ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Abir Karmakar - AICON GALLERY - New York - July 23rd - September 5th <p align="justify"><strong>Aicon Gallery</strong>&nbsp;is proud to present&nbsp;<em><strong>Uncanny Space</strong></em>, an exhibition of new works by&nbsp;<strong>Abir Karmaka</strong>r dealing with issues of voyuerism, privacy and paranoia in a post-Edward Snowden world. A world where one man disrupted his life to give us a voyeur's vantage into institutionalized voyeurism by the state. But also a world where that vantage may be on the path to obsolescence, as people on the inner&nbsp;sides of keyholes throw open their doors and share their most private moments with the world in graphic detail, voluntarily and for no apparent gratification other their own desire to exhibit. This is the world that Abir Karmakar inhabits - in life, in his head and through his paintings - in his Uncanny Space.&nbsp;</p> <div>&nbsp;Paintings from Karmakar's newest body of work take his audience into confidence. He is no longer giving us a script, but instead urging us to write it ourselves. The quiet of seemingly ordinary scenes has a lingering disquiet as the viewer witnesses them not through the frame of natural vision but through the filter of a camera lens. Why is there a camera spying on domestic idyll? Is it because we are no longer confident of ourselves? Can we not be assured of normalcy in our homes and in our lives without the reassurance of an electronic eye conveying the far away scene to us? But is that really reassurance? Can disquiet and danger lie right outside the frame?</div> <p>We live in a world where we need a selfie to prove our very presence; where joy, anger, curiosity and knowledge all need visual validation. It is world where we will risk voyeurism by unwanted eyes, whether of the state or of digital paparazzi, in order to preserve an image on the cloud. In this world of hyper documentation, Abir Karmakar drags and drops us on the very thin edge between real and unreal. A step backwards and we are no better than the state which doesn't respect the privacy of its citizens. A step forward and we are the meat upon which voyeuristic sharks feed. But right where Abir Karmakar has us, we are suspended in-between, with only our imaginations to help us.</p> <div align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify">Abir Karmakar was born in Siliguri, India in 1977. He studied at the Faculty of Fine Arts, M.S. University, Baroda (2003), where he was awarded the Gold Medal for Fine Art, Painting, and at B.V.A. Rabindra Bharati University, Kolkata (2001). He now lives and works in Baroda, India. He has exhibited widely in India - De Tour at Gallery 88, Mumbai (2005), Fusion at Baya ABS Gallery, Baroda (2004), Birla Academy of Arts and Culture, Kolkata (2003). His previous solo exhibitions include Interiors, Galerie Heike Curtze, Berlin (2006) and from my photo album, The Museum Gallery, Mumbai (2005).</div> Fri, 17 Jul 2015 07:38:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Vera Neumann - Alexander Gray Associates - July 9th - August 7th <p style="text-align: justify;">Alexander Gray Associates presents <em>Vera Paints a Rainbow</em>, an exhibition of artworks by Vera Neumann (b.1907, Stamford, CT &ndash; d.1993, North Tarrytown, NY), created between the 1960s and 1980s. The presentation focuses on the artist&rsquo;s use of color as means to express emotions through compositions characterized by a colorful palette. The works on view, organized following the rainbow spectrum&mdash;red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet&mdash;emphasize Neumann&rsquo;s rich use of color, which in her words, &ldquo;is a marvelous way of expressing emotion.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Neumann loved color. She often opted for warm tones, with a particular penchant for yellow and orange. As she used to say, &ldquo;Color sings to me&hellip;[it] is the language I speak best.&rdquo; Her artwork is defined by single gestures that convey maximum expression by employing few, yet visually strong tones. Among Neumann&rsquo;s motifs are stylized florals, abstract color fields, and avant-garde geometrics rendered in singular combinations. When designing, she stated, &ldquo;If you have too many colors, you could very easily get tied down to just one color scheme that can&rsquo;t be changed [&hellip;] I feel I have given people more joy with the designs I create.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> The exhibition&rsquo;s title, <em>Vera Paints a Rainbow</em>, alludes to the Vera Company&rsquo;s promotional materials and showrooms, whose ads from the 1970s featured the tagline &ldquo;Vera paints,&rdquo; as an ongoing campaign. Every season featured a new theme, from &ldquo;Vera paints a bunch,&rdquo; a cluster of carrots, to &ldquo;Vera paints suns,&rdquo; a recurrent motif in all her collection. As the artist expressed: &ldquo;I&rsquo;m a Leo. I&rsquo;m a sun person.&rdquo; Neumann&rsquo;s vivid watercolor paintings and collages were used on an array of fabrics to create wallpaper, home linens, apparel, and most famously, her silk scarves. <em>Vera Paints a Rainbow</em> brings together a selection of her artworks representing the solar spectrum, which became key visual references of mid-century design.<br /> <br /> A revolutionary icon of American design and brand development, dating from the 1950s onwards, Neumann became one of the most successful female entrepreneurs of her time. As writer Stephanie Mansfield wrote, &ldquo;When they dig up the remains of this land, known as America, archaeologists of the future will undoubtedly come across cultural curiosities of the 20th century that might be mistaken for objects of religious worship: millions of rainbow-colored relics bearing the name Vera.&rdquo; Throughout her business career Neumann was first and foremost an artist, whose works translated graphically into everyday objects. She maintained close relationships with her contemporaries in art and design, sharing similar aesthetics. Among her closest friends were Alexander Calder, Joan Mir&oacute;, and Marcel Breuer. Neumann was an avid traveler, gathering inspiration from her visits to countries around the world, including Mexico, Peru, China, Japan, India, and Iran, among others. Neumann&rsquo;s curiosity and experiences abroad impacted her vision, palette and understanding of the world. It emboldened her use of color as a way to communicate happiness. As she once expressed, &ldquo;We have so many problems in this world, color brings just a little bit of joy into our lives.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> Vera Neumann graduated from Cooper Union with a degree in Fine Arts in 1928, and in the 1930s attended the Traphagen School of Design. During the 1940s, she began designing placemats with a handmade silkscreen. Neumann&rsquo;s work as a designer indelibly impacted the American visual landscape, from the Truman White House and inspiring the designer Perry Ellis. In 1972 the Smithsonian National Museum of American History commissioned her to paint the museum&rsquo;s Foucault Pendulum installation, which was displayed in the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History from 1964 through 1998. Neumann&rsquo;s designs are represented in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Goldstein Museum of Design, St. Paul, MN; and the Davis Museum at Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, among others.</p> Wed, 29 Jul 2015 15:58:44 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Mary Ann Willson, Bernard Karfiol, Elie Nadelman, Charles Sheeler - American Folk Art Museum - July 18th - September 27th <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>The Invention of Folk Art</strong><br /> In the early years of the twentieth century, a group of young, pivotal American modernists began to equate the straightforwardness, abstracted forms, and delight in color of early folk art with the new modernist art they had studied in Europe and were pioneering in America. <em>Folk Art and American Modernism</em> traces the journey of these weathervanes, portraits, decoys, hooked rugs, theorem paintings, and other forms of folk art from the fishing shacks of the Summer School of Graphic Arts established in Ogunquit, Maine, in 1911 to the walls of major art museums beginning in the 1930s, and culminating in the establishment of museums such as the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum in Colonial Williamsburg and the American Folk Art Museum in New York City.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition highlights folk art owned, collected, and exhibited by such early art-world luminaries as Holger Cahill (curator), Edith Halpert (dealer), and Juliana Force (first director of the Whitney Museum of American Art), and artists Elie Nadelman, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, and Charles Sheeler, among others, whose own work is shown alongside the folk art that inspired them. In regarding folk art as art and as evidence of a &ldquo;usable past,&rdquo; these trailblazers led their generation in preserving a continuous American artistic tradition of which they considered themselves a living part.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The Ogunquit Modernists<br /> Elie and Viola Nadelman<br /> Marguerite and William Zorach<br /> Juliana Force and the Whitney Studio Club<br /> Charles Sheeler<br /> Isabel Carleton Wilde<br /> Holger Cahill<br /> Edith Halpert<br /> Abby Aldrich Rockefeller<br /> Index of American Design<br /> Jean and Howard Lipman</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Organized by the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><br /></em>The exhibition is supported in part by Becky and Bob Alexander, Joyce Berger Cowin, the David Davies and Jack Weeden Fund for Exhibitions, the Leir Charitable Foundations, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and Marvin and Donna Schwartz.</p> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 13:05:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Hayden Dunham, Parker Ito, Timur Si-Qin - Andrea Rosen Gallery - July 2nd - August 14th <p style="text-align: justify;">Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to present <em>EVERYTHINGS</em>, a three-person exhibition with Hayden Dunham, Parker Ito and Timur Si-Qin. <em>EVERYTHINGS</em> encompasses simultaneously a concept of all information imbued within &ldquo;everything&rdquo;, while suggesting a multiplicity or variant of the concept itself.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Through what feel very much like three new and significantly diverse installations, aesthetic perspectives and material languages, this exhibition introduces a conceptually expansive approach to thinking about and realizing artworks; exposing a unique potential for objects&mdash;and the experience of objects&mdash;to be imbued with information, as well as addressing an expanded, non-linear sense of time. Meaning and material are allowed to exist in multiple states at once, advocating the perception of a stagnant object as a moving one&mdash;as a transformative product that communicates, and is malleable. Together, Dunham, Ito and Si-Qin retain a clear responsibility to how we engage, and commitment to the role of an art object and how those objects move through time, while each possessing such distinct perspectives of what an object can be.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Hayden Dunham&rsquo;s work embodies a process of facilitation, where objects are conditioned and supported through their individual internal transformations. In the same way one would physically augment their body, paint is here used as an augmentation device, where its weight is supported by a surface, and its impressions communicate beyond their form in a performance. Likewise, porcelain drips and silicon pools become by-products of internal systems, implicitly active. Circulated through the air vents of the gallery, and concentrated within each object is GEL&mdash;a product developed by Dunham that takes on multiple sensory forms: solid, liquid and vapor. GEL is the distillation of products associated with energy&mdash;a supplement&mdash;whose activation occurs through interface within the objects, space, and its viewers. While Dunham&rsquo;s systems are distinct, these ideas of transformation are embedded within her parallel creative processes, where, like the objects, a process of conditioning facilitates her own internal conversions and development of identities and domains.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Infiltrating multiple spaces of the gallery, Parker Ito&rsquo;s installation builds an information network whose variables&mdash;material and non-material&mdash;are transformed and made dynamic with each exhibition. Through an ownership of assimilation, where all visual information is sourced and accessed to create a comprehensive whole, Ito&rsquo;s transformative installations present materially distinct and discrete works that each employ a different strategy. Classical techniques of bronze casting and coil ceramics are engaged with freeway culture and popular parked domain imagery. Double-sided paintings and self-portrait photographs become referential wormholes, reflective of the exhibition and object&rsquo;s history itself. While committed to the role of an object, Ito&rsquo;s layering replicates the complexity of our accessibility to information and our world, and a continuous non-static perspective. For Ito, objects are understood through networks, and here tangled within a web of LED, chain and rope, and shown amidst an accumulation of installation remnants, his work as a hub embodies a dynamic cohesive scape, whose intricacies are as meaningful as the incomprehensibility of the whole.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Aiming to expand our understanding of reality beyond something purely structured by language, signs and symbols, Timur Si-Qin&rsquo;s works suggests a geologic perspective of time, as well as multiple times existing simultaneously. Here, presented as a funerary space, his works combine the imagery and form of commercial images and display structures with ritualistic display and biological relics. While all objects have a life outside of our relationship to them, Si-Qin explores how objects and forms possess a deep history whose morphogenesis is a result of the interactions of culture, biology and materiality. Whether through an early Homo Sapien fossil rendered in today&rsquo;s 3-D printing technology or commercial images specifically used to stimulate ingrained biological reactions, Si-Qin&rsquo;s work presents our culture as material itself, with its own tendencies and capacities to self organise and form patterns of meaning and discourse.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">While the entropic processes of nature are invisible, the emotive condition and potential of each of the artist&rsquo;s works speaks to a new accommodation of our realities, while still grounded in an aesthetic tradition and responsibility to materiality.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Hayden Dunham currently lives and works in New York.</em><br /> <em>Parker Ito lives and works in Los Angeles.</em><br /> <em>Timur Si-Qin lives and works in Berlin.</em></p> Wed, 22 Jul 2015 18:11:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Nicola Martini - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 535 West 22nd - June 25th - August 14th <p style="text-align: justify;">kaufmann repetto is happy to announce Nicola Martini&rsquo;s first solo exhibition in New York.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Nicola Martini&rsquo;s practice is characterized by an intrinsic dualism in which empirical research and ritual coexist.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Ancestral procedures such as baking, mixing and melting take Nicola Martini&rsquo;s work to a sort of ground zero of sculpture, in which the artist allows the physical properties of the substances to guide the final form of the object (or of the space activated by the artist&rsquo;s intervention) that is almost dictated by the physical characteristics of the materials and their reciprocal interactions.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This cognitive tension, expressed through continuous experimentation, emerges into a category of thought that is common to different cultures and epochs: the revelation. Revelation to be interpreted as the vital link between material and idea, a link through which a chemical process dismantles preexisting paradigms in favor of a new system of understanding, and a mathematical formula opens the way to metaphysical speculation.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Through his works, Nicola Martini reveals to himself &ndash; as well as to the viewer &ndash; the fundamental relativity of physical and perceptive assumptions. Incongruous materials such as bitumen of Judea, shellac, concrete and colophony interact to create reactions that change with time, that generate physical tensions and unstable equilibriums, which remind us that matter is never static nor inert.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For his first solo exhibition in New York, <em>THE SOBER DAY,</em> Nicola Martini floods the gallery space with UV light and belies, through this simple gesture, the univocal nature of our visual system of perception.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br />Bundled together in the space are a series of plates of Plexiglas, whose form mutate according to the degree of tension generated by surrounding architecture.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Moistened with a filtering of shellac and pure alcohol, the plates are transformed by the fluid penetration within the micropores of the material, creating a new system of refraction in which the semi-transparent shellac layer is back-lit by the mirroring surface. Working as an alchemist, the artist activates a process that allows seemingly incompatible elements to react and reconstruct in a new physical manifestation.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The shellac is left to react with other elements in the exhibition, an engraved glass fiber reinforced concrete plate, whose tones change according to the absorption of the solution, as well as the gallery&rsquo;s walls.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The material itself &ndash; prompted to react to different microphysical conditions &ndash; is here manifested in some of its infinite possibilities and the viewer, absorbed/submerged in a totalizing work of art, starts to resonate with matter.</p> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 10:08:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ruth Root - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - June 25th - August 14th <p style="text-align: justify;">Andrew Kreps Gallery is pleased to present new paintings by Ruth Root, the New York-based artist&rsquo;s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Ruth Root&rsquo;s new works are two-fold, encompassing both a designed and digitally printed fabric and a painted, shaped Plexiglas element. Root distills abstraction to its components, color, shape, mark, and material, treating each work as its own site of investigation. In some works, the painted elements mirror Root&rsquo;s fabrics. However, these fabrics maintain their own distinct logic, allowing for a contrast between digital repetition and the handmade repetition of paint, whether it is spray, airbrush, or enamel. Utilizing the conventional materials of painting, soft fabric, hard supports, screws, and brushstrokes, Root interchanges their understood functions, creating new forms.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This practice represents simultaneously a departure and continuation of Root&rsquo;s past works, which similarly challenged painting&rsquo;s apparatus. In previous works, Root painted fields of color on ultra-thin aluminum sheeting. Drawing on art historical references, Root utilized shape and color to experiment with the ways in which these elements shaped the space around them. Hung flush on the wall as to make their support invisible, these works inserted themselves into the gallery architecture and as a result and encompassed the negative space of the wall as part of the work&rsquo;s overall composition. Acting in tandem, these works functioned both to complicate their own influences, as well as the exhibition space itself.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In addition to the considered spontaneity that characterizes Root&rsquo;s new works, the fabric element of Root&rsquo;s new works mark their largest departure, as they allow for the painting&rsquo;s support to come to the forefront. Cutting and sewing these into shapes of their own, which continue or contradict the form of the shaped Plexiglas, the fabric wrap and hold the painted elements through distinct looping methods, allowing the works to float from the wall. Through this, the paintings perform a reversal, as they utilize a soft support for a hard surface, upending conventions of painting. In turn, these works exist in a tenuous yet generative balance, allowing for a tension that creates a new experience of the works environment.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Ruth Root&rsquo;s work is the subject of forthcoming solo exhibitions including<em>&nbsp;Old, Odd &amp; Ova</em>l,&nbsp;at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, (Ridgefield, Connecticut) in 2015, and 356 S. Mission Road, (Los Angeles, California) in 2016. Her work is currently on view as part of&nbsp;<em>New York Painting,</em>&nbsp;Kunstmuseum Bonn, (Bonn, Germany.) &nbsp;Root&rsquo;s work has previously been presented at&nbsp;Dartmouth College, (Hanover, New Hampshire), The Suburban, (Oak Park,&nbsp;Illinois&nbsp;), MoMA&nbsp;PS1, &nbsp;ArtPace, (San Antonio, Texas), LACMA, (Los Angeles, California), and the Seattle Art Museum.</p> Wed, 24 Jun 2015 10:08:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Nobuyoshi Araki - Anton Kern Gallery - July 9th - August 7th <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Photography was destined to be involved with death.</em> <em>Reality is in color, but at its beginnings photography</em> <em>always discolored reality and turned it into black and white.</em> <em>Color is life, black and white is death. A ghost was hiding</em> <em>in the invention of photography.</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">- Nobuyoshi Araki, in an interview with Nan Goldin, 1995.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">June 23 &mdash; Nobuyoshi Araki&rsquo;s latest exhibition at Anton Kern Gallery, EROS DIARY, is comprised of a series of 77 new black and white photographs, which break from his traditional ruminations on eroticism and death to reflect more inwardly on the artist&rsquo;s own life and mortality. These photographs highlight an unusual softness and sombre introspection as Araki internalizes recent personal traumatic events including the loss of his beloved cat, Chiro, his fight with prostate cancer, and later, the loss of vision in his right eye.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Each photograph is timestamped in reference to the anniversary of Araki's marriage to his wife Yoko, who died in 1990. This date also coincides with the Chinese Qixi Festival, also known as the Tanabata Festival in Japan, a celebration of the annual meeting of &ldquo;The Cowherd and Weaver Girl,&rdquo; an ancient Chinese folktale where two forbidden lovers reunite once a year for a single night. The persistent repetition of this date speaks at once to both the artist&rsquo;s reverence for his spouse and original muse, while also highlighting her absence in his life.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For Araki, photography itself represents a diary: a record of what happens day to day in his life, and the act of taking a photograph represents the killing of a moment or life, where his &ldquo;self&rdquo; is pulled out through the subject. In consequence of this action, as well as his age, illness, and life experience, the images in <em>EROS DIARY</em> become memorialized, showing us the distinct humanistic truths of joy, sorrow, life and death. These images, which are at times humorous, sexual, melancholy, and reflective, depict the entire spectrum of life from a personal perspective foreshadowing death.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">With a career spanning six decades, Nobuyoshi Araki is one of the most prolific photographers of all time, having published over 400 books and exhibited in over 280 solo shows worldwide. Born in 1940 in Tokyo, Araki began his career as a commercial photographer, before making the intensely sexual <em>Kinbaku</em> bondage photographs he became known for. In 1971 he published his seminal book Sentimental Journey, and in 1991, Winter Journey, documenting both the euphoria of his honeymoon and sadness from his wife&rsquo;s death. <em>EROS DIARY</em> is Araki&rsquo;s fourth exhibition at Anton Kern Gallery.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Recent solo shows include KaoRi Through the Looking Glass: Photo-Mad Old Man A 2015.5.25 75th Birthday, Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, Japan (2015); Love on the Left Eye, Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, Japan (2015); Ojo Shashu - Photography for the After Life: Eastern Sky, qARADISE, Shiseido Gallery, Tokyo, Japan; Ojo Shashu - Photography for the After Life: Love Journey, Niigata City Art Museum, Niigata, Japan; Ojo Shashu - Photography for the After Life: Faces, Skyscapes, Roads, Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Toyota, Japan (2015); Ojo Shashu - Photography for the After Life: Alluring Hell, Foam, Amsterdam, Netherlands (2014). Recent group shows include In the Wake: Japanese Photographers respond to 3/11, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA (2015); Schlaflos &ndash; Das Bett in Geschichte und Gegenwartskunst, &Ouml;sterreichische Galerie Belvedere, 21er Haus, Vienna, Austria (2015); Conflict, Time, Photography, Tate Modern, London, UK (2015).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition opens on Thursday, July 9 and runs until August 7, 2015. The gallery&rsquo;s summer hours are Monday through Friday from 6-8pm. For further information and images, please contact at gallery at 212.367.9663 or email: jasmin@antonkerngallery.com.</p> Fri, 03 Jul 2015 19:34:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Chris Martin - Anton Kern Gallery - July 9th - August 7th Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:02:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Charles Burchifeld - Arkell Museum - June 26th - September 20th <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition was organized by The Burchfield Penney Art Center at the Buffalo State College, Buffalo, NY</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Charles Burchifeld is best known today for his fantastic watercolor landscapes, but from November 1921 to August 1929, he worked at the M. H. Birge &amp; Sons Company, eventually becoming one of their best wallpaper designers. His designs were so highly regarded that they printed his name in the selvage. He based many of his early designs on watercolors he had produced in Salem, Ohio. Later designs were either company determined variations on traditional themes, or imaginative designs based on his special view of nature. This exhibition highlights works from the collection including color variations of wallpapers produced with rollers, original painted designs for wallpapers and coordinating fabrics known as cretonnes. The exhibition also features panels from the complex, block-printed scenic wallpaper, Country Life and the Hunt (c. 1922-1924) that had been removed from its original installation in a home in New England, donated by Gail and John Greenberger in 1999, and restored by paper conservator Patricia D. Hamm, with assistance of Eileen Saracino, James D. Hamm, and Tracy Dulniak.</p> Fri, 05 Jun 2015 11:05:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Tom of Finland - Artists Space: Exhibitions - June 14th - August 23rd <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Artists Space is to present the most comprehensive Tom of Finland survey exhibition to date, including more than 180 drawings, gouaches from the 1940s, over 300 pages of collages, as well as early childhood works.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Touko Laaksonen, aka Tom of Finland (1920, Kaarina &ndash; 1991, Helsinki), is considered to be the most iconic gay artist of the 20th century. In spite of his global status, his work, however, has only been very infrequently presented, examined or discussed within institutional and academic contexts.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:DocumentProperties> <o:Author>Noalig</o:Author> <o:Version>12.00</o:Version> </o:DocumentProperties> </xml><![endif]--></p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-PH</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> 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gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} </style> <![endif]--></p> <h2 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">A child of teachers, Tom grew up in rural Finland. At age 19 he enrolled in a distance learning advertising course. Soon drafted, he joined the Finnish Army in its fight against the Soviet invasion. After the war he stayed in Helsinki studying classical piano at the renowned Sibelius Academy. While at the Academy, he worked as freelance graphic designer, later becoming senior art director at the Helsinki branch of the global ad agency McCann Erickson. In 1973, after 17 years with the firm, he quit to be able to focus entirely on his own work.</span></h2> <p class="font-medium" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654;">While living life as an adman in Helsinki, his global career as gay icon was jumpstarted in 1950's Los Angeles through his ongoing contributions to Bob Mizer's <em>Physique Pictorial</em>. Later Tom became friends with Robert Mapplethorpe, who in 1980 helped him to get his first major gallery exhibition in New York. From the 1970s onwards Tom visited the US frequently and while he never permanently resided in the US, in the last decade of his life he spent equal time between Helsinki and Los Angeles; it could be argued that there was a distinct Finnish Tom as much as there was a real LA Tom, but there was always only one Tom of Finland.</span></p> <h2 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Because of Tom of Finland's compound status as artist and pop icon, his work has for many years been admired by artists including the late Mike Kelley, who in 1988 invited him to speak at CalArts; Raymond Pettibon, who became a lifetime supporter of the Tom of Finland Foundation, as well as Richard Hawkins, who continues to work with the Foundation today. </span></h2> <h2 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Leading exhibition support provided by:<br /> The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, through its Curatorial Fellowship Program; The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation; Finnish Cultural Institute in New York, through its Mobius Fellowship Program; David Kordansky Gallery; and Galerie Buchholz<br /> <br /> The Tom of Finland Exhibition Supporters Circle:<br /> Philip Aarons &amp; Shelley Fox Aarons, Shane Akeroyd, Beth Rudin DeWoody, Nicoletta Fiorucci (Fiorucci Art Trust, London), Greene Naftali Gallery, Robert Gober &amp; Donald Moffett, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Michaeljohn Horne, Robert Longo, Bjarne Melgaard, John Morace &amp; Tom Kennedy, Lari Pittman, Jack Shear, Cindy Sherman, Brent Sikkema, Danh Vo, and Jordan Wolfson<br /> <br /> Artists Space Exhibitions Program is supported by:<br /> The Friends of Artists Space; Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation; Cowles Charitable Trust; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency.</span><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; line-height: 115%;"> <br /></span></h2> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:DocumentProperties> <o:Author>Noalig</o:Author> <o:Version>12.00</o:Version> </o:DocumentProperties> </xml><![endif]--> <h2 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">A child of teachers, Tom grew up in rural Finland. At age 19 he enrolled in a distance learning advertising course. Soon drafted, he joined the Finnish Army in its fight against the Soviet invasion. After the war he stayed in Helsinki studying classical piano at the renowned Sibelius Academy. While at the Academy, he worked as freelance graphic designer, later becoming senior art director at the Helsinki branch of the global ad agency McCann Erickson. In 1973, after 17 years with the firm, he quit to be able to focus entirely on his own work.</span></h2> <p class="font-medium" style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654;">While living life as an adman in Helsinki, his global career as gay icon was jumpstarted in 1950's Los Angeles through his ongoing contributions to Bob Mizer's <em>Physique Pictorial</em>. Later Tom became friends with Robert Mapplethorpe, who in 1980 helped him to get his first major gallery exhibition in New York. From the 1970s onwards Tom visited the US frequently and while he never permanently resided in the US, in the last decade of his life he spent equal time between Helsinki and Los Angeles; it could be argued that there was a distinct Finnish Tom as much as there was a real LA Tom, but there was always only one Tom of Finland.</span></p> <h2 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Because of Tom of Finland's compound status as artist and pop icon, his work has for many years been admired by artists including the late Mike Kelley, who in 1988 invited him to speak at CalArts; Raymond Pettibon, who became a lifetime supporter of the Tom of Finland Foundation, as well as Richard Hawkins, who continues to work with the Foundation today. </span></h2> <h2 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 10.0pt; color: #233654; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Leading exhibition support provided by:<br /> The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, through its Curatorial Fellowship Program; The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation; Finnish Cultural Institute in New York, through its Mobius Fellowship Program; David Kordansky Gallery; and Galerie Buchholz<br /> <br /> The Tom of Finland Exhibition Supporters Circle:<br /> Philip Aarons &amp; Shelley Fox Aarons, Shane Akeroyd, Beth Rudin DeWoody, Nicoletta Fiorucci (Fiorucci Art Trust, London), Greene Naftali Gallery, Robert Gober &amp; Donald Moffett, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Michaeljohn Horne, Robert Longo, Bjarne Melgaard, John Morace &amp; Tom Kennedy, Lari Pittman, Jack Shear, Cindy Sherman, Brent Sikkema, Danh Vo, and Jordan Wolfson<br /> <br /> Artists Space Exhibitions Program is supported by:<br /> The Friends of Artists Space; Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation; Cowles Charitable Trust; The Horace W. 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class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="section"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>In the main gallery, Milstein, long known for his images of planes in flight photographed from directly below, reverses the perspective in the current images, offering views of New York and Los Angeles taken from an altitude of 1,000 - 2,000 feet. The distance is far enough that the geometry of the urban streetscape, invisible from the ground, emerges into surprising, often elegant patterns, as in the Masonic-inspired layout of the Park La Brea housing development in Los Angeles, yet close enough that the scenes retain a human feeling, whether it's the claustrophobia of tiny rectangular houses squeezed next to each other in virtually treeless grids. The images suggest that however chaotic or inscrutable modern life might appear, it is tied to age-old patterns that guide in ways we don't immediately perceive, but which nevertheless guide us through our daily routines.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 07 Jul 2015 17:00:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Eric Cahan - Benrubi Gallery - July 9th - August 22nd <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="section"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>In the project space, Eric Cahan's Data Mining takes its name from marketing research techniques that measure web users' browsing patterns when they view fine art content online. A museum-goer spends an average of thirty seconds in front of an individual work of art, whereas a browser on Instagram or Pinterest spends only eight. Images flow past the eye one after another, throwing into question long-held assumptions about the totemic nature of a work of art. Cahan mirrors this blurring process in his photographs, transforming solarized image of water through a combination of techniques both digital and traditional. The resulting images, luminescent yet opaque, are as seductive as carnival mirrors, yet ultimately reflect only the viewer's gaze. Though representational, there silver swirls and bursts of color and shadow are so abstracted that they challenge our notion of what a photograph actually communicates: a view of an object removed in time and space, or nothing but the viewer's assumptions about the image itself.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 07 Jul 2015 18:24:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Daniel Canogar, Exonemo, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Sara Ludy, Sarah Rothberg, Angela Washko, Andrea Wolf - bitforms gallery - July 10th - August 16th <p>"I believe we lose immortality because we have not conquered our opposition to death; we keep insisting on the primary, rudimentary idea: that the whole body should be kept alive. We should seek to preserve only the part that has to do with consciousness." &ndash; Adolfo Bioy Casares, The Invention of Morel.</p> <p>Inspired by Argentinian author Adolfo Bioy Casares&rsquo; 1940 novel, The Invention of Morel, the exhibition Memory Burn explores concepts of presence, absence, immortality, and death. The title of the exhibition refers simultaneously to unforgettable visions burned in the mind and to digital burning used to archive memories.</p> Wed, 27 May 2015 17:21:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Fran├žoise Grossen - Blum & Poe | New York - June 4th - August 15th <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Blum &amp; Poe announces a survey exhibition of sculpture by Swiss-born artist Fran&ccedil;oise&nbsp;Grossen. On view will be works from 1967-1991 including&nbsp;<em>Cygne</em>&nbsp;(1967), loaned from the Museum of Arts and Design, New York and originally shown in the groundbreaking 1969 exhibition&nbsp;<em>Wall Hangings</em>&nbsp;at the Museum of Modern Art. This is Grossen's first solo-presentation with Blum &amp; Poe and her first survey in the United States.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" align="justify">Emerging in the late 1960s alongside contemporaries such as Eva Hesse, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney, Grossen sought to relinquish the traditional tools and methods of textile and fiber art, instead utilizing a free-hand braiding and knotting technique allowing for greater freedom and spontaneity in her process.&nbsp;Works appear simultaneously weightless and weighted, both masculine and feminine, all the while reinforcing their objecthood.&nbsp;</div> <blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;">Grossen's knotted and plaited rope sculptures eschew the four edges that delimited traditional tapestry, and boldly enter the third dimension by hanging from the ceiling or unfolding directly onto the floor. Grossen pushes beyond this initial rupture with the rectangle and the wall to explore the weight of her material and its response to gravity, an investigation that aligns her art with broader artistic debates taking place in New York and elsewhere. (Jenelle Porter,<em>Fiber: Sculpture 1960-Present</em>&nbsp;[Boston: Institute of Contemporary Art, 2014], 198)&nbsp;</p> </blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;">Having studied architecture and later textile design at Kunstgewerbeschule Basel and at UCLA with Bernard Kester in the 1960s, Grossen became keenly aware of her ability to&nbsp;bring fiber sculpture into unexpected and experimental realms (hanging from the ceiling, draped on the ground or over pedestals, floating in bodies of water).Grossen's interest in the weight and physical composition of her chosen material is evident in her earliest hanging manila rope sculptures,&nbsp;<em>Study for Embarcadero</em>&nbsp;(1970) and&nbsp;<em>Sisyphe</em>&nbsp;(1974), as well as in later hand-painted and dyed&nbsp;<em>Metamorphosis</em>&nbsp;(1987-1990) works. Humble materials, drawn from nature and&nbsp;manipulated in the studio,&nbsp;are coaxed into elegantly intertwined and draping forms, elevating the utilitarian to something extraordinary.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Fran&ccedil;oise&nbsp;Grossen (b. 1943 in Neuch&acirc;tel, Switzerland) lives and works in New York City. Recent group exhibitions include&nbsp;<em>Fiber: Sculpture 1960-Present</em>, which was held at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston and traveled to the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH and the&nbsp;Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, IA&nbsp;(2014-2015). Her work is in international public and private collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Smithsonian Institution, Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC; and the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia.<span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> Sat, 23 May 2015 18:21:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Sarah Ortmeyer - Bodega - June 26th - August 9th <p style="text-align: justify;">KOKO II is the second installment of the KOKO trilogy, a series of exhibitions Sarah Ortmeyer is showing in 2015 in Vienna, New York, and Paris.</p> Wed, 08 Jul 2015 17:48:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Will Benedict - Bortolami Gallery - June 11th - August 7th <p style="text-align: justify;">Bortolami is pleased to announce <em>A Bone in the Cheese</em>, our first solo exhibition with Will Benedict.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition centers around a new video by Benedict entitled <em>The Bed That Eats</em>; a portrait of an unmade bed singing a song of the same title by the reductive blues duo Stare Case. While the video is in the strictest sense a portrait of a bed, the video also takes the viewer inside the bed and down into the bowels of a yellowing underworld.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Alongside the video, Benedict will show a series of new paintings featuring an indignant chicken, an obese marmot, and a tender gorilla while dry yellowing landscapes echo the underworld of the disemboweled, a kitchen attempts and fails to remain neutral, and several people are pictured going about their day.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">While acknowledging a skewed moral compass Benedict offers approaches to relevant everyday subjects such as the psychology of production and the consumer state.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Will Benedict (b. 1978 Los Angeles) is an artist living and working in Paris, France. He most recently had solo exhibitions at Bergen Kunsthall in Norway, Balice Hertling in Paris, and d&eacute;pendance in Brussels. He has curated exhibitions at Andrew Kreps Gallery in New York, Galerie Meyer Kainer in Vienna, and at Vilma Gold in London. Benedict attended Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and the Staedelschule in Frankfurt.</p> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:11:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list