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bitforms gallery is pleased to announce Angles\, a fifth solo exhibition in New York with Israeli-American artist Daniel Rozin. Since the late 1990s\, Rozin’s constructions in software and sculptu re have investigated the psychological and optical cues inherent to image b uilding\, such as pattern and the materiality of the picture plane. In a de parture from the traditional rectilinear grid\, which was the foundation of his 2010 exhibit X by Y\, Rozin’s new series of work proposes anoth er geometric basis of image creation. Focusing on rotational systems of ori entation\, Angles celebrates the polar\, or angular\, notations of p ictographic information. Using the triangle and sculptural elements that tw ist their shape\, Rozin’s conversation of the grid highlights a new dimensi onality of formal representation.

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In Rozin’s work\, the p icture plane’s transformation is a means to explore animated behavior\, rep resentation and illusion. Merging the geometric with the participatory\, Ro zin’s installations have long been celebrated for their kinetic and interac tive properties. Grounded in gestures of the body\, three pieces in the exh ibit Angles are mirrors of various sorts and respond to the presence of viewers in real time by recreating a visual representation of their lik eness.

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Fan Mirror is a free-standing s culpture that measures fourteen feet across. Its overall shape and rounded frame suggest the folded oriental hand fan\, a decorative object that first emerged in the 10th century and gained popularity during the Mi ng Dynasty. The sculpture is comprised of seventeen ribbed wooden spokes th at support a total of 153 hand fans\, in an array of sizes and colors\, fro m Korea\, China\, Taiwan\, Spain and Japan. Crafted from materials ranging from sandalwood and synthetic silk to plastic\, each fan is actuated by a m otor that is computer controlled\, causing the bands to spread open and rhy thmically close. Sweeping patterns roll across Fan Mirror’s arced su rface\, blossoming in rings that resemble an onion peel or peacock’s tail. The sequence of movement in this work is directed in part by the viewer’s e ngagement. When approached at close range\, the fans\, which are also conne cted to a camera\, move to create a rough silhouette of the viewer within t he sculpture. When viewing from a distance\, the movement is generated by a n algorithm programmed by the artist.

The Angles Mirror rejects the idea of building a picture based on relative lightness and dar kness. Instead\, it explores a system of linear rotation that indicates the direction of an object’s contour. A wall-mounted sculpture\, the Angles Mirror is a sharp triangular block of steel\, dotted with yello w indicator arms that pivot. Based on the isometric grid\, its structure fa vors the patterns and angles found in an equilateral triangle. The arms\, w hich do not have the ability to change brightness or luminosity\, use input from a camera and reconstruct the view with areas of varying angles. The n egative space surrounding a viewer is translated into horizontal lines on t he picture plane. Rather than creating a photorealistic image\, the three-d imensional movement of a figure is represented\, visualizing optical flow a s viewer’s proximity to the sculpture changes. A nuanced contour results\, as the viewer shifts back and forth\, altering how the structure of space i s perceived. Similar to Fan Mirror\, in the Angles Mirror\, t he sequence of movement across the picture plane is directed in part by its audience. When the viewer walks away from the work\, or chooses to view th e sculpture from a distance\, a series of predefined images and transitions cover the object’s surface.

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Mirror No.12 is a color video p rojection that processes live imagery captured from a small camera. Taking upon itself the same image building restrictions as the Angles Mirror\, Mirror No.12uses the 

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rotational transformation of line as the sole means of representation. Resulting in a painterly texture\, the artist-authored software manipulates a finite set of straight lines that s pin from one position to the next\, in an attempt to replicate a visual sce ne’s angular contours and features. Cropping the camera’s frame and virtual ly torquing its imagery three-dimensionally\, the projection is bounded by an oval\, evoking the surveillant effect of an observer gazing through the peephole in a door.

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Inspired by Op Art from the 1950s and 60s\, Twisted Strips is a kinetic sculpture that explores serial image generation and perceptual illusion. Breaking the picture plane into a blac k field with twenty-one motorized white vertical strips\, the sculpture pro duces rhythmic waves of movement. The animated pattern shifts in arc and fr equency\, as the two motors on each strip continually rotate in and out of phase. Using an approach visually analogous to the tape loop structures fou nd in minimal music and phase music\, new shapes constantly flow through th e composition\, which are perceived by the eye as a singular picture in mot ion.

DTEND:20130406 DTSTAMP:20140417T160127 DTSTART:20130302 GEO:40.7464969;-74.0094471 LOCATION:bitforms gallery\,529 W. 20th St.\, 2nd Floor (between 10th and 11 th)\nNew York\, NY 10011 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Daniel Rozin: Angles\, Daniel Rozin UID:264295 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR