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New York

KLOMPCHING GALLERY

Exhibition Detail
The Architecture Of Space
111 Front Street, Suite 206
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Main-recommend2-00efe575372c445bf9143ee2903db57d 2 people have recommended this exhibit


January 25th, 2012 - March 2nd, 2012
Opening: 
February 2nd, 2012 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
 
San Mateo No. 3, S. Billie MandleS. Billie Mandle, San Mateo No. 3,
2010, C-Type, 30"x40"
© S. Billie Mandle
> ARTISTS
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WEBSITE:  
http://www.klompching.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
brooklyn
EMAIL:  
info@klompching.com
PHONE:  
+1 212 796 2070
OPEN HOURS:  
Gallery Hours: Wed — Sat, 11am — 6pm Extended Hours: 1st Thursdays, 11am — 8:30pm Private appointments available upon request
TAGS:  
James Pomerantz, Benjamin Lowy, contemporary, klompching, dumbo, Matthew Baum, Andrea Land, figurative, landscape, Justine Reyes, Greg Stimac, Monika Sziladi photography, conceptual, S. Billie Mandle, Sebastian Lemm
> DESCRIPTION

EXHIBITION DATES: JANUARY 25—MARCH 2, 2012
ARTIST RECEPTION: THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 6PM—9PM


KLOMPCHING GALLERY is pleased to announce the New York showing of The Architecture of Space, originally curated for and enthusiastically received at the inaugural Flash Forward Festival in Toronto.

This is an exhibition of contemporary photography exploring the perception and representation of space—the collapse between public and private, it’s abstract form and its role as metaphor. In many respects, the selected artists also embody the state of contemporary photography itself; in that their artworks are not easily packaged into identifiable genres, but illustrate the blurring of those categories. This can be seen through the wide-reaching visual strategies employed, as well as the imaginative modes of production that bring attention to the photograph as an abject of construction.

Monika Sziladi provides a voyeuristic look into social networks and subcultures, presented as panoramic fictions, assembled so tightly that you might believe they’re ‘shot from the hip’. Benjamin Lowy’s images of Iraq also play on this notion of voyuerism, but in his case he provides the spectator with a rare viewpoint of war, as seen from the photographer’s perspective. Street photography is addressed in Matthew Baum’s photographs, of the passing moments of people he encounters and observes, but re-presented as a kind of hyper-reality that results from a subtle and perceptive use of post-production.

The intervention of the artist is also utilized to great effect in the work of Sebastian Lemm, who creates negative space in his large-scale landscapes and new work by S. Billie Mandle, who transforms the familiarity of car parks into spaces of quiet meditation. The idea of a shared private space is also evident in the restrained portraits, by Andrea Land; of little girls in their bedrooms that entice the viewer into their imaginative worlds of make believe.

This highly personalized insight can be seen in the work of Justine Reyes too, where she fuses personal family artifacts within the tropes of  traditional dutch still life.  Greg Stimac’s images of built-up grit and bugs register tangible evidence of road journeys but also conjure up a sense of time and distance. James Pomerantz’, images of anonymous landscapes culled from a CCTV camera, on the other hand, bring about mystery and intrigue.


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