ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Malcolm Andre Davis II, Nyeema Morgan - 2AC Gallery - October 26th, 2012 - January 10th, 2013 <h2 style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: small;">MoCADA is teaming up with 2AC Gallery owner Pablo Sue-Pat to mount a satellite exhibition space. The exhibition space features two exhibitions, the first, Camouflage Nursery is a sculpture series which poignantly explore the loss of childhood and innocence in the face of adult projections created by Pablo Sue-Pat.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Newsfeed: Reconstructions of Experience @ 2AC Gallery is the base for the installation projects component of the curatorial series NEWSFEED: Anonymity &amp; Social Media in African Revolutions and Beyond. The gallery space conceptually engages with the topics of anonymity, interconnectivity, conflict and the digital arena in which they interplay. Through site specific installation work, by Malcolm Andre Davis II and Nyeema Morgan, the roles of the anonymous consumers of social media and the anonymous producer of social media are addressed.</strong></span></h2> Mon, 26 Nov 2012 00:03:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - 303 Gallery - November 17th, 2012 - December 21st, 2012 Mon, 19 Nov 2012 23:21:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list John A Parks - 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel - November 8th, 2012 - February 16th, 2013 <p>532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckelis pleased to announce “Paint and Memory” an exhibition of new paintings by John A. Parks.  Executed as finger paintings, these pictures explore the artist’s memories of his English childhood in a series of richly evocative images. “In a sense I’m using a childish means to recreate a child’s world,”says Parks, “although the resulting paintings are far more sophisticated than those of a child.”  The lush surfaces, gloriously layered color and suggestive drawing work together to create a novel and intensely nostalgic vision. What is remembered are glimpses, sometimes idyllic and sometimes disturbing; cycling through a village on a summer’s day, playing hide-and-seek in a public park, the mayhem of an indoor swimming pool, the sudden formality of a Maypole dance. The limitation of painting with his fingers has forced Parks to simplify the descriptive tasks of the painting. “There is a certain indeterminacy with finger painting,” says the artist, “you are never exactly sure where an edge is going to go.  Chance events occur that you can edit out or leave in.  The process adds a richness and a very physical engagement with the paint.  Accidents can often be suggestive - theyprod the imagination and provide a sense of discovery.  Every mark is truly an adventure.”</p> <p>Also on view are three large-scale map paintings of London in which the artist manipulates space and point of view to provide a highly entertaining excursion through the streets of his native city. Presented from multiple viewpoints but lodged in a fairly accurate street plan, buildings, monuments, bridges and buses come alive in an unexpected and inventive fashion.</p> <p>Educated at the Royal College of Art in London, Parks has made paintings over the last thirty years that have focused on themes of English life seen through expatriate eyes. The artist has lived for decades in New York and teaches at the School of Visual Arts.  Throughout that time the artist’s work has evolved expressively and stylistically. His early and intense realist work was closely associated with the realist revival but carried with it from the start a lyrical and intensely personal quality.  John Russell, writing in the New York Times, dubbed him “A true poet in paint and something of a find.”   In the mid eighties and nineties Parks adopted a larger scale approach to paint images of public monuments in a series of paintings that explored the unease of national identity and its attendant rituals.  These works included a highly irreverent series of English soldiers, often shown dancing or otherwise cavorting.</p> <p>Parks has been represented by several major New York galleries including Allan Stone Gallery and Coe Kerr Gallery.  His work is included in a number of museum collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum, in London and the Museum of the Rhode Island School of Design.This exhibition marks his debut with 532 GalleryThomas Jaeckel.</p> <p>(Gallery is closed December, 4-11 Art Fair Miami)</p> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 21:29:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Al Benkin, Krys Fox - A Gathering of the TRIBES - November 29th, 2012 - December 11th, 2012 <p>A Gathering of the Tribes Gallery presents<br /><br />“Transformations” two person show with Al Benkin and Krys Fox <br />Opening Reception: November 29th 2012 6p-9p, show up 11/29-12/11<br /><br /></p> <div class="text_exposed_show">Al Benkin’s found object assemblage-paintings consistently transform ordinary objects, into extraordinary visual stories that hint of the past &amp; the temporariness of being. Benkin’s work uses personal &amp; invented iconography inspired by the absurd comedy of life. Birds have spirit guides, the god of meat hovers in limbo understanding both the predator &amp; the prey, contortionist’s balance on broken forks etc.<br /><br />In Krys Fox’s photography, he transforms immediate, flat reality into nuances of whimsical, stylized, surreal &amp; magical dimensions. Gloriously grotesque while simultaneously an exquisite nether-reality, the moments that Fox creates &amp; captures tend to keep the viewer balancing delicately on the furrowed brow of intrigue &amp; excitement which leads to maniacally laughing panic &amp; glee.<br /><br />Both Artists’ work is old school, meaning, not manipulated by any computer technology. All Fox’s special effects were hand done on his sets or in-camera effects. Finally, both artists’ congruity and kindred spirits make this a rare &amp; seamless match that’s a fantastical and macabre playground for mature art eaters everywhere. <br />It will stain your brain. </div> Sat, 10 Nov 2012 21:04:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - AICON GALLERY - New York - December 6th, 2012 - January 19th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Aicon Gallery is proud to present Fact ● Fission, a group exhibition curated by Nitin Mukul featuring fourteen contemporary artists, working in various media to challenge preconceived ideological divisions and break down the prevailing regional aesthetics in global contemporary art.<br /> <br /> Daily unrest in the name of democracy seems endemic to some nations, whereas in others, complacency breeds blissful collapse. Volatile shifts in the balance of power appear inevitable, with over-consumption taking a tangible toll. The media's reductive narratives and sweeping generalizations over large swathes of the globe are no longer plausible as Fact. New patterns emanate, emerging at a pace more rapid than ever in regard to technology, nature, policy and social upheaval. Cultural practitioners yearn to reflect this multiplicity of voices. Enter Fission. Fusion, a term often used to describe the melding of different cultures, seems overused and worn out. A mainstream marketing gimmick, somewhat analogous to assimilation or multiculturalism, fusion advocates tolerance of the ‘Other’, albeit according to its own convenience and within the bounds of what it deems tasteful. What's more interesting is fission – when things split apart, reorganize and regenerate, smudging and splintering neatly kept categories and conventional wisdom in the process. The results are not necessarily hybrids, but new inauthentic, hyper-local and interdisciplinary manifestations resulting from willful or imposed dislocation. The work in this exhibition will center on the concept of fission, while encompassing a wide range of formal concerns.<br /> <br /> Yamini Nayar’s imagined interiors explore architecture and memory via the representation of constructed (and deconstructed) space. Drawing from the visual allegories of architecture, with the model and final photograph weaving together existing narratives with elements of fragmented idealism, Nayar’s collaged photographs become jarring snapshots of ephemeral architectural memories as experienced by our subjective subconscious. Pooneh Maghazehe interrogates the functional and obstructed uses of worn domestic furniture by methodically peeling and stripping textiles, to reveal the underlying structural vulnerability from within. The recontextualized pieces investigate the collective identity, social psychology, and symbolic gestures and emblems that define belief structures by exposing the interdependence of materials inherent in these prefabricated former objects of comfort. James Cullinane explores the diagrammatic possibilities and didactic imagery of patterns in process, navigating the tension between pictorial and physical space. His paintings act as architectural dictionaries and charts to navigate the labyrinthine paths forged in his layered dystopia of geometric forms, optic patterns and vibrant color. In Kanishka Raja’s panoramic realms, the energetic fusion of private and public domains of distinct global settings, interlocked by pulsating patterns derived from textile design and ornamentation, form a complex visual field spanning several panels. Nitin Mukul depicts details of events as various types of social rituals/commentary, deconstructing and imbuing them with palpable energy and ambiguity.<br /> <br /> The opening reception will feature a screening of the new video Haal by Nitin Mukul, with a live score by Jace Clayton (DJ Rupture) and software designer Bill Bowen, utilizing their recently developed SUFI PLUG-INS, an interdisciplinary project dedicated to exploring non-western and poetic notions of sound, creating a space where software design, music tools, encoded spirituality, digital art and indigenous knowledge systems overlap.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Tue, 25 Dec 2012 10:17:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Alexander and Bonin - December 1st, 2012 - January 19th, 2013 <p>On Saturday, December 1<sup>st</sup>, Alexander and Bonin will open an exhibition of prints and multiples by sixteen artists: Matthew Benedict, Fernando Bryce, Michael Buthe, Willie Cole, Eugenio Dittborn, Willie Doherty, Mona Hatoum, Diango Hernández, Stefan Kürten, Paul Etienne Lincoln, Jorge Macchi, Rita McBride, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Doris Salcedo, Sean Scully and Paul Thek. Some of the prints and multiples included in ‘Stimuli’ were executed in relation to large scale projects, while others are self-contained and further explore motifs found throughout the artists’ work.<br /> <br /> Prints completed in conjunction with larger projects include <strong>Jorge Macchi's</strong> large scale <em>Marienbad, </em>2012 which illustrates his 3-dimensional illusion of the 1961 film, ‘Last Year at Marienbad’ by Alain Resnais.  Maachi created the full-scale outdoor piece for the 2011 Lyon Biennale.  Obversely, <strong>Doris Salcedo’s</strong> <em>Shibboleth I-IV</em>, 2007, four archival pigment inkjet prints were created during the preparation for the fissure she created in the floor at Tate Modern in 2008.  In <em>Blueprint</em>, 2011, <strong>Rita McBride’s</strong> representation of institutional space takes the form of a woodcut based on an elevation of the façade of Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA). This print was made during a three year project with the museum, in which McBride removed the layers of temporary construction that had accumulated since Richard Meier’s original design in 1995.<br />  <br /> During 2011-12, <strong>Willie Cole</strong> worked with Highpoint Center for Printmaking in Minneapolis to produce a group of intaglio and relief prints. <em>Five Beauties Rising</em>, a suite of five  impressions of ironing boards printed in a monochromatic gray scale impart “a sense of spirituality and suggests grave markers of weathered stone."* Each ironing board has the name of a woman printed in relief on the lower edge, suggesting both the legacy of ‘women’s work’ and the psychological residue retained by objects of such intense and specific personal use.<br />  <br /> The subjects of <strong>Stefan Kürten</strong> and <strong>Sylvia Plimack Mangold’s</strong> paintings are further explored in their prints. As in her paintings, Plimack Mangold works outdoors from direct observation of the trees on the surrounds of her Washingtonville, NY home, etching plates of a maple tree motif that has been central to her work for more than thirty years. Kürten takes advantage of the exactitude of lithography to expand the representation of stillness in an image of a perfect domestic environment. <br /> <br /> Multiples in the exhibition include <strong>Mona Hatoum’s</strong> uncanny object <em>T42, </em>1993-1998 a seemingly fused pair of cups and saucers executed in stoneware; a perfume set and boxed explication commemorating <strong>Paul Etienne Lincoln’s</strong> installation <em>In Tribute to Madame de Pompadour and the Court of Louis XV</em>, 1982-1991; and <strong>Diango Hernández's</strong> cast bronze and fabric <em>Lamp-He</em>, 2010.</p> <p> </p> Sun, 25 Nov 2012 00:38:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Melvin Edwards - Alexander Gray Associates - October 31st, 2012 - December 22nd, 2012 <p>Alexander Gray Associates is pleased to present its second exhibition with Melvin Edwards, spanning the trajectory of Edwards’ nearly 50-year career. Concurrently, Edwards is a featured artist in the celebrated exhibition <i>Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980</i> on view at MoMA/PS1, organized by Kellie Jones for the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; the exhibition runs through March 11, 2013.<br /> <br /> Edwards’ manipulation of industrial materials—and their cultural connotations—is emphasized with a selection of installations, wall reliefs, and free-standing steel sculptures on view. Chains are present throughout the works, reinforcing the relationship between material and image at the foundation of Edwards’ oeuvre. The duplicity of meaning inherent in the imagery of chain, a symbol of oppression yet also a metaphor for cultural linkage, lends complex narrative to the modernist forms.<br /> <br /> The exhibition centers on Edwards’ groundbreaking 1969–70 installation, <i>Curtain for William and Peter</i> (1969–1970), a sheer drape of barbed wire hemmed with heavy-gauge chain. Included in the artist’s solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1970, Curtain pays homage to fellow artists William T. Williams and Peter Bradley, utilizing materials of labor and entrapment to create an elegant, fluid form tinged with brutality.<br /> <br /> The iconic stainless-steel sculpture <i>To Listen</i> (1990) stands at nearly 8 feet tall, anchors a gallery of pedestal-scaled sculptures, dating from the early 1970s to the present. Also included in the exhibition are works from Edwards’ renowned <i>Lynch Fragments</i> series, spanning from the 1960s to 2012. Among the disc-formed wall sculptures is the rare 1965 work, Texcali, which was included in Edwards’ 1965 solo exhibition at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.<br /> <br /> Edwards reflects on his use of materials: <br /> <i>I have always understood the brutalist connotations inherent in materials like barbed wire and links of chain and my creative thoughts have always anticipated the beauty of utilizing that necessary complexity which arises from the use of these materials in what could be called a straight formalist style.... Wire like most linear materials has a history both as an obstacle and enclosure but barbed wire has the added capacity of painfully dynamic and aggressive resistance if contacted unintelligently. To use this chain with all its kinetic parts crisscrossing the line as invader and potent container.</i> —The Afro-American Artist, 1973</p> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 01:27:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Loren MacIver - Alexandre Gallery - November 29th, 2012 - January 5th, 2013 Sat, 17 Nov 2012 08:05:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Richard Walker - Alexandre Gallery - November 29th, 2012 - January 5th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The gallery is pleased to present <em>Richard Walker: House Paintings</em>, an exhibition of nineteen new small and medium-scaled paintings by the Scottish-born artist in his second show at the gallery.  The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue with an interview with the artist by fellow painter Merlin James.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Since his first public exhibition in 1983, Richard Walker has explored various genres and styles, but his work has always had at its core a commitment to working from direct observation.  Working from life allows Walker a unique engagement with reality that allows for complications of depth and complexities of color and tone.  These new interiors have an intimate semi-abstract quality that is defined by rough loaded brush marks and simplified blocks of color.  Precedents include Fairfield Porter’s paintings, among others.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The subject of Walker’s new work involves using rooms of an old mansion house as a cross between a theater stage, artist’s studio and film set.  The furniture, paintings, mirrors and painting paraphernalia become props in the paintings.  He also makes use of projected images to challenge the viewer as to what is “real” in the paintings and to deal with ideas related to image making in general.  The work depicts light in different forms:  projected light, spotlight, daylight, reflected light, all of which have their own psychological, visual and symbolic possibilities.  Light obscures and reveals, with cast shadow, silhouette and negative light.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Walker has had numerous exhibitions, including solo shows at the Talbot Rice Gallery in Edinburgh and at the Andrew Mummery Gallery, London.  He has been the recipient of a Pollock/Krasner Award and a residency at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Connecticut.  In this new show at Alexandre Gallery, Walker exhibits the work from a recent Royal Scottish Academy Residency.</span></p> Sat, 17 Nov 2012 08:04:11 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Daphne Fitzpatrick - American Contemporary - November 8th, 2012 - December 23rd, 2012 <p>American Contemporary is excited to announce the opening of an exhibition of new work by Daphne Fitzpatrick, titled "Whistle and Flute". The title, taken from the machismo world of cockney rhyming slang, strongly reflects Daphne's playful and approach to metaphor, gender and imagery, where, seemingly captured in an instant, one thing becomes another or another thing is already something else.</p> <p>Fitzpatrick spent some time earlier in the year teaching in Tokyo, at Tokyo Tech, before traveling around Asia and Europe. The photographs collected on this trip, numbering in the high hundreds, have been edited down to approximately ten images. Six will be exhibited in the show, and four others at NADA Miami, where Fitzpatrick will have a solo presentation. These photographs will be coupled with sculptures that continue on from the pieces made for her recent inclusion in "It is what it is, or is it?" at Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, the first exhibition curated by Dean Daderko for the museum.</p> Tue, 06 Nov 2012 23:28:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square - September 12th, 2012 - January 13th, 2013 <p>“Foiled: Tinsel Painting in America” is the most comprehensive museum exhibition to focus on this under-recognized decorative art that was widely practiced in America from 1850 to 1890. One of the great revelations of the exhibition is the way this modest technique touched upon so many aspects of American life, innovation, and culture.<br /> <br /> Tinsel paintings are reverse paintings on glass with smooth or crumpled metallic foil applied behind translucent and transparent areas; when viewed in candlelight or gaslight, the effect was one of shimmering highlights. In the first half of the 19th century, tinsel painting was taught to young women whose parents were dedicated to providing refined education for their daughters and paid for such special classes. By the mid- to late 19th century, the art had expanded outside the school curriculum, and instructions proliferated in books and were advertised in women’s magazines. Its origins are related to forms developed in Renaissance Italy, 18th-century China and France, and 19th-century Austria, England, and Germany. Floral imagery predominates, as botanical copy prints and patterns were often employed. Especially appealing today are rare works that combine a variety of techniques and materials, including photography and collage. <br /> <br /> It is remarkable that so many examples of this fragile art have survived. The American Folk Art Museum has in its holdings a wealth of tinsel paintings thanks to the prescience of donors Kristina Barbara Johnson and Jean and Day Krolik Jr. With a significant gift from Susan and Laurence Lerner, the museum is now the largest public repository of this fascinating artform. <br /> <br /> Lee Kogan, curator emerita</p> Mon, 06 Aug 2012 02:38:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square - September 12th, 2012 - January 13th, 2013 <p>An attraction to shiny things is a primal human impulse. It may be instinctive and emotional, or profoundly meaningful within a cultural context. In the visual arts this has been expressed through the use of myriad materials that glitter and reflect. “Ooh, Shiny!” will highlight three centuries of artworks—ranging from needleworks by 18th-century schoolgirls to sculptures by contemporary icons including Howard Finster—that are embellished with such materials as spangles, mica flakes, glass, marble dust, sequins, glitter, and aluminum.</p> Sat, 01 Dec 2012 21:26:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Suzanne Caporael - Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe - November 15th, 2012 - December 22nd, 2012 <p>New York, New York – Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Suzanne Caporael. Seeing Things will open on 15 November and will remain on view through 22 December 2012. A reception for the artist will take place 15 November, between 6:00 and 8:00 PM. The public is welcome.</p> <p><br />A few years ago, Suzanne Caporael hit a patch of ice while driving on a rural road. As the car raced down a steep hill, she “saw” the landscape slowly dragged across her vision – as though her eyes were trying to hold her in place while the car continued its slide. The memory of that visual anomaly led her through a thicket of books and essays on the subject of visual cognition. Neuroscientists, magicians, artists and art historians, as well as psychiatrists, psychologists and evolutionary biologists, have all contributed to the literature on the eye—brain connection.</p> <p><br />The eye is device, the brain interprets. Vision has its own peculiar language of cues, some straightforward and some more subtle. In her new paintings, Caporael grapples with these cues, and with the way in which time and cultural reference affect how we see what we see.</p> <p><br />From the visceral to the deeply conceptual, the paintings present challenges to recognition and preconceptions. Some, like 632 (Home Field, Witnessed) are minimally descriptive. Others construct and reveal methodology of optical illusions, and a pair of “Newton’s Buckets” address the conundrum of rendering the strictly mental image. In 622 (Pierrot After Watteau After Picasso After Gary Clarke), fully seeing requires specific prior knowledge and 624 (Youth with a Wooden Leg) presents a choice between conflicting realities. Included are Caporael’s paintings alluding to and celebrating other artists’ engagement with the discordance between seeing and knowing.</p> <p><br />Exploring the different pathways to seeing has led Caporael to soften her formalistic practice, and the result is a full-blown stylistic disparity well suited to her subject. The paintings do not look alike. Each is endowed with an honesty of purpose of its own. Confidently moving between the dynamic and the serene, Caporael reveals a flexibility and dexterity previously held at bay. The elegance remains, as does the scholastic rigor that has categorized each series in the artist’s 30-year career.<br />Individually these paintings ask questions that beget more questions. Collectively, they invite the viewer to share the artist’s journey – to see ourselves seeing.</p> <p><br />Suzanne Caporael was born in the United States in 1949. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees from the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, California. Her work is represented in many major museum collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA; the Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI; the Legion of Honor, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA and the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT, among others.</p> <p><br />The artist lives and works in Stone Ridge, New York with her husband, novelist Bruce Murkoff. This exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by noted poet, writer and critic John Yau.</p> <p><br />Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 AM to 6 PM and by appointment. Press contact: Thomas Quigley at TQ@amy-nyc.com</p> Thu, 08 Nov 2012 17:00:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Peter Halley, Robert Motherwell, Sterling Ruby, Kelley Walker - Andrea Rosen Gallery - December 1st, 2012 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i>, two group exhibitions – both curated by Robert Hobbs –that are intertwined yet distinctly separate in their intention. The exhibitions open November 3, 2012 at the Gallery's main space at 525 West 24th Street, as well as inaugurating its new, second location, at 544 West 24th Street.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock I</i>, at the Gallery's primary and expanded space (525 West 24th Street), brings together a compelling group of four important artists – Peter Halley, Robert Motherwell, Sterling Ruby and Kelley Walker – by presenting a selection of significant paintings. The complex ideas behind the show and Hobbs' very deliberate choice of work suggest further layers of reading while remaining open to the viewers' own abstracted relationships with the works and their unique experiences. As is characteristic of shows at the Gallery, <i>Cellblock I</i> affords the opportunity to look at these familiar artists in a new way and with more depth, both in relation to each other and in regards to their individual practices.<br /> <br /> While these are four artists Hobbs has championed individually, it's compelling how this show and subject bring together his scholarship in a culminating and unexpected way with artists whom he has known, studied, and written about over the length of his career, forming a meeting point of sorts. <br /> <br /> The Gallery is especially thrilled to feature <i>Cellblock II: An Essay in Exhibition Form</i> as the first show at its second space, which will newly house its Gallery 2 program, known for content-driven, experimental and historical one time exhibitions. Andrea Rosen conceived Gallery 2 in 1999 as a liberating arena in which to consider new ideas and create parallel perspectives to the Gallery's primary program, and as a means of fulfilling the Gallery's responsibility to broaden visual references and education for its audience. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a perfect first show for the new location as its basis is a key principle of Gallery 2 – combining works and/or artists one might know, including historical artists as well as those of a younger generation, to create unexpected relationships and significant dialogues around a subject that has not been explored in such depth. The Gallery 2 program also provides the opportunity to work with esteemed independent curators and art historians, and the Gallery is extremely proud to spotlight this profound brainchild of Robert Hobbs, the prominent scholar and curator known for his extensive, in-depth, historically important writings on Robert Motherwell and a plethora of other artists, and also known as the definitive Robert Smithson scholar.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock II</i>, at the new location (544 West 24th Street), features works by a greater range of artists such as Vito Acconci, Alice Aycock, Tom Burr, Jean Genet, Robert Gober, Peter Halley, Nancy Holt, Will Insley, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Robert Motherwell, Bruce Nauman, Beverly Pepper, Ad Reinhardt, Sterling Ruby, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Jackie Winsor and Artur Żmijewski. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a dense exhibition combining historical material with an increased number of works and mediums, incorporating wall text, diagrams and video. It offers background information and contextual references that flesh out Hobbs' <i>Cellblock</i> concept without becoming didactic, since its goal is to stimulate viewers to draw their own conclusions. <i>Cellblock II</i> affords <i>Cellblock I</i> the opportunity to be a more visceral experience. Although still experiential, <i>Cellblock II</i> affords a more cerebral experience.<br /> <br /> While the show brings together work that addresses containment, enclosure, and imprisonment, it also questions the frequently unexamined assumption that modern and contemporary art's contents are eminently assessable to viewers either empirically or epistemologically by finding the right key, so that almost by magic an open sesame takes place. Countering this myth of art's ease of access, these shows look at the power of refusal, both formally and in terms of subject matter, when works of art deliberately withhold their contents so that viewers are left with enduring mysteries and disquieting conundrums. A text by Hobbs, describing the deeper intellectual content of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>II</i>, is also included for reference.<br /> <br /> The foundational concept of <i>Cellblock</i> is very purposefully presented as two distinct shows, representing two completely different yet complementary perspectives. The physical separation of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i> clarifies their different orientations.<br /> <br /> <i>Art historian Dr. Robert Hobbs has held the Rhoda Thalhimer Endowed Chair at Virginia Commonwealth University since 1991 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University for eight years. Before joining VCU, he served as a lecturer at Yale and an associate professor at Cornell University. Recognized as a scholar, teacher, and curator, Hobbs specializes in both late modern and postmodern art. His work joins social history with literary criticism and aesthetics; it also relies on feminist and postcolonial theory. He has published widely and curated dozens of exhibitions, many of which have been shown at important institutions in the U.S. and abroad such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art; the Drawing Center (NYC); the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His specific research areas span the twentieth- and twentieth-first centuries, and his publications include monographs on Milton Avery, Alice Aycock, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Mark Lombardi, Sterling Ruby, Robert Smithson, and Kara Walker. In addition he has written on such mainstream modern and postmodern artists as Hernan Bas, Duane Hanson, Keith Haring, Jonathan Lasker, Mark Lindquist, Malcolm Morley, Robert Motherwell, Beverly Pepper, Richard Pousette-Dart, Neo Rauch, Andres Serrano, Yinka Shonibare, James Siena, Tony Smith, Meredyth Sparks, Frank Stella, Frank Thiel, Kelley Walker, John Wesley, and Kehinde Wiley, among others.<br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs will co-curate the Bahamian Pavilion for the forthcoming Venice Biennale in 2013, with an exhibition of works by Tavares Strachan. This follows his appointment in 1982 as the U.S. Commissioner/Curator for the Venice Biennale for his exhibition "Robert Smithson: Sculpture," which had previously been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and his appointment in 2002 as Curator for the São Paulo Biennial for the exhibition "Kara Walker: Slavery! Slavery!"</i></p> <p><b>CURATOR STATEMENT</b></p> <p><br /> <b>CELLBLOCK I</b><br /> <br /> In his 1897 "Preface" to "Un coup de dés" ("A Throw of Dice"), French nineteenth-century Symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé clarifies how "spaced-out blanks" of white paper function in his poem. "The paper," he explains, "intervenes each time an image, of its own accord, ceases or withdraws." This <i>contrapuntal movement</i> between the poem's material components (typeface on sheets of paper) and ostensible subject matter (a shipwreck and chance) can be extended to the visual arts, so that a similar ongoing and oscillating <i>shift</i> between means and meaning can be seen as taking place. Art's media can be understood as both blocking and revealing its import by participating in an accordion-like action of alternating revelation and obduracy. The work of art, in other words, incarnates and incarcerates an idea in <i>distinct materials</i> while contradictorily and momentarily springing the release of <i>these media</i> from their confines, permitting them alternatively to be read as signs and symbols as well as to be seen for themselves, thus briefly obviating a given work's metaphysical references. This reversibility of views—a flickering oscillation between subject and object—can readily be demonstrated by pointing out how the art's material support can participate fully in its dynamics so that figure and form are mutually supportive. <br /> <br /> The two-part exhibition <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>II</i>—named for a division of a prison, a large building divided into separate units, a death house, a digital component, and biological cells working in tandem—intends to update this Mallarméan approach by looking at a selected group of works, many familiar to the curator through his past research, in order to demonstrate how artistic media can function bi-stably in the two different registers of revealing and obfuscating. Often, they paradoxically reveal themselves and their contents through the self-reflexive recalcitrance of the artistic materials comprising them. Dating from the mid-twentieth century to the present, these works figuratively re-present their constituent materials' obstinacy in terms of such <i>coercive</i> topics as incarceration, boundaries, foundations, and limits, in addition to various other obstructions. These works of art do so even when their ostensible subjects are biological cells as well as the cell-like circuitry of digital media. The artistic media making up the art in this exhibition, then, is intended to dramatize the shifting and ongoing reversible presence and absence of the figurative and formal elements comprising these works.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock</i> is organized into parts <i>I</i> and <i>II</i>, taking place in two separate locations on 24th Street. The first section is a spare hanging of works, setting up a series of similarities and differences in relation to the cellblock theme, while the second takes place in the Gallery's new space at 544 West 24th Street. <i>Cellblock II</i> fleshes out this theme by presenting a far greater range of cellblock types, illuminated with diagrams, quotes, and commentaries, with the full knowledge that any such showing can only be representative, never inclusive.<br /> <br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs<br /> Thalhimer Endowed Chair of American Art, VCU</p> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 - December 1st, 2012 - February 2nd, 2013 <p>Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i>, two group exhibitions – both curated by Robert Hobbs –that are intertwined yet distinctly separate in their intention. The exhibitions open November 3, 2012 at the Gallery's main space at 525 West 24th Street, as well as inaugurating its new, second location, at 544 West 24th Street.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock I</i>, at the Gallery's primary and expanded space (525 West 24th Street), brings together a compelling group of four important artists – Peter Halley, Robert Motherwell, Sterling Ruby and Kelley Walker – by presenting a selection of significant paintings. The complex ideas behind the show and Hobbs' very deliberate choice of work suggest further layers of reading while remaining open to the viewers' own abstracted relationships with the works and their unique experiences. As is characteristic of shows at the Gallery, <i>Cellblock I</i> affords the opportunity to look at these familiar artists in a new way and with more depth, both in relation to each other and in regards to their individual practices.<br /> <br /> While these are four artists Hobbs has championed individually, it's compelling how this show and subject bring together his scholarship in a culminating and unexpected way with artists whom he has known, studied, and written about over the length of his career, forming a meeting point of sorts. <br /> <br /> The Gallery is especially thrilled to feature <i>Cellblock II: An Essay in Exhibition Form</i> as the first show at its second space, which will newly house its Gallery 2 program, known for content-driven, experimental and historical one time exhibitions. Andrea Rosen conceived Gallery 2 in 1999 as a liberating arena in which to consider new ideas and create parallel perspectives to the Gallery's primary program, and as a means of fulfilling the Gallery's responsibility to broaden visual references and education for its audience. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a perfect first show for the new location as its basis is a key principle of Gallery 2 – combining works and/or artists one might know, including historical artists as well as those of a younger generation, to create unexpected relationships and significant dialogues around a subject that has not been explored in such depth. The Gallery 2 program also provides the opportunity to work with esteemed independent curators and art historians, and the Gallery is extremely proud to spotlight this profound brainchild of Robert Hobbs, the prominent scholar and curator known for his extensive, in-depth, historically important writings on Robert Motherwell and a plethora of other artists, and also known as the definitive Robert Smithson scholar.<br /> <br /> <i>Cellblock II</i>, at the new location (544 West 24th Street), features works by a greater range of artists such as Vito Acconci, Alice Aycock, Tom Burr, Jean Genet, Robert Gober, Peter Halley, Nancy Holt, Will Insley, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Robert Motherwell, Bruce Nauman, Beverly Pepper, Ad Reinhardt, Sterling Ruby, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Jackie Winsor and Artur Żmijewski. <i>Cellblock II</i> is a dense exhibition combining historical material with an increased number of works and mediums, incorporating wall text, diagrams and video. It offers background information and contextual references that flesh out Hobbs' <i>Cellblock</i> concept without becoming didactic, since its goal is to stimulate viewers to draw their own conclusions. <i>Cellblock II</i> affords <i>Cellblock I</i> the opportunity to be a more visceral experience. Although still experiential, <i>Cellblock II</i> affords a more cerebral experience.<br /> <br /> While the show brings together work that addresses containment, enclosure, and imprisonment, it also questions the frequently unexamined assumption that modern and contemporary art's contents are eminently assessable to viewers either empirically or epistemologically by finding the right key, so that almost by magic an open sesame takes place. Countering this myth of art's ease of access, these shows look at the power of refusal, both formally and in terms of subject matter, when works of art deliberately withhold their contents so that viewers are left with enduring mysteries and disquieting conundrums. A text by Hobbs, describing the deeper intellectual content of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>II</i>, is also included for reference.<br /> <br /> The foundational concept of <i>Cellblock</i> is very purposefully presented as two distinct shows, representing two completely different yet complementary perspectives. The physical separation of <i>Cellblock I</i> and <i>Cellblock II</i> clarifies their different orientations.<br /> <br /> <i>Art historian Dr. Robert Hobbs has held the Rhoda Thalhimer Endowed Chair at Virginia Commonwealth University since 1991 and has been a visiting professor at Yale University for eight years. Before joining VCU, he served as a lecturer at Yale and an associate professor at Cornell University. Recognized as a scholar, teacher, and curator, Hobbs specializes in both late modern and postmodern art. His work joins social history with literary criticism and aesthetics; it also relies on feminist and postcolonial theory. He has published widely and curated dozens of exhibitions, many of which have been shown at important institutions in the U.S. and abroad such as the Brooklyn Museum of Art; the Drawing Center (NYC); the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His specific research areas span the twentieth- and twentieth-first centuries, and his publications include monographs on Milton Avery, Alice Aycock, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Mark Lombardi, Sterling Ruby, Robert Smithson, and Kara Walker. In addition he has written on such mainstream modern and postmodern artists as Hernan Bas, Duane Hanson, Keith Haring, Jonathan Lasker, Mark Lindquist, Malcolm Morley, Robert Motherwell, Beverly Pepper, Richard Pousette-Dart, Neo Rauch, Andres Serrano, Yinka Shonibare, James Siena, Tony Smith, Meredyth Sparks, Frank Stella, Frank Thiel, Kelley Walker, John Wesley, and Kehinde Wiley, among others.<br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs will co-curate the Bahamian Pavilion for the forthcoming Venice Biennale in 2013, with an exhibition of works by Tavares Strachan. This follows his appointment in 1982 as the U.S. Commissioner/Curator for the Venice Biennale for his exhibition "Robert Smithson: Sculpture," which had previously been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and his appointment in 2002 as Curator for the São Paulo Biennial for the exhibition "Kara Walker: Slavery! Slavery!"</i></p> <p><b>CURATOR STATEMENT</b></p> <p><br /> <b>CELLBLOCK II </b><br /> <i>An Essay in Exhibition Form</i><br /> <br /> Beginning in the 1960s, the work of art as a restricted cell has served as a working premise for many artists, who have found ways to <i>literalize</i> this closure in a number of empathic ways. Several generative metaphors have enabled them to think about art's contradictory ability to <i>communicate</i> certain of its contents while also <i>withholding</i> information by maintaining its status as an enduring conundrum, so that viewers are left focusing on the work itself rather than any particular communiqué it might appear to be revealing. Among the most productive metaphors are <i>Plato's cave</i>, which supports the view of art as constituting at best a shadowy world; the <i>black box</i>, which focuses on art's irresolvable secrets; and Jeremy Bentham's <i>panopticon</i>, which emphasizes embodied perception and perspectival viewing. A more recent model is provided by the supermax prison, an American invention, with its enforcement of permanent solitary confinement, a concept crucial for Sterling Ruby's work. Although this exhibition focuses on the ways certain works of art function, Duchamp's inscribed portrait by Marvin Lazarus testifies to the artist's retrospective as a type of detention, an overarching restriction based on the misguided concept that all of an individual artist's work can be categorized in terms of a single stylistic designation.<br /> <br /> Robert Hobbs<br /> Thalhimer Endowed Chair of American Art, VCU</p> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 23:00:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Goshka Macuga - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - November 10th, 2012 - December 22nd, 2012 <p>The Andrew Kreps Gallery is pleased to present<em> Untitled</em>, Goshka Macuga’s second solo exhibition at the gallery.  The show is comprised of works that were recently shown at the Zachęta National Gallery of Art in Warsaw, which was the first major presentation of her work in a public institution in Poland. </p> <p>At the core of the show lies the theme of censorship in Polish art after 1989 and the related attacks against artists, curators, directors and cultural institutions.  For the project Macuga adopted her characteristic method of delving into the archives of the hosting institution and drew upon exhibition documentation, artist portfolios, press clippings and photographs, as well as guest books, emails and letters, including private correspondence addressed to Zachęta.  The show features a tapestry taken from a photograph of a protest (originally a 1967 happening by that the artist Tadeusz Kantor) that the artist re-enacted – in which 7 postmen deliver a letter addressed to Zachęta.  The original “letter” was subsequently destroyed by the viewers – but Macuga’s letter was not – and thus serves the role as prop – or evidence.</p> <p>The exhibit will also feature large-scale photographs in which the main figures have been silkscreened out – or redacted from the image.  The photos were taken from the Zachęta’s own archives and feature those artists and curators such as Adam Szymczyck and Piotr Uklanski - at the opening of their exhibition <em>The Nazi’s- </em>which was later attacked by a famous Polish actor Daniel Olbrychski with a sword; and a portrait Anda Rottenberg who was attacked for displaying Maurizio Cattelan’s <em>La Nona Ora</em> – which was later destroyed by two Polish MP’s.  Macuga also displays this act of violent censorship with a triptych of images of the damage to this same sculpture (which features Pope John Paul II felled by a meteor) – serving as a reminder that the work’s destruction was a symbolic gesture as well as an act of vandalism.</p> <p>Through addressing censorship in Poland during the Culture Wars the exhibition attempts to analyze the mechanism by which demagogy replaces education, and politics interferes with art.</p> <p>Goshka Macuga was born in Warsaw and studied at Central Saint Martin’s School of Art and in Goldsmiths College in London. In 2008, she was amongst the four nominees for the Turner Prize. She has had solo projects at the Whitechapel and Tate Britain in London, at the Kunsthalle Basel and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis.  She was included in Documenta 2012 and was the recipient of the Arnold Bode Prize.  Her first American survey show will take place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, curated by Dieter Roelstraete.   She currently lives and works in London.</p> <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: xx-small;" color="#333333" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="1"><span style="font-size: xx-small;" size="1"></span></span></p> Tue, 13 Nov 2012 00:18:24 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list