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New York

Bruce Silverstein - 20th Street

Exhibition Detail
New Vision
529 West 20th Street
New York, NY 10011


October 13th, 2011 - November 19th, 2011
Opening: 
October 13th, 2011 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
 
, Larry SilverLarry Silver
© Courtesy of the artist & Bruce Silverstein - 20th Street
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> DESCRIPTION

Larry Silver [b.1934] began photographing the streets and subways of New York City in 1949 at the age of 15, and studied photography at the High School of Industrial Art (1949-53). The School's proximity to Peerless Camera Store enabled Silver to meet numerous members of the Photo League, including W. Eugene Smith, Weegee and Lou Bernstein. In Silver's senior year, he won first prize in the Scholastic-Ansco Photography Awards, and was granted a full scholarship to the Art Center School in Los Angeles (1954-56). During visits to the Santa Monica Beach, Silver photographed the local weightlifters, body builders, and acrobats. This celebrated series, “Muscle Beach” (1954), was the subject of a solo exhibition at the International Center of Photography in 1985, and again in 1999 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Upon moving from New York City to Westport, Connecticut in 1973, Silver began a thirty-year project that would become Suburban Vision. Focusing on the isolating relationship between the inhabitants and the physical landscape of an evolving metropolitan suburb, Silver’s highly constructed images counterbalance the more satirical social depictions of Garry Winogrand and Bill Owens, who also worked during this period. Suburban Vision was exhibited at Silverstein Photography in 2002. In 2003, after more than 50 years, Larry Silver began to move away from documentary photography and began creating a series of water abstractions. These photographs often bear little resemblance to water, incorporating natural and unnatural impurities such as pollution, bacteria, leaves, and brush. For Silver, these works were the beginning of a conceptual leap – moving away from depicting people in their environment to the effects of people on their environment.


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