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New York

OUTLET

Exhibition Detail
MANIFEST DESTINY
253 Wilson Avenue
Brooklyn, New York 11237


April 19th, 2013 - May 11th, 2013
Opening: 
April 19th, 2013 8:00 PM - 11:00 PM
 
, Joseph MooreJoseph Moore
nature02, Matthew HillockMatthew Hillock, nature02,
2013, Digital Print on Vinyl, 125 x 125 inches
, Ryan BrennanRyan Brennan
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> DESCRIPTION

 

MANIFEST DESTINY

Friday, April 19 – Saturday, April 11th

OPENING FRIDAY, APRIL 19TH AT 8:00PM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

OUTLET Fine Art is pleased to present MANIFEST DESTINY, opening Friday, April 19 at 8:00PM.  MANIFEST DESTINY features the works of Arlando Battle, Ryan Brennan, Matthew Caron and Rebecca Gaffney, Matthew Hillock, Deanna Havas, and Joseph Moore.  
 
As an investigation into the ever expanding New Media/New Aesthetic artistic practice, MANIFEST DESTINY explores the lexical relationship between the language surrounding nineteenth-century imperialism and present day use of technology.  Coined by John L. O’Sullivan in an 1845 issue of the Democratic Review, the term “manifest destiny” refers to the belief in a divine mandate to expand the United States of America westward. It was consequently used as philosophical justification for the Mexican-American War, the broad usurpation of land from the Indian Peoples of America, and is closely associated both with the practice of the military filibuster and the notion of American Exceptionalism.

Interestingly, much of the language surrounding Internet usage borrows from this expansionist vocabulary. As we trailblaze the digital landscape using Safari and Explorer browsers, we recall notions of dominion, entitlement, authority, and ownership. Accordingly, our technological and cyber expansion is rooted in Western imperialist pursuits. Is this our generation’s Manifest Destiny?

In this exhibition, we showcase six artists, each of whom offers a unique perspective and insight into this uncharted territory.  Arlando Battle is presenting an Online-only interactive art piece, infiltrating www.OUTLETbk.com. As domain owners, we have given Battle free reign to manipulate our gallery’s website, enabling him to fully delve into the nuances of personal property and agency. Ryan Brennan is presenting a series of painting/collages that adopt a data-moshed aesthetic.  Their assemblage, however, consists of layers of meticulously cut paper and highly detailed paint, creating a topographic surface on his wall-mounted pieces. Brennan’s heavily symbolic and iconographic works explore the semiotics of Americana and the notion of westward movement.  Further, Brennan explores the physiological effects of technology and the ways in which we visually multitask, experiencing several images at once rather than sequentially.  Matthew Caron and Rebecca Gaffney’s video, “A Passage Above,” is a direct investigation into the inner workings of contemporary and antiquated technology. “A Passage Above” employs projection, lights, mirrors, and cameras to craft a feedback chasm representing a journey into the innerspace of the camcorder, the VCR, and the Edirol V-4 video mixer.  
 
Matthew Hillock’s massive landscapes are altered both by repeated transmission between digital devices, and by direct code manipulation.  Hillock’s stock pastoral scenes juxtapose the fabricated natural landscape and the digital environment, employing imposing scale and subject to demonstrate the absurdity of these often contradictory realms. Deanna Havas will be showcasing her curated Pinterest board via iPad, which displays several different types of Internet fandoms, focusing on abject and marginalized subjects.  The materials are compiled from various social network platforms, and when presented on the traditionally “Mom-friendly” Pinterest site, create a new context for these gruesome images.  Finally, Joseph Moore’s "Touching" series investigates the new access that smartphone and touchscreen technology provides, enabling us to directly interact with previously inaccessible items such as priceless paintings, wild animals, and dangerous plants.
 
MANIFEST DESTINY will be on view at OUTLET Fine Art through May 11, 2013.


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