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Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects is pleased to announce a sol o exhibition of paintings by Clintel Steed. Steed (b. 1977\, Salt Lake City \, Utah) lives and works in New York City. \; \;

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 \;The exhibition includes portraits\, cityscapes\, &ldquo\;transcriptions&rdquo\ ; of old master paintings\, and paintings drawn from popular culture imager y. The source imagery comes from observation\, from photography and news so urces\, and from a bifurcated tablet screen (two seemingly unrelated images side by side).

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 \;Specifically\, his recent work includes pain tings of a curved skyscraper in Beijing\, a skyline seen from Bushwick\, ho mages to two paintings by Peter Paul Rubens: &ldquo\;Fall of the Damned&rdq uo\; (c. 1620)\, and &ldquo\;Diana Returning from the Hunt&rdquo\; (c. 1615 )\; two portraits of a friend\, paintings of Antman and &ldquo\;American Ph aroah&rdquo\; &ndash\; the Triple Crown winning racehorse.

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 \;S teed&rsquo\;s work displays an explosive fracturing of forms\, a relentless \, in-your-face energy\, a pulsating\, restless organization of form\, and a raw paint handling. \; His colors can be atonal and very contemporary &ndash\; especially the hot pink accents that suggest acrylic and popular imagery. \; They have a milky\, gritty facture suggesting pollution and smog hanging over our world\, both literally and metaphorically. \; At the same time\, Steed can be lyrical\, as his marks traces the running of a horse\, and the humanity and sensitive line with which he articulates the shape of a head and facial features.

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 \;Steed has said that hi s work is &ldquo\;about the explosion of an image and the impact that it ma kes&hellip\; I use images of war and disaster\, politics and gossip. \; I paint about the feeling of being swallowed up\, the feeling that in orde r to have power\, you need to have money.&rdquo\; He made a series of paint ings about the destruction from the 2011 tsunami in Japan\, and recent work used news images from the Baltimore riots.

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 \;Steed&rsquo\;s p aintings are often complex bundles of energy\, which is probably what conne cts him to a painter like Rubens. \; This is also why he makes electron ic images (tablet screens\, computer screens) a subject matter. \; He h as painted aerial city views\, with tight networks of skyscrapers and highw ays. He reflects on the nature of contemporary life\, the constant interrup tions and the flooding of our image banks. \; At the same time\, his wo rk reads as a manifesto on the primacy of human contact\, touch\, physical materiality\, and the importance of love and the nuclear family. (In other work\, he has depicted his pregnant partner\, his young child\, and himself with his partner and daughter.)

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 \;Steed received his BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1999 and his MFA from Indiana University.& nbsp\; He also did advanced studies at the New York Studio School\, working closely with Graham Nickson. \; He was part of a two-person exhibition \, with painter Todd Bienvenu\, at SHFAP in 2015. \; His work was inclu ded in recent group exhibitions at Regina Rex Gallery and Life on Mars Gall ery. He was included in the 2015 American Academy of Arts and Letters Invit ational Exhibition\, and won their John Koch Award. \; He recently cura ted an ambitious exhibition of contemporary figurative painting\, &ldquo\;H uman Mysteries&rdquo\; (June-July 2016)\, at the Temporary Storage Gallery of Brooklyn Fire Proof\, a creative spaces company in Brooklyn. \; This is SHFAP&rsquo\;s first one-person show with Steed.

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Please contact the gallery at info@shfap.c om or 917-861-7312 for further information or images.

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DTEND:20161009 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160907 GEO:40.7228401;-73.9902918 LOCATION:Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects\,208 Forsyth Street \nNew York \, New York 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Endymion: Recent Paintings by Clintel Steed\, Clintel Steed UID:426818 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160907T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160907T180000 GEO:40.7228401;-73.9902918 LOCATION:Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects\,208 Forsyth Street \nNew York \, New York 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Endymion: Recent Paintings by Clintel Steed\, Clintel Steed UID:426819 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

José\;e Bienvenu is pleased to pr esent \;WALKING ARTIST\, Hamish Fulton&rsquo\;s first exhibiti on with the gallery and his first solo show in New York in over a decade. W hile his drawings\, sculpture diagrams\, murals\, and photographs have led to him be considered a practitioner of Land Art\, Fulton considers himself instead as a &ldquo\;walking artist.&rdquo\; Through representations of wal king itself\, nature is neither conceived as a subliminal &ldquo\;other&rdq uo\; existing to be conquered nor as an anthropocentric landscape\, nature exists rather to be lived\, endured\, and left to thrive. In our own lives\ , Fulton&rsquo\;s journeying through wilderness points to a palpable lack o f adventure\, unmediated experiences\, and connectedness to nature.

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In 1973\, after walking over 1\,000 miles in 47 days from Duncansby Head\, Scotland to Land&rsquo\;s End\, England\, Fulton made the decision to &ldquo\;only make art resulting from the experience of ind ividual walks.&rdquo\; Purposefully made of humble materials like paper\, w ooden rulers\, and photographs\, his recreations align with the belief that these walks should directly engage with the environment yet leave no trace s upon it. Calls for political justice also recur in Fulton&rsquo\;s work\, corresponding to his commitment to individual and artistic freedom.

\n< p style="margin: 0px 0px 20px\; padding: 0px\; font-family: Helvetica\,Aria l\,sans-serif\; line-height: 16px\; clear: both\; letter-spacing: normal\; text-align: justify\;">In this exhibition\, Fulton presents a body of work that exemplifies his ongoing commitment to art as a quiet protest against t he alienation of people from the natural world. Included are two large scal e vinyl works: the first refers to a guided and sherpa assisted climb of Mo unt Everest using bottled oxygen in 2009\, the latter describes a pilgrim c ircuit of the Barkhor Kora and the Jokhang Temple in Tibet. These bold text ual works attest to Fulton&rsquo\;s passion for typography in tandem with h is ongoing commitment as a walking artist. Several watercolors are included \, evoking walking journeys from Switzerland to Bolivia. Unique black and w hite gelatin silver prints portray journeys through the Pyrenees from the A tlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea. In the project space\, there will b e a selection of vintage photographs and small sculptures. For the past 20 years Fulton has devised many group walks\, with more than 30 realized tran snationally.

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Born in 1946 in London\, Hamish F ulton lives and works near Canterbury\, UK. Fulton studied at the St. Marti n&rsquo\;s School of Art\, London and the Royal College of Art\, London. Se lect solo exhibitions include Turner Contemporary\, Margate\, UK (2011)\; M useo Transfrontaliero del Monte Bianco\, Courmayeur\, IT (2010)\; Museo Ext remeñ\;o e Iberoamericano de Arte Contemporá\;neo\, Badajoz\, E S (2009)\; Center for Contemporary Art\, Kitakyshu\, JP\, and Museum of Mod ern Art\, NY (2006)\; Museum for Modern and Contemporary Art\, Bolzano\, IT \, \; and Museion Bolzano\, Bozen\, IT (2005)\; Haus Konstruktiv\, Zuri c\, CH (2004)\; and Tate Britain\, London (2002). Select group exhibitions include Ends of the Earth\, MOCA\, Los Angeles\, CA which traveled to the H aus der Kunst\, Munich\, DE (2012) and the Royal Academy of Arts\, London ( 2011).

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Selected public collections include: Ta te Gallery\, London\; Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; Brooklyn Museum\, N ew York\; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\, New York\; Princeton Art Gallery\, NJ\; Philadelphia Museum of Art\, PA\; Los Angeles County Museum\, CA\; Mu seum of Contemporary Art\, San Diego\, CA\; Eastman House\, Rochester\, NY\ ; National Gallery of Canada\, Ottawa\; Metropolitan Museum\, Tokyo\, JP\; National Museum\, Osaka\, JP\; Victoria and Albert Museum\, London\; Biblio teque National\, Paris\; IVAM\, Valencia\, ES\; Australian National Gallery \, Canberra\; Stedelijk Museum\, Amsterdam\, NL\; Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum\ , Eindhoven\, NL\; Art Gallery of Ontario\, Toronto\, CA\; National Gallery of Scotland\, Edinburgh\, UK\; British Council\, London\; Kunstmuseum\, Ba sel\, CH\; Centro Cultural Arte Contemporaneo\, Mexico City\, MX\; Centre d &rsquo\;Art Contemporain\, Geneva\, CH\; Musee de Grenoble\, FR\; Musee St. Pierre\, Lyon\, FR\; FRAC\, Rennes\, FR\; National Gallery of Iceland\, Re ykjaví\;k\; Museum of Modern Art\, Wakayama\, JP\; Museum Moderner Ku nst\, Vienna\, AT\; University of Lethbridge\, CA.

DTEND:20161012 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160908 GEO:40.7464427;-74.006994 LOCATION:Josee Bienvenu Gallery\,529 West 20th St. \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Walking Artist\, Hamish Fulton UID:426815 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160908T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160908T180000 GEO:40.7464427;-74.006994 LOCATION:Josee Bienvenu Gallery\,529 West 20th St. \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Walking Artist\, Hamish Fulton UID:426816 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Discover the talents of the Museum&rsquo\;s artist members.< /p> DTEND:20170108 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:2016 Members Exhibition UID:426813 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160925T170000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925T110000 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:2016 Members Exhibition UID:426814 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Artist Kreh Mellick&rsquo\;s w ork is influenced by a variety of sources from her family&rsquo\;s passion for collecting antiques to her great-grandmother&rsquo\;s sketch books and by Pennsylvania Dutch folklore. \; But perhaps nothing is more surprisi ng than the inspiration she felt after picking up an old book of machine dr awings.

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The diagrams of the machines were in black and red ink. The black represented the non-moving machine whi le the red showed the moving parts.

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& ldquo\;I can&rsquo\;t recall the moment or even the particular image I was looking at\, but I had this sense of the black being the real &ndash\; the constant &ndash\; and the red being the unreal or ever-changing\,&rdquo\; M ellick said. &ldquo\;From that I started making these drawing with these tw o colors\, and I was thinking of the image of the real world versus the spi rit world and ghosts\, and the relationship between those two things.&rdquo \;

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Her solo exhibition\, Kreh Mel lick: All the Woodsy Things\, premieres Sunday\, Sept. 25. A reception \, celebrating the show&rsquo\;s opening\, will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. an d will feature a talk by the former Oldwick resident. All are welcome\, and refreshments will be served.

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Mellick usually works with gouache on paper\, often times cutting and layering the paper. Her figures are often ghost-like with decorative motifs and light\, airy landscapes. Her works are often narratives inspired by folklore\, nos talgia and a time passed.

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&ldquo\;I w ant to be able to relate some kind of story that is vague or invites the vi ewer to say &lsquo\;Oh\, maybe this is happening&rsquo\;\, &ldquo\;Mellick said. &ldquo\;I like that there&rsquo\;s some kind of mystery involved.&rdq uo\;

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Mellick&rsquo\;s studio is locat ed in an old panty hose factory near the Penland School of Crafts where she was in the core fellowship program and met her husband\, artist Andrew Hay es\, who also has a solo show at the Museum opening simultaneously.

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Mellick&rsquo\;s work is also inspired by an tiques collected by her family and her grandmother&rsquo\;s sketch books.\n

A lot of the time I just sit down and start drawing and sometimes an idea comes to me\,&rdquo\; she said. &ldquo\ ;For a while I&rsquo\;ve been using these decorative motifs to fill the pap er and that came from being surrounded by the kind of imagery of antiques t hat we&rsquo\;ve had in the house. My great- grandmother did these painting s on furniture and as reverse-glass painting. I would use images from her s ketchbooks and embellish upon them. That is where some of these decorative motifs come from. So\, I&rsquo\;m just in the studio working\, working\, wo rking until something clicks into place.&rdquo\;

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All the Woodsy Things runs until Nov. 13.

DTEND:20161113 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:All the Woodsy Things\, Kreh Mellick UID:426811 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160925T160000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925T140000 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:All the Woodsy Things\, Kreh Mellick UID:426812 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Andrew Hayes may not judge a b ook by its cover\, but he does judge it by the edges of its pages.

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The artist prowls old book stores and antique shops searching for the perfect volumes for his work: Creating sculptures by marrying the rigid qualities of steel to the delicacy of book pages. Hay es gravitates toward older books with gold leaf or red on their edges.

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&ldquo\;I don&rsquo\;t respond so much to the title or what&rsquo\;s in the book so much as the form or something th at&rsquo\;s present visually\,&rdquo\; Hayes said.

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Hayes&rsquo\;s sculptures will be featured at the Hunterdon A rt Museum in a solo exhibition\, Andrew Hayes: Paper and Steel\, w hich runs from Sept. 25 to Nov. 13. The show&rsquo\;s opening reception is Sunday\, Sept. 25 from 2 to 4 p.m. and will feature an artist&rsquo\;s talk and demonstration. The event is open to everyone.

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Hayes&rsquo\;s love of books and past professional experience as a welder informs his work. He uses steel to reshape the book&rsquo\;s p ages creating a unique sculpture. &ldquo\;I take my sensory appreciation fo r the book as a material and employ the use of metal to create a new form\, and hopefully a new story.&rdquo\;

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T o separate the book&rsquo\;s pages from its spine\, he uses an ominous-soun ding tool: an antique guillotine.

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Boo k-cutting guillotines are disappearing across the country because they are becoming obsolete.  \;Hayes found his cast-iron guillotine\, which date s back to about 1915\, in a print shop at Clemson University. The artist ca n place an entire book in the guillotine and securely lock it to get a cris p\, clean cut. He then starts playing with the pages to see how they work a nd how the steel might fit.

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&ldquo\;T he process is organic\,&rdquo\; Hayes said. &ldquo\;I want to find a balanc e between the paper and the steel\, and not allow one to overpower the othe r\, although sometimes you do want the paper to steal the show because you want to honor it.&rdquo\;

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Hayes grew up in Tucson\, Arizona and studied sculpture at Northern Arizona University . He received a Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts in North Caroli na. While there\, he met his wife\, Kreh Mellick\, an Oldwick\, New Jersey native and artist who will have her own solo show running concurrently at t he Museum.

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Because of the nature of h is work\, Hayes&rsquo\;s art studio looks as if someone opened a metal shop in the middle of a library. Visitors are often attracted to the rows of sh elved books. The longing to touch the books &ndash\; hold them &ndash\; see ms instinctual.

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&ldquo\;We have a rel ationship with books\, with the way they feel and smell\,&rdquo\; Hayes sai d. &ldquo\;They were made to be held. I think that&rsquo\;s what draws me t o some of the older books because you can see that they&rsquo\;ve been hand led. There&rsquo\;s a little extra history there\; maybe the book&rsquo\;s a little beat up or there&rsquo\;s a spill on the side creating a nice surf ace.&rdquo\;

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Hayes notes that he only cuts old books that were massed produced &ndash\; &ldquo\;there&rsquo\;s n o sinister intent\,&rdquo\; he stresses. Sometimes\, he will find something too beautiful or perfect to alter in any way.

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&ldquo\;My favorite find was an old Webster&rsquo\;s Dictionary t hat has these really beautiful marble edges and finger tabs\,&rdquo\; he sa id. &ldquo\;I like it so much because it&rsquo\;s just so beautiful. I keep it on my desk. I just couldn&rsquo\;t cut it.&rdquo\;

DTEND:20161113 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Paper and Steel\, Andrew Hayes UID:426809 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160925T160000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925T140000 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Paper and Steel\, Andrew Hayes UID:426810 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Ujiie&rsquo\;s large-scale dig ital prints present a unique blending of the classical and contemporary. He r solo exhibition\, titled Heather Ujiie: Fairytales\, Monsters and Hyb rid Creatures\,runs from Sept. 25 until Jan. 8\, 2017. The show&rsquo\ ;s opening reception will be celebrated on Sunday\, Sept. 25 from 2 to 4 p. m.\, and will feature an artist&rsquo\;s talk that everyone is invited to a ttend.

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&ldquo\;Many of the pieces in this exhibition were inspired from a kind of &lsquo\;data&rsquo\; mashing o f both western and eastern world history and religion\,&rdquo\; Ujiie said. &ldquo\;This past year\, I have been fascinated by the northern Renaissanc e Christian painting by Hieronymus Bosch&rsquo\;s: The Garden of Earthl y Delights\, as well as Persian and Indian miniature paintings\, some of which depict polymorphic gods and demons.&rdquo\;

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Ujiie&rsquo\;s textile work is a synthesis of several metho ds of artistry\, including hand painting\, drawing\, stitching\, and printi ng with innovative large-format digital printing.

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&ldquo\;I love the visceral quality of paint and material inve stigations\, but I also love technology\,&rdquo\; she said. &ldquo\;Digital printing\, laser cutting and smart textiles are all tools that interest me in creating more innovative work.&rdquo\;

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Conversely\, Ujiie said she enjoys sitting in her studio painting wit h gouache\, a heavy\, opaque watercolor paint\, which produces a less wet-a ppearing and more strongly colored picture than ordinary watercolor.

\n< p style="text-align: justify\;">&ldquo\;Combining the two methods of workin g &mdash\; scanning my hand painted pieces\, and then digitally manipulatin g and printing them on different substrates &mdash\; is very gratifying\,&r dquo\; Ujiie said.

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Ujiie&rsquo\;s fas cination with the intersection of art and design impelled her to create a o ne-of-a-kind garment &ndash\; or perhaps\, persona &ndash\; made almost ent irely from paper. She said she wanted to &ldquo\;reference the temporality of our existence in the world\, but also to make something beautiful\, and almost functional\, out of a non-traditional material.

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&ldquo\;Thematically\, I am also interested in mythic tal es of female heroines\, who represent both the male and the female in terms of empowerment\, beauty and seduction. I wanted this piece to conjure up c urrent notions of what it is to be female\, and also suggest a kind of fair ytale like creature in an enchanted all white forest\,&rdquo\; Ujiie added.

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Additionally\, Ujiie will lead two p rograms at HAM this fall. Mask Making with Heather Ujiie will run on Sunday \, Oct. 16 from 1 to 4 p.m. for children ages 6 and up with an adult\; and Ujiie will offer a lecture and guided tour for adults on Sunday\, Nov. 13 a t 2 p.m. For more information\, please visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

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Ujiie is a full-time Interdisciplinary Assistant professor at Moor e College of Art &\; Design Art &\; Design in Philadelphia\, where sh e teaches across several disciplines including textile design. \;Beside s appearing previously at HAM\, her work has been exhibited at the Racine A rt Museum and the prestigious Wind Challenge Award Exhibition at the Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial Museum. Her commercial printed textile designs ha ve had numerous clients including The White House private residences for fo rmer President George W. and Laura Bush.

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Three years ago\, Ujiie&rsquo\;s work was featured in &ldquo\;Nature&rs quo\;s Mark: Printing on Fiber\,&rdquo\; an exhibition highlighting the wor k of seven artists.

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She hopes this ex hibition will pose questions about the nature of our identity in the world\ , and offer views of &ldquo\;a sacred space.&rdquo\;

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&ldquo\;Since my work is a fusion of both art and design\, I want my viewer to see the potential of a well-designed object or artifact \, and realize it can question notions about the body\, our environment\, a nd place\,&rdquo\; Ujiie said.

DTEND:20170108 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Fairytales\, Monsters and Hybrid Creatures\, Heather Ujiie UID:426807 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160925T160000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160925T140000 GEO:40.63651;-74.912151 LOCATION:Hunterdon Art Museum\,7 Lower Center Street \nClinton\, NJ 08809-1 303 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Fairytales\, Monsters and Hybrid Creatures\, Heather Ujiie UID:426808 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Galerie Richard presents Spani sh artist Dionisio Gonzá\;lez&rsquo\;s fourth solo exhibition in New York entitled The Dauphin Island Series - Venice Series from August 31st to October 9th. The exhibition will be composed of six photographs of Dauphin Island Series in 2011 and six photographs of the Venice Series (The Light Hours) in 2011. His digital photographs create spatial\, sculptural and pho tographic explorations of space\, architecture and urban development. His p hotos always request preliminary historical\, sociological\, political\, ec onomical research before making his first picture.

By mixing t he past\, present and future he condenses our sense of time\, which might b e a way to express the speediness of change nowadays. Dionisio Gonzá\ ;lez works can also be considered as Utopia\, which invite the viewer to de al with philosophical debates.

Dionisio Gonzá\;lez will be present.

DTEND:20161009 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160831 GEO:40.71951;-73.98978 LOCATION:Galerie Richard\,121 Orchard St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Dauphin Island - Venice\, Dionisio Gonzalez UID:426805 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160831T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160831T180000 GEO:40.71951;-73.98978 LOCATION:Galerie Richard\,121 Orchard St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Dauphin Island - Venice\, Dionisio Gonzalez UID:426806 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

&ldquo\;If a time machine moves through time\, a space machi ne moves through space\, but what kind of space? While such a vessel usuall y brings to mind rockets\, satellites even UFOs\, I use the interstellar im age metaphorically for parallel objects and spaces &ndash\; our inner ones. &rdquo\; (Walker\, 2016)

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Pierogi is pleased to present an exhibitio n of recent paintings by Sarah Walker. Through process-oriented abstract pa inting\, Walker creates different states of spatial reality\, moving throug h and across one another at varying densities and velocities. Some layers c ome to the fore while others recede\; some submerge or don&rsquo\;t conform yet all participate as if space and time were simultaneous. &ldquo\;The in ner world is the outer world\, multiplicity is the rule rather than the exc eption and everything that ever existed continues in some form.&rdquo\;

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Multiplicity is inherent in our neurology (as anyone who has taken a h allucinogen knows)\, but up until recently it took time to get from one thi ng to the next\, one place to the next\, one space to the next. Now\, throu gh the training wheels of digital technology\, we can position parts of our attention in different places\, spaces\, and states simultaneously. This p repares us for an altogether different sort of experience\, one where space and time behave as varying forms of connection and attachment.

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Wal ker continues to develop her process of working with highly liquid paint on a flat surface\, allowing pooled paint to dry\, wiping or scouring away ex cess\, adding more paint\, in some areas encouraging reticulation to occur\ ; the only fast rule being to leave some part of each sub-layer visible\, c reating dynamic shifts between foreground and background. &ldquo\;When I ma ke paintings I make them where all the decisions remain visible. Seemingly separate lines of development continue passing through one another even len ding their structure to each other and these influences remain visually ava ilable over time. This means in essence that what was alive\, is alive now\ , and will always be alive &ndash\; because it is visually available.&rdquo \;

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&ldquo\;Ironically although access to information is practically instantaneous\, looking at a painting takes time\, the process of its maki ng takes time &ndash\; mine are very slow. The still and silent painting gr adually absorbs the viewer&rsquo\;s attention\, which is always in motion. I love this about painting. My paintings\, generated over time in multiple contradictory layers\, hold open the space where everything is accessible b ut it is the viewers&rsquo\; own habits of attachment that crystallize the painting\, revealing something of their own inner diagram. I consider the p aintings machines for this process.&rdquo\;

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This will be Walker&rsq uo\;s fifth one-person exhibition at Pierogi. Her work has been included in numerous museum and gallery exhibitions and is included in the permanent c ollections of the Museum of Modern Art (NY\, NY)\, Milwaukee Art Museum (Mi lwaukee\, WI)\, DeCordova Museum (Lincoln\, MA)\, Neuberger Museum (Purchas e\, NY)\, and Rappaport Foundation (Boston\, MA). She is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Prize and the Rappaport Prize.

DTEND:20161009 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160909 GEO:40.7208457;-73.9854152 LOCATION:Pierogi\,155 Suffolk St \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Space Machines by Sarah Walker\, Sarah Walker UID:426801 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160911T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20160911T180000 GEO:40.7208457;-73.9854152 LOCATION:Pierogi\,155 Suffolk St \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Space Machines by Sarah Walker\, Sarah Walker UID:426802 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

An exhibition of major paintin gs by David Hepher\, exploring \;suburban house-fronts and \;monume ntal tower-blocks and incorporating \;real architectural materials such as concrete \;and \;wallpaper.

DTEND:20161210 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20161020 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Concrete Elegy\, David Hepher UID:426799 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20161020T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230723 DTSTART:20161020T180000 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Concrete Elegy\, David Hepher UID:426800 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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Flowers Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of paintings by B ritish artist Ishbel Myerscough\, drawing together meticulously observed pa intings of friends and family\, self-portraits\, and domestic still life&nb sp\;arrangements.

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Myerscough is known for her precisely rendered and frank portrayal of her subjects\, which ove r the past three decades have included herself\, her close friend and fello w artist Chantal Joffe\, and their families. Curator Sarah Howgate has desc ribed Myerscough&rsquo\;s paintings as demonstrating a &ldquo\;clear\, fore nsic vision&rdquo\;\, capturing her own reflection in the mirror with unfli nching honesty.1 Within her painstaking attention to detail\, Myerscough se es\, as she puts it\, &ldquo\;the wider things reflected in even the smalle st life you \;lead&rdquo\;.

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The p resent selection of paintings can be seen as containers for an intensely pe rsonal experience of womanhood\, beginning with images of childhood and cul minating with recent self-portraits\, interspersed with grouped or paired f igures that address the relationships between family\, lovers and friends. Myerscough&rsquo\;s particular inquiry of the nude has charted an evolving idea of self through the contemplation of form\, evoking the longings and a nxieties of female experience through discreet observations of physicality and \;gesture.

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In several portrai ts of children\, often viewed from the back\, the level of scrutiny applied to each flyaway strand of hair and wrinkle of clothing suggests the intima cy of the maternal gaze\, and yet there is also a sense that the subjects a re resisting the \;discovery of their inaccessible\, private worlds. In two paintings in which the back of the head is the focal point\, Plait s and French Plait\, the braids after which they are titled a re unevenly woven\, snaking haphazardly\, with wisp-like tendrils unfurling as though making their escape from \;orderliness.

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Hair in Myerscough&rsquo\;s paintings can be seen to hold symbolic value\, invoking the essence of the individual\, or offering refu ge and disguise. Often wayward and unruly\, such as in the self-portrait Long Hair\, the labyrinthine entanglements shield the self from othe rs. This is taken further in another painting titled Self Portrait \, in which the pelt-like shock of auburn hair\, streaked with silver\, is ungroomed and worn overly-long\, almost entirely covering the face and body . Myerscough examines the intricate details of each strand with the same fo cused attention paid to the nuances of flesh tone or gestures of the body\, as though following the thread of a story to unravel the personal \;na rrative.

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The recent painting Unti tled (hairbrush &\; comb)\, in which residual knots and tangles of hair appear disengaged from the figure\, draws associations with loss\, anx iety\, ill health and aging. This focus on shedding or casting off of bodil y matter can be seen to be rooted in the traditions of abject art\, address ing the relationship between the public and private presentation of the bod y. In other still life arrangements\, a goldfish floundering on a plate\, a nd a spider spinning its web hint at the traditions of memento mori on a do mestic scale. Despite the typically sparse composition\, Myerscough pays eq ually lavish consideration to the fading whorls of woodgrain on the tableto p\, as to the metallic sheen of the goldfish&rsquo\;s gills\; similarly the shimmering light tracing the strands of a delicate web is balanced with th e fibrous silhouette of the attendant spider\, as though searching for mean ing in the slightest of \;details.

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DTEND:20161015 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Up Close\, Ishbel Myerscough UID:426797 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160908T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908T180000 GEO:40.7464825;-74.0069332 LOCATION:Flowers Gallery NY\,529 West 20th Street \nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Up Close\, Ishbel Myerscough UID:426798 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Cheim &\; Read is pleased t o announce Lynda Benglis: New Work\, an exhibition opening on Sept ember 8\, 2016\, and running through October 22. A catalogue will be availa ble with an essay by Nancy Princenthal. This is Benglis&rsquo\;s sixth exhi bition with the gallery.

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Since the 1 960s\, Lynda Benglis has been celebrated for the free\, ecstatic forms she has poured\, thrown and molded in ceramic\, latex\, polyurethane and bronze . In her new work she turns to handmade paper\, which she wraps around a ch icken wire armature\, often painting the sand-toned surface in bright\, met allic colors offset by strokes of deep\, coal-based black. At other times s he leaves the paper virtually bare.

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These works reflect the environment in which they were made\, the &ldquo\;s ere and windblown&rdquo\; landscape of Santa Fe\, New Mexico\, as Princenth al writes in her essay. &ldquo\;It is possible to see the bleached bones of the land&mdash\;its mesas and arroyos\; its scatterings of shed snakeskins and animal skeletons&mdash\;in the new sculptures&rsquo\; combination of s trength and delicacy.&rdquo\;

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Simult aneously playful and visceral\, the new works enter into a lively dialogue with Benglis&rsquo\;s previous explorations of materials and form\, but wit h a raw immediacy inherent to the moist strips of paper she uses as their s kin. Stretched\, crimped and torn into richly organic shapes\, the paper be comes both the sculpture&rsquo\;s shell and a repository of the artist&rsqu o\;s touch. &ldquo\;The flexibility of the paper is marvelous\; it&rsquo\;s just very loving\,&rdquo\; she tells the filmmaker Burrill Crohn in Be nglis Skin Deep\, a video interview on the making of this body of work .

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The sculptures are light and open\ , with slits and apertures revealing their wire supports. &ldquo\;I&rsquo\; m drawing with air\, and wire\, and paper\,&rdquo\; Benglis remarks in the interview. Princenthal compares the paper skins to shattered piñ\;ata s and animal hides\, as well as to the kites that the artist&rsquo\;s fathe r made by hand (Benglis attends the kite festival held yearly at Ahmedabad\ , India\, where she maintains a residence).

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As a counterweight to the paper sculptures\, Benglis will also exhi bit The Fall Caught\, a new large-scale aluminum work made by appl ying spray foam instead of strips of handmade paper on the chicken wire arm ature\, as well as a new series of spiraling\, hand-built black ceramics ca lled Elephant Necklace. Benglis has said of this work\, &ldquo\;El ephants necklaces are artifacts that I imagine in the long and short of the extrusions of life. The expulsion from the garden with the umbilical cord attached are perhaps the fragments left of the family of mammoths trunks.&n bsp\; Having left only parts of their trunks in our imagination\, I long to find out more about them through a united collaboration with Saxe Patterso n\, my exploration team\, and others who may decide to question their exist ence in this hemisphere.&rdquo\;

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The sexual politics at the heart of Benglis&rsquo\;s career is intrinsic to th is work. The cylindrical shape of many of Benglis&rsquo\;s new sculptures c an bring to mind phalluses and vaginas (&ldquo\;considered as tubes\, one b ecomes the other&rdquo\;)\, and yet\, as Princenthal observes\, &ldquo\;Of all the sensations her work evokes\, pure delight is among the keenest.&rdq uo\;

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Lynda Benglis is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts grants\, among other commendations. Her work is held in extensive public collection s including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum\; the Los Angeles County Museu m of Art\; the Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; the National Gallery of Vi ctoria\, Melbourne\, Australia\; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art\; t he Walker Art Center\, Minneapolis\; and the Whitney Museum of American Art \, New York.

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Throughout 2016\, the B ergen Assembly in Bergen\, Norway\, is hosting a series of exhibitions devo ted to Benglis&rsquo\;s videos and sculpture. The Aspen Art Museum&rsquo\;s Roof Deck Sculpture Garden will host a group of her fountains through the end of October. In September\, a major survey of Benglis&rsquo\;s work will inaugurate the Museo Internacional del Barroco in Puebla\, Mexico\, this i s the first show of Benglis&rsquo\;s work in Latin America.

DTEND:20161022 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908 GEO:40.750026;-74.005133 LOCATION:Cheim & Read\,547 West 25th St \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:New Work\, Lynda Benglis UID:426795 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160908T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908T180000 GEO:40.750026;-74.005133 LOCATION:Cheim & Read\,547 West 25th St \nNew York\, NY 10001 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:New Work\, Lynda Benglis UID:426796 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20161016 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908 GEO:40.7190129;-73.99404 LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Take a stick to it\, put it on a line \, Denzil Hurley UID:426793 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160908T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908T180000 GEO:40.7190129;-73.99404 LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Take a stick to it\, put it on a line \, Denzil Hurley UID:426794 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION: DTEND:20161016 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908 GEO:40.7190129;-73.99404 LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Bricks are Heavy \, Elizabeth McIntosh UID:426791 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160908T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160908T180000 GEO:40.7190129;-73.99404 LOCATION:Canada\,333 Broome St. \nNew York\, NY 10002 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Bricks are Heavy \, Elizabeth McIntosh UID:426792 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Benrubi Gallery is proud to pr esent Letters in the Dark: Franz Kafka and Milena Jesenská\; by media artist and photographer Doug Hall. An intimate\, evocative work c onsisting of two synchronized black-and-white video projections and a selec tion of photographs\, Letters in the Dark is based on a series of love letters between Franz Kafka and Milena Jesenská\;\, a young tran slator who later became a journalist and editor before perishing in a Nazi concentration camp in 1944.
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Jesenská\; was marrie d when\, in 1920\, she wrote Kafka with a request to translate one of his s tories into Czech. That letter led to a short\, charged correspondence as p hilosophical as it was passionate\, but Kafka ultimately broke off the rela tionship when Jesenská\; wouldn&rsquo\;t leave her husband. After Kaf ka&rsquo\;s death\, Jesenská\; gave her copies of his letters to Max Brod\, who published them in 1952 as Letters to Milena\, but her l etters to Kafka were either lost or destroyed.
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Central to the video installation is Hall&rsquo\;s recreation of Jesenská\;&r squo\;s letters\, which he fashioned from fragments of her other writing\, as well as stylistic and tonal cues in Kafka&rsquo\;s letters to her. Kafka &rsquo\;s letters issue from one \;projection\, while Jesenská\;& rsquo\;s come from a second \;projection on the opposite wall. The spok en texts are accompanied by images of doorways\, hallways\, facades\, garde ns\, and domestic interiors. The images hint at lives felt but not seen\, a nd\, as with the texts\, some depict actual locations where Kafka lived and worked\, while others were taken in Moscow and San Francisco\, and act as proxies for Kafka and Jesenská\;. The presence of spray-painted graff iti and modern appliances reminds us of the historical remove\, while the m ixture of documentary and surrogate imagery acknowledges and engages with t he interplay between the real and the imagined\, the known and the unknowab le\, that colors any attempt to reread history. The result is not a simulac rum of an historical event but a new moment\, informed by the past and the &ldquo\;poetics of non-arrival&rdquo\; that Judith Butler finds in Kafka&rs quo\;s love letters\, but ultimately residing in each viewer&rsquo\;s exper ience of the installation.
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An exhibition and monograph on Hall&rsquo\;s career\, which spans 40 years with numerous pioneering con tributions in performance\, photography\, video\, and media installation\, is in development for 2017-2018. His works are collected by the Berkeley Ar t Museum and Pacific Film Archive\, California\; Berlinische Galerie\, Berl in\; the Contemporary Art Museum\, Chicago\; the Mildred Kemper Lane Art Mu seum\, St. Louis\; the Museum of Modern Art\, New York\; Museum fü\;r M oderne Kunst\, Vienna\; Museum am Ostwall\, Dortmund\, Germany\; Tate Moder n\, London\; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art\; and the Whitney Museu m\, New York. He has received numerous awards and fellowships including fro m the Guggenheim Foundation\, the Fulbright Foundation\, and the Rome Prize at the American Academy Rome. He is Professor Emeritus at the San Francisc o Art Institute.

DTEND:20161029 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160915 GEO:40.7502381;-74.0036147 LOCATION:Benrubi Gallery\,521 West 26th Street 2nd floor\nNew York\, NY 100 01 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Letters in the Dark: Franz Kafka and Milena Jesenská\, Doug Hall UID:426789 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160915T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160915T180000 GEO:40.7502381;-74.0036147 LOCATION:Benrubi Gallery\,521 West 26th Street 2nd floor\nNew York\, NY 100 01 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Letters in the Dark: Franz Kafka and Milena Jesenská\, Doug Hall UID:426790 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Juan li Carrió\;n\, Pia Rö\;nicke\, and Dr. Ina Vandebroek join in con versation about the politics of botany and the links between nature and soc iety\, moderated by Clelia Coussonnet.

Through creative projec ts and academic research\, panelists will convey various ways that links em erge between nature\, politics\, culture\, and society. With special intere st in examining the ways that human behavior impacts the so-called natural world\, the panelists will meditate on the impact of politics on the enviro nment\, patterns of plant migration\, urban ecology initiatives\, activism\ , and biodiversity preservation.

In conjunction with apexart U nsolicited Exhibition Botany under Influence organized by Clelia Cousso nnet.

For more information: https://www.apexart.org/events/transplants-human-influence-on-nature.p hp

DTEND:20160910T160000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160910T140000 GEO:40.719022;-74.004432 LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Transplants: Human Influence on Nature\, JUANLI CARRION\, Pia R önicke\, and Dr. Ina Vandebroek UID:426717 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Botany under Influence delves into the politics of plants and explores systems of meaning that have been impressed upon nature \, flora\, and seeds throughout eras of imperialism\, colonialism\, and glo balization. Unearthing forgotten and parallel histories\, this exhibition r eveals how the exportation of natural resources has affected worldwide powe r structures and cultural behavior. It pushes us to reconsider common perce ptions and representations about nature &lsquo\;having always been there\,& rsquo\; being &lsquo\;neutral&rsquo\; or &lsquo\;passive\,&rsquo\; when ins tead plants embody the larger History and are integral actors in it.

On view: September 8 - October 22\, 2016

Featuring work by:
Alberto Baraya
Joscelyn Gardner
Sasha Huber &\; P etri Saarikko
Kapwani Kiwanga
Pia Rö\;nicke
Beatriz S antiago Munoz

more at: https://apexart.org/exhibi tions/coussonnet.php

DTEND:20161022 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160907 GEO:40.719022;-74.004432 LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Botany under Influence\, Alberto Baraya\, Joscelyn Gardner\, Sasha Huber & Petri Saarikko\, Kapwani Kiwanga\, Pia Rönicke\, Beatriz Santiago M uñoz UID:426715 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:20160907T200000 DTSTAMP:20160830T230724 DTSTART:20160907T180000 GEO:40.719022;-74.004432 LOCATION:Apexart\,291 Church Street \nNew York\, NY 10013 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Botany under Influence\, Alberto Baraya\, Joscelyn Gardner\, Kapwan i Kiwanga\, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz\, Pia Rönicke\, Sasha Huber & Petri Saar ikko UID:426716 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR