BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 CALSCALE:GREGORIAN PRODID:iCalendar-Ruby VERSION:2.0 BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20150628 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150515 GEO:40.7481943;-74.0049721 LOCATION:Tracy Williams\, Ltd.\,521 West 23 Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Sobriquets\, Richard Dupont UID:381048 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Mira Burack \;is an artist living in th e mountains of New Mexico. \;She received her \;Master of Fine Arts from Cranbrook Academy of Art and Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art and Psych ology from Pepperdine University. Burack was born in Boston\, Massachusetts and grew up on the coast of Maine. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago\, Muskego n Museum of Art\, Cranbrook Art Museum\, Media Knox Gallery in Slovenia\, A rt Gallery of Windsor in Canada\, and Kunstverein Wolfsburg in Germany. She has lectured\, taught workshops\, and served as faculty at the College for Creative Studies. She received a Community + Public Arts: DETROIT grant fo r The Edible Hut\, a community space with a living edible roof. Recently re located to rural New Mexico after living in Detroit for 10 years\, Burack s pends her time learning from this new landscape\, making\, and enjoying her family.  \;

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Artis t Statement
My work investigates everyday matter\, seeking ou t an embedded material language that exists between our bodies\, our posses sions\, and our environment. In creating spaces\, making intricate photo co llages\, soft sculptures\, and installations\, I draw connections between t he material and the immaterial\, the visceral and the technological\, two d imensions and three dimensions\, and ultimately\, the conscious and unconsc ious. \;

While making\, I explore the physical qualities and historical properties of the materials. The human history of textiles and the illusionary nature of painting influence my way of working. Methods of documenting\, multiplying\, extracting\, cutting\, connecting\, layering\, and arranging are used to resuscitate the material\, bringing us closer to it again with new perspective.

I am engaged by the living sculpt ures in our daily lives&mdash\;plants\, animals\, people\, and the interior and exterior spaces around us. I am interested in how they teach us\, acti vate our senses\, and provide us with intimacy\, comfort\, rest\, and pleas ure. \;

DTEND:20150605 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150502 GEO:40.7536854;-73.9991637 LOCATION:CUE Art Foundation\,137 West 25th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:from the bed to the mountain\, Mira Burack UID:381031 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150502T190000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150502T170000 GEO:40.7536854;-73.9991637 LOCATION:CUE Art Foundation\,137 West 25th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:from the bed to the mountain\, Mira Burack UID:381032 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Flowers Gallery is pleased to announce Mortality Games\, the first solo exhibition to be held in New York by renowned Canadian artist John Scott. The exhibition draws together works from 2008 to the pr esent day\, featuring energetic\, raw-edged drawings and works on paper.

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Throughout his career\, Scott has used recurring figurative motifs to explore the broad themes of power\, politics\, conflict and mortality\, wh ich are continually enlivened by his contemporary subject matter.

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O ne of Scott&rsquo\;s persistent emblems\, the human figure with bunny ears\ , embodies a personal symbolism of vulnerability and anxiety. Identifying w ith their powerlessness\, Scott burdens the characters with the plight of t he &lsquo\;everyman&rsquo\;\, the worker he sees as eternally suffering at the hands of politicians and captains of industry. His centralized\, iconic &lsquo\;commanders&rsquo\; are warlike Napoleonic figures\, rendered as fe atureless silhouettes except for glowing red eyes. Alpha Male inco rporates text scrawled on the surface\; phrases such as &lsquo\;Event Horiz on&rsquo\; and &lsquo\;Black Sol&rsquo\; suggest that his presence transcen ds the confines of history\, existing ominously across the past\, present a nd future.

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His allegorical subjects have become increasingly self-r eferential in recent times. In his latest series of works from 2015\, the a rtist considers his own inevitable aging process\, introducing new symbols of flowers and a mummified form to reference corporeality\, decay\, restric tion and attempts at eternity.

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Scott&rsquo\;s drawings can be seen as acts of resistance and survival against the dystopian backdrop of a post -industrial world. Growing up across the water from Detroit during the 1960 &rsquo\;s in Windsor\, Ontario\, Scott witnessed the unemployment\, poverty and violence of an industrial city in decline\, alongside the pollution an d other dangers facing its blue-collar workers. Placing visual and material symbols of the automotive industry alongside images of war and apocalypse\ , (such as a painted car hood\, which resembles an iconic fighter jet in St ealth Mountain)\, Scott references the terrifying effects of the advancemen ts of industrial technology on contemporary warfare.

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&ldquo\;His pi eces are at once apocalyptic and hopeful\; they evoke both fear of annihila tion and the shrewd instinct to survive\; they embody the conflicted state of anxiety that characterizes our being.&rdquo\; &ndash\; David Liss\, Even t Horizon exhibition catalogue\, 2008.

DTEND:20150613 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150516 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Mortality Games\, John Scott UID:381029 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150516T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150516T180000 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Mortality Games\, John Scott UID:381030 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20150613 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150501 GEO:40.7472381;-74.0051301 LOCATION:DC Moore Gallery\,535 West 22nd Street\, 2nd Floor \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Selected Paintings\, Milton Avery UID:381027 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150501T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150501T180000 GEO:40.7472381;-74.0051301 LOCATION:DC Moore Gallery\,535 West 22nd Street\, 2nd Floor \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Selected Paintings\, Milton Avery UID:381028 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Charles Burchfield \;(1893-1967) had an intensely personal\, spiritualized view of t he world. As highlighted by the exceptional group of watercolors and drawin gs in this exhibition\, he was a keen observer of his surroundings\, depict ing scenes with which he was familiar\, often imbuing them with a visionary sensibility that was deeply felt. \;

Among his earliest wor ks are modernist views of his hometown of Salem\, Ohio\, and the surroundin g countryside. After graduating from the Cleveland School of Art in 1916\, he created many imaginative landscapes and developed a personal visual lang uage of fantasy.

In \;Chestnut Trees \;of 1916\ , he transformed the natural world into an expressive pattern of abstracted \, stylized forms in heightened color. Curling shapes cover the ground at t he base of two large tree trunks\, while intertwining lines enliven their b ark. Buried deep in the center of the composition is a circular form that a ppears to be vibrating or emitting energy\, linking the painting to what Bu rchfield once called his &ldquo\;rhapsodic fantasies&rdquo\; of the period.  \;

Burchfield was also drawn to the urban landscape. In the 1920s and 30s\, he often painted the austere imagery of industrial develop ment and railroad yards\, as well as the local architecture of towns and vi llages\, including many views of his home in Gardenville\, near Buffalo\, N ew York. While he was striving for increased realism\, he was not after lit eral depictions of the world around him. He was instead working towards a c larity of structure and design that was almost classical in form\, while al so poetic in feeling. In 1940\, he wrote that he preferred to be known as a &ldquo\;romantic-realist\,&rdquo\; adding that\, &ldquo\;It is the romanti c side of the real world that I portray. My things are poems&mdash\;(I hope ).&rdquo\; \;

In the early 1940s\, Burchfield returned to a bolder\, more expressive approach. Much of his later work reveals two compl ementary sides of his artistic personality&mdash\;from exuberant views of s unlit fields and atmospheric skies to more introspective meditations on the profound depths of nature. By the last five years of his life\, his painti ngs were increasingly dreamlike.

In \;Moonlight in a Flo wer Garden \;of 1961\, he envisioned a nocturnal world animated by the effects of a full moon. A multicolored\, haloed moon illuminates a pal e sky\, below two large\, colorful moths that hang on a band of green and y ellow plant forms. The energized flower garden in the bottom half of the pa inting is mysteriously attuned to the moonlight\, with vibrating bushes and trees\, and flowers with markings that resemble human faces\, giving them an almost anthropomorphic quality. \;

In both his life and a rt\, Burchfield saw the universal in the particular\, and nothing was too s mall or insignificant to capture his attention. He felt strongly that his i dentity as an artist was bound up with his relation to nature. &ldquo\;I fe el impelled to embrace the earth\,&rdquo\; he wrote in his journals. On ano ther day spent in the fields and woods\, he found that\, &ldquo\;My spirit was in complete harmony with the world of nature and absorbed every sight a nd sound with a completeness that has not been my lot for many a month.&rdq uo\;

DC Moore Gallery is the exclusive representative of The Cha rles E. Burchfield Foundation.

DTEND:20150613 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150501 GEO:40.7472381;-74.0051301 LOCATION:DC Moore Gallery\,535 West 22nd Street\, 2nd Floor \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Nature of Seeing\, Charles Burchfield UID:381025 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150501T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150501T180000 GEO:40.7472381;-74.0051301 LOCATION:DC Moore Gallery\,535 West 22nd Street\, 2nd Floor \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Nature of Seeing\, Charles Burchfield UID:381026 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Rosenberg &\; Co. is pleased to present its second exhibi tion\, Collages (May 4 &ndash\; July 2\, 2015). The group exhibition will o pen the first week of May to coincide with New York&rsquo\;s major Impressi onist and Modern art auctions.

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Opened in March 2015\, the gallery c ontinues the Rosenberg family&rsquo\;s distinguished tradition of exhibitin g balanced combinations of Modern and contemporary artworks by an internati onal roster of prominent artists. The medium of collage as a common theme e nables a rich\, cross-temporal dialogue spanning the twentieth and twenty-f irst centuries. Artworks included in this exhibition range from whimsical a nd jewel-toned to stark and analytical.

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Collages features works on paper by Morris Barazani\, Marcin Dudek\, Balcomb Greene\, Donald Hamilton Fraser\, Oleg Kudryashov\, Henri Laurens\, and Esteban Vicente\, amongst ot her artists. This exhibition provides a lens through which visitors may foc us on special examples selected from an expansive topic. The breadth of the exhibition &ndash\; chronologically and stylistically &ndash\; is illustra ted when comparing a work such as Greene&rsquo\;s #10 (1935)\, composed of densely layered papers on a small scale in a variety of textures\, shapes\, and palette of muted hues\, to Vicente&rsquo\;s Untitled (1980)\, the expa nsive picture plane dominated by emphatic vertical and horizontal linear fo rms in deep greens\, purples\, and reds.

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Rosenberg &\; Co. renew s a salon-style space with a focus on the highest standards of connoisseurs hip and expertise. With an emphasis on the secondary Modern art market\, Ro senberg &\; Co. also continues the legacy of working with contemporary a rtists.

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DTEND:20150702 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150504 GEO:40.768329;-73.968485 LOCATION:Rosenberg & Co.\,19 East 66th Street \nNew York\, NY 10065 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collages UID:381015 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150507T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150507T180000 GEO:40.768329;-73.968485 LOCATION:Rosenberg & Co.\,19 East 66th Street \nNew York\, NY 10065 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collages UID:381016 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Aida Mahmudova will hold her first solo USA exhibition at Le ila Heller Gallery. The exhibition will feature eight new paintings that bu ild on the themes of nostalgia and memory found in her past work and draw i nspiration from the landscape and architecture of Azerbaijan where she live s and works. \; In this series of paintings Mahmudova explores the idea of impermanence. The works provide glimpses of Azerbaijan&rsquo\;s natural surroundings\, urban environment and architecture\, a backdrop that is und ergoing constant and rapid change. A central component of Mahmudova&rsquo\; s work is her exploration of memory\, its links to identity\, and how they both can be continually altered and re-remembered over time.

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Aida h as exhibited widely internationally\, including Here Today at the Old Sorting Office in London\; Love Me\, Love Me Not at the 55th V enice Biennale\; Fly To Baku\, London\, Paris\, Berlin\, Moscow\, Rome\; and Merging Bridges at the Museum of Modern Art\, Baku\, Az erbaijan. She is also showing at the 56th Venice Biennale as part of the VI TA VITALE group exhibition curated by Artwise. She is also the founder and Creative Director of YARAT\, a non-for-profit arts organisation in Baku\, A zerbaijan dedicated to raising the platform of Azerbaijani art\, who have j ust opened their first permanent space in Baku. \;

DTEND:20150703 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150528 GEO:40.764217;-73.9762 LOCATION:Leila Heller Gallery - 57th Street\,43 West 57th Street \n New Yor k\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Passing By...\, Aida Mahmudova UID:381005 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20150606 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150430 GEO:40.7521176;-74.0027907 LOCATION:David Nolan Gallery\,527 West 29th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Cut-Outs\, Offcuts and Holes\, Neil Gall UID:381002 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150430T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150430T180000 GEO:40.7521176;-74.0027907 LOCATION:David Nolan Gallery\,527 West 29th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Cut-Outs\, Offcuts and Holes\, Neil Gall UID:381003 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Mira Burack \;is an artist living in the mounta ins of New Mexico. \;She received her \;Master of Fine Arts from Cr anbrook Academy of Art and Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art and Psychology fr om Pepperdine University. Burack was born in Boston\, Massachusetts and gre w up on the coast of Maine. Her work has been exhibited nationally and inte rnationally at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago\, Muskegon Museum of Art\, Cranbrook Art Museum\, Media Knox Gallery in Slovenia\, Art Galle ry of Windsor in Canada\, and Kunstverein Wolfsburg in Germany. She has lec tured\, taught workshops\, and served as faculty at the College for Creativ e Studies. She received a Community + Public Arts: DETROIT grant for The Ed ible Hut\, a community space with a living edible roof. Recently relocated to rural New Mexico after living in Detroit for 10 years\, Burack spends he r time learning from this new landscape\, making\, and enjoying her family.  \;

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Artist Statement
My work investigates everyday matter\, seeking out an embedded m aterial language that exists between our bodies\, our possessions\, and our environment. In creating spaces\, making intricate photo collages\, soft s culptures\, and installations\, I draw connections between the material and the immaterial\, the visceral and the technological\, two dimensions and t hree dimensions\, and ultimately\, the conscious and unconscious. \;

While making\, I explore the physical qualities and historical pro perties of the materials. The human history of textiles and the illusionary nature of painting influence my way of working. Methods of documenting\, m ultiplying\, extracting\, cutting\, connecting\, layering\, and arranging a re used to resuscitate the material\, bringing us closer to it again with n ew perspective.

I am engaged by the living sculptures in our dai ly lives&mdash\;plants\, animals\, people\, and the interior and exterior s paces around us. I am interested in how they teach us\, activate our senses \, and provide us with intimacy\, comfort\, rest\, and pleasure. \;

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Full catalogue essay: \;Col lage and the Landscape of Familiarity \;by John McKissick

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Photography by Eric Swanson.

DTEND:20150605 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150502 GEO:40.7536854;-73.9991637 LOCATION:CUE Art Foundation\,137 West 25th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:from the bed to the mountain\, Mira Burack UID:381000 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150502T190000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150502T170000 GEO:40.7536854;-73.9991637 LOCATION:CUE Art Foundation\,137 West 25th Street Ground Floor\nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:from the bed to the mountain\, Mira Burack UID:381001 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
&ldquo\;We have only to look at the force of one of the \;Opens&hellip\;to feel the co mplexity of observation the painter requires of himself and the viewer.&rdq uo\; *
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&ldquo\;&hellip\;a subtle but firmly asser ted spatial ambiguity that gives the picture a deep resonance and an aura o f mystery.&rdquo\;**
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Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighte d to announce a comprehensive exhibition of Robert Motherwell&rsquo\;s semi nal \;Open \;series. The gallery has an ongoing commitment to timely presentations of historical material\, in this case highlighting a point in the artist&rsquo\;s trajectory when a confluence of institution al\, intellectual\, and market attention brings renewed appreciation to a s ignificant body of work. The gallery is particularly interested in creating historical exhibitions that expand the reading and understanding of an art ist&rsquo\;s work. While Motherwell&rsquo\;s significance may have been per ceived primarily through the gestural \;Elegies\,presenting th e \;Opens \;now not only allows us to compare these master works against the present-day focus on abstraction\, but also encourages us to reconcile the breadth of Motherwell&rsquo\;s rigor and clarity. They ar e undeniably fresh\, beautiful\, and bold.
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Typically compo sed as single-color surfaces on which he has painted three charcoal lines\, the \;Opens \;were a primary occupation for Motherwell fr om 1967 through the 1970s\, and briefly into the 1980s. Although it has bee n common practice to locate Motherwell alternately within the histories of midcentury American painting and Minimalism\, the \;Opens \;exemplify the cerebral\, content-fueled character that sets his work apar t: the fragmentary rectangles offer an intense conceptual engagement with d ualities of interior and exterior\, and with perceptions of nature and spac e. \;
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Coinciding with the centennial of Motherwell&rsq uo\;s birth\, the exhibition comes amid a groundswell of appre-ciation of h is significance. In 2012\, the Dedalus Foundation (founded by Motherwell in 1981) and Yale University Press published a major catalogue raisonné \; of Motherwell&rsquo\;s work. The Art Gallery of Ontario and The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in New York have also produced remarkable studies on Motherwell in recent years\, and the Opens themselves are the subject of a dedicated collection of essays and scholarly criticism published in 2010 . In February of this year\, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York ope ned an exhibition of Motherwell&rsquo\;s monumental paintings\, collages\, prints\, and illustrated books drawn from its holdings and those of the Ded alus Foundation.
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\n< div style="text-align: justify\;">*Mary Ann Caws\n
** Jack Flam
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Robert Motherwell\, a cen tral figure in twentieth-century painting who coined the name &ldquo\;The N ew York School\,&rdquo\; was born in Aberdeen\, Washington\, on January 24\ , 1915. He graduated from Stanford University in 1937 and undertook graduat e coursework first at Harvard University\, then at Columbia University\, wh ere Meyer Schapiro encouraged him to devote himself to painting rather than scholarship. Motherwell had his first solo exhibition at Peggy Guggenheim& rsquo\;s Art of This Century gallery in 1944\; by the mid-1940s he had beco me the leading spokesperson for avant-garde art in America. Throughout his life\, Motherwell taught and lectured extensively\, and exhibited widely at museums in the United States and Europe. In 1965\, The Museum of Modern Ar t\, New York held a major retrospective of his work that subsequently trave led to Amsterdam\, London\, Brussels\, Essen\, and Turin. Throughout the 19 70s and 1980s\, he had important retrospective exhibitions in a number of E uropean cities\, including Dü\;sseldorf\, Stockholm\, Vienna\, Paris\, Edinburgh\, and London. In 1977\, Motherwell was given a major mural commis sion for the new wing of the National Gallery of Art\, Washington\, D.C. A retrospective of one hundred major works was organized by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery\, Buffalo\, NY\, in 1983 and subsequently traveled to The Los Angeles County Museum of Art\; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art\; The Seattle Art Museum\; the Corcoran Gallery of Art\, Washington\, D.C.\; and The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\, New York. Robert Motherwell died in Pro vincetown\, Massachusetts\, on July 16\, 1991.
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Wo rks from Robert Motherwell&rsquo\;s \;Open \;series are in the collections of major international institutions including Albright Kno x Gallery\, Buffalo\, NY\; The Art Institute of Chicago\; The Guggenheim Mu seum\, Bilbao\; The Los Angeles County Museum of Art\; the Menil Collection \, Houston\, TX\; The Metropolitan Museum of Art\, New York\; The Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth\; the San Fran cisco Museum of Modern Art\; The National Gallery of Art\, Washington\, D.C .\; and The Whitney Museum of American Art\, New York.
DTEND:20150620 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150501 GEO:40.749185;-74.005023 LOCATION:Andrea Rosen Gallery\,525 W.24th St. \nNew York \, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Opens\, Robert Motherwell UID:380995 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20150530 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150430 GEO:40.749403;-74.004838 LOCATION:532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel\,532 W. 25th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Tomorrow-land\, Julie Langsam UID:380991 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150430T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150430T180000 GEO:40.749403;-74.004838 LOCATION:532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel\,532 W. 25th Street \nNew York\, NY 100 01 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Tomorrow-land\, Julie Langsam UID:380992 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Yun-Woo Choi presents &ldquo\;Endless\, Seamless\,&rdquo\; a n installation for Open Source Gallery.

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Given the ubiquity of print ed matter in daily life\, it is no wonder that people often become more con cerned with the representation of a thing than the thing itself. In pop cul ture\, print and images in the pages of magazines and newspapers illustrate our world through depictions of cars\, celebrities\, and lifestyles. In re ligion\, many believe that the Holy Bible\, Koran\, and Buddhist scripts ex ist as sacred objects. Yet\, constructed out of symbolic language\, all of these texts and images only function as a kind of map\, a tangible object t hat points to an existence outside of our four-dimensional perception. Acco rding to philosopher William James\, there are two ways of knowing things: immediately and intuitively or conceptually and representatively. By foldin g\, tearing\, and combining\, Yun-Woo Choi obfuscates the meanings construc ted in two-dimensional printed material in an attempt to deliver intuitive feelings to the viewer.

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Philosopher Ken Wilber posits that thought and text represent a process of compressing three-dimensional reality into a two-dimensional illusion of the real world. Objectivity becomes an imposs ibility if one&rsquo\;s own thoughts always translate the world into subjec tive representation. In theoretical physics\, scientists discuss theories i nvolving eleven space-time dimensions that cannot be perceived\, yet exist all around us. Within these dimensions\, there would exist a multitude of w ays to perceive and exist in the world. Choi takes these theories into cons ideration to speculate about the possibility for one to exist in multiple r ealities where invisible and untouchable subjective concepts such as emotio ns may manifest physically\, supported by different laws of physics.

\n< p>&ldquo\;Endless\, Seamless&rdquo\; presents an intensely physical\, yet f ragmented and ethereal experience that allows for dualities to coalesce. Ch oi explores the relationship between the banal and profound\, allowing seem ingly opposite concepts to fragment and become intertwined as he constructs a subjective and ever-changing experience for the viewer. Encountering the philosophical and theoretical simultaneously within his elegant sculptures \, one can begin to comprehend the numerous hidden and overlapping dimensio ns in reality.

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Yun-Woo Choi is a Brooklyn-based artist who was born in Seoul\, Korea. He received a BFA and MFA in sculpture from Hong-Ik Univ ersity\, and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. Choi was a recipient of the Jung-Ang Fine Art Prize in 2007 and participated in the Anderson Ranch Art Center residency program in Aspen in 2010. He recently won the award o f Year in Review in the Sculpture and Installation category from See Me in 2014. His works have been featured in the Chungju International Craft Bienn ial\, Busan International Biennial\, as well as several group shows in Seou l\, Los Angeles\, and New York.

DTEND:20150531 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150502 GEO:40.6623377;-73.9890539 LOCATION:Open Source Gallery\,306 17th street \nNew York\, NY 11215 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Endless\, Seamless\, Yun-Woo Choi UID:380816 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150502T210000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150502T190000 GEO:40.6623377;-73.9890539 LOCATION:Open Source Gallery\,306 17th street \nNew York\, NY 11215 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Endless\, Seamless\, Yun-Woo Choi UID:380817 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

For immediate release

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Co ntact: Hanne Tierney\, 347-534-6776

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 \;&n bsp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;  \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;  \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;&nb sp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;& nbsp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \ ; \; \; \; \; hanne@fivemyles.org

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April 23 &ndash\; May 24\, 2015

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Artistic Weapons of Mass Communication

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Curator: Souhad Rafey

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Artists: S amira Abbassy\, Rajie Cook\, John Halaka\, Ganzeer\, Mary Tuma

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Reception: \; \; \; Satur day\, April 25\,  \;5pm &ndash\; 8pm

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Hours: \;  \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;&nb sp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; Thu thru Sun\, 1 to 6 p.m. or by appointment: 718-783-4438

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Location: \; \; \; \; \; \; FiveM yles\, 558 St. Johns Place\, Brooklyn\, NY 11238

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 \; \;&nbs p\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \;&n bsp\; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; \; Direct ions below

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A common thread connects the selected wo rks being shown in this exhibition.

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Represented in &ldquo\;Artistic Weapons of Mass Communication&rdquo\; are five artists who utilize differe nt artistic means in order \;to communicate strong statements through t heir work. In this context weapons may be construed to include art that is used to gain a strategic\, material or mental advantage over traditional mi ndset.

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With the Middle East in focus\, the show&nbs p\;reflects \;opposition to \;wars of aggression\, military occupat ions of foreign lands\, and the \;necessary \;change to \;the d estructive reality of \;"empire as a way of life." \;

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Samira Abbassy \;includes \;a fragmente d painting from her "Eternal War" series.  \;The timelessness and repet itive nature of cycles of war\, occupation and exile throughout history&nbs p\;is captured here. \;With \;similarities to Persian miniature pai nting\, the artist portrays the dismal realities of combat. Abbassy uses br own oil paint on gesso panels which \;deliberately places the work in t he "Western Canon" and brings to mind Goya's "Disasters of War." \;

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Ganzeer concentrates on civic respons ibility and social justice.  \;

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He \;takes a poem which can  \;be considered a rather outdated form of mass communication\, and not only repackages it in a singing style that matches the spirit and times of today\, but also in an artistic music video that can be shared on the inte rnet and distributed to the masses at large. \;

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Through her use of incorporeal forms Mary Tuma's work por trays a sense of loss. It invokes a feeling of distant memories\; Images ar e like shadows or ghosts\, something not quite whole and no longer real. Re ality and surreality or humor and sadness usually come into play\,

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The works of John \;Halaka and Rajie \;Cook are specific to the \;Israeli-Palesti nian "conflict." \; \;

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The Palestinian-Amer ican artist Rajie Cook constructs intricate miniature sile nt theaters\, small boxes attached to the wall\, that conveying his feeling s about the tragic situation in the Middle East.

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Th rough John Halaka's fabric photographs of fragmented portr aits\, he puts a human face on the abstract notion of the displaced masses\ , making the experiences of the refugees more real\, comprehensible and unf orgettable.

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Souhad Rafey has an M. A. in Museum Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University. She has worked in over a dozen NYC museums and galleries\, \;among which are the Coope r Hewitt\, American Craft Museum\, Museum of American Folk Art\, Galerie St . Etienne\, and Andy Warhol's Studio.  \;Currently\, she is the Curator of Exhibitions at the American Academy of Arts and Letters\, and she \ ;oversees a private art collection. \; \;

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Directions: Take the 2\,3\,4 or 5 train to Franklin Ave. in Brooklyn. Walk two blocks against the traffic on Franklin Ave.\, turn left into St. Johns Place\, Walk ½\; block to 558 St. Johns Place. FiveMy les is located

DTEND:20150524 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150423 GEO:40.672585;-73.959598 LOCATION:FiveMyles\,558 St. Johns Place \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Artistic Weapons of Mass Communication\, Samira Abbassy\, Rajie Coo k\, John Halaka\, Ganzeer\, Mary Tuma UID:380810 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150425T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150425T170000 GEO:40.672585;-73.959598 LOCATION:FiveMyles\,558 St. Johns Place \nBrooklyn\, NY 11238 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Artistic Weapons of Mass Communication\, Samira Abbassy\, Rajie Coo k\, Ganzeer\, John Halaka\, Mary Tuma UID:380811 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20150530 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150422 GEO:40.7478986;-74.0050994 LOCATION:The Curator Gallery\,520 West 23rd Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Above & Beyond: Photographs by Kacper Kowalski\, Kacper Kowalski UID:380688 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Mike Weiss Gallery is pleased to present New Order\, the first solo exhibition by Michael Zelehoski with the gallery. Zelehoski takes found three-dimensional objects like pall ets and police barricades and restructures them into two-dimensional space. The resulting works are not mirrors of the objects but instead examine and challenge the selective process of human perception in its most abstract a nd creative tendencies. By working somewhere in between the separate domain s of sculpture&rsquo\;s core dimensionality and painting&rsquo\;s historica l flatness\, Zelehoski&rsquo\;s work also mixes in the formalist ethos of e mphasizing composition. The exhaustive process of metamorphosis in Zelehosk i&rsquo\;s work fluidly moves between fully-formed objects and binary abstr action\, pursuing the possibilities and intricacies of perception. \; DTEND:20150620 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150507 GEO:40.7488587;-74.0049112 LOCATION:Mike Weiss Gallery\,520 W.24th St. \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:New Order\, Michael Zelehoski UID:380677 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150507T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150507T180000 GEO:40.7488587;-74.0049112 LOCATION:Mike Weiss Gallery\,520 W.24th St. \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:New Order\, Michael Zelehoski UID:380678 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

It is a Sisyphean effort to cajole perfection from our tumul tuous and imperfect world. \; Ever cognizant of this Beth Lipman create s visual metaphors that represent both humanity&rsquo\;s abundant growth an d its potential\, or possible inevitable decline. Her use of glass and the process of sculpting and blowing records her ability to control the materia l as the work begins to form. In an instant the Artist is a stand-in for Ma n and the environment. \; All imperfections and flaws are embraced- eve ry detail has a role to play within the composition.

DTEND:20150613 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150430 GEO:40.7497654;-74.003155 LOCATION:Claire Oliver Gallery\,513 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Alone and the Wilderness\, Beth Lipman UID:380631 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150430T200000 DTSTAMP:20150418T071852 DTSTART:20150430T180000 GEO:40.7497654;-74.003155 LOCATION:Claire Oliver Gallery\,513 West 26th Street \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Alone and the Wilderness\, Beth Lipman UID:380632 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR