BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 CALSCALE:GREGORIAN PRODID:iCalendar-Ruby VERSION:2.0 BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

MoCADA is teaming up with 2AC Gallery owner Pablo Sue-Pat to mount a satel lite exhibition space. The exhibition space features two exhibitions\, the first\, Camouflage Nursery is a sculpture series which poignantly explore t he loss of childhood and innocence in the face of adult projections created by Pablo Sue-Pat.

Newsfeed: Reconstructions of Experience @ 2AC Gallery is the base for th e installation projects component of the curatorial series NEWSFEED: Anonym ity &\; Social Media in African Revolutions and Beyond. The gallery spac e conceptually engages with the topics of anonymity\, interconnectivity\, c onflict and the digital arena in which they interplay. Through site specifi c installation work\, by Malcolm Andre Davis II and Nyeema Morgan\, the rol es of the anonymous consumers of social media and the anonymous producer of social media are addressed.

DTEND:20130110 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121026 GEO:40.678125;-73.940322 LOCATION:2AC Gallery\,2 Alice Court\, Brooklyn \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:NEWSFEED: Reconstructions of Experience Meets Camouflage Nursery\, Malcolm Andre Davis II\, Nyeema Morgan UID:248586 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckelis pleased to announce “Paint and Memory” an exhibition of new paintings by John A. Parks.  Executed as finge r paintings\, these pictures explore the artist’s memories of his English c hildhood in a series of richly evocative images. “In a sense I’m using a ch ildish means to recreate a child’s world\,”says Parks\, “although the resul ting paintings are far more sophisticated than those of a child.”  The lush surfaces\, gloriously layered color and suggestive drawing work together t o create a novel and intensely nostalgic vision. What is remembered are gli mpses\, sometimes idyllic and sometimes disturbing\; cycling through a vill age on a summer’s day\, playing hide-and-seek in a public park\, the mayhem of an indoor swimming pool\, the sudden formality of a Maypole dance. The limitation of painting with his fingers has forced Parks to simplify the de scriptive tasks of the painting. “There is a certain indeterminacy with fin ger painting\,” says the artist\, “you are never exactly sure where an edge is going to go.  Chance events occur that you can edit out or leave in.  T he process adds a richness and a very physical engagement with the paint.  Accidents can often be suggestive - theyprod the imagination and provide a sense of discovery.  Every mark is truly an adventure.”

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Also on vie w are three large-scale map paintings of London in which the artist manipul ates space and point of view to provide a highly entertaining excursion thr ough the streets of his native city. Presented from multiple viewpoints but lodged in a fairly accurate street plan\, buildings\, monuments\, bridges and buses come alive in an unexpected and inventive fashion.

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Educat ed at the Royal College of Art in London\, Parks has made paintings over th e last thirty years that have focused on themes of English life seen throug h expatriate eyes. The artist has lived for decades in New York and teaches at the School of Visual Arts.  Throughout that time the artist’s work has evolved expressively and stylistically. His early and intense realist work was closely associated with the realist revival but carried with it from th e start a lyrical and intensely personal quality.  John Russell\, writing i n the New York Times\, dubbed him “A true poet in paint and something of a find.”   In the mid eighties and nineties Parks adopted a larger scale appr oach to paint images of public monuments in a series of paintings that expl ored the unease of national identity and its attendant rituals.  These work s included a highly irreverent series of English soldiers\, often shown dan cing or otherwise cavorting.

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Parks has been represented by several major New York galleries including Allan Stone Gallery and Coe Kerr Gallery .  His work is included in a number of museum collections including the Vic toria and Albert Museum\, in London and the Museum of the Rhode Island Scho ol of Design.This exhibition marks his debut with 532 GalleryThomas Jaeckel .

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(Gallery is closed December\, 4-11 Art Fair Miami)

DTEND:20130216 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121108 GEO:40.749403;-74.004838 LOCATION:532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel\,532 W. 25th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Paint and Memory\, John A Parks UID:244787 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

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Aicon Gallery is proud to present Fact ● Fission\, a group exhi bition curated by Nitin Mukul featuring fourteen contemporary artists\, wor king in various media to challenge preconceived ideological divisions and b reak down the prevailing regional aesthetics in global contemporary art.

Daily unrest in the name of democracy seems endemic to some nati ons\, whereas in others\, complacency breeds blissful collapse. Volatile sh ifts in the balance of power appear inevitable\, with over-consumption taki ng a tangible toll. The media's reductive narratives and sweeping generaliz ations over large swathes of the globe are no longer plausible as Fact. New patterns emanate\, emerging at a pace more rapid than ever in regard to te chnology\, nature\, policy and social upheaval. Cultural practitioners year n to reflect this multiplicity of voices. Enter Fission. Fusion\, a term of ten used to describe the melding of different cultures\, seems overused and worn out. A mainstream marketing gimmick\, somewhat analogous to assimilat ion or multiculturalism\, fusion advocates tolerance of the ‘Other’\, albei t according to its own convenience and within the bounds of what it deems t asteful. What's more interesting is fission – when things split apart\, reo rganize and regenerate\, smudging and splintering neatly kept categories an d conventional wisdom in the process. The results are not necessarily hybri ds\, but new inauthentic\, hyper-local and interdisciplinary manifestations resulting from willful or imposed dislocation. The work in this exhibition will center on the concept of fission\, while encompassing a wide range of formal concerns.

Yamini Nayar’s imagined interiors explore ar chitecture and memory via the representation of constructed (and deconstruc ted) space. Drawing from the visual allegories of architecture\, with the m odel and final photograph weaving together existing narratives with element s of fragmented idealism\, Nayar’s collaged photographs become jarring snap shots of ephemeral architectural memories as experienced by our subjective subconscious. Pooneh Maghazehe interrogates the functional and obstructed u ses of worn domestic furniture by methodically peeling and stripping textil es\, to reveal the underlying structural vulnerability from within. The rec ontextualized pieces investigate the collective identity\, social psycholog y\, and symbolic gestures and emblems that define belief structures by expo sing the interdependence of materials inherent in these prefabricated forme r objects of comfort. James Cullinane explores the diagrammatic possibiliti es and didactic imagery of patterns in process\, navigating the tension bet ween pictorial and physical space. His paintings act as architectural dicti onaries and charts to navigate the labyrinthine paths forged in his layered dystopia of geometric forms\, optic patterns and vibrant color. In Kanishk a Raja’s panoramic realms\, the energetic fusion of private and public doma ins of distinct global settings\, interlocked by pulsating patterns derived from textile design and ornamentation\, form a complex visual field spanni ng several panels. Nitin Mukul depicts details of events as various types o f social rituals/commentary\, deconstructing and imbuing them with palpable energy and ambiguity.

The opening reception will feature a sc reening of the new video Haal by Nitin Mukul\, with a live score by Jace Cl ayton (DJ Rupture) and software designer Bill Bowen\, utilizing their recen tly developed SUFI PLUG-INS\, an interdisciplinary project dedicated to exp loring non-western and poetic notions of sound\, creating a space where sof tware design\, music tools\, encoded spirituality\, digital art and indigen ous knowledge systems overlap.

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DTEND:20130119 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121206 GEO:40.7268368;-73.9929619 LOCATION:AICON GALLERY - New York\,35 Great Jones Street \nNew York\, NY 10 012 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Fact ● Fission\, Eric Ayotte\, Sarnath Banerjee\, Ruby Chishti\, Ja ce Clayton (aka DJ Rupture)\, James Cullinane\, Gisela Insuaste\, Mala Iqba l\, John Jurayj\, Abir Karmakar\, Pooneh Maghazehe\, Nitin Mukul\, Seher Na veed\, Yamini Nayar\, Kanishka Raja UID:249912 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121206T200000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121206T180000 GEO:40.7268368;-73.9929619 LOCATION:AICON GALLERY - New York\,35 Great Jones Street \nNew York\, NY 10 012 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Fact ● Fission\, Eric Ayotte\, Sarnath Banerjee\, Ruby Chishti\, Ja ce Clayton (aka DJ Rupture)\, James Cullinane\, Gisela Insuaste\, Mala Iqba l\, John Jurayj\, Abir Karmakar\, Pooneh Maghazehe\, Nitin Mukul\, Seher Na veed\, Yamini Nayar\, Kanishka Raja UID:249913 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

On Saturday\, December 1st\, Alexander and Bonin will open an exhibition of prints and multiples by sixteen artists: Matthew Benedict\, Fernando Bryce\, Michael Buthe\, Willie Cole\, Eugenio Dittborn \, Willie Doherty\, Mona Hatoum\, Diango Hernández\, Stefan Kürten\, Paul E tienne Lincoln\, Jorge Macchi\, Rita McBride\, Sylvia Plimack Mangold\, Dor is Salcedo\, Sean Scully and Paul Thek. Some of the prints and multiples in cluded in ‘Stimuli’ were executed in relation to large scale projects\, whi le others are self-contained and further explore motifs found throughout th e artists’ work.

Prints completed in conjunction with larger p rojects include Jorge Macchi's large scale Marienbad\, 2012 which illustrates his 3-dimensional illusion of the 1961 film\, ‘Last Year at Marienbad’ by Alain Resnais.  Maachi created the full-scale o utdoor piece for the 2011 Lyon Biennale.  Obversely\, Doris Salcedo ’s Shibboleth I-IV\, 2007\, four archival pigment inkjet prints were created during the preparation for the fissure she created in t he floor at Tate Modern in 2008.  In Blueprint\, 2011\, Ri ta McBride’s representation of institutional space takes the form of a woodcut based on an elevation of the façade of Museu d'Art Contemporan i de Barcelona (MACBA). This print was made during a three year project wit h the museum\, in which McBride removed the layers of temporary constructio n that had accumulated since Richard Meier’s original design in 1995.
 
During 2011-12\, Willie Cole worked with Highpoin t Center for Printmaking in Minneapolis to produce a group of intaglio and relief prints. Five Beauties Rising\, a suite of five  impressions of ironing boards printed in a monochromatic gray scale impart “a sense of spirituality and suggests grave markers of weathered stone."* Each ironing board has the name of a woman printed in relief on the lower edge\, sugges ting both the legacy of ‘women’s work’ and the psychological residue retain ed by objects of such intense and specific personal use.
 
The subjects of Stefan Kürten and Sylvia Plimack Mango ld’s paintings are further explored in their prints. As in her pai ntings\, Plimack Mangold works outdoors from direct observation of the tree s on the surrounds of her Washingtonville\, NY home\, etching plates of a m aple tree motif that has been central to her work for more than thirty year s. Kürten takes advantage of the exactitude of lithography to expand the re presentation of stillness in an image of a perfect domestic environment. 
Multiples in the exhibition include Mona Hatoum’s uncanny object T42\, 1993-1998 a seemingly fused pair of cups and saucers executed in stoneware\; a perfume set and boxed explication com memorating Paul Etienne Lincoln’s installation In Trib ute to Madame de Pompadour and the Court of Louis XV\, 1982-1991\; and Diango Hernández's cast bronze and fabric Lamp-He\, 2010.

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DTEND:20130119 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121201 GEO:40.7497717;-73.9976946 LOCATION:Alexander and Bonin\,132 10th Ave. between 18th and 19th streets i n Chelsea\nNew York \, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Stimuli: prints and multiples\, Matthew Benedict\, Fernando Bryce\, Michael Buthe\, Willie Cole\, Eugenio Dittborn\, Willie Doherty\, Mona Hat oum\, Diango Hernández\, Stefan Kürten\, Paul Etienne Lincoln\, Jorge Macch i\, Rita McBride\, Sylvia Plimack Mangold\, Doris Salcedo\, Sean Scully\, P aul Thek UID:248525 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

“Foiled: Tinsel Painting in America” is the most comprehensi ve museum exhibition to focus on this under-recognized decorative art that was widely practiced in America from 1850 to 1890. One of the great revelat ions of the exhibition is the way this modest technique touched upon so man y aspects of American life\, innovation\, and culture.

Tinsel paintings are reverse paintings on glass with smooth or crumpled metallic f oil applied behind translucent and transparent areas\; when viewed in candl elight or gaslight\, the effect was one of shimmering highlights. In the fi rst half of the 19th century\, tinsel painting was taught to young women wh ose parents were dedicated to providing refined education for their daughte rs and paid for such special classes. By the mid- to late 19th century\, th e art had expanded outside the school curriculum\, and instructions prolife rated in books and were advertised in women’s magazines. Its origins are re lated to forms developed in Renaissance Italy\, 18th-century China and Fran ce\, and 19th-century Austria\, England\, and Germany. Floral imagery predo minates\, as botanical copy prints and patterns were often employed. Especi ally appealing today are rare works that combine a variety of techniques an d materials\, including photography and collage.

It is remark able that so many examples of this fragile art have survived. The American Folk Art Museum has in its holdings a wealth of tinsel paintings thanks to the prescience of donors Kristina Barbara Johnson and Jean and Day Krolik J r. With a significant gift from Susan and Laurence Lerner\, the museum is n ow the largest public repository of this fascinating artform.

Lee Kogan\, curator emerita

DTEND:20130113 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20120912 GEO:40.7732646;-73.9816233 LOCATION:American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square\,2 Lincoln Square \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Foiled: Tinsel Painting in America UID:229822 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20120912T173000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20120912T103000 GEO:40.7732646;-73.9816233 LOCATION:American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square\,2 Lincoln Square \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Foiled: Tinsel Painting in America UID:229823 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

An attraction to shiny things is a primal human impulse. It may be instinctive and emotional\, or profoundly meaningful within a cultur al context. In the visual arts this has been expressed through the use of m yriad materials that glitter and reflect. “Ooh\, Shiny!” will highlight thr ee centuries of artworks—ranging from needleworks by 18th-century schoolgir ls to sculptures by contemporary icons including Howard Finster—that are em bellished with such materials as spangles\, mica flakes\, glass\, marble du st\, sequins\, glitter\, and aluminum.

DTEND:20130113 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20120912 GEO:40.7732646;-73.9816233 LOCATION:American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square\,2 Lincoln Square \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Ooh\, Shiny! UID:229824 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20120912T173000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20120912T103000 GEO:40.7732646;-73.9816233 LOCATION:American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square\,2 Lincoln Square \nNew York\, NY SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Ooh\, Shiny! UID:229825 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce Cellblock I and Cellblock II\, two group exhibitions – both curated by Robe rt Hobbs –that are intertwined yet distinctly separate in their intention. The exhibitions open November 3\, 2012 at the Gallery's main space at 525 W est 24th Street\, as well as inaugurating its new\, second location\, at 54 4 West 24th Street.

Cellblock I\, at the Gallery's prim ary and expanded space (525 West 24th Street)\, brings together a compellin g group of four important artists – Peter Halley\, Robert Motherwell\, Ster ling Ruby and Kelley Walker – by presenting a selection of significant pain tings. The complex ideas behind the show and Hobbs' very deliberate choice of work suggest further layers of reading while remaining open to the viewe rs' own abstracted relationships with the works and their unique experience s. As is characteristic of shows at the Gallery\, Cellblock I afford s the opportunity to look at these familiar artists in a new way and with m ore depth\, both in relation to each other and in regards to their individu al practices.

While these are four artists Hobbs has champione d individually\, it's compelling how this show and subject bring together h is scholarship in a culminating and unexpected way with artists whom he has known\, studied\, and written about over the length of his career\, formin g a meeting point of sorts.

The Gallery is especially thrille d to feature Cellblock II: An Essay in Exhibition Form as the first show at its second space\, which will newly house its Gallery 2 program\, k nown for content-driven\, experimental and historical one time exhibitions. Andrea Rosen conceived Gallery 2 in 1999 as a liberating arena in which to consider new ideas and create parallel perspectives to the Gallery's prima ry program\, and as a means of fulfilling the Gallery's responsibility to b roaden visual references and education for its audience. Cellblock II is a perfect first show for the new location as its basis is a key princi ple of Gallery 2 – combining works and/or artists one might know\, includin g historical artists as well as those of a younger generation\, to create u nexpected relationships and significant dialogues around a subject that has not been explored in such depth. The Gallery 2 program also provides the o pportunity to work with esteemed independent curators and art historians\, and the Gallery is extremely proud to spotlight this profound brainchild of Robert Hobbs\, the prominent scholar and curator known for his extensive\, in-depth\, historically important writings on Robert Motherwell and a plet hora of other artists\, and also known as the definitive Robert Smithson sc holar.

Cellblock II\, at the new location (544 West 24t h Street)\, features works by a greater range of artists such as Vito Accon ci\, Alice Aycock\, Tom Burr\, Jean Genet\, Robert Gober\, Peter Halley\, N ancy Holt\, Will Insley\, Donald Judd\, Robert Morris\, Robert Motherwell\, Bruce Nauman\, Beverly Pepper\, Ad Reinhardt\, Sterling Ruby\, Tony Smith\ , Robert Smithson\, Jackie Winsor and Artur Żmijewski. Cellblock II is a dense exhibition combining historical material with an increased numbe r of works and mediums\, incorporating wall text\, diagrams and video. It o ffers background information and contextual references that flesh out Hobbs ' Cellblock concept without becoming didactic\, since its goal is to stimulate viewers to draw their own conclusions. Cellblock II affor ds Cellblock I the opportunity to be a more visceral experience. Alt hough still experiential\, Cellblock II affords a more cerebral expe rience.

While the show brings together work that addresses con tainment\, enclosure\, and imprisonment\, it also questions the frequently unexamined assumption that modern and contemporary art's contents are emine ntly assessable to viewers either empirically or epistemologically by findi ng the right key\, so that almost by magic an open sesame takes place. Coun tering this myth of art's ease of access\, these shows look at the power of refusal\, both formally and in terms of subject matter\, when works of art deliberately withhold their contents so that viewers are left with endurin g mysteries and disquieting conundrums. A text by Hobbs\, describing the de eper intellectual content of Cellblock I and II\, is also inc luded for reference.

The foundational concept of Cellblock< /i> is very purposefully presented as two distinct shows\, representing two completely different yet complementary perspectives. The physical separati on of Cellblock I and Cellblock II clarifies their different orientations.

Art historian Dr. Robert Hobbs has held the R hoda Thalhimer Endowed Chair at Virginia Commonwealth University since 1991 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University for eight years. Befo re joining VCU\, he served as a lecturer at Yale and an associate professor at Cornell University. Recognized as a scholar\, teacher\, and curator\, H obbs specializes in both late modern and postmodern art. His work joins soc ial history with literary criticism and aesthetics\; it also relies on femi nist and postcolonial theory. He has published widely and curated dozens of exhibitions\, many of which have been shown at important institutions in t he U.S. and abroad such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art\; the Drawing Center (NYC)\; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art\; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Vi lle de Paris\; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His specific researc h areas span the twentieth- and twentieth-first centuries\, and his publica tions include monographs on Milton Avery\, Alice Aycock\, Edward Hopper\, L ee Krasner\, Mark Lombardi\, Sterling Ruby\, Robert Smithson\, and Kara Wal ker. In addition he has written on such mainstream modern and postmodern ar tists as Hernan Bas\, Duane Hanson\, Keith Haring\, Jonathan Lasker\, Mark Lindquist\, Malcolm Morley\, Robert Motherwell\, Beverly Pepper\, Richard P ousette-Dart\, Neo Rauch\, Andres Serrano\, Yinka Shonibare\, James Siena\, Tony Smith\, Meredyth Sparks\, Frank Stella\, Frank Thiel\, Kelley Walker\ , John Wesley\, and Kehinde Wiley\, among others.

Robert Hobbs will co-curate the Bahamian Pavilion for the forthcoming Venice Biennale i n 2013\, with an exhibition of works by Tavares Strachan. This follows his appointment in 1982 as the U.S. Commissioner/Curator for the Venice Biennal e for his exhibition "Robert Smithson: Sculpture\," which had previously be en shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art\, and his appointment in 200 2 as Curator for the São Paulo Biennial for the exhibition "Kara Walker: Sl avery! Slavery!"

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CURATOR STATEMENT

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CEL LBLOCK I

In his 1897 "Preface" to "Un coup de dés" ("A Thr ow of Dice")\, French nineteenth-century Symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé clarif ies how "spaced-out blanks" of white paper function in his poem. "The paper \," he explains\, "intervenes each time an image\, of its own accord\, ceas es or withdraws." This contrapuntal movement between the poem's mate rial components (typeface on sheets of paper) and ostensible subject matter (a shipwreck and chance) can be extended to the visual arts\, so that a si milar ongoing and oscillating shift between means and meaning can be seen as taking place. Art's media can be understood as both blocking and r evealing its import by participating in an accordion-like action of alterna ting revelation and obduracy. The work of art\, in other words\, incarnates and incarcerates an idea in distinct materials while contradictoril y and momentarily springing the release of these media from their co nfines\, permitting them alternatively to be read as signs and symbols as w ell as to be seen for themselves\, thus briefly obviating a given work's me taphysical references. This reversibility of views—a flickering oscillation between subject and object—can readily be demonstrated by pointing out how the art's material support can participate fully in its dynamics so that f igure and form are mutually supportive.

The two-part exhibiti on Cellblock I and II—named for a division of a prison\, a la rge building divided into separate units\, a death house\, a digital compon ent\, and biological cells working in tandem—intends to update this Mallarm éan approach by looking at a selected group of works\, many familiar to the curator through his past research\, in order to demonstrate how artistic m edia can function bi-stably in the two different registers of revealing and obfuscating. Often\, they paradoxically reveal themselves and their conten ts through the self-reflexive recalcitrance of the artistic materials compr ising them. Dating from the mid-twentieth century to the present\, these wo rks figuratively re-present their constituent materials' obstinacy in terms of such coercive topics as incarceration\, boundaries\, foundations \, and limits\, in addition to various other obstructions. These works of a rt do so even when their ostensible subjects are biological cells as well a s the cell-like circuitry of digital media. The artistic media making up th e art in this exhibition\, then\, is intended to dramatize the shifting and ongoing reversible presence and absence of the figurative and formal eleme nts comprising these works.

Cellblock is organized into parts I and II\, taking place in two separate locations on 2 4th Street. The first section is a spare hanging of works\, setting up a se ries of similarities and differences in relation to the cellblock theme\, w hile the second takes place in the Gallery's new space at 544 West 24th Str eet. Cellblock II fleshes out this theme by presenting a far greater range of cellblock types\, illuminated with diagrams\, quotes\, and commen taries\, with the full knowledge that any such showing can only be represen tative\, never inclusive.


Robert Hobbs
Thalhimer Endowed Chair of American Art\, VCU

DTEND:20130202 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121201 GEO:40.749185;-74.005023 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery\,525 W.24th St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:CELLBLOCK I\, Peter Halley\, Robert Motherwell\, Sterling Ruby\, Ke lley Walker UID:243615 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121130T200000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121130T180000 GEO:40.749185;-74.005023 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery\,525 W.24th St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:CELLBLOCK I\, Peter Halley\, Robert Motherwell\, Sterling Ruby\, Ke lley Walker UID:243616 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce Cellblock I and Cellblock II\, two group exhibitions – both curated by Robe rt Hobbs –that are intertwined yet distinctly separate in their intention. The exhibitions open November 3\, 2012 at the Gallery's main space at 525 W est 24th Street\, as well as inaugurating its new\, second location\, at 54 4 West 24th Street.

Cellblock I\, at the Gallery's prim ary and expanded space (525 West 24th Street)\, brings together a compellin g group of four important artists – Peter Halley\, Robert Motherwell\, Ster ling Ruby and Kelley Walker – by presenting a selection of significant pain tings. The complex ideas behind the show and Hobbs' very deliberate choice of work suggest further layers of reading while remaining open to the viewe rs' own abstracted relationships with the works and their unique experience s. As is characteristic of shows at the Gallery\, Cellblock I afford s the opportunity to look at these familiar artists in a new way and with m ore depth\, both in relation to each other and in regards to their individu al practices.

While these are four artists Hobbs has champione d individually\, it's compelling how this show and subject bring together h is scholarship in a culminating and unexpected way with artists whom he has known\, studied\, and written about over the length of his career\, formin g a meeting point of sorts.

The Gallery is especially thrille d to feature Cellblock II: An Essay in Exhibition Form as the first show at its second space\, which will newly house its Gallery 2 program\, k nown for content-driven\, experimental and historical one time exhibitions. Andrea Rosen conceived Gallery 2 in 1999 as a liberating arena in which to consider new ideas and create parallel perspectives to the Gallery's prima ry program\, and as a means of fulfilling the Gallery's responsibility to b roaden visual references and education for its audience. Cellblock II is a perfect first show for the new location as its basis is a key princi ple of Gallery 2 – combining works and/or artists one might know\, includin g historical artists as well as those of a younger generation\, to create u nexpected relationships and significant dialogues around a subject that has not been explored in such depth. The Gallery 2 program also provides the o pportunity to work with esteemed independent curators and art historians\, and the Gallery is extremely proud to spotlight this profound brainchild of Robert Hobbs\, the prominent scholar and curator known for his extensive\, in-depth\, historically important writings on Robert Motherwell and a plet hora of other artists\, and also known as the definitive Robert Smithson sc holar.

Cellblock II\, at the new location (544 West 24t h Street)\, features works by a greater range of artists such as Vito Accon ci\, Alice Aycock\, Tom Burr\, Jean Genet\, Robert Gober\, Peter Halley\, N ancy Holt\, Will Insley\, Donald Judd\, Robert Morris\, Robert Motherwell\, Bruce Nauman\, Beverly Pepper\, Ad Reinhardt\, Sterling Ruby\, Tony Smith\ , Robert Smithson\, Jackie Winsor and Artur Żmijewski. Cellblock II is a dense exhibition combining historical material with an increased numbe r of works and mediums\, incorporating wall text\, diagrams and video. It o ffers background information and contextual references that flesh out Hobbs ' Cellblock concept without becoming didactic\, since its goal is to stimulate viewers to draw their own conclusions. Cellblock II affor ds Cellblock I the opportunity to be a more visceral experience. Alt hough still experiential\, Cellblock II affords a more cerebral expe rience.

While the show brings together work that addresses con tainment\, enclosure\, and imprisonment\, it also questions the frequently unexamined assumption that modern and contemporary art's contents are emine ntly assessable to viewers either empirically or epistemologically by findi ng the right key\, so that almost by magic an open sesame takes place. Coun tering this myth of art's ease of access\, these shows look at the power of refusal\, both formally and in terms of subject matter\, when works of art deliberately withhold their contents so that viewers are left with endurin g mysteries and disquieting conundrums. A text by Hobbs\, describing the de eper intellectual content of Cellblock I and II\, is also inc luded for reference.

The foundational concept of Cellblock< /i> is very purposefully presented as two distinct shows\, representing two completely different yet complementary perspectives. The physical separati on of Cellblock I and Cellblock II clarifies their different orientations.

Art historian Dr. Robert Hobbs has held the R hoda Thalhimer Endowed Chair at Virginia Commonwealth University since 1991 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University for eight years. Befo re joining VCU\, he served as a lecturer at Yale and an associate professor at Cornell University. Recognized as a scholar\, teacher\, and curator\, H obbs specializes in both late modern and postmodern art. His work joins soc ial history with literary criticism and aesthetics\; it also relies on femi nist and postcolonial theory. He has published widely and curated dozens of exhibitions\, many of which have been shown at important institutions in t he U.S. and abroad such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art\; the Drawing Center (NYC)\; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art\; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Vi lle de Paris\; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His specific researc h areas span the twentieth- and twentieth-first centuries\, and his publica tions include monographs on Milton Avery\, Alice Aycock\, Edward Hopper\, L ee Krasner\, Mark Lombardi\, Sterling Ruby\, Robert Smithson\, and Kara Wal ker. In addition he has written on such mainstream modern and postmodern ar tists as Hernan Bas\, Duane Hanson\, Keith Haring\, Jonathan Lasker\, Mark Lindquist\, Malcolm Morley\, Robert Motherwell\, Beverly Pepper\, Richard P ousette-Dart\, Neo Rauch\, Andres Serrano\, Yinka Shonibare\, James Siena\, Tony Smith\, Meredyth Sparks\, Frank Stella\, Frank Thiel\, Kelley Walker\ , John Wesley\, and Kehinde Wiley\, among others.

Robert Hobbs will co-curate the Bahamian Pavilion for the forthcoming Venice Biennale i n 2013\, with an exhibition of works by Tavares Strachan. This follows his appointment in 1982 as the U.S. Commissioner/Curator for the Venice Biennal e for his exhibition "Robert Smithson: Sculpture\," which had previously be en shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art\, and his appointment in 200 2 as Curator for the São Paulo Biennial for the exhibition "Kara Walker: Sl avery! Slavery!"

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CURATOR STATEMENT

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CEL LBLOCK II
An Essay in Exhibition Form

Beginn ing in the 1960s\, the work of art as a restricted cell has served as a wor king premise for many artists\, who have found ways to literalize th is closure in a number of empathic ways. Several generative metaphors have enabled them to think about art's contradictory ability to communicate certain of its contents while also withholding information by mai ntaining its status as an enduring conundrum\, so that viewers are left foc using on the work itself rather than any particular communiqué it might app ear to be revealing. Among the most productive metaphors are Plato's cav e\, which supports the view of art as constituting at best a shadowy wo rld\; the black box\, which focuses on art's irresolvable secrets\; and Jeremy Bentham's panopticon\, which emphasizes embodied percepti on and perspectival viewing. A more recent model is provided by the superma x prison\, an American invention\, with its enforcement of permanent solita ry confinement\, a concept crucial for Sterling Ruby's work. Although this exhibition focuses on the ways certain works of art function\, Duchamp's in scribed portrait by Marvin Lazarus testifies to the artist's retrospective as a type of detention\, an overarching restriction based on the misguided concept that all of an individual artist's work can be categorized in terms of a single stylistic designation.

Robert Hobbs
Thalhim er Endowed Chair of American Art\, VCU

DTEND:20130202 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121201 GEO:40.749177;-74.0058861 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery 2\,544 West 24th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:CELLBLOCK II\, Vito Acconci\, Alice Aycock\, Tom Burr\, Jean Genet\ , Robert Gober\, Peter Halley\, Nancy Holt\, Will Insley\, Donald Judd\, Ro bert Morris\, Robert Motherwell\, Bruce Nauman\, Beverly Pepper\, Ad Reinha rdt\, Sterling Ruby\, Tony Smith\, Robert Smithson\, Javier Téllez\, Jackie Winsor\, Artur Zmijewski UID:243621 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121130T200000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121130T180000 GEO:40.749177;-74.0058861 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery 2\,544 West 24th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:CELLBLOCK II\, Vito Acconci\, Alice Aycock\, Tom Burr\, Jean Genet\ , Robert Gober\, Peter Halley\, Nancy Holt\, Will Insley\, Donald Judd\, Ro bert Morris\, Robert Motherwell\, Bruce Nauman\, Beverly Pepper\, Ad Reinha rdt\, Sterling Ruby\, Tony Smith\, Robert Smithson\, Javier Téllez\, Jackie Winsor\, Artur Zmijewski UID:243622 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Anna Kustera is pleased to present in his second solo show a t the gallery\, Mattia Biagi's 'Someone Told Me Never To Do It.'  In this new body of work\, Biagi explores through multi-media forms the des ire to make tangible a belief in supernatural causality and its cultural nu ances.   

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By traversing abstract sculpture\, video\, painting\, pho tography and performance\, he investigates human emotional reaction to phys ical objects that have superstitious associations.

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Please n ote: The gallery will be closed for the holidays from December 24 - January 1\, 2013

DTEND:20130126 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121129 GEO:40.7463774;-74.0070609 LOCATION:Anna Kustera\,520 W. 21st St. \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Someone Told Me Never To Do It \, Mattia Biagi UID:248414 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121129T200000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121129T180000 GEO:40.7463774;-74.0070609 LOCATION:Anna Kustera\,520 W. 21st St. \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Someone Told Me Never To Do It \, Mattia Biagi UID:248415 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Paintings of idyllic farmland and pristine parkland and are included in this exhibition of American art from the Arkell collections. Th omas Doughty's idealized depiction of early New England's backwoods and Alb ert Bierstadt's painting of the majesty of Yellowstone are among the wilder ness views. The exhibition also features pastoral and poetic and landscapes by George Inness\, Ralph Blakelock\, Henry W. Ranger and J. Alden Weir.

DTEND:20130424 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20120630 GEO:42.907359;-74.572002 LOCATION:Arkell Museum\,2 Erie Boulevard \nCanajoharie\, NY 13317 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pastoral and Parkland: American Landscape Paintings\, Thomas Dought y\, George Inness\, Albert Bierstadt\, Ralph Blakelock\, Henry W. Ranger\, J. Alden Weir UID:229826 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

This exhibition features remarkable American Impressionist p aintings from the Arkell collections. Twelve paintings recently returned fr om the Fenimore Art Museum's exhibition "American Impressionism: Paintings of Light and Life" will be featured along with other treasures from the per manent collection. Sun-dappled views of France and America by Childe Hassam \, John Twatchman\, Theodore Robinson\, J. Alden Weir\, and Edward Redfield are among the notable paintings in this exhibition. Most American Impressi onists spent time in Paris and Monet&rsquo\;s hometown of Giverny where the y saw the work of French Impressionists. Once they returned to America they made the new Impressionist style their own. Views of the New England count ryside\, coastal communities and New York City were popular subjects for th e American Impressionists. The exhibition includes Twatchtman&rsquo\;s "Jos ephine in the Garden" in Giverny\, Hassam's "Provincetown"\, Twatchtman&rsq uo\;s "Gloucester Harbor" and Ernest Lawson&rsquo\;s "Brooklyn Bridge."

DTEND:20131020 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121027 GEO:42.907359;-74.572002 LOCATION:Arkell Museum\,2 Erie Boulevard \nCanajoharie\, NY 13317 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:From Giverny to the Brooklyn Bridge: American Impressionist Paintin gs from the Arkell Collections\, Edward Redfield\, J. Alden Weir\, Theodore Robinson\, John Twatchman\, Childe Hassam UID:234785 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121027T170000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121027T123000 GEO:42.907359;-74.572002 LOCATION:Arkell Museum\,2 Erie Boulevard \nCanajoharie\, NY 13317 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:From Giverny to the Brooklyn Bridge: American Impressionist Paintin gs from the Arkell Collections\, Childe Hassam\, Edward Redfield\, Theodore Robinson\, John Twatchman\, J. Alden Weir UID:234786 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Asia Society Museum presents the first major solo exhibition in the United States of leading Chinese artist Lin Tianmiao (born 1961\, China). Surveying the past 20 years\, this exhibition highl ights the remarkably consistent focus on women’s issues that is subtly embo died in her work.

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The exhibition — a series of installations and sc ulpture with a textile focus — will fill Asia Society’s entire museum space with several new installations and many works never seen outside of China.

DTEND:20130127 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20120907 GEO:40.7700155;-73.9644801 LOCATION:Asia Society Museum\,725 Park Avenue at 70th Street\nNew York\, NY 10021 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Bound\, Unbound\, Lin Tianmiao UID:222701 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

In photographs of intense color and almost palpable texture\ , Michael Yamaoka explores the tensions between color and form\, surface an d depth\, the ravages of time and the timeless. The brilliant color\, inher ent\, but often subdued in the original images\, has been enhanced in these new works to depict a heightened reality.

DTEND:20130201 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20130108 GEO:40.7517031;-74.0040108 LOCATION:Atlantic Gallery\,548 West 28th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Saturation & Serenity\, Michael K. Yamaoka UID:251738 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130110T203000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20130110T163000 GEO:40.7517031;-74.0040108 LOCATION:Atlantic Gallery\,548 West 28th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Saturation & Serenity\, Michael K. Yamaoka UID:251739 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Axelle’s Winter Group Show features paintings\, sculptures a nd prints by Michel Delacroix\, Fabienne Delacroix\, Patrick Piet ropoli\, Yves Crenn\, Laurent Dau ptain\, Philippe Jacquet\, Laurent Hours\, Xavier Rodes and Beth C arter.

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We are also pleased to introduce works by two new artist s\, Sabine Jaccard and Claudio Locatelli.

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We welcome French p hotographer Jaccard’s beautiful black and white images from her series\, Théatre d’eau (water theatre). Her work is inspired by her travels to New York\, London\, St Petersburg\, Rome and the Canary Islands\, her love of theatre and her interest in the aesthetic possibilities of light and sha dow. During her ten years as a student of English literature at Oxford\, Pa ris and London universities\, she held internships with professional photog raphers in architecture\, fashion\, advertisement and portraiture. In 2000\ , Jaccard completed her studies by participating in the Rencontres Internatio nales de la Photographie in Arles\, France. Following her first exhibit ion in 2002\, her work has been consistently shown in galleries throughout Europe. Since 2007\, Jaccard has printed her black and white photos in her own photo lab. In 2013\, her works will be shown at art galleries in New Yo rk and Boston\, as well as in Seattle\, where she has recently been appoint ed visiting photography professor at Seattle University.

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Axelle is proud to present Locatelli’s stunning collection of wire brace and papier-m âché animals. French multimedia artist Locatelli studied sculpture a t L’Ecole Nat ionale Supérieure de Beaux-arts de Paris. Since his graduation in 1999\ , his work has been regularly exhibited in Paris in galleries such as Galer ie Eric de Montbel\, Galerie Aittouares\, Galerie Francis Barlier\, Galerie du Fleuve and Musée de la Halle Saint Pierre. Since 2004\, Galleria Forni< /a> has exhibited his work in contemporary art fairs including St’Art Strasbourg\, A rte Fiera Bologna\, Art Verona\, Amsterdam Art Fair\, London Art Fair and Art Brussels. He has also participated in group exhibits organized in Fran ce\, Belgium\, Spain and the Netherlands. In 2006\, the city of Nantes comm issioned an outdoor sculpture for the Artec Festival. He currently works in a wide range of mediums\, including terra cotta\, paper-mache\, wood\, pen cil drawings and watercolour.

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See more on our website:

\n< p>http://www.axelle.com/new-york/exhibitions/group-show-winter-2013/

DTEND:20130228 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20130103 GEO:40.7261899;-74.0005339 LOCATION:Axelle Fine Arts Galerie Soho\,472 West Broadway \nNew York\, NY 10012 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Winter Group Show\, Claudio Locatelli\, Michel Delacroix\, Fabienne Delacroix\, Patrick Pietropoli\, Yves Crenn\, Laurent Dauptain\, Philippe Jacquet\, Laurent Hours\, Xavier Rodes\, Beth Carter\, Sabine Jaccard UID:258086 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The Bowery Gallery presents an exhibition of Yo unghee Choi Martin's "Recent Paintings: Myth of Orpheu s\," on view from December 26\, 2012 through January 26\, 201 3. The opening reception will be held on Thursday\, 5–8 pm\, January 3\, 20 13.

There are over a d ozen paintings ranging in size from mural scale\, Here is the Meadow Wh ere We Started\, (74" x 112") to a more intimate size\, On the Edge of Light\, (12" x 21").Younghee Choi Martin's approaches and methods involve extremes. Some paintings have been labored over for several years\, re-work ing\, adjusting\, scraping\, repainting\, and finally re-inventing the enti re composition. The rigorous creative process results in varied density and unexpected moves within one canvas. Other paintings have been completed wi th ease in a few sessions. Similarly\, many paintings are expressed in full color palette while others are painted nearly in monochrome\, and still ot hers in black and white over a field of a single dominant color. As she dev elops pictorial themes and ideas\, they flow from large canvases to small s ketches and back.

Youn ghee Choi Martin's interpretive vision of the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus derives not only from classical sources\, but also from Monteverdi's opera L'Orfeo. She draws a wealth of emotionally charged situations: the joyful preparation for a wedding\, the tragedy of a wife's sudden death\, the insu rmountable challenge to persuade the god of the underworld through music\, the illusion of victory destroyed by a doubting backward glance\, and the i nconsolable grief at the second loss of a loved one. Younghee structures th ese scenes of human vulnerability in painting terms\, creating an expressiv e poetic fullness.

He r pursuit in Fine Arts began as a high school student attending the Brookly n Museum Art School. She went on to study at the Rhode Island School of Des ign\, RISD's Rome program\, and Yale's Summer Program. In the 1980's\, she was awarded painting fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts a nd the NY CAPS program.

For over three decades\, Younghee Choi Martin's works have been exhibite d in New York and throughout the United States\, Korea\, Japan\, France\, a nd Italy\, including 19 one-person shows and 50 group-shows in various gall eries\, museums\, and art fairs. Over 80 paintings and drawings are placed in various collections in the United States\, Korea\, Japan\, and India.

DTEND:20130126 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121226 GEO:40.7494584;-74.0046212 LOCATION:Bowery Gallery\,530 W. 25 St. 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Recent Paintings: Myth of Orpheus\, Younghee Choi Martin UID:251740 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20130103T200000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20130103T170000 GEO:40.7494584;-74.0046212 LOCATION:Bowery Gallery\,530 W. 25 St. 4th Floor \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Recent Paintings: Myth of Orpheus\, Younghee Choi Martin UID:252902 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

BravinLee programs is very pleased to present 100 Little Dea ths by Tom Sanford\, opening New Year’s Eve\, 6-9pm.

Tom Sanfo rd set out to draw one hundred notable individuals who passed away in 2012 with the idea of “Petite Morte” in mind. Translated literally\, this means  “little death” but it is often used colloquially to mean orgasm.  It is a b eautifully romantic notion\, that with each orgasm a little part of one’s s elf dies and is gone forever\; each person held particular interest for San ford.  100 Little Deaths will open on New Year’s Eve.

In our p ost-Warholian culture\, we celebrate the lives of the famous with a brief e cstatic excitement\, a metaphorical cultural media orgasm. We read obituari es and articles about them\, post on Facebook and Twitter\, listen to their songs on the radio\, watch TV specials and YouTube videos about their live s and accomplishments. Inevitably\, however\, the excitement fades and with each of these deaths\, we have lost something forever.

Sanfo rd\, was able to meditate on each individual\, as he drew\, remembering the ir unique contributions\, and according to Sanford\, “As the drawings of th ose who passed away in 2012 accumulated\, I realized that to see them all t ogether would be very powerful.  Installed together I hope that my 100 Litt le Deaths shows the immensity of what we lose every year. The wall of drawi ngs becomes a mausoleum for 2012.” Among the portraits represented are poli tical figures\; music legends\; cultural icons of our youth such as Davy Jo nes and Donna Summer\; noteworthy artists\, Thomas Kinkade\, Franz West\, a nd Will Barnet\; publishers\; religious leaders\; comediennes\; and news wo rthy individuals such as Rodney King and Joe Paterno.  The list goes on.

In wishing to bring levity to a very serious and somewhat somber project\, Sanford embarked on his most ambitiously scaled painting\, measu ring 8 feet by 16 feet.  Sanford states “The painting is of an airport depa rtures cocktail lounge where each of the 100 Little Deaths are depicted gat hering for a last drink before they board flights to oblivion. I executed t his painting in a more cartoonish manner and is intended to be a Mad Magazi ne meets Jorg Immendorff style purgatory scene of the dead before they depa rt\, finally and forever.”

To further lionize the departed\, S anford invited other artists to make small works of one of the individuals for BravinLee’s project room. The artists include: Graham Preston\, Jessica Ellis\, Shay Kun\, Rudy Shepherd\, Les Rogers\, Jonathan Allen\, Dan Heidk amp\, Kelli Williams\, Joe Heaps Nelson\, Noah Becker\, Eric White\, Nic Ra d\, Daniel Davidson\, Taylor McKimens\, Kristen Schiele\, Ryan Schneider\, Aaron Johnson\, Michael Hilsman\, Sydney Chastain-Chapman\, Michael Scoggin s\, Robin Willimas\, Josh Jordan\, Ridley Howard\, Holly Coulis\, Natalie F rank\, Paul Brainard\, Jeremy Willis\, Jeff Beebe\, Michael Anderson\, Guy Richards Smit\, Michael Bevilacqua\, Francesca Neiman\, Alfred Steiner\, Er ic Doeringer\, Peter Daverington\, Thomas Broadbent\, Dawn Frasch\, Nina Ch anel Abney\, Kevin Klein\, Erin McNalley and Aaron Zimmerman.
 
Tom Sanford lives and works in New York and has exhibited internationally .  He has enjoyed solo shows at Leo Koenig Gallery in New York\, Galleri Fa rschou in Copenhagen\, Galleri Poulson in Copenhagen\, and Gallery Zidoun i n Luxembourg\, and group shows at ACME in Los Angeles and Freight and Volum e in New York\, among many others. He recently completed a temporary public art project that was curated by Keith Schweitzer\, ArtUp\, FABnyc\, and in stalled on scaffolding on the Lower East Side in New York.

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DTEND:20130209 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121231 GEO:40.7500416;-74.0038805 LOCATION:BravinLee Programs\,526 West 26th Street Suite 211\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: 100 Little Deaths\, Tom Sanford UID:251758 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20121231T210000 DTSTAMP:20140822T121212 DTSTART:20121231T180000 GEO:40.7500416;-74.0038805 LOCATION:BravinLee Programs\,526 West 26th Street Suite 211\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY: 100 Little Deaths\, Tom Sanford UID:251872 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR