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New York

McKenzie Fine Art

Exhibition Detail
Marietta Ganapin
55 Orchard Street
New York, NY 10002


March 22nd, 2007 - April 21st, 2007
 
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> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.mckenziefineart.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
east village/lower east side
EMAIL:  
valerie@mckenziefineart.com
PHONE:  
212-989-5467
OPEN HOURS:  
Wednesday – Saturday, 11 to 6 Sunday, 12 to 6
TAGS:  
works-on-paper
COST:  
Free
> DESCRIPTION
Marietta Ganapin is an avid museum and gallery visitor, and her relationaship to specific works of art is highly personal and reverential. Her creative method is an expression of her spiritual connection to artwork that she loves. After having viewed the work of art--whether a painting, a sculpture, or decorative object--many times, she then gathers scores or even hundreds of gift-shop postcards or museum brochures which reproduce it. Using a hand-held hole punch and scissors, Ganapin creates a palette of color, pattern and form by repeatedly cutting specific areas of the reproduced image. These hole punches and cut-outs are then used as the building blocks of her designs. With great care and attention to detail, the artist transforms these elements into intricately detailed mandalas. At first, the viewer is dazzled by the obsessive and precise execution in these colorful and beautiful works. Slowly, recognizable details from the source material reveal themselves: a shank of hair in Roy Lichtenstein's Stepping Out reads as a yellow arabesque in the concentric composition; the eyes and lips of a statuette of the Egyptian god Amun become a ring of dimensional, abstracted forms within the inner rings of the mandala structure. Yet the resultant artworks transcend mere appropriation. Ganapin's labor-intensive execution and reverence toward her subject parallels the devotional activity of a Buddhist monk creating a sand mandala. As Ganapin has noted, "A symbol of healing, wholeness, totality and spirituality, the mandala inspires contemplation and meditation. For me, what more fitting framework than that of the mandala in reinterpreting other works of art."

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