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New York

Muriel Guepin Gallery

Exhibition Detail
Interpolating
83 Orchard street
New York, New York 10002


January 7th, 2011 - February 20th, 2011
Opening: 
January 7th, 2011 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
 
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> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.murielguepingallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
east village/lower east side
EMAIL:  
contact@murielguepingallery.com
PHONE:  
1.347.244.1052
OPEN HOURS:  
Wednesday - Sunday: 12 - 6 pm
TAGS:  
graffiti/street-art, mixed-media, photography, abstract, modern
> DESCRIPTION

Muriel Guepin Gallery is pleased to announce "Interpolating," a new group show featuring the work of Jean-Paul Cattin, Sally Gil, Tony Ingrisano, Lionel Pratt, and Jamison Sarteschi.

Their work will be on view from January 7– February 20, 2011. Please join us for the opening reception on Friday, January 7, 2011 from 6–7:30.

Jean-Paul Cattin's photographs of urban environments have an abstract, painterly feel. Contrasted to the extreme, these urban "landscapes" capture the texture of City life and the reminiscence of haunted memories.

Contrasting with Cattin's somewhat spare compositions, Sally Gil uses mixed media collage to create poetic, highly detailed, and delicately intricately landscapes. Gil is inspired by patterns in knitting, crochet, doilies, origami, cartoons, by pop icons and encyclopedia images.

Tony Ingrisano also embraces detail and patterning, composing drawings from repetitive, obsessive marks, which sometimes resemble cells. These marks cohere into absurd desolated urban landscapes, amalgams of organic/graphic circumvolutions, or fierce, wounded and decaying animals.

Lionel Pratt's paintings are a tribute to urban culture, and borrow from the language of graffiti. His paintings celebrate jazz musician icons, and existential writers. Pratt's canvases are palimpsests, sprinkled with inverted text, and piled with layers of acrylic and patches of pastel with occasional collages remnant from vintage books.

Jamison Sarteschi's combines black ink drawings of domestic objects together with splashes of fluorescent colors to create a sarcastic world full of sexualized whimsical creatures that depict our omnipresent trash culture.


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