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New York

Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University

Exhibition Detail
In the Search of an Absolute: Art of Valery Yurlov
Curated by: Julia Tulovsky
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901


December 3rd, 2011 - April 14th, 2013
 
Counter-Form, Valery YurlovValery Yurlov, Counter-Form,
1959, oil on canvas
© Collection Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers, Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union
> QUICK FACTS
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http://www.zimmerlimuseum.rutgers.edu
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other (outside main areas)
EMAIL:  
press@zimmerli.rutgers.edu
PHONE:  
848-932-7237
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday - Friday: 10am-4:30pm; First Wednesday 10am-9pm; Weekends: Noon-5pm. Closed Mondays, the month of August, & Major Holidays: Memorial Day, July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Thursday & Friday, December 24 & 25, January 1.
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
TAGS:  
avant-garde painting, Soviet Nonconformist Art
COST:  
$6 for adults; $5 for 65 and over; Free for museum members, children under 18, and Rutgers students, faculty, and staff (with ID).
> DESCRIPTION

This exhibition continues a series of one-man shows devoted to early nonconformist artists. The art of Valery Yurlov (born 1932) stands out as one of the earliest examples of geometric analytical abstraction within Soviet nonconformist art. Yurlov never was a member of any art movements or groups, and stayed beyond the confines of politics, not once yielding to the temptation of using ideology in his art. Yurlov’s creativity developed in direct communion with his teachers, the artists Vladimir Favorsky and Petr Miturich, and his long-term friend, the philosopher and theoretician Victor Shklovsky. All of them carried within themselves the ideology and traditions of the avant-garde of the 1920s. In Yurlov’s work this tradition manifested itself in the search for an absolute, for an expressive visual sign, built in accordance with universal principles of construction of a visual form. Throughout his artistic career, Yurlov combined this principle with the latest developments and theories in contemporary art, such as neo-constructivism, structuralism, impermanence, and performance art.


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