ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Elad Lassry - 303 Gallery - September 12th, 2013 - October 26th, 2013 <p>303 Gallery is pleased to present our first exhibition of Elad Lassry's new work.</p> <p>What is the philosophical location of a picture? Working with images culled from advertising, films, illustrated magazines, and commercial catalogues, Lassry lifts them out of their original contexts, alters them, and radically destabilizes their function. He not only points to the processes of photographic production and reproduction (underscoring the idea that a picture de facto relates to other pictures), but also to the material attributes of the picture as an object. In his rigorously formatted photographs, which never exceed the dimensions of a magazine page or spread, Lassry elaborates on the potential of a photograph to exist as a sculpture. Often displayed in frames that derive their saturated colors from the dominant hues in the pictures, or more recently featuring pleated sheets of 4-ply silk affixed to the frame, his works "stretch" the concept of image-making. Taken as a whole, Lassry's works create an archive of significations, of images that critically investigate other images, which leads to more elastic ways of articulating representation.</p> <p>Over the last several years, Lassry has distinguished himself as an outstanding thinker and experimenter within the expanded field of contemporary art. Mining the relationship between traditional modes of analogue production and digital intervention within an unprecedented "blitz" of image proliferation, Lassry has creatively reassessed what it means to make pictures in the post-photographic age. His image-driven, interdisciplinary practice-including photographs, films, sculptures, performances and site-interventions-is positioned within an art historical genealogy that taps the readymade, post-appropriative practices, structuralist filmmaking and relational modes of exhibition display.</p> <p>In 2014, Lassry's work will be the subject of a major exhibition at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningan in Rotterdam. Solo exhibitions devoted to his work have also been held at The Kitchen, New York; Kunsthalle Zurich, Switzerland; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Padiglione d'Arte Contemporanea, Milan; and the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis. Recent group exhibitions include "Film as Sculpture", WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels; "Beyond. International Curator Exhibition of Tallinn Month of Photography", KUMU Art Museum, Tallinn, Estonia; "The Anxiety of Photography", Aspen Art Museum; "Secret Societies. To Know, To Dare, To Will, To Keep Silence", Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and CAPC de Bordeaux, "Time Again", SculptureCenter, New York; and "New Photography 2010", Museum of Modern Art, New York. Lassry was born in Tel Aviv in 1977; he lives and works in Los Angeles.</p> Tue, 24 Sep 2013 12:47:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list John Miller, Aura Rosenberg - 3A Gallery - September 19th, 2013 - October 11th, 2013 <p>A Klee painting named &lsquo;Angelus Novus&rsquo; shows an angel looking as though it is about to move away from something it is fixedly contemplating. Its eyes are staring, its mouth is open, its wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history.&nbsp; Its face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, it sees one single catastrophe, which keeps piling wreckage and hurls it in front of its feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing in from Paradise; it has got caught in its wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. The storm irresistibly propels it into the future to which its back is turned, while the pile of debris before it grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.</p> <p>The true picture of the past flits by. The past can be seized only as an image which flashes up at the instant when it can be recognized and is never seen again.</p> <p>&ndash;Walter Benjamin, &ldquo;Thesis on the Philosophy of History&rdquo;</p> <p>The angel of history is the inspiration for Aura Rosenberg&rsquo;s film. Compressed into five minutes, this film animates the ruin and progress of history, starting with formation of planets from gas clouds through to the present.&nbsp; The pile, culled from an online pictorial archive, depicts Benjamin&rsquo;s single catastrophe. A flash of original paradise interrupts the cataclysmic momentum and reminds the viewer of the dialectic of history in which the past can be recalled only in relation to the demands of the present.</p> Sun, 08 Sep 2013 22:56:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Diana Copperwhite - 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel - September 10th, 2013 - October 19th, 2013 <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp/> <w:DontBreakConstrainedForcedTables/> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx/> <w:Word11KerningPairs/> <w:CachedColBalance/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="--"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--> <p>We are pleased to announce Diana Copperwhite&rsquo;s first US solo show in collaboration with Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin. This follows on from her succesful solo presentation at VOLTA NY earlier this year, and her residency at the Josef Albers Foundation in December 2012.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Whose afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue&rdquo; asked Barnett Newman in the sixties amid the era&rsquo;s monikers of post-painterly abstraction and colour field painting. His answer, and indeed the answers of his compatriots at the time, seem to us now as stately as they are staid. They sit comfortably into the art historical narrative -the progressive imperative of Modernism. The paintings of Diana Copperwhite deliver us back into the maelstrom of colour resurrecting the fear that such charged tints and hues can conjure. Copperwhite&rsquo;s colours misbehave, taunting and mocking our narrow appreciation of their emotional potential.&nbsp;</p> <p>We have radiant colour, scrubbed colour, muddied colour, mercurial colour, structural colour, all carefully choreographed within these large canvases. The work carries the evidence of the intense labour of its making. These are not easily won images, we can see from the erasure, the under-painting and the re-painting the myriad of decisions employed in their completion.</p> <p>These paintings are not abstract but abstractions. In some, the geometrical shaping of certain passages seem to suggest architecture, both internal or external, and at times simultaneously internal and external. These are faint armatures on which to secure the eye, take a breath, before launching into the immensity of colour on offer. Recently the artist has introduced neon radiant colour bars onto the surface. Floating on top of the composition they startle the eye and delight the perception, like freeform riffs in jazz.&nbsp;</p> <p>So what gives here in these colourful paintings? There is no ironic strategy underlying their production, nor, wacky systemic analysis of colour theory. These are hot paintings, panting with sensuality, overburdened with sensitivity, and&nbsp; demanding &ndash;demanding that we give ourselves to them as wholeheartedly as they were created.</p> <p>Patrick T Murphy, Dublin</p> <p><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif'; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;">(<em>from 1989 to 1998 Murphy was Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, currently he is Director of the Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin).</em></span><span style="font-size: 16.5pt; font-family: 'Arial','sans-serif'; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;">&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true" 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mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--> Mon, 30 Sep 2013 22:00:08 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Matthew Daub - ACA Galleries, Est 1932 - September 19th, 2013 - October 19th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">In Matthew Daub&rsquo;s newest body of work, <em>The Maiden Creek Series, </em>his subject is a twenty-two mile stretch&nbsp;along Maiden Creek, a rural tributary of Pennsylvania&rsquo;s Schuylkill River. Depicting specific sites along the way, and identified only by their&nbsp; latitude and longitude coordinates that serve as the title of each image,&nbsp;Daub&rsquo;s finely rendered, near-monochromatic watercolor panoramas are experienced not as landscape&nbsp;but of place: place as a private world with its own interior life; place as somewhere to linger and explore deeply or where we are encouraged, indeed commanded, to move on, the place itself escorting us along the road.</p> Tue, 15 Oct 2013 12:35:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list M. F. Husain, S. H. Raza, F.N. Souza - AICON GALLERY - New York - September 12th, 2013 - October 19th, 2013 Mon, 09 Sep 2013 23:35:29 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ram Kumar - AICON GALLERY - New York - September 13th, 2013 - October 19th, 2013 Mon, 09 Sep 2013 23:32:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Michael Buthe - Alexander and Bonin - September 10th, 2013 - October 12th, 2013 <div id="artistBio"> <p>Buthe&rsquo;s work was widely exhibited throughout Germany from 1968 until his death in 1994. His work was included in the legendary exhibition &ldquo;When Attitudes Become Form: Live in Your Head&rdquo; at Kunsthalle Bern as well as four &ldquo;Documenta&rdquo; exhibitions. Beginning in 1970, Buthe spent an increasing amount of time in North Africa and the Middle East. These experiences, melded with his European upbringing and the zeitgeist embraced by his contemporaries Sigmar Polke and Gerhard Richter, led to the development of Buthe&rsquo;s distinct and constantly evolving vernacular. With little separation between his Shamanistic lifestyle and the work he produced, there exists a seamless shift from medium to medium.</p> <p>Buthe&rsquo;s work has come under re-examination in the past few years. In 2009 &ldquo;Michael Buthe: The Angel and His Shadow&rdquo; was presented at Ernst Barlach Haus, Hamburg and at the Arp-Museum Banhof, Rolandseck. In &ldquo;Abstraction and Empathy,&rdquo; (also 2009,) at the Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, curator Carmen Gimenez paired his work with that of Thomas Sch&uuml;tte to represent empathy in contrast with abstract representation as seen in the work of Blinky Palermo and Joseph Albers. Alexander and Bonin presented solo exhibitions of Buthe&rsquo;s work in New York in 2007 and 2010. Recent solo exhibitions in European galleries include Thomas Flor, D&uuml;sseldorf (2009) and RECEPTION, Berlin (2010). Approximately 20 works by Buthe were exhibited in &ldquo;Intense Proximity,&rdquo; the 2012 Paris Triennale (April 20 &ndash; August 12, 2012). In September 2013, Alexander and Bonin will present a solo exhibition of Buthe&rsquo;s work.</p> </div> Tue, 27 Aug 2013 01:32:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jack Whitten - Alexander Gray Associates - September 11th, 2013 - October 12th, 2013 <p>Alexander Gray Associates is pleased to present an exhibition featuring new paintings by Jack Whitten, accompanied by a fully-illustrated catalog. The presentation highlights the most recent evolution of process in Whitten&rsquo;s nearly 50-year career dedicated to abstraction, manipulation, and subversion of traditional painting practices.<br /> <br /> Scale, context, and history play equally integral roles in the group of paintings on view. With its alluring, slick black surface, the sprawling <em>Remote Control</em> (2013) is both seductive and intimidating, alluding to the appeal and threat of technology. In the massive <em>Crushed Grid</em> (2013), Whitten reinvents the modernist grid by immersing a distorted net of acrylic ribbons in thick layers of undulating paint. The varied effects of his material experimentation add a sense of tension, depth, and motion; the result is an array of illusory surface textures that seem solid and aerated, dense and viscous yet fluid.<br /> <br /> The memorial and homage paintings in the exhibition further exemplify Whitten&rsquo;s innovative consideration of painting as object. Elements of three-dimensionality are applied to the canvas, such as the acrylic molds in <em>Nine Cosmic CDs: For The Firespitter (Jayne Cortez)</em> (2013). The radiant energy captured by Whitten&rsquo;s vivid palette provides insight into the fierce personality and artistic achievements of the late poet who inspired the painting.<br /> <br /> About his recent work Whitten states, &ldquo;I like the idea that people are suspended while asking questions about process. I like the idea that the viewer might be frozen by wonder. I have developed many conceptual and technical approaches over the past 50 years, and now, all I&rsquo;m doing is going back into my toolbox and using them. I am dealing with the evolution of painting, Western abstract painting in particular. In this way, evolution is the symbol I am trying to capture. That&rsquo;s why each work is so different, it is still in the act of evolving.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> Concurrent with the exhibition at Alexander Gray Associates, <em>Jack Whitten: Light Years 1971&ndash;1973</em> is on view at the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University September 17&ndash;December 22, 2013. Whitten&rsquo;s painting, <em>9-11-01</em>, is featured in 
<em>The Encyclopedic Palace</em> at the <em>55th Venice Biennale</em> through November 24, 2013. Whitten will also be featured in the renowned traveling exhibition <em>Blues for Smoke</em> at the Wexner Center for the Arts September 21, 2013&ndash;January 5, 2014, as well as the Gallery&rsquo;s Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 presentation. Whitten&rsquo;s work will be the subject of an upcoming retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego in 2014.</p> Tue, 06 Aug 2013 02:08:38 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Julia Goldman - American Contemporary - September 11th, 2013 - October 20th, 2013 <p>American Contemporary Gallery is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition by Julia Goldman. In Magazine Goldman presents a new, extensive, series of oil paintings, all of a similar size, that explore her continued interest in the female figure and the structure of painting. <br /> <br />In these paintings Goldman refers to images from a variety of sources. They are then combined and reconstructed as prototypes for the final works. Each tableau presents images of women obstructed by additional images of women, whilst maintaining multiple traces and disruptions of the original. The compositions are clearly fractured, seeming at points like paintings within paintings, however, the manner in which Goldman layers her compositions creates a resounding wholeness. <br /> <br />Goldman is interested in the results facilitated by a repeated subject. She chooses subjects she knows well - explaining, 'I can evaluate them easily, they are legible'. This allows her to break each subject into the clear layers that define her compositions. Every painting struggles with the same set of problems: her goal is to address this challenge differently each time within the poetic dynamics of the given series. <br /> <br />Julia Goldman (b.1982. Philadelphia, PA). After receiving her MFA and BA at Columbia University, Goldman's work was included in the New York Times reviewed exhibition The Ankle Bones are Higher on the Inside at Museum 52 (2009) where her work was compared to Milton Avery and Alex Katz. Her work has been exhibited in New York, London, Art Los Angeles Contemporary 2013, NADA 2011, and Portugal Arte 2010.</p> Mon, 09 Sep 2013 23:42:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Sabrina Gschwandtner, Luke Haynes, Stephen Sollins - American Folk Art Museum - Lincoln Square - October 1st, 2013 - January 5th <p>This exhibition considers three contemporary artists who are inspired by the history and structure of American quilts but who are neither inhibited, constricted, nor defined by it. Sabrina Gschwandtner, Luke Haynes, and Stephen Sollins are keenly aware that a quilt&rsquo;s very substance&mdash;its remnants, pieces, choices, geometries&mdash;is profoundly laden with meaning. They intentionally seek such emotional and retentive content in their work, oftentimes through ingenious techniques and by using unexpected materials such as 16mm film strips or used Tyvek envelopes. By purposefully reusing experiential elements with relevance to their own lives and times, they exploit the tension inherent in historical quilts between function and significance. The three artists are especially attracted to the rationality and precision of specific quilt patterns that often have illusive qualities&mdash;Tumbling Blocks, Log Cabin, Sunshine and Shadow, Double Wedding Ring&mdash;examples of which, from the museum&rsquo;s collection, will also be on view.</p> Sun, 01 Sep 2013 22:10:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Cristóbal Lehyt - Americas Society Gallery - September 10th, 2013 - December 14th, 2013 <p>Crist&oacute;bal Lehyt&rsquo;s (b. 1973) approach to site-specificity questions the immediate perception of sight (and the site) as a device of cultural translation: what you see is not what you get. For Lehyt, site-specific sculpture occupies the exhibition space as a phenomenological difficulty rather than an encounter with the audience.</p> <p>Lehyt&rsquo;s artistic practice, specially his drawings, also departs from a psychological conundrum, projecting the real on a screen, or "sheet"&mdash;a piece of white fabric, thick but not totally opaque, serves in this case as an allegory of sight as blurred vision or detritus. Typically, his series of drawings entitled, <em>Drama Projections</em> operates within the liminal realm of language as an impediment or defect. Drawing serves as a medium for a silent type of storytelling in which a mechanism of reproduction/psychic projection allows the artist to delve into life&rsquo;s everyday conflicts that are unleashed by the artist&rsquo;s narrative impulse.</p> <p><em>Iris Sheets</em>, Lehyt&rsquo;s solo project for the Americas Society, in its various paradoxes and components&mdash;a site-specific sculpture, a mural of drawings, and a banner to be hung at the building&rsquo;s southwestern fa&ccedil;ade&mdash;tackles the contradictions of an artist from the so-called periphery living in and outside his original context. On the one hand, Lehyt's site-specific sculpture echoes the shape of the geography of Chile and its materials symbolically link the piece with the country&rsquo;s role as a successful world exporting country. Lehyt is not interested in undertaking an essentialist celebration or in examining political mythologies from the Cold War, although in his previous works allusions to Chile have been repressed and abstracted. It is not accidental he recurrently uses materials from the South American country blended with a cluster of multilayered references to land art and minimalism, as well as Matt Mullican&rsquo;s hypnotic drawings. An artist born in 1973, Lehyt&rsquo;s sculpture and drawings are informed by an exploration of the repression of memory after Chile&rsquo;s dictatorship and its trivialization through the gap between traumatic experience and the past. Lehyt uses history as an abstracted fact muted by language and identifies post-traumatic effects of repression as a mythological construction of the present. <em>Iris Sheets</em> frames these issues as a Samuel Beckett-like tongue twister directed to non-English native speakers.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>The Installation</strong></p> <p>Lehyt will create a site-specific installation that responds to the architecture of the Americas Society&rsquo;s art gallery and considers its exhibition history as a space dedicated to (re)present the art of the Americas since the 1960s. The centerpiece of the show will be a gigantic snake-like, three-dimensional structure that weaves through the 1000-square foot space. Upon entering, visitors will encounter what will seem to be the head of the monstrous figure. The structure will be made with natural wood drenched in red Chilean wine and natural-fiber rope therefore engaging the spectator&rsquo;s perception of space and teasing his or her sense of vision, smell, and touch. The body of the sculpture forms a sort of vertebrae that will operate very much like many of Lehyt&rsquo;s other works&mdash;it will appear as one thing and function as another, making it difficult to identify. The work will be at once abstract, yet organic in form. Lehyt&rsquo;s work operates within these contradictions, which can also take the form of humor or through a linguistic game in which a joke can be a way for the visitor to access to the meaning of the work of art. For Lehyt, contemporary art&mdash;specifically sculpture&mdash;game playing allows for alternative approaches to be explored, some of which may not normally be taken seriously within the traditional context of art making.</p> <p>Another component of <em>Iris Sheets</em> is a mural the artist will produce specifically for the exhibition. Working in tandem with the monumental three-dimensional piece, this work is based on drawings, which the artist titles <em>Drama Projections</em>&mdash; a psycho-analytic process that is the result of mind-numbing sessions of &ldquo;automatic drawing.&rdquo; Begun in 2003, <em>Drama Projections</em> was started as a means for Lehyt to overcome a conceptual resistance to representing the traumas of the present through portraiture. Through these sessions of automatic drawing, the artist projects his own fantasies upon his everyday encounters with unknown men and women on the subway, in restaurants, or on the streets of the many cities he has visited. At the end of each session, Lehyt is left with intimate drawings he has produced, which can be viewed as characters staring in their own fiction. As the artist has stated, the portraits are like the &ldquo;the undead in a strange limbo.&rdquo; Nevertheless, these raw drawing are rarely shown and undergo various levels of mediation. For <em>Iris Sheets</em>, Lehyt will enlarge these drawings, so that they are almost life-size in form.</p> <p>Lehyt will also hang a large banner outside Americas Society&rsquo;s building southwestern fa&ccedil;ade entitled <em>Violeta </em>(2006). The banner features an image of the Chilean protest and folk singer Violeta Parra, along with the text "Thank you life for giving me so much," lyrics from her iconic song.&nbsp; Although Parra&rsquo;s song became internationally associated to the shattered social utopias from the 1970s, the song is the mere product of the singer&rsquo;s existential preoccupations rather than a programmatic piece of propaganda. Lehyt emphasizes the lack of accuracy of its present meaning by showing it as an enigmatic marker, decontextualized from history and transmitted through myths. The song&rsquo;s lyrics printed on the banner also operates as a comical element to be discovered by the passersby.</p> <p><em>Iris Sheets</em> will be accompanied by an upcoming fully illustrated catalogue in which art historian Jaleh Mansoor (Department of Art History, Visual Art &amp; Theory at University of British Columbia) will contribute with an essay as well as Chilean writer Alejandro Zambra with a text in dialogue with Lehyt&rsquo;s approach to history as repressed memory. In addition, the publication will feature an interview with Chief Curator Gabriela Rangel and Assistant Curator Christina De Le&oacute;n and the artist.&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><strong>About the Artist</strong></p> <p>Crist&oacute;bal Lehyt, born in Santiago, Chile in 1973,&nbsp;lives and works in New York City. He studied at the Universidad Cat&oacute;lica de Chile, and later at Hunter College and The Whitney Independent Study Program in New York. His solo exhibitions include the Carpenter Center (Cambridge, MA in 2010), Fundaci&oacute;n Telef&oacute;nica Chile (2009), K&uuml;nstlerhaus Stuttgart (2008), University of California Irvine (2007), and numerous others in galleries in London, Santiago de Chile, Caracas, and Mexico City. He has also participated in group exhibitions at the Mercosur Biennial (2009), El Museo del Barrio (2007), Kunsthaus Dresden (2006), the Shanghai Biennale (2004), the Whitney Museum of American Art (2003), MoCA Los Angeles (2002), among many others in New York, Madrid, Santiago, Bogot&aacute;, Caracas, Mexico City, Berlin, Vienna, Beijing, and Rio de Janeiro. He has been awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and the Art Forum Fellowship at Harvard University. He is represented by Die Ecke, Santiago and Johannes Vogt Gallery in New York. His work with paintings, drawings, and photographs explore identity, figuration, and dramatic narrative.</p> Tue, 10 Sep 2013 06:11:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Michael Raedecker - Andrea Rosen Gallery - September 6th, 2013 - October 5th, 2013 <p>Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to announce Michael Raedecker's fifth exhibition at the gallery, highlighting substantial new developments in the artist's practice and anticipating an important traveling mid-career survey show opening at the Wilhelm Hack Museum at the end of this year. <br /> <br /> In a recent shift, Raedecker began cutting his painted canvases apart and stitching the fragments back together to form new compositions. The cut is disruptive and perverse: the rip becomes a repair and the fragmented scene becomes newly reanimated. In his newest body of work, Raedecker uses the intentional precision of this technique to interrogate our sentimental attachment to highly recognizable yet generic symbols of the good life: the suburban model home, the palm tree, the chandelier. These anonymous objects, repeated and set adrift in gestural monochromatic fields of paint, are placeholders for the whole history of the world, appearing and disappearing on the surface of the paintings. <br /> <br /> The initial familiarity of these scenes allows for our personal investment in them, but the literal trace of the object, created by the puncture of the needle and gauge of the thread, continues to pull us back to the surface and to the painting itself as the object of extraordinary investment and inquiry. For Raedecker the decorative fa&ccedil;ade of a house is analogous to a painting - its flatness resists vision, reflecting instead the viewer's own desires and fears. The painting, like the fa&ccedil;ade or the almost abstract filigree of a chandelier picked out in thread, is always a fragile surface, its loose narratives caving in on themselves, turning upside down and failing to resolve into known pictorial categories. This uncanny loop of recognition and estrangement is intensified by the newest sutures, which disrupt the integrity of the picture and memorialize the essential violence of representation. <br /> <br /> The title of the exhibition invokes the tour as a journey undertaken for pleasure or inspection - a contemplative invitation to the viewer with various way stations for connection, exchange and new perspectives. <br /> <br /> <em>Michael Raedecker was born in Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1963 and currently lives and works in London. He studied at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam (1993 - 1994), and at Goldsmiths College, London (1996 - 1997). In 2000, Raedecker was shortlisted for the prestigious Turner Prize. Recent solo exhibitions include </em>volume<em> at Hauser &amp; Wirth, London (2012); Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin (2010); and </em>line-up<em> which opened at Camden Arts Centre, London, England (2009) and travelled to Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands (2009) and Carr&eacute; d'Art - Mus&eacute;e d'Art Contemporain de N&icirc;mes (2010).</em><br /> </p> Thu, 29 Aug 2013 23:09:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Michael St. John - Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 - September 6th, 2013 - October 5th, 2013 <p>Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to present Michael St. John&rsquo;s third Gallery 2 exhibition. Titled <em>Country Life,</em> the exhibition unites St. John&rsquo;s consistent interest in the representation of common, everyday experience with a diligent, but often playful, formal practice. It opens just before the release of St. John&rsquo;s first major monograph, published by Karma.<br /> <br /> This series of work represents source material as varied as 18th Century American <em>tromp l&rsquo;oeil</em> painting by John Peto, images of women found on the internet by searching &ldquo;nice racks,&rdquo; American presidents, and Jasper Johns&rsquo; painting &ldquo;In the Studio,&rdquo; 1982. St. John&rsquo;s work makes claims for the relevance of contemporary art by abandoning a hierarchy of culture and placing art equally at the center of the broader discourse with mass media.<br /> <br /> At the heart of this exhibition is the question of representation and the slippery boundary between what is real and what is not. Mimicking the &ldquo;rack&rdquo; paintings of Philadelphia painter John Peto, St. John employs <em>tromp l&rsquo;oeil</em> as a metaphor for the increasingly complex nature of fact and fiction and how information is perceived, delivered, represented, and understood in the age of the internet and cable news. St. John cleverly updates the tradition of painstaking, <em>tromp l&rsquo;oeil</em> painting by incorporating both real objects and modern reproduction (photographs and photocopies). For St. John, the process of collecting and displaying objects and images, whether done by a teenager in a bedroom or an artist in the studio, is both a means of generating a narrative about one&rsquo;s own identity and who we might be, or want to be, as a people. This body of work moves from the urban studio to the country but it continues St. John&rsquo;s investigation into how people generate meaning through commemorative acts.<br /> <br /> Having lived in New York for many years, St. John now lives in the Berkshires and the title <em>Country Life</em> alludes to the potentially false narrative of simplicity and irony that attends that lifestyle. If the world has truly become inescapable with internet access and cable television, perhaps a country life is as thin a veneer of reality as the faux wood treatment used by St. John in many of the paintings in the exhibition. Using a wide range of techniques, St. John&rsquo;s paintings alternately fool the eye and call attention to their own material construction.<br /> <br /> In contrast to the sentiment of Norman Rockwell&rsquo;s paintings, St. John&rsquo;s work is a clear-eyed representation of America at this moment. Without imbuing his works with any ostensible ideology, St. John presents his viewers with the space to occupy a subjective position. &ldquo;Like watching the news,&rdquo; St. John says, &ldquo;you are left to wonder, what&rsquo;s real and what&rsquo;s not.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> <em>Michael St. John lives and works in Sheffield, Massachusetts. Karma will publish St. John&rsquo;s first major monograph in September, shortly after the opening of this exhibition. Karma will concurrently present a large selection of work from St. John&rsquo;s ongoing series </em>These Days: Leaves of Grass<em> made between 1996 and 2013. Along with an extensive resume of curatorships, St. John has held numerous teaching positions.</em><br /> </p> Thu, 29 Aug 2013 23:14:08 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Goshka Macuga - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 535 West 22nd - September 12th, 2013 - October 5th, 2013 <p>In the 535 West 22nd Gallery, Goshka Macuga will be presenting works based on the work of Miroslav Tich&yacute;. Macuga&rsquo;s work interweaves two strands that have helped define contemporary art in the last decade: artists&rsquo; increasing tendency toward historical and archival research and their growing interest in strategies of display and the dialogue between artistic and curatorial practice. Featuring a large-scale tapestry, as well as collages that incorporate images taken from Tich&yacute;'s original negatives layered with Communist images, the works in the show emulate Tich&yacute;'s works while presenting a new reading through the eyes of a contemporary female artist who has also lived under Communism, there by addressing the inherent problematics of Tich&yacute;'s practice.</p> <p>Born in Poland in 1967, Macuga has been based in London since 1989. Her most recent solo exhibition took place the MCA Chicago where&nbsp;she is currently in residence. She has shown extensively internationally with solo exhibitions at&nbsp;the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the Zacheta National Gallery of Art in Warsaw (both 2011),&nbsp;&nbsp;Whitechapel Gallery in London (2010), Kunsthalle Basel (2009), and&nbsp;Tate Britain (2007). &nbsp;Her work was included in&nbsp;Documenta (13) (2012),&nbsp;&nbsp;the 53rd Venice Biennial (2009),&nbsp;the 5th Berlin Biennial (2008) and the&nbsp;Liverpool Biennial (2006), and she&nbsp;was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2008.</p> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 03:52:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Annette Kelm - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - September 12th, 2013 - November 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: small;">For her second solo exhibition at the gallery Annette Kelm is presenting new works that have been made entirely in 2013. Kelm's photos filter significations as a system of values and codes that are established and stabilized by various forms of image production. This system includes their distribution by the art market, media and consumers: among them phenomena of sports and daily life, botanics, exoticism, Hollywood film, and architecture. She produces both individual and series of works with repeating motifs and, in her exhibitions, shows a combination of photographs that refuse to submit to a single reading of a theme or concept. Different ways of viewing her works are offered, but never quite fulfilled- instead they obfuscate and undo themselves. <br /><br />Annette currently has work included in <em>New Photography&nbsp;2013</em> at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Born (1975) in Stuttgart, Kelm presently lives and works in Berlin and has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions internationally; most recently with Presentation House gallery, Vancouver (2012), Bonner Kunstverein (2011), KW &ndash; Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin and Kunstalle Zurich (both 2009). In 2011, Kelm participated in the 54th Venice Biennale.</span></p> Mon, 28 Oct 2013 16:48:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jonas Wood - Anton Kern Gallery - September 12th, 2013 - October 19th, 2013 <p>Jonas Wood&rsquo;s fourth solo show at Anton Kern Gallery presents a collection of paintings that transform everyday spaces, subjects, and artifacts from his daily life into novel encounters. These energetic new works expose a complex interweaving of personally charged subject matter and locales that imbue the paintings with emotional depth and evoke a bewildering sense of familiarity and awe. Still lifes of still lifes, portraits of friends, a facade surrounded by dense foliage, former pets, a tennis arena, a scene from a poker tournament and various artworks all emerge and dissemble, as though by camouflage, into the paintings&rsquo; vivid color planes and mosaic-like forms.<br />Wood uses techniques of layering and transposition to assemble scenarios that reveal intricately manipulated narratives that hover between genres and artistic styles. Blurring boundaries of figuration and abstraction, his works re-animate domestic spaces through off-kilter perspectives and instill an exotic air into their autobiographical tones.<br />Working almost exclusively from sketches of photographs and life studies, or collaged mock-ups of the two, Wood&rsquo;s process intentionally moves through several mediums, each of which subtly alters its previous form before committing the composition to canvas. For several of these paintings, Wood created etchings, produced by Jacob Samuel Editions, of his preparatory drawings, adding yet another level of translation to his already semiotic-skewing approach.<br />Wood&rsquo;s paintings celebrate a mastery of incongruity and the re-organization of representation and memory. Wood not only puts our visual world out of its order, he rearranges the temporal and psychological landscapes in such a way that the paintings themselves conjure a logic and spatial continuity of their own.<br />Jonas Wood was born in Boston and received his MFA from the University of Washington. His work has been shown in galleries in the U.S., Europe, and Japan, as well as numerous public collections, such as the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Wood has a solo exhibition at the Lever House, New York which opens September 27th, 2013. Wood lives and works in Los Angeles. <br /><br /></p> Tue, 27 Aug 2013 01:42:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list