

Miho Suzuki’s work often employs the camera’s potential to generate physical and temporal space parallel to an event and, effectively, place recollection on top of an unfolding moment in the present. Suzuki is intrigued by the concept of memory: both what is remembered and what has been forgotten.

The title of the show is taken from the book “Our Children Today,” published in 1952 by S. W. Gruenberg, which has caught Miho Suzuki’s attention. The stronger influence so has been the ongoing practice of photographing the children of her friends over the last decade. Documenting kids at play brought back memories of her own childhood in Japan. “As a child I took pictures secretly with my sister when our parents were away. We invented roles to play act for the camera. After shooting we would return the camera and keep our game a secret. This secret, of course, was revealed when our mother came back with the developed films and prints.”

Open Source is pleased to announce “Our Children Today,” an exhibition by Miho Suzuki on view from October 12 – November 6, 2013. Please join us for a reception with the artist on Saturday, October 12, from 7 to 9pm.

Kids at play is spontaneous theater, each child playing the starring role. They are filled with a joy and wonder that adults can no longer comprehend. Child’s play lacks the strict rules, conventions, and social pressures of the “adult” world. For most, spontaneous play is only for children. As we “mature” and create inviolable personal spaces that are only punctured by our families and closest friends, we envy the absolute freedom and abandon of the very young.

The exhibition at Open Source expands Suzuki’s body of work of children at play. She sequestered adults to recreate the playful poses she has captured when photographing the children. In recreating the scenes with adults she has sought to investigate the nature of play itself.

Miho Suzuki’s work often employs the camera’s potential to generate physical and temporal space parallel to an event and, effectively, place recollection on top of an unfolding moment in the present. Suzuki is intrigued by the concept of memory: both what is remembered and what has been forgotten.

The title of the show is taken from the book “Our Children Today,” published in 1952 by S. W. Gruenberg, which has caught Miho Suzuki’s attention. The stronger influence so has been the ongoing practice of photographing the children of her friends over the last decade. Documenting kids at play brought back memories of her own childhood in Japan. “As a child I took pictures secretly with my sister when our parents were away. We invented roles to play act for the camera. After shooting we would return the camera and keep our game a secret. This secret, of course, was revealed when our mother came back with the developed films and prints.”

- See more at: http://open-source-gallery.org/category/upcoming/#sthash.n1pq2A8g.dpuf

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