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This is the first U.S. museum exhibition of mirror works and drawings by Iranian artist Monir Shahroudy F armanfarmaian (b. Qazvin\, Iran\, 1924). Considered in relation to the Gugg enheim&rsquo\;s historical commitment to abstraction\, this presentation ex amines the artist&rsquo\;s rich body of work in its own right and as part o f a transnational perspective on artistic production and its reception. Aft er formative years in New York from 1945 to 1957\, during which she met art ists Milton Avery\, Willem de Kooning\, Joan Mitchell\, Louise Nevelson\, B arnett Newman\, and\, later\, Andy Warhol\, among others\, Monir returned t o Iran. There\, she further developed her artistic sensibility through enco unters with traditional craftsmanship\, indigenous art forms such as Turkom an jewelry and clothing\, coffee house paintings (a popular form of Iranian narrative paintings)\, and the technique of reverse-glass painting\, resul ting in a period of artistic discovery that culminated in commissions in Ir an and exhibitions in Europe and the United States. The Islamic Revolution in 1979 marked the beginning of Monir&rsquo\;s 26-year exile in New York\, during which she focused on drawing\, collage\, commissions\, and carpet an d textile design. In 2004\, when she finally returned to Iran\, she reestab lished her studio there and resumed working with some of the same craftsmen she had collaborated with in the 1970s.

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This presentation includes plaster and mirror reliefs\, large-scale mir ror sculptures the artist refers to as &ldquo\;geometric families\,&rdquo\; and works on paper\, revealing the central role drawing has played in Moni r&rsquo\;s practice and focusing on a sculptural and graphic oeuvre develop ed over more than 40 years (many examples of which have not been displayed publicly since the 1970s). This body of work is characterized by a merging of visual and spatial experience\, coupled with the aesthetic traditions of Islamic architecture and decoration. Her use of geometry as form allows fo r\, in the artist&rsquo\;s words\, &ldquo\;infinite possibility.&rdquo\;

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This exhibition is organized by Suzanne Cotter\, Director\, Fundaç\;ã\;o de Serralves&ndash\;Museu de Arte Contemporâ\;nea\, Porto\, Portugal\, with Karole Vail\, Associate Curator\, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

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The Leadership Committe e for Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian is gratefully acknowledged fo r its support\, with special thanks to Maryam Eisler\, The Soudavar Memoria l Foundation\, and Mohammed Afkhami.

DTEND:20150603 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150313 GEO:40.782979;-73.958867 LOCATION:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\,1071Fifth Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10128 -0173 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Infinite Possibility. Mirror Works and Drawings 1974-2014\, Monir S hahroudy Farmanfarmaian UID:368676 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150313T194500 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150313T100000 GEO:40.782979;-73.958867 LOCATION:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\,1071Fifth Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10128 -0173 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Infinite Possibility. Mirror Works and Drawings 1974-2014\, Monir S hahroudy Farmanfarmaian UID:368677 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Through radically restricted m eans\, On Kawara&rsquo\;s work engages the personal and historical consciou sness of place and time. Kawara&rsquo\;s practice is often associated with the rise of Conceptual art\, yet in its complex wit and philosophical reach \, it stands well apart.

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Organized wi th the cooperation of the artist\, On Kawara&mdash\;Silence will b e the first full representation of Kawara&rsquo\;s output\, beginning in 19 64 and including every category of work\, much of it produced during his tr avels across the globe: date paintings (the Today series)\; postca rds (the I Got Up series)\; telegrams (the I Am Still Alive series)\; maps (the I Went series)\; lists of names (the I Met series)\; newspaper cuttings (the I Read series)\; the in ventory of paintings (Journals)\; and calendars (One Hundred Y ears and One Million Years). The exhibition will also present numerous drawings produced in Paris in 1964\, which are fascinating propos als for unrealized works\; and Kawara&rsquo\;s only two extant paintings of 1965\, Location and Title\, which herald the Today series. In conjunction with the exhibition\, the Guggenheim will organi ze a continuous live reading of the artist&rsquo\;s One Million Years\, the steady recitation of numbers from a vast ledger\, which will be p erformed on the ground floor of the Guggenheim rotunda.

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On Kawara&rsquo\;s paintings were first shown at the Gug genheim Museum in the 1971 Guggenheim International Exhibition. Over 40 yea rs later this large exhibition will transform the Frank Lloyd Wright rotund a&mdash\;itself a form that signifies movement through time and space&mdash \;into a site within which audiences can reflect on an artistic practice of cumulative power and depth.

DTEND:20150503 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150206 GEO:40.782979;-73.958867 LOCATION:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\,1071Fifth Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10128 -0173 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Silence\, On Kawara UID:368674 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150206T194500 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150206T100000 GEO:40.782979;-73.958867 LOCATION:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\,1071Fifth Ave. \nNew York\, NY 10128 -0173 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Silence\, On Kawara UID:368675 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Jonah Kinigstein was born in C oney Island in 1923. Growing up in Coney Island was\, well\, like growing u p in an amusement park.

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&ldquo\;As a kid\, I was glued to everything that took place&mdash\;what they call &lsqu o\;on the bowery.&rsquo\; It was an area that had all these old amusement p ark things. Carousels\, horses. Ghost houses where you go up with your girl friend&mdash\;twists and turns&mdash\;and then you come out at the other en d. And they had all kinds of combinations like that\, and then the games th at you play. That always remained . . . you couldn&rsquo\;t get rid of it i n your head as a kid. I mean\, it was stuck in there.&rdquo\;

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His family moved to the Bronx when he was 11 or 12 \, which is when he started drawing. Like other artists of his generation h e started drawing on the street in chalk to entertain his friends and enhan ce his social standing. By the time he was attending James Monroe High Scho ol\, he knew he wanted to be an artist and make a living at it. He credits an art teacher there\, Max Wilkes\, as an inspiration.

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&ldquo\;He was an academic teacher and he could teach us anatomy\, and that was important at the time\, very important. He taught us how to set up a whole figure. We used to bring in our drawings to Max\, wh o looked at them\, corrected them\, and showed [us] where it was all wrong. &rdquo\;

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He discovered artists such a s Norman Rockwell\, whom he especially admired because his painting was nar rative. He visited the Metropolitan Museum&mdash\;&ldquo\;When I really saw the old masters\, it blew my mind\, of course.&rdquo\;

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Upon graduating high school\, Kinigstein attended Cooper Union. He could afford it because the tuition was free to students who pas sed a test. He spent a year there studying architecture\, sculpture\, and p ainting but was drafted into the Army in 1942. After basic training at Fort Dix\, he was stationed in Louisiana where he was assigned to a phototopogr aphy unit\, which enhanced aerial photos of enemy territory. He continued t he same work in Saipan&mdash\;and in Tinian\, where he would also occasiona lly paint landscapes for himself while listening to bombs exploding not far from the base.

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He was discharged in 1945\, moved back home with his parents\, spent another year at Cooper Unio n\, and then started pounding the payment and knocking on doors looking for freelance illustration jobs. Although he managed to do some LP covers and book jackets\, he wasn&rsquo\;t particularly successful.

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In 1948\, an old Army buddy encouraged him to move to P aris. &ldquo\;So I decided that&rsquo\;s where I&rsquo\;m gonna go. And I t ell you\, it wasn&rsquo\;t easy to get myself over there on a boat. . . . I went to work for a place that was selling fish. And for a whole month I wa s there shucking clams until I got enough money.&rdquo\;

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He arrived that same year and started attending the Aca dé\;mie de la Grande Chaumiè\;re. He lived a Spartan existence on his monthly $75.00 stipend courtesy of the G.I. Bill\, and found the ins truction generally less valuable than the social context&mdash\;conversing with other aspiring artists\, exchanging ideas\, exhibiting his work\, seei ng established artists\, and generally soaking up a fertile creative enviro nment.

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He was part of exhibitions at the Salon D&rsquo\;Automne\, Salon de Mai\, and the Salon des Moins de Tren te Ans\, and had one-man shows in the Galerie Breteau and Les Impressions D &rsquo\;Art. But the money ran out\, and he couldn&rsquo\;t make a living i n Paris\, so he returned to New York in 1954. A year later\, he went to Rom e on a Fulbright Scholarship\, and studied at the La Schola Di Belles Artes for a year.

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He again returned to the U.S. and exhibited his paintings at the Downtown Gallery in Manhattan for a year or so\, and continued to exhibit his work at the Alan Gallery\, an a djunct to the Downtown Gallery.

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Like so many painters\, he was unable to make a living solely from painting\, so he worked in the commercial art world and did freelance illustration and d esign. One of his most significant clients was the Austen Display Company\, where he designed and constructed window display backgrounds for well-know n department stores such as Bloomingdale&rsquo\;s\, Bonwit Teller\, Lord &a mp\; Taylor\, and Tiffany &\; Co. He also created the first designer sho pping bag for Bloomingdale&rsquo\;s.

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He then found himself the head of the Research and Development at a point-o f-purchase advertising firm exclusively devoted to the Seagram Company. Gov ernment regulations ended his position there when it became illegal to adve rtise whiskey in store windows or on counters.

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His next job was as a chromist with a printing company that made lithographs for a variety of famous artists. Watercolor or oil paintings ha d to be deconstructed so the painting&rsquo\;s colors could be reproduced o n a printing press. The chromist&rsquo\;s job was the exacting one of separ ating those colors so the press could handle them. At times\, as many as 20 different plates needed to be produced to make a lithographic print of a s ingle painting.

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Throughout this time\ , Kinigstein&rsquo\;s commitment to his own art never wavered\, and he cont inued to paint and occasionally exhibit. In an uncharacteristic understatem ent\, he wrote\, &ldquo\;Not happy in the direction the &lsquo\;Art&rsquo\; world was going and who was goading it on I started to make caricatures of the guilty parties and am continuing to make them to this very day.&rdquo\ ;

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Jonah Kinigstein lives in Brooklyn with his wife\, Eileen.

DTEND:20150207 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150106 GEO:40.764789;-73.966889 LOCATION:Society of Illustrators\,128 East 63rd Street \nNew York\, NY 1002 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Emperor’s New Clothes: The Tower of Babel in the Art World\, Jo nah Kinigstein UID:368672 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150106T200000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150106T100000 GEO:40.764789;-73.966889 LOCATION:Society of Illustrators\,128 East 63rd Street \nNew York\, NY 1002 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Emperor’s New Clothes: The Tower of Babel in the Art World\, Jo nah Kinigstein UID:368673 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Belleza y Felicidad\, a mini-retrospective o f poetry booklets by Buenos Aires literature and art collective Belleza y Felicidad. Now Showing is a program that highlights a sing le artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to o ur audiences.

Spearheaded by two friends\, the poet and artis t Fernanda Laguna and poet and translator Cecilia Pavó\;n from 1999&ndash\;2007 in a storefront gallery and ar t supply store\, Belleza y Felicidad brought together writers and artists of differing generations and statures to collaborate on small books \, events\, and other happenings\, energizing the Buenos Aires art and lite rature scene. Although no longer tied to a physical location\, Belleza y Felicidad continues to produce books under their imprint. Published texts include poems by Laguna\, Pavó\;n\, Cé\;sar Aira\, Gabrie la Bejerman\, Roberto Jacoby\, Fabiá\;n Casas\, and many others. Sele ct copies will be available for sale.

Additionally\, the indep endent Key West-based publisher Sand Paper Press is releasing a publication in February 2015\, spanning the last fifteen years of Laguna and Pav&oacut e\;n's literary works and collaborations. Belleza y Felicidad: Selected Writings of Fernanda Laguna and Cecilia Pavó\;n includes an int roduction by translator Stuart Krimko\, noted for his work on Hé\;cto r Viel Temperley and other Argentine writers. This authoritative volume tra nsmits the urgency and passionate feeling at the heart of one of the most e xciting artistic and literary movements to emerge from South America in rec ent decades. This book will also be available for purchase in SculptureCent er's bookstore.

DTEND:20150330 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150125 GEO:40.746944;-73.940851 LOCATION:Sculpture Center\,44-19 Purves Street \nLong Island City\, NY 1110 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Now Showing: Belleza y Felicidad UID:368669 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150125T180000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150125T110000 GEO:40.746944;-73.940851 LOCATION:Sculpture Center\,44-19 Purves Street \nLong Island City\, NY 1110 1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Now Showing: Belleza y Felicidad UID:368670 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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For nearly fifty years Robert Dash (1 934&ndash\;2013) painted and gardened at Madoo (an old Scottish word for "m y dove")\, a gray-shingled cluster of 18th-century buildings near the ocean in Sagaponack. He recorded epiphanies large and small that transpired in t hose two acres\, in both lyrical paint and elegant prose written for a week ly newspaper column. In a final series of ten paintings and as many works o n paper\, Dash amplified a single image of neighboring Sagg Main Street to create a nuanced exploration of color and light. \;

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Parrish Perspectives is a series of concentrate d exhibitions that offers the Museum opportunities to respond spontaneously and directly to unique ways of thinking about art\, artists\, and the crea tive process. \;

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DTEND:20150426 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150315 GEO:40.9046535;-72.3656126 LOCATION:Parrish Art Museum\,279 Montauk Highway \nWater Mill\, NY 11976 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Theme and Variations: Parrish Perspectives\, Robert Dash UID:368667 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150315T170000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150315T100000 GEO:40.9046535;-72.3656126 LOCATION:Parrish Art Museum\,279 Montauk Highway \nWater Mill\, NY 11976 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Theme and Variations: Parrish Perspectives\, Robert Dash UID:368668 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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More than 140 large scale ink and wat ercolor drawings Jules Feiffer created for his first-ever full scale graphi c novel demonstrate how\, at the age of 85\, this world renowned cartoonist has established an entirely new artistic direction. The installation takes viewers on a journey through Feiffer's complex noir drama\, and offers a u nique opportunity to see and experience the artist's creative process. In a ddition\, Feiffer has created a dozen new drawings that function as wall te xts guiding the audience through the story.

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Parrish Perspectives is a series of concentrated exhibition s that offers the Museum opportunities to respond spontaneously and directl y to unique ways of thinking about art\, artists\, and the creative process . \;

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DTEND:20150426 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150315 GEO:40.9046535;-72.3656126 LOCATION:Parrish Art Museum\,279 Montauk Highway \nWater Mill\, NY 11976 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Kill My Mother: Parrish Perspectives\, Jules Feiffer UID:368665 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150315T170000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150315T100000 GEO:40.9046535;-72.3656126 LOCATION:Parrish Art Museum\,279 Montauk Highway \nWater Mill\, NY 11976 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Kill My Mother: Parrish Perspectives\, Jules Feiffer UID:368666 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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A recent gift to the Parrish of nine drawings by Joe Zucker\, all studies for a 1992 print project with Riverhou se Editions in Steamboat Springs\, Colorado\, prompted an in depth look at the working process of this protean artist. For the first time the drawings and prints will be shown together with a series of paintings&mdash\;sash-c ord strung in a lattice-like grid&ndash\;all inspired by an extended consid eration of the wily and industrious arachnid. "My paintings are about the p rocess of painting\," he said. "It's a blue-collar\, proletarian approach." The work touches on the issues of the relationship between the process of painting and the meaning and use of the materials." \;

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Parrish Perspectives is a series of concentr ated exhibitions that offers the Museum opportunities to respond spontaneou sly and directly to unique ways of thinking about art\, artists\, and the c reative process. \;

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DTEND:20150426 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150315 GEO:40.9046535;-72.3656126 LOCATION:Parrish Art Museum\,279 Montauk Highway \nWater Mill\, NY 11976 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Life & Times of an Orb Weaver: Parrish Perspectives\, Joe Zucker UID:368663 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150315T170000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150315T100000 GEO:40.9046535;-72.3656126 LOCATION:Parrish Art Museum\,279 Montauk Highway \nWater Mill\, NY 11976 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Life & Times of an Orb Weaver: Parrish Perspectives\, Joe Zucker UID:368664 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Marking the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War and Lincoln&rsquo\;s assassination\, this exhib ition focuses on the significant\, and hitherto unknown\, relationships and interactions between Abraham Lincoln and his Jewish friends and associates . At a time when Jews comprised less than one-half of one percent of the Am erican population\, and with the country rampant with prejudice\, Lincoln&r squo\;s positive and meaningful personal relationships with Jewish individu als not only arguably changed him but also had an important and lasting imp act on the status of American Jews. Lincoln stood up to his anti-Semitic ge nerals even as he depended upon them to win the war\, and became an advocat e for Jewish equality and acceptance.

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Through never-before displayed original documents\, artifacts\, photograph s\, Lincoln's own writings\, and first person accounts primarily from the S hapell Manuscript Collection\, the exhibition will trace events in Lincoln& rsquo\;s life through the lens of his Jewish contemporaries\, such as Abrah am Jonas\, who became Lincoln&rsquo\;s political strategist and &ldquo\;mos t valued friend\,&rdquo\; and Issachar Zacharie\, his enigmatic confidant. Furthermore\, the exhibition will explore Lincoln&rsquo\;s profound interes t in and connection to the Old Testament\, as exemplified in his wish to se e Jerusalem before he died.

DTEND:20150607 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150320 GEO:40.7793273;-73.973725 LOCATION:New York Historical Society\,170 Central Park West \nNew York City \, NY 10024 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Lincoln and the Jews UID:368661 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150320T200000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150320T100000 GEO:40.7793273;-73.973725 LOCATION:New York Historical Society\,170 Central Park West \nNew York City \, NY 10024 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Lincoln and the Jews UID:368662 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Part III of the highly acclaim ed tripartite series Audubon&rsquo\;s Aviary: The Complete Flock w ill continue showcasing masterpieces from the New-York Historical Society c ollection of John James Audubon&rsquo\;s preparatory watercolors for the su mptuous double-elephant-folio print edition of The Birds of America (1827&ndash\;38)\, engraved by Robert Havell Jr. Part III of The Comp lete Flock will highlight Audubon&rsquo\;s watercolor models for Havel l plates 306&ndash\;435 (fascicles 62&ndash\;87). At this time he was rushi ng to complete his great work and\, therefore\, represented the outliers an d western species to bookend the North American continent.

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Considered America&rsquo\;s first great watercolorist \, the legendary naturalist-artist rendered his birds in unparalleled life- size scale. His years drawing portraits to support his family\, coupled wit h his passion for drawing birds\, enabled him to capture the individuality of each species in inventive tableaux. Since every avian watercolor is base d on a lifetime of observation and study\, they characterize the essence of each bird in arresting\, often cinematic\, images that soar beyond illustr ation to magically capture the fragile\, often brutal and endangered balanc e of nature. With Audubon&rsquo\;s peripatetic existence\, the survival of this trove in such pristine condition is miraculous. Featuring new findings about the artist&rsquo\;s working methods and his ornithological and artis tic influences\, Audubon&rsquo\;s Aviary will illuminate his true genius.&n bsp\;The series reveals the multiple reasons why history has deemed Audubon an American icon and New-York Historical's watercolors a national treasure .

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This once-in-a lifetime trilogy exp lores Audubon&rsquo\;s dazzling watercolors in the order in which they were engraved\, affording visitors the unique opportunity to view them sequenti ally\, like his original subscribers\, and in their entirety. Audubon organ ized The Birds of America not by traditional taxonomic order\, but according to his aesthetic and practical judgments. He believed this manne r of presentation was closer to that of nature. Bird songs of all the speci es exhibited and videos will underline the importance of field observation for the artist and the conservation of avian species\, which are the canari es in the coalmine for planet Earth. In addition\, one of Havell&rsquo\;s c opper plates and volume four of New-York Historical's copy of The Birds of America\, whose plates will be turned weekly\, will also be exhibi ted.

DTEND:20150510 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150306 GEO:40.7793273;-73.973725 LOCATION:New York Historical Society\,170 Central Park West \nNew York City \, NY 10024 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Audubon’s Aviary: The Final Flight (Part III of The Complete Flock) \, John James Audubon UID:368659 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150306T200000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150306T100000 GEO:40.7793273;-73.973725 LOCATION:New York Historical Society\,170 Central Park West \nNew York City \, NY 10024 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Audubon’s Aviary: The Final Flight (Part III of The Complete Flock) \, John James Audubon UID:368660 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

A signature initiative of the New Museum\, the Triennial is the only recurring international exhibition in New York City devoted to early-career artists from around the world.

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It provides an impo rtant platform for an emergent generation of artists that is shaping the di scourse of contemporary art. The Triennial&rsquo\;s predictive\, rather tha n retrospective\, model embodies the institution&rsquo\;s thirty-seven-year commitment to exploring the future of culture through the art of today. Th e 2015 Triennial is organized by Lauren Cornell\, Curator\, 2015 Triennial\ , Museum as Hub\, and Digital Projects at the New Museum\, and the iconic a rtist Ryan Trecartin\, who was featured in the inaugural 2009 Triennial.

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This third iteration of the Triennial i s titled &ldquo\;Surround Audience&rdquo\; and will featur e fifty-one artists and artist collectives from over twenty-five countries\ ; for many of the participants\, this will be their first inclusion in a mu seum exhibition in the United States.

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Cornell and Trecartin have worked together for nearly a decade and they ea ch bring a shared passion for probing the social and psychological effects of digital technology. For Cornell\, &ldquo\;Surround Audience&rdquo\; is i nspired in part by Trecartin&rsquo\;s own artistic practice\, which\, as sh e describes\, &ldquo\;vividly manifests a world in which the effects of tec hnology and late capitalism have been absorbed into our bodies and altered our vision of the world.&rdquo\; A tension between the newfound freedoms an d threats of today&rsquo\;s society animates and anchors &ldquo\;Surround A udience.&rdquo\;

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We are surrounded by a culture replete with impressions of life\, be they visual\, written\, or construed through data. We move through streams of chatter\, swipe past pi ctures of other people&rsquo\;s lives\, and frame our own experiences as\, all the while\, our digital trails are subtly captured\, tracked\, and stor ed. This is a culture in which the radical multimedia environments envision ed by pioneering artists like Nam June Paik and Stan VanDerBeek are being l ived out every day\, albeit with much more complexity and compromise. With these transformations in mind\, &ldquo\;Surround Audience&rdquo\; explores how artists are currently depicting subjectivity\, unpacking complex system s of power\, and claiming sites of artistic agency.

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While issues around social media provide a point of departur e for the exhibition\, it is not the platforms themselves that are the exhi bition&rsquo\;s primary focus\, but rather the ways their associated effect s intersect with life. Among the many narratives and ideas emerging from th e works\, there are three recurring lines of inquiry: First\, how represent ations of the body and persona have evolved in an image-laden culture in wh ich surveillance is widely dispersed and editorializing one&rsquo\;s life i n public is the norm\; second\, if it might be possible to opt out of or re frame the pressures of increasingly corporatized and invasive spaces\; and third\, how artists are striving to embed their works in the world around t hem through incursions into media and activism.

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The exhibition encompasses a variety of artistic practices\, inc luding sound\, dance\, comedy\, poetry\, installation\, sculpture\, paintin g\, video\, and one online talk show. If there is any aesthetic link betwee n these diverse works it is in their energetic mutability of form. Together \, these works speak to a newfound elasticity in our understanding of what mediums constitute contemporary art. Here\, paintings evolve out of 3-D mod els\, digital images erupt into sculpture\, and sound becomes action. This is a group of works that attests to how form is continuously converted acro ss word\, image\, and medium.

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RESIDENCIES\, COMMISSIONS\, &\; NEW WORKS
Many of the wo rks in the Triennial have been commissioned specifically for the show. In t he two years leading up to the exhibition\, the New Museum has hosted resea rch and production residences for both international and local artists: niv Acosta\, Aslı Ç\;avuşoğlu\, Juliana Huxtable\, Geumhyung Jeong\, Edu ardo Navarro\, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané\;\, and Luke Willis Thompson . These residencies took different forms: Some consisted of research suppor ted by the New Museum&rsquo\;s curatorial team\, while others took place on -site at the studio spaces in the Museum&rsquo\;s adjacent building at 231 Bowery and in the New Museum Theater\, which was used as a rehearsal space. Additional new works by Nadim Abbas\, Sophia Al-Maria\, Ketuta Alexi-Meskh ishvili\, Olga Balema\, Frank Benson\, Sascha Braunig\, José\; Le&oac ute\;n Cerrillo\, Onejoon Che\, Tania Pé\;rez Có\;rdova\, DIS\, Aleksandra Domanović\, Casey Jane Ellison\, Exterritory\, Shadi Habib Alla h\, Lena Henke\, Josh Kline\, Eva Kotá\;tková\;\, Oliver Laric\ , Rachel Lord\, Ashland Mines\, Avery K. Singer\, Martine Syms\, and Lisa T an have also been commissioned or produced for the exhibition.

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In addition to works featured in the galleries\, the curators selected artists to mobilize sites outside of the Museum\, inc luding the means of dispersing information about the exhibition itself. Suc h projects include the Triennial ad campaign Extended Release (201 5)\, which was conceived and designed by New York artist collective K-HOLE and serves as the group&rsquo\;s contribution to the exhibition. Distant Feel (2015)&mdash\;a new symbo l for empathy designed by Antoine Catala\, intended as an &ldquo\;update to the peace sign&rdquo\;&mdash\;was co-commissioned by the Carnegie Museum o f Art and will be made available online as a GIF as well as presented withi n the show as a sculpture. Finally\, episodes of Ovation&rsquo\;s &ldquo\;T ouching the Art&rdquo\; (2014&ndash\;15)&mdash\;a web series by Casey Jane Ellison that will temporarily become an artwork in &ldquo\;Surround Audienc e&rdquo\;&mdash\;will focus on themes broached by the exhibition and will b e shot in the Museum.

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PUBLICA TIONS
&ldquo\;Surround Audience&rdquo\; will also be accompa nied by an exhibition catalogue designed by Familiar and copublished by the New Museum and Rizzoli. The catalogue will include full-color\, four-page spreads on each of the fifty-one artists and groups as well interviews betw een the artist collective DIS and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané\;\, artis t\; Andrew Durbin\, writer\, and Frank Benson and Juliana Huxtable\, artist s\; Helga Christoffersen\, Assistant Curator\, and Basim Magdy\, artist\; a nd Sara O&rsquo\;Keeffe\, Assistant Curator\, and Aslı Ç\;avuşoğlu\, artist. The catalogue will also include essays by Cornell and Trecartin\; J ohanna Burton\, Keith Haring Director and Curator of Education and Public E ngagement\; Brian Droitcour\, writer\; Alexander Provan\, writer and Cofoun der\, Triple Canopy\; and Hito Steyerl\, artist.

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In conjunction with the exhibition\, the New Museum will publis h a book of poetry\, researched and edited by Droitcour. Featuring works by over sixty-nine contributors\, including Cathy Park Hong\, Dodie Bellamy\, Jenny Zhang\, Mó\;nica de la Torre\, and Bhanu Kapil\, with original translations and texts by Triennial artists all interwoven with transcript ions of social media statuses of many varieties\, The Animated Reader: Poetry of Surround Audience offers an expansion of the Triennial&rsquo \;s themes in the medium of poetry.

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< strong>ABOUT THE TRIENNIAL
The New Museum Triennial was init iated in 2009. The first edition\, &ldquo\;Younger Than Jesus\,&rdquo\; was organized by Massimiliano Gioni\, Laura Hoptman\, and Lauren Cornell. The second Triennial\, &ldquo\;The Ungovernables\,&rdquo\; was organized by Eun gie Joo in 2012. The 2015 Triennial was organized by Lauren Cornell\, Curat or\, 2015 Triennial\, Museum as Hub\, and Digital Projects\, and artist Rya n Trecartin\, with Sara O&rsquo\;Keeffe\, Assistant Curator. The catalogue was overseen by Helga Christoffersen\, Assistant Curator.

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PARTICIPATING ARTISTS
N adim Abbas
(b. 1980\, Hong Kong\, China. Lives and works in Hong Kong\, China)
Lawrence Abu Hamdan
(b. 1 985\, Amman\, Jordan. Lives and works in London\, UK)
niv Aco sta
(b. 1988\, New York\, NY\, US. Lives and works in Brook lyn\, NY\, US)
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
(b. 19 83\, Enugu\, Nigeria. Lives and works in Los Angeles\, CA\, US)
Sophia Al-Maria
(b. 1983\, Tacoma\, WA\, US. Lives and w orks in Doha\, Qatar\, and London\, UK)
Ketuta Alexi-Meskhish vili
(b. 1979\, Tbilisi\, Georgia. Lives and works in Berli n\, Germany)
Ed Atkins
(b. 1982\, Oxford\, UK . Lives and works in London\, UK)
Olga Balema
(b. 1984\, Lviv\, Ukraine. Lives and works in Amsterdam\, Netherlands\, an d Berlin\, Germany)
Frank Benson
(b. 1976\, N orfolk\, VA\, US. Lives and works in New York\, NY\, US)
Sasc ha Braunig
(b. 1983\, Vancouver Island\, Canada. Lives and works in Portland\, ME\, US)
Antoine Catala
( b. 1975\, Toulouse\, France. Lives and works in New York\, NY\, US)
< strong>Aslı Ç\;avuşoğlu
(b. 1982\, Istanbul\, Turkey. Lives and works in Istanbul\, Turkey)
José\; Leó \;n Cerrillo
(b. 1976\, San Luis Potosí\;\, Mexico. L ives and works in Mexico City\, Mexico)
Onejoon Che
(b. 1979\, Seoul\, South Korea. Lives and works in Seoul\, South Kor ea)
Tania Pé\;rez Có\;rdova
(b. 1 979\, Mexico City\, Mexico. Lives and works in Mexico City\, Mexico)
Verena Dengler
(b. 1981\, Vienna\, Austria. Lives a nd works in Vienna\, Austria)
DIS (Founded 2010\, Ne w York\, NY\, US)
Aleksandra Domanović
(b. 19 81\, Novi Sad\, SFR Yugoslavia. Lives and works in Berlin\, Germany)
Casey Jane Ellison
(b. 1988\, Los Angeles\, CA\, US . Lives and works in Los Angeles\, CA\, and New York\, NY\, US)
Exterritory
(Founded 2009\, the Extraterritorial Waters)
Geumhyung Jeong
(b. 1980\, Seoul\, South Kor ea. Lives and works in Seoul\, South Korea)
Ane Graff
(b. 1974\, Bodø\;\, Norway. Lives and works in Oslo\, Norway \, and Amsterdam\, Netherlands)
Guan Xiao
(b. 1983\, Sichuan Province\, China. Lives and works in Beijing\, China)
Shadi Habib Allah
(b. 1977\, Jerusalem\, Palestine . Lives and works in New York\, NY\, US)
Eloise Hawser
(b. 1985\, London\, UK. Lives and works in London\, UK)
Lena Henke

(b. 1982\, Warburg\, Germany. Lives and wor ks in New York\, NY\, US)
Lisa Holzer
(b. 197 1\, Vienna\, Austria. Lives and works in Vienna\, Austria\, and Berlin\, Ge rmany)
Juliana Huxtable
(b. 1987\, Houston\, TX\, US. Lives and works in New York\, NY\, US)
Renaud Jerez< /strong>
(b. 1982\, Narbonne\, France. Lives and works in Berlin\, G ermany)
K-HOLE
(Founded 2010\, New York\, NY\ , US)
Shreyas Karle
(b. 1981\, Mumbai\, India . Lives and works in Mumbai\, India)
Kiluanji Kia Henda

(b. 1979\, Luanda\, Angola. Lives and works in Luanda\, Angola\, and Lisbon\, Portugal)
Josh Kline
(b. 1979\, Philadelphia\, PA\, US. Lives and works in New York\, NY\, US)
Eva Kotá\;tková\;

(b. 1982\, Prague\, Czech Republic. Lives and works in Prague\, Czech Republic)
Donna K ukama
(b. 1981\, Mafikeng\, South Africa. Lives and works i n Johannesburg\, South Africa)
Firenze Lai
(b . 1984\, Hong Kong\, China. Lives and works in Hong Kong\, China)
Oliver Laric

(b. 1981\, Innsbruck\, Austria. Lives and works in Berlin\, Germany)
Li Liao
(b. 1982\ , Hubei\, China. Lives and works in Shenzhen\, China)
Rachel Lord
(b. 1986\, Washington\, DC\, US. Lives and works in Lo s Angeles\, CA\, US)
Basim Magdy
(b. 1977\, A ssiut\, Egypt. Lives and works in Cairo\, Egypt\, and Basel\, Switzerland)< br /> Nicholas Mangan
(b. 1979\, Geelong\, Australi a. Lives and works in Melbourne\, Australia)
Ashland Mines
(b. 1982\, Pittsburgh\, PA\, US. Lives and works in Los Angel es\, CA\, US)
Shelly Nadashi
(b. 1981\, Haifa \, Israel. Lives and works in Brussels\, Belgium)
Eduardo Nav arro
(b. 1979\, Buenos Aires\, Argentina. Lives and works i n Buenos Aires\, Argentina)
Steve Roggenbuck
(b. 1987\, Harbor Beach\, MI\, US. Lives and works in Brunswick\, ME\, US)< br /> Avery K. Singer
(b. 1987\, New York\, NY\, US . Lives and works in New York\, NY\, US)
Daniel Steegmann Man grané\;
(b. 1977\, Barcelona\, Spain. Lives and works in Rio de Janeiro\, Brazil)
Martine Syms
(b. 1988\, Los Angeles\, CA\, US. Lives and works in Los Angeles\, CA\, US)
Lisa Tan
(b. 1973\, New York\, NY\, US. Lives a nd works in Stockholm\, Sweden)
Luke Willis Thompson
(b. 1988\, Auckland\, New Zealand. Lives and works in Auckland\, Ne w Zealand\, and Frankfurt\, Germany)
Peter Wä\;chtler
(b. 1979\, Hannover\, Germany. Lives and works in Brussels\, B elgium\, and Berlin\, Germany)

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DTEND:20150524 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150225 GEO:40.722337;-73.992844 LOCATION:New Museum\,235 Bowery \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:2015 Triennial: Surround Audience\, Nadim Abbas\, Lawrence Abu Hamd an\, Niv Acosta\, Njideka Akunyili Crosby\, Sophia Al-Maria\, Ketuta Alexi- Meskhishvili\, Ed Atkins\, Olga Balema\, Frank Benson\, Sascha Braunig\, An toine Catala\, Aslı Çavuşoğlu\, José León Cerrillo\, Onejoon Che\, Tania Pe rez Cordova\, Verena Dengler\, DIS\, Aleksandra Domanovic\, Casey Jane ELLI SON\, Exterritory\, Geumhyung Jeong\, Ane Graff\, Guan Xiao\, Shadi Habib A llah\, Eloise Hawser\, Lena Henke\, Lisa Holzer\, Juliana Huxtable\, Renaud Jerez\, K-HOLE\, Shreyas Karle\, Kiluanji Kia Henda\, Josh Kline\, Eva Koť átková\, Donna Kukama\, Firenze LAI\, Oliver Laric\, Li Liao\, Rachel Lord\ , Basim Magdy\, Nicholas Mangan\, Ashland Mines\, Shelly Nadashi\, Eduardo Navarro\, Steve Roggenbuck\, Avery K. Singer\, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané\, Martine Syms\, Lisa Tan\, Luke Willis Thompson\, Peter Wächtler UID:368657 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150225T180000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150225T110000 GEO:40.722337;-73.992844 LOCATION:New Museum\,235 Bowery \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:2015 Triennial: Surround Audience\, Nadim Abbas\, Niv Acosta\, Soph ia Al-Maria\, Ketuta Alexi-Meskhishvili\, Shadi Habib Allah\, Ed Atkins\, O lga Balema\, Frank Benson\, Sascha Braunig\, Antoine Catala\, Aslı Çavuşoğl u\, José León Cerrillo\, Onejoon Che\, Tania Perez Cordova\, Njideka Akunyi li Crosby\, Verena Dengler\, DIS\, Aleksandra Domanovic\, Casey Jane ELLISO N\, Exterritory\, Ane Graff\, Lawrence Abu Hamdan\, Eloise Hawser\, Kiluanj i Kia Henda\, Lena Henke\, Lisa Holzer\, Juliana Huxtable\, Geumhyung Jeong \, Renaud Jerez\, K-HOLE\, Shreyas Karle\, Josh Kline\, Eva Koťátková\, Don na Kukama\, Firenze LAI\, Oliver Laric\, Li Liao\, Rachel Lord\, Basim Magd y\, Nicholas Mangan\, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané\, Ashland Mines\, Shelly Na dashi\, Eduardo Navarro\, Steve Roggenbuck\, Avery K. Singer\, Martine Syms \, Lisa Tan\, Luke Willis Thompson\, Peter Wächtler\, Guan Xiao UID:368658 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

This exhibition will be dedica ted to the radical modernist movements in German and Russian art at the beg inning of the 20th century. Their development was parallel and often inters ected. Such artists as Vasily Kandinsky or Alexei von Jawlensky are claimed by the Germans but remain Russian artists for the Russians.

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The Burliuk brothers\, who became celebrities of th e Russian radical art scene\, participated in the first exhibition of Blaue Reiter in Germany. Russian artists travelled to Germany and lived there\, while their German counterparts were aware of what was shown in Moscow exhi bition halls. A diverse art movement formed in Germany in the beginning of the 1910s was given the name &ldquo\;Expressionism&rdquo\; by the critic He rwarth Walden. Members of such groups as Die Brucke and Blaue Reiter were i nitially influenced by the French Fauves. Their Russian contemporaries also tried to find artistic truth in these new approaches. However\, both in Ge rmany and Russia\, the French style underwent radical transformation. The e xhibition will explore not only the direct connections and collaborations o f German and Russian artists\, but also the affinities in both countries&rs quo\; artistic development. It will trace the Russian approach to Expressio nism and put this in the context of the history of twentieth-century art. DTEND:20150615 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150219 GEO:40.7813091;-73.9601761 LOCATION:Neue Galerie Museum for German and Austrian Art\,1048 Fifth Avenue \nNew York\, NY 10028 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Russian Modernism: Cross-Currents in German and Russian Art\, 1907- 1917 UID:368655 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150219T180000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150219T110000 GEO:40.7813091;-73.9601761 LOCATION:Neue Galerie Museum for German and Austrian Art\,1048 Fifth Avenue \nNew York\, NY 10028 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Russian Modernism: Cross-Currents in German and Russian Art\, 1907- 1917 UID:368656 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Revealing Architecture features work and projects by FXFOWLE Architects and artist Richard Haas in the Curatorial Lab.

DTEND:20150503 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150129 GEO:40.7836604;-73.9586801 LOCATION:National Academy Museum\,1083 Fifth Avenue \nNew York City\, NY 10 128 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Revealing Architecture\, Richard Haas UID:368653 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20150129T180000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150129T110000 GEO:40.7836604;-73.9586801 LOCATION:National Academy Museum\,1083 Fifth Avenue \nNew York City\, NY 10 128 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Revealing Architecture\, Richard Haas UID:368654 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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In his painting process\, Richard Estes uses photography as a basis from which to create his photorealist paintings\, on view in th e exhibition Richard Estes: Painting New York. Widely employed by a variety of painters\, this technique allows for artists to gather the raw visual materials needed in order to construct final tableaux.

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This free\, daylong demonstration by local painte rs showcases the process of using photography as source material\, and reve als how this technique can inform the making of contemporary paintings.

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DTEND:20150530T130000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150530T120000 GEO:40.7673947;-73.9820338 LOCATION:Museum of Arts and Design\,2 Columbus Circle \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Painting Realism from Photographs (May 30)\, Richard Estes UID:368652 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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In his painting process\, Richard Estes uses photography as a basis from which to create his photorealist paintings\, on view in th e exhibition Richard Estes: Painting New York. Widely employed by a variety of painters\, this technique allows for artists to gather the raw visual materials needed in order to construct final tableaux.

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This free\, daylong demonstration by local painte rs showcases the process of using photography as source material\, and reve als how this technique can inform the making of contemporary paintings.

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DTEND:20150411T130000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150411T120000 GEO:40.7673947;-73.9820338 LOCATION:Museum of Arts and Design\,2 Columbus Circle \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Painting Realism from Photographs (April 11) UID:368651 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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In his painting process\, Richard Estes uses photography as a basis from which to create his photorealist paintings\, on view in th e exhibition Richard Estes: Painting New York. Widely employed by a variety of painters\, this technique allows for artists to gather the raw visual materials needed in order to construct final tableaux.

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This free\, daylong demonstration by local painte rs showcases the process of using photography as source material\, and reve als how this technique can inform the making of contemporary paintings.

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DTEND:20150314T130000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150314T120000 GEO:40.7673947;-73.9820338 LOCATION:Museum of Arts and Design\,2 Columbus Circle \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Painting Realism from Photographs (March 14) UID:368650 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Discover the new exhibition&nb sp\;Richard Estes: Painting New York City \;with curator Patte rson Sims as your guide. Surveying the work of this quintessentialNew York artist and pioneer of the Photorealist movement\, this exhibitioncombines f or the first time a range of Estes&rsquo\;s works\, art-makingtools and sou rce materials to provide deeper insight into theartist&rsquo\;s creative pr ocess.

DTEND:20150312T193000 DTSTAMP:20141229T080021 DTSTART:20150312T183000 GEO:40.7673947;-73.9820338 LOCATION:Museum of Arts and Design\,2 Columbus Circle \nNew York\, NY 10019 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Curator-Led Tour of Richard Estes: Painting New York City UID:368649 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR