ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Ericka Beckman, Yoji Kondo, Tom Morrill, Akiko Maruyama & Philippe Roy, Rebecca Naegele, Trevor Shimizu - 3A Gallery - June 29th - August 28th <p>Six Films show of a veteran film artist Ericka Beckman and young artists.</p> <p>Ericka Beckman: Tension Building<br /> Yoji Kondo: Parasol<br /> Tom Morrill: Justice Coin Gold<br /> Akiko Maruyama &amp; Philippe Roy: Koropokkuru<br /> Rebecca Naegele: Cyclops<br /> Trevor Shimizu: Yawn</p> Sat, 25 Jun 2016 10:59:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list James Rosenquist, Hans Hoffman, Claes Oldenburg, Kenneth Noland - Acquavella Galleries - July 5th - September 30th Sat, 02 Jul 2016 18:19:21 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Sunil Gawde - AICON GALLERY - New York - July 7th - August 6th <div align="justify"><strong>Aicon Gallery New York</strong>&nbsp;is proud to present<em>&nbsp;id - od &amp; other dimensions</em>, the first major U.S. solo exhibition of Mumbai-based artist&nbsp;<strong>Sunil Gawde</strong>. Since his participation in 2009's Venice Biennale, Gawde has become internationally recognized for his unique sculptural and installation-based works, which blur and question the boundaries between the physical reality of everyday objects and our subjective perceptions of them. Whether embarking on a philosophical exploration inspired by an object itself, or creating an object or tableaux born of an idea, Gawde's works serve as complex, yet often humorous, visual allegories exposing the absurdities and dualities inherent in our struggle to come to terms with both our history and contemporary life.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify">The 'id - od' of the exhibition's title, standing for 'inner dimension - outer dimension', is taken from a series of newly created mid-scale sculptural works in which many-layered, often ironic narratives have been spun outwards from objects ranging from the everyday to the iconic. Herds of hand-made miniature elephants roam amidst the domestic trappings of modern Indian life, while kinetic installations endlessly perform simple repetitive actions, which in turn lead to Sisyphean loops of contemplation in the viewer. The familiar objects juxtaposed in these works project a series of surreal fables and warnings outwards for our interpretation, while simultaneously turning our gaze inwards upon our traditional understanding of their meanings. It is this parallel and two-way exploration of perception versus reality that remains central to Gawde's practice.</div> <p style="text-align: justify;">Accompanying the 'id - od' series on display are a selection of important large-scale installation pieces spanning the last decade of Gawde's career. These works not only dig deeper into the dualities and contradictions explored in the works mentioned above, but also highlight the artist's masterful manipulation of materials in pursuit of the illusionistic perfection required to cement our belief in the physical possibility of the objects and installations themselves. As Gawde has stated:</p> <div align="justify"><br /> <blockquote> <div align="center">"...the marriage of philosophy, technique, aesthetics, and material is the foundation of my creative process. An essential element of my sculptures is also the technical skill of the experts I work with. While canvases are a solitary effort, sculptural creations, which have to be aesthetically and structurally sound, require a skillful combination of engineering and art."</div> </blockquote> <div style="text-align: justify;" align="center">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;" align="center"> <div align="justify">Anchoring these two sets of sculpture in the current exhibition is group of new work building upon Gawde's past experiments with butterfly forms made of mirrored stainless steel in works such as<em>Virtually Untouchable</em>&nbsp;(2004) and&nbsp;<em>Conquer</em>&nbsp;(2012). These remarkably beautiful organic creatures, precision-cast from cold, glistening, industrialized steel, incorporate Gawde's recurring motifs of razor blades, swords, and daggers, though which he again plays with dueling notions of beauty and danger, desire and pain, and, more broadly, perception and reality.</div> <div align="justify">&nbsp;</div> <div align="justify">Born in Mumbai in 1960, Gawde graduated in Fine Art from the J.J. School of Art in 1980. In 1995, he received the British Council's Charles Wallace Award for 1995-96, and spent a year as a visiting artist at the Glasgow School of Art, Scotland. Since 1990, Gawde has held more than 11 solo exhibitions worldwide. In 2009, he was invited to participate in the 53rd Venice Biennale, curated by Daniel Birnbaum, and in 2011, his work was featured in the group exhibition&nbsp;<em>Paris-Delhi-Bombay</em>&nbsp;at the Centre Pompidou. His work has been collected by the National Gallery of Modern Art, the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, and the Devi Art Foundation in India, as well as by important international private collections. This is his first major solo exhibition in the United States and his first exhibition with Aicon Gallery.</div> </div> </div> Mon, 04 Jul 2016 16:44:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Alexander Gray Associates - July 7th - August 12th <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Haptic: of or relating to the sense of touch, in particular relating to the perception and manipulation of objects using the senses of touch and proprioception.</em><br /> <br /> Alexander Gray Associates presents <em>Haptic</em>, featuring work by artists Polly Apfelbaum, Amy Bessone, Alexandre da Cunha, Leonardo Drew, Melvin Edwards, Ann Hamilton, Harmony Hammond, Sheila Hicks, William J. O&rsquo;Brien, Howardena Pindell, Norbert Prangenberg, Jacolby Satterwhite, Hassan Sharif, and Betty Woodman. Together, they simultaneously expand and question traditional craft practices within the context of contemporary art.<br /> <br /> Spanning media, including ceramic, textile, sculpture and video art, the works on view evoke the haptic through irregular or tactile surfaces with the presence of handiwork. As art historian and curator Helen Molesworth notes in Imaginary Landscape from the exhibition catalogue <em>Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College: 1933&ndash;1975</em>, &ldquo;while the dictionary may define haptic as &lsquo;relating to the sense of touch, in particular relating to the perception and manipulation of objects using the senses of touch and proprioception&rsquo;, the word, when used in reference to works of art, denotes those works that engage visuality through an appeal to tactility. Haptic objects intertwine visuality and tactility so thoroughly that they are inextricable from each other.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> In addition to the variety of media, the artists also represent a diversity of cultures and generations, highlighting the omnipresence of craft modalities across geographies and ages. <strong>Alexandre da Cunha</strong>, <strong>Sheila Hicks</strong> and <strong>Hassan Sharif</strong> refer to global traditions in their woven compositions which simultaneously recall geographically-situated histories and ingrained understandings of gender roles. <strong>Harmony Hammond</strong> and <strong>Howardena Pindell</strong>, collage, and paint built-up surfaces which evoke abstracted female bodies. <strong>Amy Bessone</strong>, <strong>William J. O&rsquo;Brien</strong>, <strong>Norbert Prangenberg</strong> and <strong>Betty Woodman</strong> render fragmented portions of the human body in clay, to create both functional and decorative art objects that retain visual traces of the maker&rsquo;s touch. <strong>Polly Apfelbaum</strong> utilizes saturated color and abstract forms in her wall-based ceramics, and implies human presence through her use of peoples&rsquo; names as titles. <strong>Ann Hamilton</strong> and <strong>Jacolby Satterwhite</strong> use the aesthetics of aggregation to mine memory, both communal and personal. <strong>Leonardo Drew</strong> and <strong>Melvin Edwards</strong> employ assemblage to create sculptural objects that indicate the links between craft and craftsmanship. As a group, these artists subvert traditional modes of making (craft) by imbuing their work with personal perspective while commenting on social or political realities. <br /> <br /> <strong>About the Artists</strong> <br /> <strong>Polly Apfelbaum</strong> (b.1955) was born in Abington, PA and lives and works in New York. <strong>Amy Bessone</strong> (b.1970) was born in New York and lives and works in Los Angeles. <strong>Alexandre da Cunha</strong> (b.1969) was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and lives and works in London. <strong>Leonardo Drew</strong> (b.1961) was born in Tallahassee, FL, and loves and works in Brooklyn, NY. <strong>Melvin Edwards</strong> (b.1937) was born in Houston, TX, and lives and works in New York, and Dakar, Senegal. <strong>Ann Hamilton</strong> (b.1956) was born, and continues to live and work in Ohio. <strong>Harmony Hammond</strong> (b.1944) was born in Illinois and lives and works in Galisteo, NM. <strong>Sheila Hicks</strong> (b.1934) was born in Hastings, NE and lives and works in Paris. <strong>William J. O&rsquo;Brien</strong> (b.1975) was born in Eastlake, OH and lives and works in Chicago, IL. <strong>Howardena Pindell</strong> (b.1943) was born in Philadelphia, PA and lives and works in New York. <strong>Norbert Prangenberg</strong> (b.1949&ndash; d.2012) was born in Rheinland, Germany and died in Krefeld, Germany. <strong>Jacolby Satterwhite</strong> (b.1986) was born in Columbia, SC and lives and works in New York. <strong>Hassan Sharif</strong> (b.1951) was born, and continues to live and work in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. <strong>Betty Woodman</strong> (b.1930) was born in Norwalk, CT and lives and works in New York.</p> Sat, 02 Jul 2016 18:22:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ronald Lockett - American Folk Art Museum - June 21st - September 18th <p style="text-align: justify;">The art of Ronald Lockett (1965&ndash;1998) speaks to the universality of the human condition through the lens of lived experience in the American South. <em>Fever Within</em>, the first retrospective on the artist, emphasizes the themes Lockett explored over the course of his decade-long artistic career.&nbsp;Working within the artistic traditions of found materials, he addressed subjects of racial, economic, and political unrest, including the unfulfilled promises of the civil rights movement and environmental degradation.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Born and raised in Bessemer, Alabama, Lockett turned his attention to artmaking full-time in his early twenties. His elder cousin, the artist Thornton Dial (1928&ndash;2016), mentored and encouraged him. By the time of his death at age thirty-two from HIV/AIDS-related pneumonia, Lockett&nbsp;had produced more than 350 works. Largely unrecognized in his lifetime, Lockett fits squarely into evolving histories of American art in the late twentieth century.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Curator<br /> <em>Bernard L. Herman, George B. Tindall Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies, Department of American Studies, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill </em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Organizing Curator, American Folk Art Museum<br /> <em>Val&eacute;rie Rousseau, Curator, Self-Taught Art and Art Brut</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition is on view at the same time as a complement presentation,&nbsp;<a href="http://folkartmuseum.org/exhibitions/once-something-has-lived-it-can-never-really-die" target="_blank"><em>Once Something Has Lived It Can Never Really Die</em></a>, which borrows its title from an artwork by Lockett.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition is organized and circulated by the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It is made possible in part by awards from the William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust and the National Endowment for the Arts, and additional funding is provided by the Department of American Studies Chair&rsquo;s Discretionary Fund for Southern Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The presentation at the American Folk Art Museum is supported in part by Joyce Berger Cowin, the David Davies and Jack Weeden Fund for Exhibitions, the Ford Foundation, Agnes Gund, the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, the Leir Charitable Foundations, the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.</p> Fri, 20 May 2016 09:31:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ronald Lockett - American Folk Art Museum - June 21st - September 18th <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Once Something Has Lived It Can Never Really Die</em> takes its title from a large-scale assemblage created by African American self-taught artist Ronald Lockett (1965&ndash;1998) in 1996, two years before he died of AIDS-related pneumonia. On the rusted-tin surface of the artwork emerges the silhouette of a stag&mdash;a depiction of Lockett&rsquo;s avatar, which he used repeatedly in his art. Like many other works in his oeuvre, the piece reflects the artist&rsquo;s reckoning with his own mortality and endurance in the face of brutal entrapment.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In the exhibition, ten of Lockett&rsquo;s artworks&mdash;representing different phases of his career&mdash;are paired with more than eighty small and portable works made by both known and unidentified artists from various eras and geographical regions, all of whom are situated&nbsp;outside the art mainstream. It includes eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Native American effigies, Brazilian wood ex-votos, sculptures by Sandra Sheehy (b. 1965), and drawings by Melvin Way (b. 1954). Each production relates to the most pervasive and essential themes in Lockett&rsquo;s art: mortality, eschatology, and vulnerability. Produced for their protective qualities and invested with powers, the creations played a role in daily rituals. They allude to recurring human conditions&mdash;fear, loss, illness, and survival&mdash;and mark transitions between, and connections with, the ongoing cycles of life.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Curator<br /> <em>Val&eacute;rie Rousseau, Curator, Self-Taught Art and Art Brut</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Once Something Has Lived It Can Never Really Die</em> is a complement presentation to <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/418921-fever-within-the-art-of-ronald-lockett" target="_blank"><em>Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett</em></a>, a traveling exhibition organized by the Ackland Art Museum that will be on view at the same time.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The museum&nbsp;would like to thank Gordon W. Bailey, Edward V. Blanchard, Andrew Castrucci, Cavin-Morris Gallery, Beate Echols and Michael Shub, Harriet Finkelstein, Jacqueline Loewe Fowler, Audrey Heckler, Jeffrey Myers, Richard Rosenthal, Sandra Sheehy, Ron and June Shelp, and Melvin Way for their loans and support for the exhibition.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition is supported in part by Joyce Berger Cowin, the David Davies and Jack Weeden Fund for Exhibitions, the Ford Foundation, the Leir Charitable Foundations, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 20 May 2016 09:38:19 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Matthew Ronay, Serge Charchoune, Fernand L├ęger, Graham Marks, Terry Riley - Andrea Rosen Gallery - June 28th - August 5th <p style="text-align: justify;">Andrea Rosen Gallery is delighted to present <em>Empirical Intuitive Absorption</em>, an exhibition organized by Matthew Ronay featuring significant and rarely seen works by Serge Charchoune, Fernand L&eacute;ger, Graham Marks and Terry Riley, as well as new works by Ronay. This exhibition, inspired by a conversation with Ronay following his lecture at the Perez Art Museum Miami this spring, exemplifies the intention, exploration and potential behind the gallery&rsquo;s historical program in shaping contemporary dialogues to illuminate new facets of past and present.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Curator&rsquo;s Statement</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">An ongoing interest in the origin of creativity has led me in many directions, with each interpretation I come across supporting its unknowable nature.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>The Science of the Dogon: Decoding the African Mystery Tradition </em>by Laird Scranton, a book of guerilla scholarship, proposes that the Dogon people of West Africa, whose creation mythology is told through symbols, sculpture, and architecture, had knowledge of the genesis of matter, biology on an atomic level, astronomy, and other psychical phenomena that would have been impossible for them to have understood through direct observation. When viewed thorough this lens, it&rsquo;s uncanny the way some of their symbols echo mitosis or string theory, as if their bodies knew.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">I wondered, might it be possible that other works of abstraction also have roots in something beyond formal endeavor? Can abstraction be knowledge? Can knowledge be expressed without dogma?</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Some abstractions, even if unconnected to organized traditions and mythologies, may relate to something empirical. It is possible that in our evolution from stardust to human that we have absorbed some sort of intuitive understanding of our dawning and being, an implicit inherited memory of our existence, charted out in images of biology, botany, geology, astronomy, etc&hellip; Historically, artists have naturally &ldquo;de-conditioned themselves from the community&rsquo;s instinctual distrust of the mystery&hellip;to go between ordinary reality and the domain of ideas.&rdquo;* They&rsquo;ve trained to relax and discharge the repeating song of the universe in its echoing forms of micro and macro, biological knots, and intricacies. These ideas then become narratives, then parallel into mythologies. Does everything loop back into nature?</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">As I warmed to this idea I saw it in works that are inspirations to me by Charchoune, L&eacute;ger, Marks, and Riley.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Serge Charchoune</strong> (1888&ndash;1975). A self described Ornamental Cubist, with Copley, Duchamp, Ernst, L&eacute;ger, and Miro amongst his supporters and patrons. I think he was a synesthete, as his oeuvre is pocked with paintings inspired by music. He also had an affinity for water and saw it and music as mirroring each other. He is undoubtedly another artist whose diagrams and &ldquo;landscapes&rdquo; mimic some instinctual understanding of geology, biology, and even engineering. As his painting progresses, he begins to deplete the color in his work so that by the 1960s he is painting almost entirely in white monochrome.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Fernand L&eacute;ger</strong> (1881&ndash;1955). There is a period of L&eacute;ger&rsquo;s work, from the mid 1920s to early 1930s, that I am particularly interested in, and that I believe is inspired by the &ldquo;close-up&rdquo; in film &ndash; where he seems to be understanding, like a computer, the unconscious psychological associations with objects. He definitely took a turn into the physical / biological world for a moment after this when his strange visual computations blossomed into amoeboid. This period of serious interest in microscopic imagery was inspired by his frequent hiking with Charlotte Perriand.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Graham Marks</strong> (b.1951). Marks&rsquo; vegetal egg structures map the universe and vibrate microscopic cellular or elemental possibilities. Often in repose, they seem to be projecting outward and pulling inward at the same time.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Terry Riley</strong> (b. 1935). Minimalist musician and student of La Monte Young and Pandit Pran Nath, Riley is a flexible and organic contemporary of his minimalist peers. His music bubbles like water boiling, grows like a plant, or freezes into crystalline structures. It reflects something analog but infinitely intricate, like a molecular structure.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">My own relationship to this proposition of the abstract as more than formalist is obvious in its participation with alien deep sea creatures, glandular secretions, vibrating fields of energy, and tongues and protrusions on scales indeterminable.<br /> _</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Matthew Ronay</strong> (b. 1976) lives and works in New York. His work has been exhibited internationally, and is currently on view in concurrent solo-exhibitions at the Perez Art Museum Miami (through January 15, 2017) and The Blaffer Art Museum, Houston (through October 1). A new monographic catalogue illustrating major recent and new bodies of work will conjunctively be published by Gregory R. Miller &amp; Co. at the end of the summer.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">*Terence McKenna and The Shaman, Re:Evolution, 1992.</p> Sat, 25 Jun 2016 10:54:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Kevin Jerome Everson, Lucy Raven, Dierk Schmidt, Cheyney Thompson - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 535 West 22nd - June 24th - August 19th <p style="text-align: justify;">Andrew Kreps Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of works by Kevin Jerome Everson, Lucy Raven, Dierk Schmidt, and Cheyney Thompson, all of whom share a deeply analytical approach to their subject material.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Kevin Jerome Everson&rsquo;s works in film, painting, sculpture and photography, explore the ordinariness of everyday lives. Often adopting the stance of an observer, the works approach race, sexuality, and economic circumstances, parsing a relationship between the human body and labor. Everson&rsquo;s films have previously been presented at numerous institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2015, and the Whitney Museum of Art, New York, 2011.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Lucy Raven combines photography, animation and sound in her practice to interrogate the relationship of industrial systems to image production. Over the past years, Raven has collected examples of test patterns utilized by 35mm film projectionists to calibrate projectors. Presenting these in a series of prints, Raven reveals the mechanics behind the creation of what are considered to be optimal images. A solo exhibition of her work is currently on view at the Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, through November 27, 2016.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Dierk Schmidt utilizes painting to reflect on political histories past and present in projects that often span several years. In a series of small paintings on glass, Schmidt investigates the ways in which Western institutions often make cultural objects inaccessible to the societies that created them. Schmidts work was recently included in the exhibition <em>Nervous Systems. Quantified Life and the Social Question</em>,&nbsp;Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, 2016 and <em>Dialog der Meisterwerke</em>, St&auml;del Museum, Frankfurt/Main, 2015, among others.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Cheyney Thompson employs rational structures, and technological processes to examine the production and distribution of painting. His most recent series of paintings are generated by placing financial algorithms in relation to Munsell&rsquo;s color system &ndash; the resulting compositions tracing a line between painting&rsquo;s twin imperatives of capture and exposure.&nbsp;Thompson&rsquo;s work is currently on view as part of <em>Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner</em>, Centre Pompidou, Paris, through February 2017 (traveled from the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York).</p> Wed, 22 Jun 2016 09:50:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Peter Piller - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - June 30th - August 12th Fri, 20 May 2016 09:41:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Brian Calvin - Anton Kern Gallery - June 30th - August 19th <p style="text-align: justify;">For her debut solo exhibition in New York, Anton Kern Gallery has invited Chicago-based painter Margot Bergman (b.1934) to present a body of recent portraits. Paired with Bergman&rsquo;s work is a selection of early drawings and paintings by Brian Calvin (b.1969), from the <em>Popeye</em> series created during his time in Chicago in the early 1990s. These side by side exhibitions depict the human figure and all its grotesque facets, and reflect the painterly Neo-Expressionist sensibilities of the Chicago art scene. With an emphasis on building up paint, working and reworking their materials, both artists create layers; Bergman in a physical sense and Calvin in a more figurative sense.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Margot Bergman builds layers of paint atop found artworks. The interplay between elements of the found works she exposes and her own additions creates distorted and uncanny forms, reminiscent of Modernist collage. Her constructed &lsquo;double-portraits&rsquo; converge into a single subject. With titles like <em>Auntie Gladyce</em>, <em>Gloria Jean</em>, and <em>Patty</em>, each painting possesses a unique personality, a soul. This process of prosopopoeia stems from the artist&rsquo;s relationship with the found paintings, who she has &ldquo;rescued&rdquo; from flea markets and kept in her home. As Bergman explains, &ldquo;It was a process - living with them, understanding what I was looking for, beginning to draw it out, slowly and without a plan, responding to the original paintings. I didn&rsquo;t know what the next step would be. Once I found my way to the portraits, it was magical for me.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">When Brian Calvin moved from Berkeley to Chicago in the early 1990s, his predisposition toward painterly figuration was broadened through local influences such as the Imagists and the Hairy Who, resulting in a tonal shift in his painting. In his &lsquo;Popeye&rsquo; works, Calvin renders the stark cartoon figure in thickly applied paint against a dark brooding background, paused amid mundane activities such as smoking a cigarette, standing in the rain, lying awake in bed. The contrast and stillness creates a sense of unease and focuses the viewer&rsquo;s attention on the subject&rsquo;s gestures. Calvin subverts Popeye&rsquo;s inherent cartoon lightness by reimagining himself in an alternate reality, restaging him in a bleak psychological landscape. With the memory accumulated from drawing this iconic character repeatedly in his youth, Calvin uses the figure&rsquo;s instantly recognizable shape, and it&rsquo;s associations, as a vessel for ruminations on pathos.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Margot Bergman</strong>, born in 1934, has been an active member of the Chicago art scene since the 1950s. Her works often deal with the interplay between found works and her own painterly interventions. Recent exhibitions include <em>Body Doubles</em>, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2015); <em>Unbound: Contemporary Art after Frida Kahlo</em>, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2014); INNER SIGHT/INSIGHT: Driven to Dare, Governors State University, University Park, IL (2014); <em>Look at Me: Portraiture from Manet to the Present</em>, Leila Heller Gallery, New York (2014); D<em>ialogue Chicago: Taking Chances</em>, Noyes Cultural Arts Center, Evanston, IL (2013).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Brian Calvin</strong>, born in 1969 in Visalia, California, has gained a reputation as the painter of &ldquo;pausing-an-activity,&rdquo; using a matte palette and skewed cropping in portraits, landscapes, facial features, and reflections that hover uncertainly between states of abstraction and figuration. His recent solo exhibitions include the mid-career survey <em>End of Messages</em>, which traveled from Le Consortium, Dijon to Mu.ZEE, Oostende (2015). Recent group exhibitions include <em>Wild Style</em>, Peres Projects, Berlin, Germany (2016); <em>About Face</em>, Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles, CA (2015); <em>intimate paintings</em>, Half Gallery, New York, NY (2015); <em>Tracing Shadows</em>, PLATEAU, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea (2015); and <em>The Shell (Landscapes, Portraits, &amp; Shapes)</em>, Almine Rech Gallery, Paris, France (2015).</p> Sat, 02 Jul 2016 18:29:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Margot Bergman - Anton Kern Gallery - June 30th - August 19th <p style="text-align: justify;">For her debut solo exhibition in New York, Anton Kern Gallery has invited Chicago-based painter Margot Bergman (b.1934) to present a body of recent portraits. Paired with Bergman&rsquo;s work is a selection of early drawings and paintings by Brian Calvin (b.1969), from the <em>Popeye</em> series created during his time in Chicago in the early 1990s. These side by side exhibitions depict the human figure and all its grotesque facets, and reflect the painterly Neo-Expressionist sensibilities of the Chicago art scene. With an emphasis on building up paint, working and reworking their materials, both artists create layers; Bergman in a physical sense and Calvin in a more figurative sense.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Margot Bergman builds layers of paint atop found artworks. The interplay between elements of the found works she exposes and her own additions creates distorted and uncanny forms, reminiscent of Modernist collage. Her constructed &lsquo;double-portraits&rsquo; converge into a single subject. With titles like <em>Auntie Gladyce</em>, <em>Gloria Jean</em>, and <em>Patty</em>, each painting possesses a unique personality, a soul. This process of prosopopoeia stems from the artist&rsquo;s relationship with the found paintings, who she has &ldquo;rescued&rdquo; from flea markets and kept in her home. As Bergman explains, &ldquo;It was a process - living with them, understanding what I was looking for, beginning to draw it out, slowly and without a plan, responding to the original paintings. I didn&rsquo;t know what the next step would be. Once I found my way to the portraits, it was magical for me.&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">When Brian Calvin moved from Berkeley to Chicago in the early 1990s, his predisposition toward painterly figuration was broadened through local influences such as the Imagists and the Hairy Who, resulting in a tonal shift in his painting. In his &lsquo;Popeye&rsquo; works, Calvin renders the stark cartoon figure in thickly applied paint against a dark brooding background, paused amid mundane activities such as smoking a cigarette, standing in the rain, lying awake in bed. The contrast and stillness creates a sense of unease and focuses the viewer&rsquo;s attention on the subject&rsquo;s gestures. Calvin subverts Popeye&rsquo;s inherent cartoon lightness by reimagining himself in an alternate reality, restaging him in a bleak psychological landscape. With the memory accumulated from drawing this iconic character repeatedly in his youth, Calvin uses the figure&rsquo;s instantly recognizable shape, and it&rsquo;s associations, as a vessel for ruminations on pathos.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Margot Bergman</strong>, born in 1934, has been an active member of the Chicago art scene since the 1950s. Her works often deal with the interplay between found works and her own painterly interventions. Recent exhibitions include <em>Body Doubles</em>, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2015); <em>Unbound: Contemporary Art after Frida Kahlo</em>, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2014); INNER SIGHT/INSIGHT: Driven to Dare, Governors State University, University Park, IL (2014); <em>Look at Me: Portraiture from Manet to the Present</em>, Leila Heller Gallery, New York (2014); D<em>ialogue Chicago: Taking Chances</em>, Noyes Cultural Arts Center, Evanston, IL (2013).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Brian Calvin</strong>, born in 1969 in Visalia, California, has gained a reputation as the painter of &ldquo;pausing-an-activity,&rdquo; using a matte palette and skewed cropping in portraits, landscapes, facial features, and reflections that hover uncertainly between states of abstraction and figuration. His recent solo exhibitions include the mid-career survey <em>End of Messages</em>, which traveled from Le Consortium, Dijon to Mu.ZEE, Oostende (2015). Recent group exhibitions include <em>Wild Style</em>, Peres Projects, Berlin, Germany (2016); <em>About Face</em>, Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles, CA (2015); <em>intimate paintings</em>, Half Gallery, New York, NY (2015); <em>Tracing Shadows</em>, PLATEAU, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea (2015); and <em>The Shell (Landscapes, Portraits, &amp; Shapes)</em>, Almine Rech Gallery, Paris, France (2015).</p> Sat, 02 Jul 2016 18:37:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Apexart - June 2nd - July 30th <p style="text-align: justify;">With the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, pundits rejoiced in the dawn of a new era, a world without walls. Instead, walls now permeate our world with 33 nation-states constructing them. Walls now separate Spain from Morocco (in the exclaves of Ceuta and Melilla), India from Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia from Yemen, Botswana from Mozambique, and the United States from Mexico. Many countries, including the United States, view border walls as a key element in their wars on terror, undocumented immigration, and smuggling. These walls are the centerpiece of policies aimed at increased militarization and the reconfiguration of rights and citizenship at borders. Their construction is part of a border security industry that includes collaborations between the public sector and multinational corporations. Even though border walls are a strategic reaffirmation of state sovereignty, states build them with minimal public input on their necessity, location, and design. Concrete walls, metal fences, and concertina wire speak to the overwhelmingly militaristic logic that guides the prevailing approach to borders. More specifically, in the United States, mainstream media, through its reporting and circulation of images, fuels the public&rsquo;s articulation of borders as war zones. Mexican-American residents of border communities, border artists, human rights advocates, leaders of Native American groups, and environmental organizations contest this onslaught of government and corporate domination as well as the mass mediated spectacular. This contestation is a story rarely told and a media imaginary rarely re-imagined.<br /><br /> This bilingual (English and Spanish) group exhibition brings together work by artists, activists, architects, and other public intellectuals who have created alternative designs for or fought the construction of the United States - Mexico border wall. The major questions that this exhibition addresses include: How can we reassert a more populist notion of sovereignty by re-imagining borders? What is the role of art and architecture in providing a bulwark against the erosion of democracy that border walls materialize?<br /><br /> 1,950 mile-long open wound<br /> dividing a pueblo, a culture<br /> running down the length of my body,<br /> staking fence rods in my flesh,<br /> splits me splits me<br /> me raja me raja<br /> <br /> ---Gloria Anzald&uacute;a,<em> La Frontera/Borderlands</em>, 1987, Preface <br /><br /> <em>Raja</em> (split) encompasses how borders not only divide but also scar and wound both the landscape and people (namely, Mexican-American citizens residing in the borderlands) it also describes how the border wall affects borderland culture on the United States side. The painter Celeste De Luna shows the border wall as it cuts through the in-between spaces of border culture while mapping this &ldquo;tearing&rdquo; onto border residents&rsquo; subjectivities and bodies. In Anchor Baby, De Luna represents a pregnant women&rsquo;s torso and upper body as the dividing line between the United States and Mexico, with picket fencing and barbed wire entrapping and severing her bare breasts and limbs. Within her body is a mature fetus encircled by an anchor calling attention to how childbirth is rendered a crime within the militarized framework of the border wall, anti-immigration discourse, and presidential candidates wanting to end birthright citizenship. <br /> <br /> A series of ethnographic photographs invite contemplation about how the border wall splits people, communities, and nature preserves in the United States. A photograph from a community museum and park, Pedestrian Trail (Miguel D&iacute;az-Barriga and Margaret Dorsey), centers the viewer&rsquo;s attention on a sign pointing to hiking trails in South Texas sliced by the wall. In a place where 90% of residents are Latina/o, and the poverty rate is among the highest in the nation, such action slices more than a park. The wall literally cuts into family life as illustrated in a photograph of metal pylons from the border wall rising behind the backyard of a house in Granjeno, Texas. <br /> <br /> The art of Alfred J. Quiroz draws attention to the theological and existential aspects of border crossings, including miracles and deaths. The exhibition includes three border milagros: <em>Mano por Centavo</em>, <em>Brazo de Trabajo</em>, and <em>Sinagua</em> from his binational <em>Parade of Humanity</em> project in which he attached sixteen giant metallic sculptures to the Arizona border wall. The three milagros (icons that reference miraculous events) featured at apexart draw inspiration from religious amulets popular in Mexican vernacular Catholicism, and also highlight the deathly nature of border crossers&rsquo; experiences, as people regularly die in the desert from dehydration. <br /> <br /> Anthropologists also locate the wall in relation to the experiences of migrants, the transformation of the landscape into killing fields, and, in subtler ways, the reshaping of border subjectivities. Photographs provided by Jason De Le&oacute;n feature the border crossing experience from the perspective of migrants themselves, and Carolina Rocha&rsquo;s digital recordings voice migrants&rsquo; fear as they cross the international boundary, border wall, and interior checkpoints. Gilberto Rosas and Randall McGuire&rsquo;s photographs capture anti-militarization graffiti and the paradoxes of border life, focusing on the wall as state violence. Lupe Flores documents United States border residents&rsquo; unease with their community&rsquo;s militarization in his photograph <em>Abrazos No Balazos/Hugs not Slugs</em> in which adolescents hug in front of the border wall. The improvised nature of the graffiti suggests the ephemeral yet embodied and visceral nature of their disappointment with the immense concrete wall that stands in their backyard. Alejandro Lugo interprets late twentieth century borderlands culture through a larger history of conquest, and his photographs of the border wall and the Statue of Liberty are symbolic gestures towards such conquest. <br /> <br /> Architects reimagine the border wall's potential as a generative site of binational cooperation. An installation in the exhibition features architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello&rsquo;s vision for repurposing the wall's concrete and metal into hike and bike trails along the border, solar panels that generate electricity for residents, and water collection stations (a statement on the deaths from dehydration). Another architectural redesign is James Brown&rsquo;s plan for a "friendlier" Friendship Park. Brown&rsquo;s proposal restores cross-border human touch, a small gesture that embodies a much needed turn to Humanism. <br /> <br /> Maurice Sherif&rsquo;s photographs capture the massive and monumental, yet piecemeal and prosaic, nature of the border wall. Sherif spent three years photographing the wall from California to Texas and brings the structure as a whole into public view, inviting scrutiny of its socio-cultural, environmental, and binational impacts. His photographs represent how the wall frames and indifferently militarizes historical and cultural sites, through its rusted metal and severe pretense.In the photograph University of Texas at Brownsville Rio Grande Valley Sector, the border wall intersects a white building generically labelled &ldquo;ART MUSEUM&rdquo; and provides a critical vantage point for pondering the intersection of culture and militarization. In their floor-to-ceiling print that emulates the grand scale of the wall, Scott Nicol and David Freeman photographed muddy footprints moving up the wall&rsquo;s rusty bollard poles. While its title, <em>Section 0-21</em>, mimics the military logic of the border security industrial complex, the footprints signify the humanity of border crossers. <br /><br /> In this exhibition, visitors cross a threshold, a checkpoint where their citizenship becomes suspect and under review. North the Checkpoint, (De Luna), an oil on canvas painting, depicts an interior checkpoint that draws attention to the camera and light arrays through which travelers must pass even though they are 75 miles north of the United States-Mexico border. The camera and light arrays teleport visitors into a virtual world where their images are reticulated onto crisscrossing security grids that compress experiences into a technologically accelerated space-time and transmutes personhood into algorithms and Non Structured Query Language searches. What kind of biometric data and photographs are these cameras capturing, and how are they being correlated with other information in the enormous data aggregators that enmesh citizen and non-citizen alike? The entrance to the exhibition reproduces these cameras and light arrays to provide visitors with an ephemeral sense of their empowerment over them. In this zone, can we challenge their all-seeing power and their infinitely flexible searchability? <br /><br /> The title <em>Fencing in Democracy</em> indexes how the border wall encloses democracy through suspending laws. In building the border wall, the U.S Department of Homeland Security waived thirty-seven laws. United States citizens had no legal standing to either challenge the construction of the wall or to contest its design and placement. In other words, the way in which the DHS organized the construction of the wall "fenced in" democracy&rsquo;s creative power. This exhibition invites participants to ask: Would we have a wall if its proposed construction had occurred in a fully democratic setting with an ethos of democracy? Can border walls and international boundaries become eco-zones that produce green energy and sites of binational cooperation, as suggested by the architects Brown, Fratello, and Rael? <br /><br /> In the case of the actual border wall, democracy&rsquo;s power was constrained; this exhibition allows participants and visitors to imagine alternatives and generate public dialogue about border militarization. While history offers many examples of building walls to restrict and control people, they crumble. But before they crumble, walls imprison, make legitimate human interaction across political borders illegitimate, and reduce democracy to tyranny. We can break down these barriers. De-fence Democracy. <br /><br /> <br /> <em>Fencing In Democracy</em> is a 2015-16 apexart <a href="https://apexart.org/unsolicited.php" target="_blank">Unsolicited Proposal Program</a> winning exhibition along with <a href="https://apexart.org/exhibitions/paris-williams.php" target="_blank"><em>Life After Death and Elsewhere</em></a> (September 2015), and <a href="https://apexart.org/exhibitions/kitchen-ogasian-vincent.php" target="_blank"><em>Setting Out</em></a> (January 2016).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Dr. Miguel Diaz-Barriga</strong> is a Professor of Anthropology at University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and recently served as the The Carol L. Zicklin Endowed Chair for the Honors Academy at Brooklyn College. He received his bachelors degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and his masters and doctorate degree from Stanford University. His research has focused on concepts relating to Mexican-American politics and identity, Latin American social movements, and border studies. He is the recipient of grants and research awards including the National Science Foundation for the project, "The Border Wall, Immigration, and Citizenship on the United States/Mexico Border.&rdquo; Professor Diaz-Barriga served as the President of the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) from 2010-2012. His forthcoming book with Margaret Dorsey is entitled Militarization on the Edge: Necro-Citizenship and the U.S.-Mexican Border Fence.<br /><br /> <strong>Dr. Margaret Dorsey</strong> is currently Associate Professor of Anthropology of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) and was Visiting Associate Professor of Anthropology at Brooklyn College (CUNY) from 2014-2015. Her research focuses on border security, Mexican American folklore, and border studies more generally. In 2014 Dorsey resided in Santa Fe as a Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow at the School for Advanced Research. Dorsey has won numerous grants (National Endowment of the Humanities, National Science Foundation) and published numerous articles on borderlands music and politics and is currently completing a book manuscript with Miguel D&iacute;az-Barriga on border security. Her other book-length projects include <em>Linda Escobar and Tejano Conjunto Music in South Texas</em> (2013) and <em>Pachangas: Borderlands Music, U.S. Politics, and Transnational Marketing</em> (2006). Dorsey is founding curator of the Border Studies Archive at UTRGV.</p> Fri, 20 May 2016 09:48:44 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Edward Buyck - Arkell Museum - March 1st - September 11th <div class="textbox" style="text-align: justify;">Edward Buyck (1888-1960) was commissioned to paint two historic views of Canajoharie as part of the Sesquicentennial celebration and pageant of Clinton&rsquo;s Brigade that brought boats overland from the Mohawk River at Canajoharie to Otsego Lake. Canajoharie&rsquo;s 150th anniversary celebration of Revolutionary War events opened with a two mile long parade that included floats carrying log cabins, stage couches, a wagon and other regional historic treasures from the American Revolution. Militia hauling boats in a reenactment of Clinton&rsquo;s Brigade at Canajoharie also marched along with the parade that attracted a crowd of 15,800 people on June 15, 1929. <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: justify;">The exhibition features both of the the paintings created by Buyck for the Sesquicentennial celebration along with 18th century paintings of Americans by Gilbert Stuart and Benjamin West.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Exhibitions are supported in part by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Jun 2016 18:34:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Winslow Homer, George Inness, Thomas Eakins, Childe Hassam, Robert Henri - Arkell Museum - March 1st - September 11th <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition features late 19th and early 20th century American paintings purchased by Bartlett Arkell, the founder and first president of the Beech-Nut Packaging Company. Works by Winslow Homer, George Inness, Thomas Eakins, Childe Hassam and other leading American Impressionists, and members of The Eight including Robert Henri are displayed in the original Canajoharie Gallery that opened to the public in 1929.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Bartlett Arkell encouraged his marketing staff to use both his collection, and the works he purchased for Canajoharie, in their print ads. The result of this borrowing of images from oil paintings created by artists such as Edward Gay and J.G. Brown, was a series of ad campaigns that brought &ldquo;art to the masses&rdquo; and linked the virtues found in the paintings with Beech-Nut gum and food products.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Exhibitions are supported in part by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Jun 2016 18:40:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Arkell Museum - June 12th - October 16th <p style="text-align: justify;">Featuring colorful paintings of the American circus by artists from the 1920s and 1930s alongside circus-themed marketing materials used by the Beech-Nut Packaging Company in the 1930s.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The Circus coming to town was a highly anticipated event in small towns across America during the early decades of the 20th century. Leading American artists painted the spectacle of the parade as the circus arrived and the excitement under the big top. Images of circus cars, animals and acrobats were also used to market food products during the 1930s. The Beech-Nut Packaging Company was one of the companies to use the excitement and nostalgia of the circus to sell its products. This culminated in the creation of Beech-Nut miniature circuses that traveled across the country by bus, and a circus themed pavilion at the New York World&rsquo;s Fair in 1939.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Exhibition sponsored by the Beech-Nut Nutrition Company</p> Wed, 01 Jun 2016 18:38:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Asia Society Museum - March 8th - January 8th, 2017 <p style="text-align: justify;">On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the founding of Asia Society, this exhibition celebrates the legacy of collecting and exhibiting Asian art that John D. Rockefeller 3rd and Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller set in motion for Asia Society. This exhibition plays with the notion of context by juxtaposing historical and contemporary works to trigger distinctive ways of thinking about artworks and the people that produce them, both past and present. The exhibition is a testament to the visionary commitment to Asia and its art begun by Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd, and that continues to the present at Asia Society.</p> Fri, 08 Jan 2016 08:04:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list