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New York

Parrish Art Museum

Exhibition Detail
Genius Loci
279 Montauk Highway
Water Mill, NY 11976


November 10th, 2012 - January 31st, 2013
 
Hope Sandrow in her Shinnecock Hills "Open Air Studio",
Hope Sandrow in her Shinnecock Hills "Open Air Studio"

© Courtesy of the artist & Parrish Art Museum
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://parrishart.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
long island/hamptons
PHONE:  
631-283-2118
OPEN HOURS:  
Mon, Wed-Thu, Sat-Sun 10-5; Fri 10-8; Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day
TAGS:  
installation
> DESCRIPTION

In Genius Loci (the prevailing spirit of a place), inaugural Platform artist Hope Sandrow responds to the opening of the new Parrish by creating temporary installations that integrate art and cultural objects used in rituals and ceremonies that mark a beginning or rite of passage. Sandrow, whose practice often involves intensive historical research into site and place, will evoke symbols of new life and good fortune, corresponding to the many cultures that have enlivened the history of the East End.

Schedule of Installations, Events and Performances
November 2012 – January 2013

(Sky)gaze

(Sky)gaze is a component of Hope Sandrow’s project, Genius Loci, a series of site-specific events and projects that evoke “the spirit of place.” (Sky)gaze refers to the ancient practice of seeking information about one’s environment by observing the sky. The project includes scheduled screenings of the artist’s video, Untitled Observations– images of the moon projected through a telescope on to the artist; and guided telescope viewings of the sun, moon, and celestial bodies, offered in collaboration with the Montauk Observatory, Suffolk County Community College, and Dark Skies Society, (under the direction of astronomers Sean Tvelia and Dr. Mike Inglis, and dark sky advocate Susan Harder). On select telescope viewing dates, Sandrow will offer photographic portraits of viewers with the moon projected on their bodies.

Schedule for (Sky)gaze:

Screening of Untitled Observations
Lichtenstein Theater
Saturday, November 10, 11 AM – 12 PM
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 3 PM – 4 PM through December 31.

*Guided telescope viewing
Southwest Terrace
Friday, November 9, 6 – 8 PM
Friday, November 16, 4 – 8 PM
Friday, December 7, 4 – 8 PM
Friday, December 21, 4 – 8 PM
Friday, January 4, 4 – 8 PM
Friday, January 18, 4 – 8 PM
(*weather permitting)

*Photo portraits by Hope Sandrow
Southwest Terrace
Friday, November 9, 7 – 8PM
(*weather permitting)

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Schedule for The Future is Ours
November 10 – December 31


The Future is Ours

The Future is Ours, a component of Hope Sandrow’s project, Genius Loci, a series of site-specific events and projects that evoke “the spirit of place,” is a voluntary participatory project for visitors, families, employees, and workers at the site of the new Parrish Art Museum. A card imprinted with the phrase, “The Future is Ours,” will be distributed to visitors as they arrive or depart with the invitation to write how they envision the new museum within their lives. Each completed card will be strung on a line between two stanchions: as more and more are added, the responses will become sculptural and layered. Ultimately, the responses will become part of an archive produced by the artist.

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Schedule for Observational Findings
Lobby
November 12 – January 31

Observational Findings

Observational Findings, a component of Hope Sandrow’s project, Genius Loci, a series of site-specific events and projects that evoke “the spirit of place,” is a temporarily installed 19th Century display case, once owned by Samuel L. Parrish, that contains objects selected by Hope Sandrow as symbols of the “genius loci” of the Parrish Art Museum. The vitrine’s rotating contents– ranging from rare photographs from the earliest days of the Museum to found objects like “good luck” horseshoes, and elixir bottles unearthed from the grounds of the artist’s studio (property once managed by Samuel Parrish as President of the Long Island Improvement Society)– serve as reminders of the customs prevalent at the time in which the Museum was founded. Other contemporary found objects relate to the agrarian roots of the Museum site, the materials and processes of observation, and the golden ratio, found in both nature and the proportions of the new building.


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