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New York

The Center for Book Arts

Exhibition Detail
Brother, Can You Spare a Stack?
28 West 27th Street
3rd Floor
New York, NY 10001


January 18th, 2013 - March 30th, 2013
Opening: 
January 18th, 2013 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
 
Brother, Can You Spare a Stack?, Brother, Can You Spare a Stack?,
Friday, January 18, 2013 until Saturday, March 30, 2013, Mixed Media
© Valentina Curandi and Nathaniel Katz / Pacifist Library
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> DESCRIPTION

Valentina Curandi & Nathaniel Katz / Pacifist Library

Brother, Can You Spare a Stack?

Organized by Yulia Tikhonova

Opening reception Friday, January 18th, 2012 - Free

January 18, 2013 - March 30, 2013

Open Hours: Monday to Friday 10am-6pm & Saturday 10am-4pm

The Center For Book Arts New York City

28 W. 27th St., 3rd floor, New York, NY 10001

(212) 481-0295  info@centerforbookarts.org

http://www.centerforbookarts.org

 

"Brother, Can You Spare a Stack?" presents thirteen art projects that re-imagine the library as a force for social change. Each project constructs a micro library of sorts that serves specific economic or social needs within the community. Each project proposes an alternative politicized realm, which can be imagined and formed to explore the social dimensions of contemporary culture.

"Brother, Can You Spare a Stack?" borrows its title from the lyrics of a popular depression era song, claiming that the artists invent alternative models of questioning, inspiring new perspectives on social transformation. They insert themselves into the most unexpected situations and spaces, in this case libraries, to propose social and cultural improvement.

The exhibition includes projects by: 

Arlen Austin and Jason Boughton; Brett Bloom and Bonnie Fortune; Stephen Boyer; BroLab (Rahul Alexander, Jonathan Brand, Adam Brent, Ryan Roa, and Travis LeRoy Southworth); Valentina Curandi and Nathaniel Katz / Pacifist Library; Finishing School with Christy Thomas; Anna Lise Jensen and Michael Wilson; Jen Kennedy and Liz Linden; The K.I.D.S. with Word Up Collective, Eyelevel BQE, Launchpad, NURTUREart, Weeksville Heritage Center, and individual partners, as well as with Emcee C.M., Master of None; Annabel Other; Reanimation Library; The Sketchbook Project; and Micki Watanabe Spiller.

Permanent Collection Spotlight: An Ode to Libraries

To complement the main gallery exhibition, artwork that repurpose library systems and materials from the Center's Collection will be on display. Featuring artwork by Bureau for Open Culture; Dexter Siniter; Stephen Gan; Cecilian Dean; and James Kaliardos; Bruce McLean, SKART, Tom Trusky, Sam Winston, among others.

Also on view:

Featured Artist Projects: Tomie Arai: Tales from Home organized by Alex Campos

Through the use of family stories, shared memories and archival photographs, Tomie constructs pages of ‘living’ history that reflect the layered and complex narratives that give meaning to the spaces we live in. The pieces in this Featured Artists exhibition include large silkscreened monoprints and artist books made of wood and found objects.

Candace Hicks: Fabrications organized by Alex Campos

As an ardent reader, Hicks naturally gravitates toward creating books and printing. Most of her projects take the form of books or series of prints as each represents an inquiry or sustained reflection on a given subject. Taking note of coincidences is akin to the kind of observation a landscape or portrait artist practices. Her observations take the form of hand-stitched texts that she calls Common Threads. Sewing every line, letter, and illustration in the books enhances their status as objects.

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