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As an image maker\, Andrew Jordan is dedica ted to experimentation and exploration. Taking a song about meeting strange rs on the internet from Joseph Keckler's new piece\, I am an Opera\, as inspiration\, Jordan sought to create a series of photographic portra its of real-life internet strangers quickly and collaboratively by strippin g away the pressures and formalities of more normative social interactions.

Jordan used three websites known for facilitating face to face transactions with strangers--Craigslist\, Facebook and Grindr--to connect w ith his subjects. He worked quickly\, meeting with people as soon as possib le\, and attempted to approach each meeting without expectations other than a desire to explore the ephemeral tension and magic of the unknown. Each p articipant was invited to be photographed with an object\, item\, or garmen t that represented him or her. Jordan accepted each participant's ideas and compositional suggestions\, and thus each photographŒwas collaboratively c omposed. All portrait subjects will receive copies of their photographs.

Everything is voluntary. Let's see who shows up.

DTEND:20130506 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130412 GEO:40.7205057;-73.9928144 LOCATION:Dixon Place\,161A Chrystie Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Seeking Strangers (NYC)\, Andrew Jordan UID:273264 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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Fluxus was an interna tional network of artists active in the 1960s and 1970s. Through the tirele ss efforts of its founder George Maciunas\, Fluxus presented festivals and concerts and distributed artists’ multiples\, which Maciunas fabricated in his Soho loft. Collective\, performative\, anti-institutional\, and irrever ent\, Fluxus sought to bridge the gaps between different artistic mediums a nd between art and life.

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In 1973 Maciunas announced his intention t o design a grand art history chart\, an exhaustive chronicle of Fluxus that would also narrate the movement’s origins since the beginning of performan ce-based art. Later that year\, he produced the breathtakingly detailed Diagram of Historical Development of Fluxus and Other 4 Dimentional\, Aura l\, Optic\, Olfactory\, Epithelial and Tactile Art Forms\, which he ca lled\, simply\, “the chart.”

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The chart positions Fluxus\, often rel egated to an art historical footnote\, as the culmination of a distinguishe d artistic lineage. It elucidates connections between various artistic phen omena that are often considered only in isolation.

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Maciunas’s chart —which he never considered complete—reveals not only the history of Fluxus but also an ambitious reckoning with modernism and its legacy. This exhibit ion of objects in the Museum’s Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Archives presents the “final” 1973 version of Maciunas’s chart alongside a rchival documentation that illustrates its genesis and its significance in the very history of art it maps.

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DTEND:20130506 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130306 GEO:40.7614029;-73.9776248 LOCATION:MoMA (Museum of Modern Art)\,11 West 53 Street \nNew York\, NY 100 19 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Charting Fluxus: George Maciunas’s Ambitious Art History UID:263909 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130306T173000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130306T103000 GEO:40.7614029;-73.9776248 LOCATION:MoMA (Museum of Modern Art)\,11 West 53 Street \nNew York\, NY 100 19 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Charting Fluxus: George Maciunas’s Ambitious Art History UID:263910 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Exhibition Space considers the aesthetic and concep tual implications of photography and its pivotal role in two early mileston es of the US exploration of space. Begun in 1948 using the most powerful te lescope in the world\, the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey was the first sys tematic attempt of photograph and catalogue the visible universe. The resul ting 1\,870 plates took ten years to complete\, and are some of the most te chnically advanced prints ever made. Project Echo was the first manmade obj ect photographed in space. Hastily conceived as NASA's first response to Sp utnik\, Echo I was an inflatable Mylar sphere 100 feet in diameter\, a comm unications satellite whose primary mission was to be visible to the naked e ye. Photos of Echo began appearing in the US press almost immediately after its launch in 1960. Meanwhile\, models of Echo\, called "the most beautifu l object ever put in space\," were exhibited at the US Capitol\, and at Wor ld's Fairs throughout the 1960s.



Greg Alle n is a writer and filmmaker based in Washington DC. He has publish ed his art writings in Cabinet magazine and The New York Times \, and on his blog\, greg.org: the maki ng of\, since 2001. Allen published Canal Zone Richard Prince Yes Rasta : Collected Court Documents from Cariou v. Prince\, in 2011\, and exhi bited paintings at both Postmasters Gallery and Printed Matter in 2012.

DTEND:20130508 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130320 GEO:40.719022;-74.004432 LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Exhibition Space UID:261200 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130320T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130320T180000 GEO:40.719022;-74.004432 LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Exhibition Space UID:261201 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

In February 2013\, the Guggenheim Museum will open the first U.S. museum retrospective exhibition ever devoted to Gutai\, the most infl uential artists collective and artistic movement in postwar Japan and among the most important international avant-garde movements of the 1950s and ‘6 0s. The exhibition aims to demonstrate Gutai’s extraordinary range of bold and innovative creativity\; to examine its aesthetic strategies in the cult ural\, social and political context of postwar Japan and the West\; and to further establish Gutai in an expanded\, transnational history and critical discourse of modern art.

Organized thematically and chronolog ically to explore Gutai’s unique approach to materials\, process and perfor mativity\, Gutai: Splendid Playground explores the group’s radical experimentation across a range of media and styles\, and demonstrates how individual artists pushed the limits of what art could be or mean in a post -atomic age. The range includes painting (gestural abstraction and post-con structivist abstraction)\, conceptual art\, experimental performance and fi lm\, indoor and outdoor installation art\, sound art\, mail art\, interacti ve or “playful” art\, light art and kinetic art. The Guggenheim show compri ses some 120 objects by 25 artists on loan from major museum and private co llections in Japan\, the U.S. and Europe\, and features both iconic Gutai a nd lesser-known works to present a rich survey reflecting new scholarship\, especially on so-called “late Gutai” works dating from 1965-1972. Gut ai: Splendid Playground is organized by Ming Tiampo\, Associate Profes sor of Art History\, Carleton University\, and Alexandra Munroe\, Samsung S enior Curator of Asian Art\, Guggenheim Museum.

DTEND:20130508 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130215 GEO:40.782979;-73.958867 LOCATION:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\,1071Fifth Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10128 -0173 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Splendid Playground\, GUTAI UID:253885 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130215T194500 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130215T100000 GEO:40.782979;-73.958867 LOCATION:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\,1071Fifth Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10128 -0173 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: Splendid Playground\, GUTAI UID:253886 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Exhibition by the Czech artist MARK T HER\, featuring his award winning film Das Wandernde Sternlein\, 2011.
The film takes place in the dark forest of the Czech frontiers\, the Sudet enland\, and presents woods and wilderness as the site of childhood nightma res and secret rituals.

Exhibition opening: Thursday\, March 21 at 7PM. Open through May 9.
Taste Czech wine - Supported by Vino z Cze ch www.vinozczech.com
... and Czech beer - supported by Staropramen www.staropramen.com

To enumerate all the possibilities of meaning and pathos one finds in the vast oeuvre of Mar k Ther\, who\, in his late 20s\, has already become a prolific video artist in the Czech Republic\, one would have to write an entire book. Rather tha n producing a body of work that boasts a coherent message\, Ther’s videos – incredibly short\, cinematic\, hilarious\, and confusing – have concerned themselves with the enunciation of a definitive style\, a style that is mar ked by the joyful revivification of a camp aesthetic that is as sophisticat ed as it is playful\, as well as a flippant sense of humor that has its roo ts in Eastern European absurdism. What distinguishes Ther’s work from that of other contemporary Czech artists is its fearless exploration of sexualit y and transgenderism\, topics that he manages to engage in without politici zing his commitment. Unlike most video artists belonging to his generation\ , Ther experiments with narrative in all of his videos\; his is a liberated – and liberating – approach\, one that isn’t blinded by the conceits of ag e. Although they frequently\, through music and visuals\, hearken back to t he 1980s\, perhaps the kitschiest decade yet\, there’s something timeless i n so many of these pieces that make them work so well in the here and now. Perhaps we’d do best to call it Ther’s time.
-By Travis Jeppesen

Das wandernde Sternlein\, 2011\, 20min\, FullHD
The video Das wa ndernde Sternlein\, awarded in 2011 with the Jindrich Chalupecky Award\, cu mulates several issues and strategies used by its author Mark Ther in his p revious work.
The story begins with a tale narrated by a very old lady in Sudeten dialect. She brings us in the times of late 1930s and she remin ds us how one of the children she knew disappeared in the woods under very odd circumstances. Then we see a wood in late afternoon\, soon will be dark . A man is chasing a 11–year-old boy. Then the man molests the child and fi nally strangles him. This scene is very realistic\, but very unnatural in t he same time. After that we have a detailed look at the dead children´s bod y\, when the rapist leaves.
The video was awarded by an international committee for Ther's “courage to overcome social prejudices and taboos”. On the other hand\, the video Das wandernde Sternlein was received also with controversy\, especially by parents and conservatives. ~Ladislav Zikmund-Le nder

Mark Ther is the 2011 Jiri Chalupecky Prize finalist.

DTEND:20130509 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130321 GEO:40.7689943;-73.956651 LOCATION:Czech Center New York\,321 E 73rd Street \nNew York \, NY 10021 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Das Wandernde Sternlein\, Mark Ther UID:266612 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130321T203000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130321T190000 GEO:40.7689943;-73.956651 LOCATION:Czech Center New York\,321 E 73rd Street \nNew York \, NY 10021 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Das Wandernde Sternlein\, Mark Ther UID:266613 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

International Print Center New York announces the pre sentation of Pop-Up! The Magical World of Movable Books — Selections fro m the Collection of Bernard S. Shapiro\, an exhibition of children’s po p-up books. Pop-Up! will be on view from January 18 - March 9\, 2013 in IPCNY’s gallery at 508 West 26th Street\, 5th floor.  

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Bernard S. Shapiro (1917-2009) was a Boston-based entrepreneur wi th many interests who formed the collection over a period of some twenty ye ars.  The collection numbers over 250 books\, of which thirty-five were ori ginally shown at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge\, MA in the wint er of 2012.  IPCNY has selected seventeen from the children’ book portion o f the collection for presentation here. 

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 Mr. Shapiro’s first acquisition was Lothar Meggendorfer’s International Circus:  A Rep roduction of the Antique Pop-Up Book\, purchased at a neighborhood book shop in Brookline\, MA.  It remained a centerpiece of his collection\, insp iring the many acquisitions that followed\, discovered in antique shops and bookstores in Boston\, New York\, Canada\, and overseas during travels. \n

An illustrated brochure with a curatorial essay by Leo nard S. Marcus will accompany the Exhibition.  Mr. Marcus is one of the world’s leading authorities on children’s books and illustrations.  The au thor of more than twenty books\, Mr. Marcus is a frequent contributor to th e New York Times Book Review and is a founding trustee of the Eric Carle Mu seum of Picture Book Art in Amherst\, Massachusetts. He is currently curati ng the New York Public Library’s major exhibition for 2013\, which will ope n on June 7 and will remain on view through March 2014.

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Pop-Up! will be presented in the Viewing Room adjacent to IPC NY’s main gallery\, where New Prints 2013/Winter will be on view. Ex hibition design is by Artist and facilitator\, Grayson Cox. IPCNY is gratef ul to Barbara Stern Shapiro for generously lending the selections from Mr. Shapiro’s collection of pop-up books for the exhibition\, and to the Norman Rockwell Museum for its assistance with the project. The exhibition is mad e possible thanks to the generous contributions of two anonymous individual s.  A grant from the PECO Foundation supports IPCNY’s Exhibitions Program t his season.

DTEND:20130510 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130118 GEO:40.7536854;-73.9991637 LOCATION:IPCNY International Print Center New York\,508 W.26th St. Rm 5A \n New York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pop-Up! The Magical World of Movable Books: Selections from the Col lection of Bernard S. Shapiro UID:262632 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130304T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130304T180000 GEO:40.7536854;-73.9991637 LOCATION:IPCNY International Print Center New York\,508 W.26th St. Rm 5A \n New York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pop-Up! The Magical World of Movable Books: Selections from the Col lection of Bernard S. Shapiro UID:264150 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The 2010 census shows a 32 percent increase since 2000 of Am ericans who identify themselves as belonging to a multiracial background. T hey represent the growing multiracial diversity that has become more eviden t in our country and in our communities during the Obama era. Dimensions Va riable: Multiracial Identity features artists whose work expresses various aspects of their diverse\, yet highly individual backgrounds. The exhibitio n attempts to move beyond the polarized discussions of race and identity po litics of the 1980s and 90s and past the limitations imposed by political c orrectness. It also contests the idea of a "post-racial" society presented by political commentators after the election of Barack Obama. In the four y ears since the biracial president's first inauguration\, race has remained a critical and contentious topic in national politics. Challenging a monoli thic view of race\, this exhibition examines contemporary issues of identit y\, hybridism\, and racial ambiguity. At times the artists in the show dire ctly tackle issues that relate to race and cultural awareness. At other tim es\, the artists deal with these issues subtly by acknowledging the spread of multiculturalism in our global society and the ways in which race and et hnicity are fluid and dependent upon perception and context.

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In an effort to understand unfamiliar cultures or to foster solidarity within a c ommunity\, people are frequently categorized into singular compartments acc ording to ethnic or national origin. Current artists are looking at the pol itical implications of racial categories and perceptions about mixing cultu res. In his work\, Nicky Enright explores the U.S. census\, its history of ingrained prejudices\, and the absurdity of categorizing one's race into in sufficient and inaccurate labels\; the census has only allowed respondents to indicate more than one race since 2000. Israeli-American artist Yael Ben -Zion's photographic series investigates the implications of intermarriage. Herself part of an interfaith "mixed marriage\," she was appalled when she learned of the State of Israel's campaign to target Jews who were "lost" t o intermarriage. She set out to photograph other couples who are facing cha llenges because they chose to share their lives regardless of their ethnic origins\, races\, or religions.

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By exposing the problems of categor ization\, artists are opening up the dialogue about identity to make it mor e inclusive. Lorra Jackson's paintings explore her own multi-ethnic backgro und of Korean and African American to engage the story of identity in the U nited States. Her figurative series on the platypus—an animal that was diff icult for scientists to classify when it was discovered—challenges cultural ly-defined notions regarding race and ethnicity. Cecile Chong\, who was bor n and raised in Ecuador of Chinese parents\, creates cross-cultural narrati ves using subjects and materials that are appropriated from international s ources. Her encaustic and multi-media works depict figures in fantastical l andscapes that reflect the recurring global exchange of ideas and influence s.

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For these artists\, personal significance and experience are por trayed in a way that is relevant to broad audiences. Dennis Redmoon Darkeem addresses the historical displacement of people of color\, integrating ima gery and objects from his Native American and African American cultural roo ts into his paintings\, sculpture\, and mixed-media installations. Sara Jim enez is interested in "embodied inheritance\, female lineage and ancestry\, and the presence of a loved figure as she exists in memory." Her drawings on nylon explore her relationship to her Filipino grandmother\, Lola Meldy. Through her grandmother\, Jimenez reflects on her own identity and her pla ce in the world. As a material\, the nylon represents a fragile\, permeable representation of memory\, as well as a second skin available in a range o f hues to match one's complexion. It molds to the body and hides imperfecti ons.

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Mixed race identity can lead to a sense of feeling caught betw een cultures or not fitting into the communities with which one identifies. To address this disorientation\, artists are exploring ideas about hybridi sm\, ambiguity\, and transmutation. Firelei Báez explores her Dominican and Haitian identity through Caribbean folklore\, black female subjectivity\, and aspects of her personal history. Her Ciguapa series depicts a mythologi cal female creature that dwells in the Dominican highlands and preys on err ant men. Avoiding literal representations of the Ciguapa\, Báez's shape-shi fting beast constantly transitions from animal to human to vegetative forms \, re-conceptualizing and challenging romanticized notions of the tropics. Saya Woolfalk depicts a fictional multi-racial utopia as seen through the e yes of an anthropologist in The Ethnography of No Place series. The Empathi cs project depicts Woolfalk's invented race of women\, a mix of ethnic iden tities\, who progressively transform from human to plants. While each serie s takes a different approach—the former from the position of an outsider's observation\, the latter portrayed as self-representation—they can both be seen as allegories for how conceptions of race and identity might evolve.\n

Through their investigations\, these artists show that issues of rac e and identity remain complex and continually shifting in this country. By engaging this topic in new ways\, their work fosters an open\, inclusive\, and ongoing dialogue. Recognizing that today's viewers are more culturally aware\, artists challenge us to acknowledge the significance of the growing diversity in our communities.

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Artist's Talk May 4 from 4 to 6pm

DTEND:20130510 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130404 GEO:40.7498123;-74.0035012 LOCATION:Rush Arts Gallery\,526 W.26th St. Suite 311\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Dimensions Variable: Multiracial Identity\, Dennis -RedMoon Darkeem \, Firelei Báez\, Yael Ben-Zion\, Cecile Chong\, Nicky Enright\, Lorra Jack son\, Sara Jimenez\, Saya Woolfalk UID:267932 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130404T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130404T180000 GEO:40.7498123;-74.0035012 LOCATION:Rush Arts Gallery\,526 W.26th St. Suite 311\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Dimensions Variable: Multiracial Identity\, Firelei Báez\, Yael Ben -Zion\, Cecile Chong\, Dennis -RedMoon Darkeem\, Nicky Enright\, Lorra Jack son\, Sara Jimenez\, Saya Woolfalk UID:267933 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new paint ings and related drawings by Anne Harris.  Included are a series of six med ium-sized self-portrait oil paintings\, related pastel and Mylar drawings a nd two earlier works.  This is Harris’s third one-person show with the gall ery. 

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In her new self-portraits\, Harris shows us\, in a manner tha t is both brutal and liberating\, the physical and emotional consequences o f middle-age for women. The youthful curve between her waist and hips is go ne and her belly fat is starting to fold over her hips. Her breasts flatten and sag\, having completed their youthful functions. Her skin is transpare nt and has lost its elasticity\, veins are more pronounced. Her face is pal e in some works and\, in others\, it is flushed and blotchy. Some of these changes are suggested in the titles Harris gives these portraits including Pink Face and Invisible. The latter refers not only to th e fact that women become physically transparent as they age—thin skin and w hite hair—but they also become invisible because they no longer carry the s igns of youth\, youth being what is sought and seen today.

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Harris’s body in her self-portraits\, signals what might be understood as the begin ning of the process of a woman’s physical demise\, starting with the loss o f her ability to create new life. Harris’s paintings\, however\, are not ab out lamenting these losses. In fact\, as is emphasized by the title and con tent of two other self-portraits tentatively titled Pale Angel and Angel\, she seems quite ready to accept the fact that her body\, having performed its earthly purpose of conveying life is transforming\, re adying itself for a new phase.  Harris’s paintings\, however\, do not dwell on the fact of death but rather find in it a release\, a semblance of free dom\, perhaps even a different kind of birth. This can be seen in the fact that\, while physically grounded in their body’s solidity\, the heads and e longated necks of these figures—slightly smaller in proportion to the bodie s—appear to hover above their bodies\, contributing to a spectral quality i n these works. Her expressions in these works register confidence\, resolve \, and poise\, and in Invisible resized\, we glimpse a slight smil e. These figures seem to possess knowledge or a state of consciousness that exists beyond the realm of the ordinary.  Her figures appear to emerge fro m thin air and\, despite their physicality\, exist in a state and space of suspension.

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            Harris was born in 1963 and received an M.F .A. in from Yale.  She has exhibited her work in Chicago\, New England and New York.  In 2003 her work was the subject of a mid-career survey at Bowdo in College Museum of Art curated by Alison Ferris.  She currently teaches a t the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130406 GEO:40.762227;-73.971964 LOCATION:Alexandre Gallery\,Fuller Building 41 East 57th Street\, 13th Floo r\nNew York\, NY 10022 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Phantasmatical: Self Portraits\, Anne Harris UID:234186 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Hours

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Wednesday May 811am - 7pm
Thursday May 911am - 7p m
Friday May 1011am - 9pm
Saturday May 1111am - 5pm
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Admission

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$25 per day
$30 for a four day pass
Chi ldren 12 and under free

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Exhibitors

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\n DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130508 GEO:40.7464969;-74.0094471 LOCATION:Collective .1 Design Fair\,Pier 57 West Side Highway\n New York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collective .1 Design Fair 2013 UID:273322 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130508T190000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130508T110000 GEO:40.7464969;-74.0094471 LOCATION:Collective .1 Design Fair\,Pier 57 West Side Highway\n New York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collective .1 Design Fair 2013 UID:273323 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Denise Bibro Fine Art\, in Chelsea\, New York is plea sed to announce its exclusive representation of Chicago artist\, Tim Ripley and his first solo exhibition in New York.

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Soft Cell refers to the tiny soft polymer clay forms and environments that Ripley carefully sculpts\, which are the precursor for his deftly painted oil paintings on panel. Ripley's works remind us that technology has changed the way we perc eive the world around us. Simulations\, reproductions\, and symbols have be come more "real" than the subject they represent. This concept has become c entral to the process of Ripley's works. His technical method includes phys ically sculpting polymer clay forms\, and then composing his pictorial land scape by photographing them. The artist manipulates the value\, color\, tex ture and scale with digital editing programs\, in high resolution for each layer. The generated digital print serves as a reference for the painting. Color decisions are based on a combination of sources: the print\, the scre ened digital image and the actual sculpture created. Using a technique of " wet into wet\," with tiny brushes\, painting three or four times over the w ork\, he achieves the "Smooth" gradient shading effect he desires. A gloss varnish enhances the refined surface giving each work both a clean modern e ffect\, as well as a timeless quality.

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The fundamental idea behind the arduous process is to represent the surreal pseudo digital forms and en vironments created through mediations of form and subject. The titles of hi s paintings however\, were taken from the names of 80's movies\, an obtuse relation to the painting's subject matter. Ripley's bright and shining adol escence shines through his titles\, performing as a direct reference to the culture he grew up in\, and the time period that shaped his character.

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Ripley has an M.F.A from Northwestern University and a B.A. from Columbia College in Illinois. Besides showing extensively in the Chica go area\, Tim Ripley's works have also been included in exhibitions in Clev eland\, Ohio and Houston\, Texas.

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130404 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Denise Bibro Fine Art\,529 West 20th Street 4W\nNew York\, NY 1001 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Soft Cell\, Tim Ripley UID:269061 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130404T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074345 DTSTART:20130404T180000 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Denise Bibro Fine Art\,529 West 20th Street 4W\nNew York\, NY 1001 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Soft Cell\, Tim Ripley UID:269062 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

DRISCOLL BABCOCK GALLERIES presents Interrupted Spring\, an exhibition of oil paintings and works on paper by Alan Gussow (193 1-1997)\, which captures the energy of natural environment through a lively synthesis of abstract expressionism and realism\, presenting a profound an d poetic artistic vision. Gussow’s unique imagery conveys the intimate link between man and the environment\, invoking his personal encounters with th e smells\, sounds\, tastes\, and tactile sensations of nature.

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“His paintings are elegant\, joyous\, celebratory and occasionally elegi ac representations of the world he treasured and embraced\, the world of na tural phenomena\,” notes John Driscoll\, president of Driscoll Babcock.

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With nature as his muse\, Gussow sought to reconcile his percep tual experiences and transform them into persuasive visual expression. Many works in this exhibition—Interrupted Spring (1975)\, Vegetabl e Garden in a March Rain (1975) and Edges of A Delayed Spring (1987)—reflect Gussow’s intuitive awareness of the shifting colors and tex tures of the changing seasons\, as thawing frost and spring rain make way f or a lush explosion of buds and greenery. The rich color associations and f luctuating brushstrokes in these works suggest a dynamic shift in focus fro m the panorama towards the detail\, and a new emphasis on the rhythm\, colo r\, and texture of the productive earth. 

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The observational work Evening Bird Song with Crickets and Fireflies (1978)\, a syn esthetic mingling of visual and sound patterns\, exemplifies his expansion of painting’s potential to embody sensations that extend far beyond the vis ual. His quick\, darting lines capture the fleeting buzz around him and cre ate a sustained momentum that enlivens the entire surface of the canvas. By the 1970’s\, the experience of gardening as a process fully infiltrated Gu ssow’s work. In May Garden (1976)\, an all-over pattern of stitch like strokes of black ink at first glance resembles a sort of abstract call igraphy\, but in actuality chronicles the hive of invisible activity observ ed beneath the sprouting soil.  The exhibition includes six of black and wh ite ink on paper works\, which are being exhibited for the first time.

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Gussow desired to create art not simply from the viewing of natu re\, but from his palpable sense of place. He created a new visual language rooted in man’s universal interconnectedness with nature\, one that contin ued to evolve alongside his own relationship with the environment.

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ABOUT ALAN GUSSOW
Driscoll Babcock Galleries has han dled the work of Alan Gussow since 2001. The gallery has staged two solo ex hibitions of his work: Alan Gussow: A Painter’s Nature (2009) and Alan Gussow: Oils (2006). Additionally\, Gussow’s work has been th e subject of more than a dozen solo museum exhibitions\, including the Corc oran Gallery of Art\, Washington\, D.C.\; The National Arts Club\, New York \; Flint Institute of Arts\, MI\; Arkansas Art Center\, Little Rock\, AK\; Mississippi Museum of Art\, Jackson\, MS\; and the Portland Museum of Art\, Portland\, ME.

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Gussow’s work can be found in public collect ions throughout the United States and in Europe\, including The Metropolita n Museum of Art\, New York\; the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art\, Kansas City\, MO\; Corcoran Gallery of Art\, Washington\, D.C.\; Arkansas Art Cen ter\, Little Rock\, AK\; Flint Institute of Arts\, MI\; Palmer Museum of Ar t\, University Park\, PA Montgomery Museum of Art\, AL\; Greenville County Museum of Art\, SC\; and the National Museum\, Udine\, Italy.

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In addition to being recognized as an artist\, Gussow was an avid environ mentalist and activist. He advised Senators Robert F. Kennedy and George Mc Govern on key environmental issues\, served on the Board of Directors of th e Friends of the Earth\, and had a strong national presence\, serving as an expert witness on environmental conservation issues before Congress and se veral legislative committees. He served as a Consultant in the Arts for the National Park Service\, and was an active teacher for 40 years. His many w ritten works include the books\, “A Sense of Place: The Artist and the Amer ican Landscape” and “The Artist as Native: Reinventing Regionalism.”

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130418 GEO:40.7494436;-74.0043134 LOCATION:Driscoll Babcock\,525 West 25th Street \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Interrupted Spring\, Alan Gussow UID:271372 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130418T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130418T180000 GEO:40.7494436;-74.0043134 LOCATION:Driscoll Babcock\,525 West 25th Street \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Interrupted Spring\, Alan Gussow UID:271373 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Edwynn Houk Gallery is delighted to present a selection of v intage prints by the British photographer\, Bill Brandt\, from the collecti on of the artist’s family. The exhibition coincides with the major retrospe ctive that is currently at the Museum of Modern Art\, Bill Brandt: Shadow a nd Light (until August 12). Edwynn Houk Gallery has exclusively represented the Estate of Bill Brandt for 30 years.

Bill Brandt (British\ , b. Germany\, 1904-1983) is widely acknowledged to be one of the most inno vative photographers of the twentieth century\, with a professional career spanning over 50 years. Working in a variety of styles and genres – from ph otojournalistic documents of English society in the 1930s and life in Londo n during World War II\, to portraits of England’s artistic elite\, and fina lly to his surrealist and ground breaking nudes of the 1950s – Brandt’s div erse output as a photographer reflected the wide variety of his interests. Consequently\, Brandt cannot be reduced to a single style or look. The prin ts on view will clearly articulate this variety.

This exhibiti on will present photographs from his family’s collection\, many of which wi ll be on view for the first time. It will include prints that explore Briti sh society\, taken during the time of his first two publications\, The Engl ish at Home (1936) and A Night in London (1938). Throughout the 1930s and 4 0s\, his photographic dramatizations focused on the vast differences betwee n the social classes and decidedly English types\, seen in “Parlourmaid at a Window in Kensington\,” 1939\, and “Barmaid at the Crooked Billet Tower H ill\,” 1939. The strong influence of Brassaï’s “Paris du Nuit” can be felt in his “Soho Bedroom\,” 1934.

The journalistic assignments du ring the War laid the foundation of his subsequent career\, with portraits of writers (“Dylan Thomas and his Wife Caitlin\, in Their Room\, Manresa Ro ad\, Chelsea\,” 1944)\, and artists (“Eye Portrait\, Henry Moore\,” 1960) a s well as English landscapes (“Stonehenge under Snow\,” 1947). It is in the se photographs that Brandt’s shift away from the purely documentary to the more poetic can be keenly felt. A bewildering and beguiling atmosphere perm eates\, compounded by Brandt’s own reticence. He quietly insisted that the images should speak for themselves.

Finally\, in the 1950s\, Brandt gained renown as an artist and not just a photographer\, with his st unning and unforgettable nudes. The mastery of the female nude has long bee n considered an important threshold for a photographer\, and it’s Brandt’s creative use of shadow\, reflection and a wide-angle lens for a dramatic\, almost surrealist\, perspective that makes his nudes so distinctive and uni que. Brandt had done some work in fashion photography in the late 1940s\, b ut like Man Ray and Erwin Blumenfeld who before him in Paris had done fashi on work\, Brandt often had more interest in the model than what she wore. H is radical reworking of the genre can be seen in “Belgravia London\,” 1953 and “East Sussex Coast\,” 1957.

Brandt was born in Germany to an aristocratic British banking family. Suffering from tuberculosis as a te enager\, he spent seven years recovering at a Swiss sanatorium. It is there that he first took up photography. As a young man\, he lived in Vienna and then in Paris\, where he worked in the atelier of Man Ray. Finally\, in 19 34\, he relocated to Britain permanently. Brandt continues to be considered Britain’s greatest photographer of the modern era\, and certainly one of t he major forces in the elevation of photography as an art form.

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130404 GEO:40.76326;-73.973161 LOCATION:Edwynn Houk Gallery\,745 Fifth Avenue\, 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10151 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Early Prints from the Collection of the Family\, Bill Brandt UID:266722 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130404T210000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130404T190000 GEO:40.76326;-73.973161 LOCATION:Edwynn Houk Gallery\,745 Fifth Avenue\, 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10151 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Early Prints from the Collection of the Family\, Bill Brandt UID:267622 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Flowers is pleased to present an exhibition title d Cityscapes surveying several of our artists who engage with the themes of urban life. Included in this collection are David Hepher\, Peter Howson\, Patrick Hughes\, Lucy Jones\, Nadav Kander\, John Keane\, Mona Kuhn\, Jiro Osuga\, Tai-Shan Schierenberg and Renny Tait. 

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Each of t hese artists interacts with the city in a unique capacity. David Hepher use s real building materials\, such as concrete\, in his paintings. Patrick Hu ghes and Lucy Jones both lead us to question our perception of reality with their works: Hughes with his three-dimensional relief paintings and Jones with her impressionistic interpretations of the cityscape. Peter Howson\, N adav Kander and John Keane bring social commentary to the discussion\, draw ing on the presence of war and violence\, and also the rapid development of urban settings. Photographer Mona Kuhn is know for her nude portraiture\, but here she shows us a glimpse of Venice\, exposed. Renny Tait and Tai-Sha n Schierenberg explore the light\, textures and geometry of the city in the ir paintings\, while Jiro Osuga plays with spaces that make up contemporary city life.

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130411 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Cityscapes\, David Hepher\, Peter Howson\, Patrick Hughes\, Lucy Jo nes\, Nadav Kander\, John Keane\, Mona Kuhn\, Jiro Osuga\, Tai-Shan Schiere nberg\, Renny Tait UID:270705 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

You have a right to perform your prescribed action\; but you are not entitled to the fruits of your action.
Never consider yourself the cause of the results for your activities\; and never be associated with not doing your duty.

-The Bhagavad Gita\ , verse 47

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Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to ann ounce New Yorked\, Tallur L.N.’s first solo exhibit ion with the gallery. Employing a range of materials including bronze\, woo d\, terracotta\, silicone\, concrete and silver\, the show includes sculptu re\, wall pieces and a site-specific installation.

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Dr. Chaitanya Sa mbrani wrote\, “Tallur’s work reaffirms the death of future-driven progress . The future is already obsolete. Eternal and omnipresent speed propels us headlong into a chaotic intermingling of conditions where the vernacular an d the international commingle in uneasy marriages\, and where epiphanies ar e only to be found stumbled upon in the refuse heap amongst the endlessly a ccumulating pile of debris.” Challenging the bondage of materiality and the futility of desire\, Tallur reaches deep into dichotomies between the tang ible and the ethereal\, the figurative and the abstract\, the decorative an d the conceptual to bring forth new meanings on contemporary existence.

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Karma Yoga is a model for a larger sculpture of similar form and is titled after the belief that a person’s present is based on his or h er past and this process of continuity will be in action until the individu al attains a zero balance. Tallur is exploring the ways to become liberated through the repetitious movement of the body as it works the machinery in an endless cycle without clear consequence.

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In Chromataphobia\, a large recreation of the Laughing Buddha holding a wooden log\, Tall ur describes the title’s meaning as an abnormal and persistent fear of mone y and its diagnosis as a state in which rhythm is lost to a greed for growt h and speed. This rhythm he speaks of can only return through the passage o f time. Viewers are encouraged to hammer their own coins into the wood’s cr acks and crevices. With every insertion the participants are to clear their minds of worry and negative thoughts and make a wish for themselves. The u nfixed concept of value is explored throughout Tallur’s practice. In Ch romataphobia\, the viewer/participant is brought into the ritual where the liquid\, the presumed and the trade values of an object are intertwine d with their meanings: tangled\, snagged and reformed. 

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In Unic ode\, Tallur tackles contemporary problems of information storage and loss using traditional techniques and lush material to bridge the past\, pr esent and future and point toward thematic interconnectedness through time. The bronze figure stands erect\, holding a staff while sections of the bod y reveal erosion that has penetrated deep beyond the surface. Indicative of much of his practice\, Tallur bridges historical iconography with present conditions exploring our phobias and fetishes. 

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Tallur L.N.\, lives and works between Seoul\, South Korea and Karnataka\, India. He was awarde d The Skoda Prize for Indian Contemporary Art\, 2012 and was part of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale\, India\, 2012-13. He has been exhib ited internationally\, including solo exhibitions in Germany\, South Korea\ , India\, China and the United States. Selected group exhibitions include < em>The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT 7)\, Queens land Art Gallery\, Gallery of Modern Art\, Brisbane\, Australia\, 2012\; Critical Mass: Contemporary Art from India\, Tel Aviv Museum of Art\ , Israel
2011\; Meditation: Asian Art Biennial\, National Ta iwan Museum\, Taiwan\, 2011\; The Empire Strikes Back: Indian Art Today \, Saatchi Gallery\, United Kingdom\, 2010 and La Route de la Soir \, Tri Postal\, France\, 2010.

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130411 GEO:40.7489192;-74.0050579 LOCATION:Jack Shainman Gallery 24th Street\,524 West 24th Street \nNew York \, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: New Yorked\, tallur l.n. UID:270066 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130411T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130411T180000 GEO:40.7489192;-74.0050579 LOCATION:Jack Shainman Gallery 24th Street\,524 West 24th Street \nNew York \, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: New Yorked\, tallur l.n. UID:270067 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

LYNCH THAM specializes in contemporary art\, representing hi storical artists as well 

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as mid-career and emerging artists workin g in all media. The gallery identifies artists of 

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historical impor tance\, and dedicates itself to a reemergence of their careers. Also of 

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interest is the discovery and launching of the artistic careers of ne w and emerging 

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talents. 

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Florence Lynch is forme rly from Florence Lynch Gallery\, a contemporary art gallery of 

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in ternational standing\, previously located in New York’s Chelsea gallery dis trict. Lynch 

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has over 15 years of art world experience\, and has w orked as an independent curator\, 

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critic and lecturer. 

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Lynch has a Master of Arts degree in Art Administration and Art Hi story. She is fluent 

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in 5 languages. 

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Bee Tham’ s career spans over 15 years in public and private sectors. Trained as a \n

diplomat and European political specialist at the Foreign Service Of fice of Singapore\, 

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Tham has also held leadership positions in mar keting and communications - She has 

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launched advertising campaigns that won the Cannes Gold Lion at Cannes Lion 

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Festival of Creativi ty. 

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Tham has a Master of Art in Philosophy and an Honor s Degree in Philosophy and 

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History.  

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Media enquiries:   

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Florence Lynch /Bee Tham 

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Tel: 917- 327-3580 / 917-288-9099\; info@lynchtham.com

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130328 GEO:40.7188646;-73.9846431 LOCATION:LYNCH THAM\,175 Rivington Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Inauguration\, Tiong Ang\, Carolina Raquel Antich\, Leonard Bullock \, Guglielmo Achille Cavellini\, Quisqueya Henriquez\, Greg Kwiatek\, Chant al Michel\, Ralph Provisero UID:273428 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130328T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130328T180000 GEO:40.7188646;-73.9846431 LOCATION:LYNCH THAM\,175 Rivington Street \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Inauguration\, Tiong Ang\, Carolina Raquel Antich\, Leonard Bullock \, Guglielmo Achille Cavellini\, Quisqueya Henriquez\, Greg Kwiatek\, Chant al Michel\, Ralph Provisero UID:273429 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Newman Popiashvili gallery is pleased to present A Steady Pr ogress of Nothingness\, the third solo exhibition at the gallery by Egyptia n artist Basim Magdy. The artist will present a film\, a slide projection a nd paintings.
Magdy’s titles for his works and exhibitions always play on the idea of human achievement through the ages\, but hints at the ultim ate failure that occurs with each generation. Highlighting this idea in My Father Looks For An Honest City\, 2010\, Magdy asked his own father to reen act Diogenes of Sinope’s philosophical statement of carrying a lamp in dayt ime. Diogenes\, who was one of the founders of the philosophy of cynicism\, was most known by his repeated act of carrying a lamp in daylight supposed ly “looking for an honest man.”
Magdy filmed his father walking throug h a transformative urban landscape with a flashlight in hand – a city that is suspended in the process of construction. The backdrop of generic unfini shed structures partially urbanized and still full of nature\, allowing ima ges of petrified wood\, doves\, fake palm trees\, stray dogs\, and a flashl ight to evolve as dystopian protagonists.
The double slide projection titled A 240 Second Analysis Of Failure And Hopefulness (with Coke\, Vinega r And Other Tear Gas Remedies)\, 2012\, consists of 160 color slides shown on two synchronized slide carousel projectors. Shot over a period of one mo nth and developed through an elaborate process of exposure to common househ old chemicals\, the images depict a demolition site as it emerges into a co nstruction one. For this process\, Magdy has selected liquids such as vineg ar\, coca cola and others\, which have been used as anti tear–gas remedies by revolutionaries throughout the Middle East over the past two years.
Once applied to the slide film\, the household chemicals distort the color palette of the slides in unusual ways\, resulting in an unlimited number o f variations. Magdy is especially interested in exploring the analogue phot ographic medium at this particular period because of the limited time befor e the film ceases to exist completely. The projects produced in this expiri ng medium\, however\, will remain as evidence to the incredible generosity and flexibility this medium has offered.
Both the slide projection and the video deal with imagery of demolition and construction\, bringing the sense of a real landscapes coupled with the tragic and abandoned desolation of our future. Basim Magdy continues to bring up the notions of failure an d the search for something unknown.
Born in Assiut\, Egypt\, Magdy cur rently lives and works in Basel and Cairo. His work has recently appeared i n La Triennale: Intense Proximity\, Palais de Tokyo\, Paris\, curated by Ok wui Enwezor\; Newtopia\, the State of Human Rights\, Mechelen\, Belgium\, c urated by Katerina Gregos\; Sharjah Biennial\, Sharjah\, UAE\, curated by Y uko Hasegawa\; Future Generation Art Prize\, PinchukArtCenter\, Kiev\, Ukra ine\, curated by Bjorn Geldhof. Upcoming shows in 2013 include the 13th Ist anbul Biennial\, Turkey\, curated by Fulya Erdemci\; Biennale Jogja XII\, I ndonesia\, curated by Agung Hujatnikajennong and Sarah Rifky\; and Dissiden t Futures at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts\, San Francisco\, curated by B etti-Sue Hertz

DTEND:20130511 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130404 GEO:40.7471381;-74.0051007 LOCATION:Marisa Newman Projects\,504 West 22nd Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:A Steady Progress of Nothingness \, Basim Magdy UID:267906 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130404T200000 DTSTAMP:20140921T074346 DTSTART:20130404T180000 GEO:40.7471381;-74.0051007 LOCATION:Marisa Newman Projects\,504 West 22nd Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:A Steady Progress of Nothingness \, Basim Magdy UID:268097 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR