ArtSlant - Closing soon http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 - MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) - March 2nd, 2012 - January 28th, 2013 <p>Showcasing objects that adhere to the traditional view of design as a tool for problem-solving, <i>Born out of Necessity</i> offers close examination of the problems themselves—whether urgent, foreseen, or imagined. From objects that respond to pressing needs in developing countries to new solutions that are tailored to the urban environment, the exhibition examines how design intervenes across a range of experiences, including medical emergencies and natural disasters. Other objects demonstrate how products created to address specific challenges for people with disabilities can provide solutions that improve everyone’s life. Drawing on the narrative power of design, <i>Born out of Necessity</i> addresses a host of complex cultural developments, such as the need to incorporate environmental responsibility in everyday life, our attempts to marry ancient religious beliefs with contemporary mores, and the desire to anticipate and prevent technological and ecological quagmires.</p> Sun, 04 Mar 2012 22:57:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Franz Erhard Walther, Willem de Kooning, Martha Rosler - MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) - August 8th, 2012 - January 28th, 2013 <p>This exhibition is culled from the past two years of acquisitions by MoMA's Department of Drawings. Anchored in various explorations of the late 1960s, these works reveal a range of creative, intellectual, and critical impulses—whether serving as an intimate record of the artist’s practice, or purposefully crafted to address an assumed wider audience. German artist Franz Erhard Walther created a suite of “work drawings” to illustrate (both functionally and conceptually) his First Work Series (1963–69), a group of 58 interactive sculptural objects, on display at the Museum for the first time since their original presentation here in 1969. While roughly contemporary, Willem de Kooning’s “Eyes-Closed” drawings of 1966, which were sketched blindly by the artist, offer a counterpoint to Walther’s project and seem to embrace the traditional role of drawing as a tool of private expression, while Martha Rosler’s <i>Bringing the War Home: House Beautiful</i> photomontage series of 1967–72 turns a critical eye to the era’s sociopolitical context and expanding media sphere.</p> Mon, 07 Jan 2013 00:21:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Alina Szapocznikow - MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) - October 7th, 2012 - January 28th, 2013 <div class="description"> <p>A sculptor who began working during the postwar period in a classical figurative style, Alina Szapocznikow radically reconceptualized sculpture as an imprint not only of memory but also of her own body. Though her career effectively spanned less than two decades (cut short by the artist’s premature death in 1973 at age 47), Szapocznikow left behind a legacy of provocative objects that evoke Surrealism, Nouveau Réalisme, and Pop art. Her tinted polyester casts of body parts, often transformed into everyday objects like lamps or ashtrays; her poured polyurethane forms; and her elaborately constructed sculptures, which at times incorporated photographs, clothing, or car parts, all remain as wonderfully idiosyncratic and culturally resonant today as when they were first made. Well known in Poland, where her work has been highly influential since early in her career, Szapocznikow’s compelling book of work is ripe for art historical reexamination. <i>Alina Szapocznikow: Sculpture Undone, 1955–1972</i> offers a comprehensive overview of this important artist’s work at a moment when international interest is blossoming. Spanning one of the most rich and complex periods of the 20th century, Szapocznikow’s oeuvre responds to many of the ideological and artistic developments of her time through artwork that is at once fragmented and transformative, sensual and reflective, playfully realized and politically charged.</p> <p>Featuring over 100 works, including sculpture, drawings, and photography, the exhibition draws on loans from private and public collections, including major institutions in Poland. It is accompanied by a major publication, copublished by The Museum of Modern Art and Mercatorfonds, that reflects new scholarship on Szapocznikow, contextualizing this little known artist’s work for a wider audience.</p> </div> Mon, 15 Oct 2012 02:30:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Carmen Cicero - June Kelly Gallery - December 14th, 2012 - January 29th, 2013 <p>An exhibition of scrupulously rendered illusory and mysterious paintings by Carmen Cicero entitled <i>Visionary Paintings</i> will open at the June Kelly Gallery, 166 Mercer Street, on Friday, December 14.  The works will remain on view through January 29, 2013.</p> <p>            The paintings point to Cicero’s open mind toward mating spiritual and symbolic imagery to bridge reality and metaphor.  Cicero’s endless psychic probing with tranquil comic apparitions reflects both his reverence for the natural environment and obsession with the mystical interconnectedness among all things. </p> <p>            Cicero’s uncompromising fascination with themes that are deeply personal and enigmatic are exposed in the surreal alliances he postulates among his subjects. The provocative results are the magical resonances that are original, perhaps quirky, and hypnotic.  </p> <p>            Cicero uses humor as a stimulant to initially engage attention, then coupled with his subtle cunning, he launches his search for deeper realizations.  The tone and spirit in Cicero’s work mesmerize the viewer with eerie quietness, bolstering the unnerving mystery and firing up curiosity for a rational interpretation of commonplace sites and figures linked in isolated strange happenstance. </p> <p>            For example, he offers an apparent standoff on a deserted road with an oversize owl working on roadkill, or a Shakespearean maiden and fox behaving alluringly in drifts of snow, or a lone figure pushing a cloth-covered wheelbarrow stealthily through a dense growth of trees.</p> <p>Or we find, in a similar dense growth of trees, an old-fashioned subway kiosk standing unexplained in this desolate landscape.</p> <p>            All of these tableaux are painted with Cicero’s meticulous detail in the trees, limbs and leaves and are suffused with the pervading glow of a full moon.</p> <p>            Cicero’s evocative scenarios reflect the artist’s psychic response to the concept of an inner eye and sense of reality found only in the deepest reaches of consciousness.   Perhaps for him, his paintings are catalysts for ideas and truths as he perceives them and wants them to become known.</p> <p> “Something ambiguous, yet intellectually challenging is always happening in Cicero’s paintings,”  said art writer Phyllis Braff in an essay on the artist in 2004.</p> <p>A native of New Jersey, Cicero holds a BA from Newark State Teachers College and an MFA from Montclair State.  He lives in New York City and Truro on Cape Cod.</p> <p>His work is represented in numerous public, corporate and private collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Newark Museum, The Montclair Museum of Art, National Academy Museum, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA; West Publishing Company, St. Paul, MN; and Musei Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Holland.</p> <p>In 2012 Carmen Cicero received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.</p> Tue, 04 Dec 2012 22:54:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ron Clark, Michael Ingui, Mark Sharp, Arimori Ueno - Walter Wickiser Gallery - January 5th, 2013 - January 30th, 2013 <p>Walter Wickiser Gallery is pleased to announce New Abstractionists VII, group exhibition with four artists, Ron Clark, Michael Ingui, Mark Sharp, Arimori Ueno, from January 5th, 2013 - January 30th, 2013. </p> <p>"With their asymmetrical compositions driven by linear structures, Sharp and Ingui press against the edges of the canvas as if pushing forms into a void. The implications of movement, whether calligraphic (in Ingui’s case) or almost geographic (in Sharp’s), retain a dynamic instability in these paintings, an almost choreographed grace. By contrast, Clark and Ueno determine highly centralized formal arrangements, and make sure to articulate the surface of their paintings, Ueno with active brushwork and Clark with crucially placed scorings of the paintings’ “skin.” </p> <p>The stylistic practices of these four artists may diverge – all four make work distinctive to the hands of each – but all share a self-recognition in modernist practice. They inherit and extend a century of abstract painting, perpetuating a sensibility that may go in and out of fashion, but refuses to disappear.”**</p> <p></p> <p>** Excerpt from catalog essay &lt;The New Abstractionist VII: The Non-Objective Imperative&gt; by Peter Frank</p> <p>Peter Frank is art critic for the Huffington Post and Senior Curator at the Riverside [CA] Art Museum. He has previously served as art critic for the LA Weekly,  Angeleno magazine, the Village Voice, and the SoHo Weekly News; has edited THEmagazine Los Angeles and Visions art quarterly; and has curated exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum, Madrid’s Museo Reina Sofia, and other venues around the world. </p> Sat, 29 Dec 2012 03:41:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Hope Sandrow - Parrish Art Museum - November 10th, 2012 - January 31st, 2013 <p>In <i>Genius Loci</i> (the prevailing spirit of a place), inaugural Platform artist Hope Sandrow responds to the opening of the new Parrish by creating temporary installations that integrate art and cultural objects used in rituals and ceremonies that mark a beginning or rite of passage. Sandrow, whose practice often involves intensive historical research into site and place, will evoke symbols of new life and good fortune, corresponding to the many cultures that have enlivened the history of the East End.</p> <p>Schedule of Installations, Events and Performances<br />November 2012 – January 2013<br /><br />(Sky)gaze<br /><br />(Sky)gaze is a component of Hope Sandrow’s project, Genius Loci, a series of site-specific events and projects that evoke “the spirit of place.” (Sky)gaze refers to the ancient practice of seeking information about one’s environment by observing the sky. The project includes scheduled screenings of the artist’s video, Untitled Observations– images of the moon projected through a telescope on to the artist; and guided telescope viewings of the sun, moon, and celestial bodies, offered in collaboration with the Montauk Observatory, Suffolk County Community College, and Dark Skies Society, (under the direction of astronomers Sean Tvelia and Dr. Mike Inglis, and dark sky advocate Susan Harder). On select telescope viewing dates, Sandrow will offer photographic portraits of viewers with the moon projected on their bodies.<br /><br />Schedule for (Sky)gaze:<br /><br />Screening of Untitled Observations<br />Lichtenstein Theater<br />Saturday, November 10, 11 AM – 12 PM<br />Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 3 PM – 4 PM through December 31.<br /><br />*Guided telescope viewing<br />Southwest Terrace<br />Friday, November 9, 6 – 8 PM<br />Friday, November 16, 4 – 8 PM<br />Friday, December 7, 4 – 8 PM<br />Friday, December 21, 4 – 8 PM<br />Friday, January 4, 4 – 8 PM<br />Friday, January 18, 4 – 8 PM<br />(*weather permitting)<br /><br />*Photo portraits by Hope Sandrow<br />Southwest Terrace<br />Friday, November 9, 7 – 8PM<br />(*weather permitting)<br /><br />______________________________________________________________________________<br /><br />Schedule for The Future is Ours<br />November 10 – December 31<br /><br /><br />The Future is Ours<br /><br />The Future is Ours, a component of Hope Sandrow’s project, Genius Loci, a series of site-specific events and projects that evoke “the spirit of place,” is a voluntary participatory project for visitors, families, employees, and workers at the site of the new Parrish Art Museum. A card imprinted with the phrase, “The Future is Ours,” will be distributed to visitors as they arrive or depart with the invitation to write how they envision the new museum within their lives. Each completed card will be strung on a line between two stanchions: as more and more are added, the responses will become sculptural and layered. Ultimately, the responses will become part of an archive produced by the artist.<br /><br />______________________________________________________________________________<br /><br />Schedule for Observational Findings<br />Lobby<br />November 12 – January 31<br /><br />Observational Findings<br /><br />Observational Findings, a component of Hope Sandrow’s project, Genius Loci, a series of site-specific events and projects that evoke “the spirit of place,” is a temporarily installed 19th Century display case, once owned by Samuel L. Parrish, that contains objects selected by Hope Sandrow as symbols of the “genius loci” of the Parrish Art Museum. The vitrine’s rotating contents– ranging from rare photographs from the earliest days of the Museum to found objects like “good luck” horseshoes, and elixir bottles unearthed from the grounds of the artist’s studio (property once managed by Samuel Parrish as President of the Long Island Improvement Society)– serve as reminders of the customs prevalent at the time in which the Museum was founded. Other contemporary found objects relate to the agrarian roots of the Museum site, the materials and processes of observation, and the golden ratio, found in both nature and the proportions of the new building.</p> Fri, 09 Nov 2012 02:11:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Damien Echols - Sacred Gallery NYC - January 5th, 2013 - January 31st, 2013 <p><strong>Artist Statement:</strong><br /> These pieces of art are all things I created from my cell on death row,where I spent 18 years for a crime I did not commit. During that time, I had to scavenge for any supplies I got, often bartering for them in the prison underground.<br /> I eventually received ordination in the Rinzai tradition of Japanese Buddhism. This is the same tradition that trained the samurai in ancient Japan. It was this back ground which was the driving force behind much of my artwork. Most of it was the result of me attempting to turn my cell into a shrine,where I would practice meditation from 5 to 7 hours a day.<br /> Most of the pieces I created over the years were either given to friends as gifts of gratitude or destroyed by vindictive prison guards. These pieces are all that remain of my 18 years in Hell.<br /> This collection will showcase a series of drawings, collage works, and a set of craft items Damien made while in prison.</p> <p><strong>About Damien Echols</strong><br /> Damien Echols, known as part of the wrongfully imprisoned West Memphis Three. Echols has been well-documented in books, films, songs, and more. And after his release last August after 18 years on death row, Echols got the chance to document it himself in his just-released memoir, Life After Death: a frustrating, honest, and surprisingly joyful account of a life lived under trying circumstances.</p> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 00:23:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Eugene Hyon - A Gathering of the TRIBES - January 18th, 2013 - February 1st, 2013 <p>Emerging artist/photographer Eugene Hyon<br />will exhibit sepia tone and digital color photographs for one week in Steve Cannon’s art gallery at A Gathering of the Tribes, located at 285 East 3rd Street, 2nd floor, between Avenues C &amp; D, starting Friday, January 18 and ending Friday, January 25, 2013; exhibition hours: 11:00AM–5:00PM. Evening Reception Party will be held on Friday, January 18 between the hours of 6:00PM–10:00PM.</p> <p>The theme of the exhibit is a photographic series that calmly observes those features that make buildings part of an urban landscape, which on the surface is man-made in structure, yet is made physically natural and spiritually alive in its use and occupation by people.</p> <p>I create with a painter’s eye for composition. Each photo is evidence of the patience required to get things just right and my attention to craft and detail is what holds a viewer’s attention. Stillness, elegance and classical proportion are the stylistic characteristics that make my photographic compositions. A viewer never senses overweening intention or manipulated intervention. What is uplifting occurs simply and as a result of patient witness in which that kernel of hope ultimately shines through. Soulfulness is that crucial element that prevents my photography from becoming lost in the noise of the temporary and trivial.</p> <p>The gallery at A Gathering of the Tribes was chosen for its strong sense of history, artistic neighborhood atmosphere and relevance to the exhibit’s photographic subject matter. The popularly known “Tribes” on the Lower East Side was founded by Steve Cannon, author, well-known mentor of emerging contemporary artists and an iconic figure of the Lower East Side art scene.</p> Tue, 29 Jan 2013 00:52:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Michael K. Yamaoka - Atlantic Gallery - January 8th, 2013 - February 1st, 2013 <p>In photographs of intense color and almost palpable texture, Michael Yamaoka explores the tensions between color and form, surface and depth, the ravages of time and the timeless. The brilliant color, inherent, but often subdued in the original images, has been enhanced in these new works to depict a heightened reality.</p> Mon, 17 Dec 2012 23:06:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Peter Halley, Robert Motherwell, Sterling Ruby, Kelley Walker - Andrea Rosen Gallery - December 1st, 2012 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i>, two group exhibitions – both curated by Robert Hobbs –that are intertwined yet distinctly separate in their intention. The exhibitions open November 3, 2012 at the Gallery's main space at 525 West 24th Street, as well as inaugurating its new, second location, at 544 West 24th Street.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock I</i>, at the Gallery's primary and expanded space (525 West 24th Street), brings together a compelling group of four important artists – Peter Halley, Robert Motherwell, Sterling Ruby and Kelley Walker – by presenting a selection of significant paintings. The complex ideas behind the show and Hobbs' very deliberate choice of work suggest further layers of reading while remaining open to the viewers' own abstracted relationships with the works and their unique experiences. As is characteristic of shows at the Gallery, <i>Cellblock I</i> affords the opportunity to look at these familiar artists in a new way and with more depth, both in relation to each other and in regards to their individual practices.<br /> <br /> While these are four artists Hobbs has championed individually, it's compelling how this show and subject bring together his scholarship in a culminating and unexpected way with artists whom he has known, studied, and written about over the length of his career, forming a meeting point of sorts. <br /> <br /> The Gallery is especially thrilled to feature <i>Cellblock II: An Essay in Exhibition Form</i> as the first show at its second space, which will newly house its Gallery 2 program, known for content-driven, experimental and historical one time exhibitions. Andrea Rosen conceived Gallery 2 in 1999 as a liberating arena in which to consider new ideas and create parallel perspectives to the Gallery's primary program, and as a means of fulfilling the Gallery's responsibility to broaden visual references and education for its audience. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a perfect first show for the new location as its basis is a key principle of Gallery 2 – combining works and/or artists one might know, including historical artists as well as those of a younger generation, to create unexpected relationships and significant dialogues around a subject that has not been explored in such depth. The Gallery 2 program also provides the opportunity to work with esteemed independent curators and art historians, and the Gallery is extremely proud to spotlight this profound brainchild of Robert Hobbs, the prominent scholar and curator known for his extensive, in-depth, historically important writings on Robert Motherwell and a plethora of other artists, and also known as the definitive Robert Smithson scholar.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock II</i>, at the new location (544 West 24th Street), features works by a greater range of artists such as Vito Acconci, Alice Aycock, Tom Burr, Jean Genet, Robert Gober, Peter Halley, Nancy Holt, Will Insley, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Robert Motherwell, Bruce Nauman, Beverly Pepper, Ad Reinhardt, Sterling Ruby, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Jackie Winsor and Artur Żmijewski. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a dense exhibition combining historical material with an increased number of works and mediums, incorporating wall text, diagrams and video. It offers background information and contextual references that flesh out Hobbs' <i>Cellblock</i> concept without becoming didactic, since its goal is to stimulate viewers to draw their own conclusions. <i>Cellblock II</i> affords <i>Cellblock I</i> the opportunity to be a more visceral experience. Although still experiential, <i>Cellblock II</i> affords a more cerebral experience.<br /> <br /> While the show brings together work that addresses containment, enclosure, and imprisonment, it also questions the frequently unexamined assumption that modern and contemporary art's contents are eminently assessable to viewers either empirically or epistemologically by finding the right key, so that almost by magic an open sesame takes place. Countering this myth of art's ease of access, these shows look at the power of refusal, both formally and in terms of subject matter, when works of art deliberately withhold their contents so that viewers are left with enduring mysteries and disquieting conundrums. A text by Hobbs, describing the deeper intellectual content of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>II</i>, is also included for reference.<br /> <br /> The foundational concept of <i>Cellblock</i> is very purposefully presented as two distinct shows, representing two completely different yet complementary perspectives. The physical separation of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i> clarifies their different orientations.<br /> <br /> <i>Art historian Dr. Robert Hobbs has held the Rhoda Thalhimer Endowed Chair at Virginia Commonwealth University since 1991 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University for eight years. Before joining VCU, he served as a lecturer at Yale and an associate professor at Cornell University. Recognized as a scholar, teacher, and curator, Hobbs specializes in both late modern and postmodern art. His work joins social history with literary criticism and aesthetics; it also relies on feminist and postcolonial theory. He has published widely and curated dozens of exhibitions, many of which have been shown at important institutions in the U.S. and abroad such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art; the Drawing Center (NYC); the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His specific research areas span the twentieth- and twentieth-first centuries, and his publications include monographs on Milton Avery, Alice Aycock, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Mark Lombardi, Sterling Ruby, Robert Smithson, and Kara Walker. In addition he has written on such mainstream modern and postmodern artists as Hernan Bas, Duane Hanson, Keith Haring, Jonathan Lasker, Mark Lindquist, Malcolm Morley, Robert Motherwell, Beverly Pepper, Richard Pousette-Dart, Neo Rauch, Andres Serrano, Yinka Shonibare, James Siena, Tony Smith, Meredyth Sparks, Frank Stella, Frank Thiel, Kelley Walker, John Wesley, and Kehinde Wiley, among others.<br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs will co-curate the Bahamian Pavilion for the forthcoming Venice Biennale in 2013, with an exhibition of works by Tavares Strachan. This follows his appointment in 1982 as the U.S. Commissioner/Curator for the Venice Biennale for his exhibition "Robert Smithson: Sculpture," which had previously been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and his appointment in 2002 as Curator for the São Paulo Biennial for the exhibition "Kara Walker: Slavery! Slavery!"</i></p> <p><b>CURATOR STATEMENT</b></p> <p><br /> <b>CELLBLOCK I</b><br /> <br /> In his 1897 "Preface" to "Un coup de dés" ("A Throw of Dice"), French nineteenth-century Symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé clarifies how "spaced-out blanks" of white paper function in his poem. "The paper," he explains, "intervenes each time an image, of its own accord, ceases or withdraws." This <i>contrapuntal movement</i> between the poem's material components (typeface on sheets of paper) and ostensible subject matter (a shipwreck and chance) can be extended to the visual arts, so that a similar ongoing and oscillating <i>shift</i> between means and meaning can be seen as taking place. Art's media can be understood as both blocking and revealing its import by participating in an accordion-like action of alternating revelation and obduracy. The work of art, in other words, incarnates and incarcerates an idea in <i>distinct materials</i> while contradictorily and momentarily springing the release of <i>these media</i> from their confines, permitting them alternatively to be read as signs and symbols as well as to be seen for themselves, thus briefly obviating a given work's metaphysical references. This reversibility of views—a flickering oscillation between subject and object—can readily be demonstrated by pointing out how the art's material support can participate fully in its dynamics so that figure and form are mutually supportive. <br /> <br /> The two-part exhibition <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>II</i>—named for a division of a prison, a large building divided into separate units, a death house, a digital component, and biological cells working in tandem—intends to update this Mallarméan approach by looking at a selected group of works, many familiar to the curator through his past research, in order to demonstrate how artistic media can function bi-stably in the two different registers of revealing and obfuscating. Often, they paradoxically reveal themselves and their contents through the self-reflexive recalcitrance of the artistic materials comprising them. Dating from the mid-twentieth century to the present, these works figuratively re-present their constituent materials' obstinacy in terms of such <i>coercive</i> topics as incarceration, boundaries, foundations, and limits, in addition to various other obstructions. These works of art do so even when their ostensible subjects are biological cells as well as the cell-like circuitry of digital media. The artistic media making up the art in this exhibition, then, is intended to dramatize the shifting and ongoing reversible presence and absence of the figurative and formal elements comprising these works.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock</i> is organized into parts <i>I</i> and <i>II</i>, taking place in two separate locations on 24th Street. The first section is a spare hanging of works, setting up a series of similarities and differences in relation to the cellblock theme, while the second takes place in the Gallery's new space at 544 West 24th Street. <i>Cellblock II</i> fleshes out this theme by presenting a far greater range of cellblock types, illuminated with diagrams, quotes, and commentaries, with the full knowledge that any such showing can only be representative, never inclusive.<br /> <br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs<br /> Thalhimer Endowed Chair of American Art, VCU</p> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 - December 1st, 2012 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i>, two group exhibitions – both curated by Robert Hobbs –that are intertwined yet distinctly separate in their intention. The exhibitions open November 3, 2012 at the Gallery's main space at 525 West 24th Street, as well as inaugurating its new, second location, at 544 West 24th Street.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock I</i>, at the Gallery's primary and expanded space (525 West 24th Street), brings together a compelling group of four important artists – Peter Halley, Robert Motherwell, Sterling Ruby and Kelley Walker – by presenting a selection of significant paintings. The complex ideas behind the show and Hobbs' very deliberate choice of work suggest further layers of reading while remaining open to the viewers' own abstracted relationships with the works and their unique experiences. As is characteristic of shows at the Gallery, <i>Cellblock I</i> affords the opportunity to look at these familiar artists in a new way and with more depth, both in relation to each other and in regards to their individual practices.<br /> <br /> While these are four artists Hobbs has championed individually, it's compelling how this show and subject bring together his scholarship in a culminating and unexpected way with artists whom he has known, studied, and written about over the length of his career, forming a meeting point of sorts. <br /> <br /> The Gallery is especially thrilled to feature <i>Cellblock II: An Essay in Exhibition Form</i> as the first show at its second space, which will newly house its Gallery 2 program, known for content-driven, experimental and historical one time exhibitions. Andrea Rosen conceived Gallery 2 in 1999 as a liberating arena in which to consider new ideas and create parallel perspectives to the Gallery's primary program, and as a means of fulfilling the Gallery's responsibility to broaden visual references and education for its audience. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a perfect first show for the new location as its basis is a key principle of Gallery 2 – combining works and/or artists one might know, including historical artists as well as those of a younger generation, to create unexpected relationships and significant dialogues around a subject that has not been explored in such depth. The Gallery 2 program also provides the opportunity to work with esteemed independent curators and art historians, and the Gallery is extremely proud to spotlight this profound brainchild of Robert Hobbs, the prominent scholar and curator known for his extensive, in-depth, historically important writings on Robert Motherwell and a plethora of other artists, and also known as the definitive Robert Smithson scholar.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock II</i>, at the new location (544 West 24th Street), features works by a greater range of artists such as Vito Acconci, Alice Aycock, Tom Burr, Jean Genet, Robert Gober, Peter Halley, Nancy Holt, Will Insley, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Robert Motherwell, Bruce Nauman, Beverly Pepper, Ad Reinhardt, Sterling Ruby, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Jackie Winsor and Artur Żmijewski. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a dense exhibition combining historical material with an increased number of works and mediums, incorporating wall text, diagrams and video. It offers background information and contextual references that flesh out Hobbs' <i>Cellblock</i> concept without becoming didactic, since its goal is to stimulate viewers to draw their own conclusions. <i>Cellblock II</i> affords <i>Cellblock I</i> the opportunity to be a more visceral experience. Although still experiential, <i>Cellblock II</i> affords a more cerebral experience.<br /> <br /> While the show brings together work that addresses containment, enclosure, and imprisonment, it also questions the frequently unexamined assumption that modern and contemporary art's contents are eminently assessable to viewers either empirically or epistemologically by finding the right key, so that almost by magic an open sesame takes place. Countering this myth of art's ease of access, these shows look at the power of refusal, both formally and in terms of subject matter, when works of art deliberately withhold their contents so that viewers are left with enduring mysteries and disquieting conundrums. A text by Hobbs, describing the deeper intellectual content of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>II</i>, is also included for reference.<br /> <br /> The foundational concept of <i>Cellblock</i> is very purposefully presented as two distinct shows, representing two completely different yet complementary perspectives. The physical separation of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i> clarifies their different orientations.<br /> <br /> <i>Art historian Dr. Robert Hobbs has held the Rhoda Thalhimer Endowed Chair at Virginia Commonwealth University since 1991 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University for eight years. Before joining VCU, he served as a lecturer at Yale and an associate professor at Cornell University. Recognized as a scholar, teacher, and curator, Hobbs specializes in both late modern and postmodern art. His work joins social history with literary criticism and aesthetics; it also relies on feminist and postcolonial theory. He has published widely and curated dozens of exhibitions, many of which have been shown at important institutions in the U.S. and abroad such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art; the Drawing Center (NYC); the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His specific research areas span the twentieth- and twentieth-first centuries, and his publications include monographs on Milton Avery, Alice Aycock, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Mark Lombardi, Sterling Ruby, Robert Smithson, and Kara Walker. In addition he has written on such mainstream modern and postmodern artists as Hernan Bas, Duane Hanson, Keith Haring, Jonathan Lasker, Mark Lindquist, Malcolm Morley, Robert Motherwell, Beverly Pepper, Richard Pousette-Dart, Neo Rauch, Andres Serrano, Yinka Shonibare, James Siena, Tony Smith, Meredyth Sparks, Frank Stella, Frank Thiel, Kelley Walker, John Wesley, and Kehinde Wiley, among others.<br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs will co-curate the Bahamian Pavilion for the forthcoming Venice Biennale in 2013, with an exhibition of works by Tavares Strachan. This follows his appointment in 1982 as the U.S. Commissioner/Curator for the Venice Biennale for his exhibition "Robert Smithson: Sculpture," which had previously been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and his appointment in 2002 as Curator for the São Paulo Biennial for the exhibition "Kara Walker: Slavery! Slavery!"</i></p> <p><b>CURATOR STATEMENT</b></p> <p><br /> <b>CELLBLOCK II </b><br /> <i>An Essay in Exhibition Form</i><br /> <br /> Beginning in the 1960s, the work of art as a restricted cell has served as a working premise for many artists, who have found ways to <i>literalize</i> this closure in a number of empathic ways. Several generative metaphors have enabled them to think about art's contradictory ability to <i>communicate</i> certain of its contents while also <i>withholding</i> information by maintaining its status as an enduring conundrum, so that viewers are left focusing on the work itself rather than any particular communiqué it might appear to be revealing. Among the most productive metaphors are <i>Plato's cave</i>, which supports the view of art as constituting at best a shadowy world; the <i>black box</i>, which focuses on art's irresolvable secrets; and Jeremy Bentham's <i>panopticon</i>, which emphasizes embodied perception and perspectival viewing. A more recent model is provided by the supermax prison, an American invention, with its enforcement of permanent solitary confinement, a concept crucial for Sterling Ruby's work. Although this exhibition focuses on the ways certain works of art function, Duchamp's inscribed portrait by Marvin Lazarus testifies to the artist's retrospective as a type of detention, an overarching restriction based on the misguided concept that all of an individual artist's work can be categorized in terms of a single stylistic designation.<br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs<br /> Thalhimer Endowed Chair of American Art, VCU</p> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 23:00:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Ceres Gallery - January 9th, 2013 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>Ceres Gallery is pleased to present <em>Meet My Uterus</em> with work by 24 artists in painting, sculpture, printmaking, drawing and mixed-media, in all manner serious, humorous, political, or not, realist to abstract and everything in between. Who would have ever envisioned the need to fight for, of all things, contraception in 2013? <br /> <br /> Women's reproductive rights are being eroded. Because of government interference with women's healthcare decisions, these women artists felt the need to express their concern in the way they know best. They have gotten creative with the image, the shape, the form, the essence of the uterus and we have presented them all in an exciting and visually arresting format of high density and over-the-top repetition of just one thing: the uterus.</p> Sun, 13 Jan 2013 17:57:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Tania Kravath, Judith Greenwald - Ceres Gallery - January 9th, 2013 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>This is a collaborative show in which two gallery artists have responded to a poem by Ruth Sohn-- Tania Kravath in wood fired ceramic sculpture and Judith Greenwald in combined media paintings. Composer Roberta Kosse, interpreting the same poem, will be premiering a musical piece which will be performed by Spirits in Harmony along with a chamber ensemble. In addition, they will perform a program of pieces that grow out of various spiritual traditions.</p> Sun, 13 Jan 2013 18:01:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Roger Brown - DC Moore Gallery - January 8th, 2013 - February 2nd, 2013 <p><strong>DC Moore Gallery is pleased to present the work of Roger Brown (1941 – 1997), a leading member of the Chicago Imagist group whose bold canvases explore postwar America.</strong> Brown's work is personal, political, and provocative, providing commentary on current events and attitudes with a strong dose of irony and a wry sense of humor. He celebrated the everyday, mined popular culture, and focused on a range of themes from urban alienation and environmental abuse to sexual intrigue and personal isolation.<br /> <br /> Born in Alabama, Brown developed an early and eclectic interest in the material culture of the South, from folk art to comic strips. In 1962, he moved to Chicago to pursue two degrees from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. By the late 60s, he was participating in a series of exhibitions with the group now known as the Chicago Imagists. These artists, including Ed Paschke, Jim Nutt, and Joseph Yoakum, shared Brown’s interest in using pop culture and its vernacular as source material. As his critical acclaim grew in the 70s and 80s, Brown explored new art forms: sculpture with found objects, theater sets, murals, and more. At 56, Brown’s life was tragically cut short by AIDS.<br /> <br /> Since his death, Roger Brown’s work has been exhibited widely and collected by numerous major museums. Just this year, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago hosted the exhibition Roger Brown: This Boy’s Own Story. Traveling retrospectives of Roger Brown’s work have been organized by the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Alabama in 1980; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC in 1987; and Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, Auburn University, Alabama in 2007. The latter exhibition traveled to American University, Washington, DC, and the University of New Orleans, Louisiana in 2008. Brown’s work is also included in the permanent collections of The Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California; Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh; and Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna.</p> <p><strong>THE ART OF ROGER BROWN: A Discussion by Robert Cozzolino</strong><br /> Senior Curator and Curator of Modern Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts<br /> Saturday, January 26, 2013, 5 pm<br /> Reception to follow</p> Wed, 26 Dec 2012 00:22:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Mario Naves - Elizabeth Harris Gallery - January 4th, 2013 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>After having pursued collage for twenty years, Mario Naves has shifted to painting directly on canvas and panel with acrylics and oils. </p> <p class="style1">Naves’s improvisatory process remains unchanged, as does the underlying structural logic of his pictures. What is markedly different is the degree of surface finish, vibrant tonal palette and quirky equipoise of his spare geometric compositions.</p> <p class="style1">Each image is arrived at through the layering of shapes, lines and colors. Pictorial relationships, once stated, are subsequently altered, negated, tweaked and redefined. Flux is an inherent component of Naves’s process—the paintings are worked on for weeks and sometimes months.</p> <p class="style1">The resulting pieces are simultaneously clarified and open-ended, earnestly felt and welcoming of caprice. They evince Naves’s ongoing dialogue with world art, particularly Indian and Persian miniatures and 16th-century Netherlandish painting.</p> <p class="style1">Mario Naves is an artist, critic and teacher. He is a member of the faculties at Hofstra University, Pratt Institute and Brooklyn College. He is the recipient of many prizes and awards, most recently a Pollock-Krasner Grant in 2011. Naves’s art has been written about in <em>The New York Times, Art in America, The Village Voice, The New York Sun, ArtCritical, Time Out New York</em> and other venues. His writing has been published in <em>The New York Observer, City Arts, The New Criterion, Slate</em> and <em>The Wall Street Journal</em>.</p> <p>Naves lives and works in New York City. This is his sixth one-person exhibition at Elizabeth Harris Gallery.</p> Mon, 14 Jan 2013 03:43:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Brett Baker - Elizabeth Harris Gallery - January 4th, 2013 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>The Elizabeth Harris Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of paintings by Brett Baker. This will be the artist's first exhibition with the gallery. The show will be up from January 4 to February 2, with an opening reception for the artist on Friday, January 4 from 6 – 8pm.<br /><br /> From the text that accompanies the catalog for the exhibition Jennifer Samet writes:<br /><br /> Brett Baker moved, in 2003, from a huge studio upstate to a tiny New York City apartment. He had made large-scale paintings and installations before beginning this body of work, which ranges from small to miniature in size. He still wanted to make large paintings, but couldn't, until it occurred to him to attempt making "big" small paintings. Duration replaced size – he resolved to work on them until they lived up to the larger works. They are dense, thick with years of oil paint, abstract matrixes of interlocking marks, rows of vertical and diagonal dashes. The color chords are not traditionally lush or beautiful. They are olive greens, reddish-browns, dark blues and purple – but somehow never murky. We see beauty more than the weight of application. We do not sink into these paintings: the sensation comes off from the surface. It is this quality that is central to Baker's work: the suspension.<br /><br /> The artist recently wrote about his paintings: <br /><br /> "In my work, the application of paint is universal in that it could be left by any hand. Yet, subject to repetition and scrutiny, mark and color are gradually calibrated to achieve a unity and visual complexity. Time is essential to this process - a single painting may take years to overcome the universal and achieve individuality. Over the last decade, I have embraced a dramatic shift in scale. My work has evolved from near mural size paintings to miniatures while maintaining an otherwise similar visual language. Although leaving behind the expanded visual field inherited from Abstract Expressionism, I have attempted, nevertheless, to preserve and condense its energy. My most recent work investigates the possibility that by focusing the field, miniature abstract painting can carry the tradition of heroic abstraction into a truly personal and portable (and perhaps utilitarian) realm."</p> Mon, 14 Jan 2013 00:06:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list