ArtSlant - Current exhibits http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Jane and Louise Wilson - 303 Gallery - June 25th, 2013 - August 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jane &amp; Louise Wilson's fifth exhibition at 303 Gallery will mark the first time that they bring several bodies of work together: the photographs "Atomgrad, Nature Abhors A Vacuum" I, V, VI, VII and VIII, 2011; and "Blind Landing, H-Bomb Test Facility", Lab 1 and Lab 4, 2012. In the 'Atomgrad' series, the Wilsons photographed in the town of Pripyat, built in the early 1970s under the former Soviet Union to house the Chernobyl factory workers. Known as Atomgrad (Atom City), the town has lain abandoned and contaminated for the last 25 years. 'Blind Landing' documents the Wilsons' first publicly sited installation, on a former H-Bomb test facility on Orford Ness, an island off the Suffolk Coast owned by the Ministry of Defense.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The large aluminium cast sculptures "Blind Landing" Lab 1 and Lab 4, 2012, were installed in the H-bomb test labs on Orford Ness. Siting literal measures, the Wilsons used yardsticks to act as a register for scale and intimacy. The measures are cast in aluminum, painted with individual black and white markers. The vertical uprights challenge our sense of scale and ruin, pointing to an architecture of forensics and camouflage. The Yardsticks are obsolete measures, because of their imperial standard: the yard (0.9144 of a metre), 36 inches. (The inch is the basis of the British imperial system of measurement.) 'Man', 'antiquity', 'empire' - all obsolete measures. Obsolete and therefore subject to monumentalization.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In the 'Atomgrad' photographs, a wooden yardstick measure is physically placed in each interior, here acting more as a readymade. The recurring motif of a yardstick signals a desire to make conscious the act of entering and photographing these spaces. The photograph encourages us to stare back into the past, into the empty manmade spaces, yet the yardsticks (a means of measurement now fallen into disuse, much like the buildings themselves) play with memory on material fact, on that which had been recorded, measured, articulated and analyzed, for levels of radiation. The work explores the thematics of dark tourism, using the yardsticks as a forensic and literal measure that act as a register for the viewer.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">"Altogether", 2010, is based on a photograph of a hanging spatial construction in Liubov Popova's studio by Aleksandr Rodchenko from 1924. It is comprised of 52 yard measures. Drawing attention to the various qualities of this internal architecture, "Altogether", does not evoke the sculptural tradition so much as Mel Bochner's 1969 'Measurement Room' or the Polish artist Edward Krasinski's Intervention series (1969-70). In which Bochner's and Krasinski's lines mark the alienation of measure from the measurer.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Also on view will be "Konvas Automat", a cast of the 35mm Russian Bolex camera, the same model of camera used by the Ukrainian film maker Vladimir Shevchenko who made the seminal film "Chernobyl: A Chronicle of Difficult Weeks" in the days immediately following the disaster. This film is an extraordinary, close-up record of the efforts to contain and clear up the disaster but it is also a compelling document of the physical effects of radiation on film. When Shevchenko first processed his film he noticed that portions of it were heavily pockmarked and affected by static interference. He mistakenly thought that this interference was caused by faulty film stock, however when he subsequently played the film back on a Steinbeck, he heard sound alongside the image and realized that each time the image deteriorated, it coincided with the sound of the Geiger counter. So there was no fault with the processing... Shevchenko had captured the effect of radiation on film, for the first time. Caroline Wilkinson a Professor of Craniofacial Identification at the Centre of Anatomy and Human Identification, University of Dundee comments, "The idea of a radioactive forensic film and camera is also fascinating - that the moment and the event are captured in time as a process as well as an image is the ultimate forensic experience."</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jane and Louise Wilson were born in Newcastle received their MAs at Goldsmiths College of Art, London. They began working together in 1989 and since then have exhibited at major galleries internationally. They were nominated for the Turner Prize in 1999. Recent solo exhibitions include Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester; Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, UK; Helga de Alvear, Madrid; the British Film Institute Gallery, London; and Musee d'Art Contemporain de Montreal. They are currently included in the exhibition "Stanley Kubrick" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The artists live and work in London.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 26 Jul 2013 06:50:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Jay Shinn - 55 5th Avenue Lobby Exhibitions - June 12th, 2013 - August 31st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><b>Time Equities Inc. Art-in-Buildings is pleased to announce the newest exhibition in the lobby of the 55 5<sup>th</sup>Avenue Office Tower, Jay Shin: <i>Doublerama and Adagiorama. </i>Please join us for an opening celebration with the artist<i> </i>on Wednesday, June 12<sup>th</sup> from 5-7pm.</b><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jay Shinn’s site specific illuminated wall painting, </span><i style="font-size: small;">Doublerama, </i><span style="font-size: small;">challenges the viewer’s experience of the lobby space by confounding the geometry of the main architectural element, a curved wall. Shinn projects light on to wall painting with theatrical lenses to create the illusion of a three dimensional object floating in space. His experiential works are constructed of relatively simple geometric shapes that are deployed in intricate patterns to create origami-like structures. Also on view is </span><i style="font-size: small;">Adagiorana, </i><span style="font-size: small;">an 8-minute looping animation that references the wall painting. This is the first time one of Shinn’s animations has been shone publically. The TV screen is fronted with a frosted Plexiglas box which distorts the video, blurring the line between video and sculpture. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jay Shinn lives and works in Dallas and New York. He has a BFA in painting from the Kansas City Art Institute. Shinn’s work has been exhibited widely in the US and Europe. Recent exhibitions include Miejska, Bydgoszcz, Poland; University of Colorado Colorado Springs Galleries of Contemporary Art, Colorado Springs; Marty Walker Gallery, Dallas; Barbara Davis Gallery, Houston; Kunstverein Neukolln, Berlin and Mixed Greens, New York. Shinn has completed residencies at Omi International Arts Center and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. His work is represented by Marty Walker Gallery, Dallas and Barbara Davis Gallery, Houston.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><i style="font-size: small;">Jay Shinn: Doublerama and Adagiorama</i><span style="font-size: small;"> is curated by Jennie Lamensdorf and sponsored by the Time Equities Inc. (TEI) Art-in-Buildings. TEI is committed to enriching the experience of our properties through the Art-in-Buildings Program, an innovative approach that brings contemporary art by emerging and mid-career artists to non-traditional exhibition spaces in the interest of promoting artists, expanding the audience for art, and creating a more interesting environment for our building occupants, residents, and their guests.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Founded in 1966, privately-held Time Equities Inc. has been in the real estate investment, development and asset &amp; property management business for more than 40 years. With properties in 26 states, four Canadian provinces and Germany, the TEI portfolio consists of approximately 23.4 million square feet of residential, industrial, office and retail property.</span></p> Wed, 12 Jun 2013 06:37:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Abdullah M I Syed - AICON GALLERY - New York - July 18th, 2013 - August 31st, 2013 <p>Aicon Gallery is proud to present Brut-Nama: The Chronicles of Brut, the first major U. S. solo exhibition by Australia-based Pakistani artist Abdullah M I Syed. Brut-Nama represents the culmination of ten years of research born from Syed&rsquo;s award-winning installation, Discourse within Discourse: The Circle at the IAO Gallery in Oklahoma City (2003) and developed over the past decade through a series of international solo and group exhibitions while living, working and studying between Karachi and Sydney.<br />The title Brut-Nama: The Chronicles of Brut alludes to the immensely popular fragrance, Brut for Men, launched by Faberge in 1964. Designed to create a new market for male grooming products under the slogan &ldquo;The Essence of Man,&rdquo; Brut set itself up as a catch-all symbol attempting to embody a swarm of conflicting notions of traditional masculinity, strength and character, while its extreme binary, signified by the word brute, implied the inherent power make it so by sheer force of will. In contrast, the work in Brut-Nama presents a series of nuanced, complex and interlocking visual chapters, portraying contemporary Pakistani masculinities ranging from brutish, the raw and unrestrained, to the cultured, gentle and atypical. The exhibition explores the very essence of the dichotomy of the word Brut(e) through chance, experimentation, collaboration and real and imagined narratives while drawing on an obsession with the effects of history and geography on questions of performed identity and the construction of multiple contrasting &lsquo;Others&rsquo;.<br />Abdullah M I Syed&rsquo;s practice is founded in personal observations and experiences as a Muslim male artist straddling multiple and frequently conflicting cultures. His work explores political instability, religious and secular tensions, Orientalism, Post-Colonialism, Capitalism, diasporic issues and the tragedy of 9/11 as powerful factors in the construction of contemporary Muslim male identities. In this exhibition, Syed deploys a host of recurring metaphors, symbols, imagery and texts across a dizzying array of mediums, constructing a labyrinthine yet self-referential evolving narrative of personal and shared cultural notions of masculinity. The intricate and obsessive yet playful art making in Brut-Nama originates in patterns derived from the beehive, geometric and arabesque streamlined into formal grids and regular and isometric graphs, pinstripes and checkered patterns. The reparative act of making and breaking the modular system of the grid, either as an order or a screen, not only suggests a simultaneous acceptance and rejection of social conformity, but also reasserts the balance and variation of traditional and conceptual compositions.<br />Abdullah M I Syed, The Fragrance of the Moon (Detail), 2013, Brut for Men fragrance bottle, Perspex and transparency projector, Dimensions variable.<br />Syed&rsquo;s interest in Art Brut (Outsider Art) led him to Pakistani arts-and-craft traditions, such as hand woven rugs, garlands made from currency and the more recent urban Pakistani fascination of adorning commercial trucks with intricate hand-beaten metal reliefs and hand-cut stickers. Recognized as a masculine domain, such crafts are undoubtedly a rich source of imagery, which &ndash; previously muted &ndash; are now richly colored. In Brut-Nama, all of these outsider elements find their way into Syed&rsquo;s formally meticulous practice. Exuberantly colored out-sized hand-made Brut for Men medallions are set off by flashing neon signs and balanced by quietly powerful hand-woven and cut works assembled from uncirculated U.S. currency. Ethereal moon-like sculptures radiate light through surfaces woven of countless Muslim skullcaps while text-based and collaborative installations juxtapose the earnest and the ironic both within and amongst works.<br />Throughout the exhibition, Syed takes his cues from both Western and Eastern vocabularies of art history and theory to re-contextualize and re-frame contemporary issues affecting both cultures. His works simultaneously celebrate hybridity, pluralism and uprootedness while questioning how time and place act as mediators of subjectivity, and come to bear on the work&rsquo;s political and cultural connections to the society that produced it. Taken as a whole, Brut-Nama presents a diversity of ideas, techniques and material explorations as a balancing act of creative obsession and traditional craft, resulting in a hybrid space where communal wounds, memories, dreams and joy are shared, new ideas are layered, traditions are reinvented and Pakistani &lsquo;masculinity&rsquo; is restored to its intrinsically &lsquo;balanced&rsquo; vernacular.</p> Tue, 23 Jul 2013 00:46:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Uri Aran, David Berezin, Cynthia Daignault, Joel Holmberg, Matt Keegan, Margaret Lee, Jimmy Merris, Oliver Osborne, Amanda Ross Ho - American Contemporary - June 27th, 2013 - August 10th, 2013 <p>Saying no is easy, almost too easy, but yes can lead to yes, which opens up possibility: repetition, continuation, communication. People say we have to watch our thoughts, as thoughts become actions and actions can become our habits. I try to say what I mean.<br />Looking can be like listening. When you look and listen really hard it can be worth it, but doing it can also be like saying no. Sometimes it’s worth just simply seeing (and listening): just taking in everything in front of you and every thought that comes with it.<br />People misunderstand me. I misunderstand them. But when we do understand each other it’s wonderful.<br />I just forget that it takes time.<br />________<br />“Yes I will Yes” features work by nine artists, one from LA, two from London and six from New York. The work chosen for the exhibition includes modes of image repetition, layering and juxtaposition in an attempt to examine the differences and similarities that exist between thought and communication.<br />Current highlights for the exhibiting artists are listed here. Uri Aran is currently exhibiting in The Encyclopedic Palace at the Venice Biannale and had a solo exhibition at Gavin Brown and the Kunsthalle Zürich, Switzerland this past fall/winter; David Berezin recently displayed new work at the Sculpture Centre in January and had a solo presentation at the Columbus Museum of Art; Cynthia Daignault has work this summer at White Columns and MKG127, Toronto amongst others and wlll have her first solo exhibition with Lisa Cooley in September; Joel Holmberg exhibited with American Contemporary in January and has also recently shown at the New Museum and Kettles Yard, Cambridge, England; Matt Keegan had a two person exhibition at the Kitchen with Eileen Quinlan titled “Y? O! G... A” in 2012 and a solo exhibition at Pedro Cera in 2013; Margaret Lee was the recipient of the Artadia NADA Award, 2012 and was recently included in “MHMMML” with Matthew Higgs and Marlon Mullen at Murray Guy, The Green Gallery and International Art Objects; Jimmy Merris was awarded the Studio Voltaire Members’ Show Award selected by Mike Nelson and Jenni Lomax and was given a Frieze Film commission for the 2012 Frieze Art Fair; Oliver Osborne has upcoming solo shows with Frutta, Rome and Vilma Gold, London and recently exhibited with Mihai Nicodim in Los Angeles; Amanda Ross-Ho had solo exhibitions with Mitchell Innes and Nash, Shane Campbell Gallery and the MCA Chicago in 2013 as well as a solo exhibition at MoCA, LA in 2012.</p> Fri, 21 Jun 2013 22:23:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Bill Traylor - American Folk Art Museum - June 11th, 2013 - September 22nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">This exhibition will include approximately 63 drawings and paintings by self-taught Alabama artist Bill Traylor. Traylor began making art near the end of his life, and his works are notable for their flat, simply defined shapes and vibrant compositions in which memories and observations relating to African American life are merged. Traylor is recognized as one of the finest American artists of the 20th century.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&ldquo;Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts&rdquo; is co-organized by the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery. The exhibition is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.<br /> <br /> The presentation at the American Folk Art Museum is sponsored in part by Joyce Berger Cowin, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, the Ford Foundation, the Robert Lehman Foundation, the David Davies and Jack Weeden Fund for Exhibitions, and Laura and Richard Parsons. Lectures and symposia are supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.</p> Sat, 07 Sep 2013 14:33:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Bill Traylor - American Folk Art Museum - June 11th, 2013 - September 22nd, 2013 <p>Bill Traylor (c. 1854–1949) forged a personal iconography of recurring characters and subjects. They exhibit the artist’s photographic memory by recalling images, sounds, or movements with clear precision. In their protean nature, these subconscious fragments return in multiple drawings, forming interrelated sequences in a single feature that offer significant parallels with cinematic production and its images in motion. Late in his life, the street scene in Montgomery itself contributed a kind of cinema verité, adding a fertile complexity to themes that beg to be thought of together, stakeholders in a continuous, coherent scene. In this regard no detail is superficial but is always connected to an ongoing dynamic cycle.<br /> <br /> “Traylor in Motion: Wonders from New York Collections” delves into this aspect of Traylor’s vision by considering specific groups of figures and gestures and their implications: the development of action through staged poses—subjects mostly looking right, with expressive pointed fingers; the tension created by offset spatial compositions; the introduction of vibrant colors; startling metamorphoses; and the sinuous movement of bodies from contortion to the astonishing balletic extension of a limb. High-kicking legs evoke the exuberance of such dances of the era as the gymnastic Lindy Hop. But such posturing may also be a sly reference to the satirical strut of the “cakewalk,” a subversive plantation dance that mocked the formal grand marches and minuets of the slaveholders through exaggerated movements. Often the women wore long dresses with hoop skirts and the men sported high hats, split-tail coats, and walking sticks.<br /> <br /> These moving images become lines of force: jumps and ellipses between cause and effect, stirring up the surfaces. Yet the ritualistic cinema created by Traylor is not a strict narrative, social commentary, or reaction to historical fact. Mysterious and intimate, it carries a reinvented perception of reality laden with fantasies, myths, and symbols.</p> Sun, 09 Jun 2013 23:25:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - American Folk Art Museum - June 11th, 2013 - September 22nd, 2013 <p>The exhibition is sponsored in part by Joyce Berger Cowin, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, the Ford Foundation, the Robert Lehman Foundation, the David Davies and Jack Weeden Fund for Exhibitions, and Laura and Richard Parsons. Lectures and symposia are supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.</p> Sun, 09 Jun 2013 23:29:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Simon Fujiwara - Andrea Rosen Gallery - June 29th, 2013 - August 9th, 2013 <p>Fujiwara's work <em>Studio Piet&agrave; (King Kong Komplex)</em> debuted at the Sharjah Biennial in March and will be presented in a newly expanded format at Andrea Rosen.&nbsp;</p> <p>A young artist who has achieved exceptional recognition and acclaim across Europe and Asia, Fujiwara was born in London, spent his childhood between Japan, England, Spain and Africa and is now based in Berlin. His complex installations incorporate sculpture, performance, video and photographic elements to create fully imagined scenarios that underscore the interdependence of personal history and more universal narratives. <em>Studio Piet&agrave; (King Kong Komplex)</em> addresses issues of racial profiling, exoticism, terrorism, and sexual identity, and relations between the West and the Middle East.</p> Mon, 05 Aug 2013 12:19:35 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Nigel Cooke, David Altmejd, Michael Raedecker, Andrea Zittel - Andrea Rosen Gallery 2 - June 28th, 2013 - August 9th, 2013 Tue, 09 Jul 2013 01:29:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ricci Albenda - Andrew Kreps Gallery @ 537 W. 22nd - June 27th, 2013 - August 9th, 2013 <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: small;" color="#333333" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="1"><span size="1">Andrew Kreps Gallery is pleased to present a single-work installation by Ricci Albenda.  <br /> <br />Untitled is a simple experiment. Though similar in many ways to some of his Trompe l'oeil installations of the past, this installation does not attempt to fool the eye but rather relies on the viewer's suspension of disbelief. Like the ocean meeting the sky, the floor extends up the wall as a flat plane of color, while the ceiling descends to meet it at an infinite distance on the horizon. This horizon line is tilted slightly, loosening itself from the architecture to which it is attached, and destabilizing the viewer's relationship with the absolute level horizon with which we are all familiar. This tilt also allows the work to accommodate the majority of adult heights and their associated eye-levels. Thus, if everyone in the gallery were to migrate to a place for which the horizon coincided with their own eye-level, a tilted plane of heads would be created</span></span></p> Mon, 01 Jul 2013 23:54:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Francis Upritchard - Anton Kern Gallery - June 27th, 2013 - August 16th, 2013 <p>For her full-scale New York gallery debut, Francis Upritchard &ndash; a London-based New Zealander who represented her country at the 2009 Venice Biennale &ndash; stages eight figurative sculptures seemingly engaged in a ritualistic war dance. Quite unlike the traditional fierceness of such stylized warfare however, Upritchard&rsquo;s figures appear to prepare for a different kind of battle, showing off skills of a different nature. Stance, expression, and garb of these delicately modeled sculptures are focused yet tender and soft, at times leaning towards awkward, limp and visceral.<br />Gestures, especially of the hands and elongated fingers, suggest a determined dreamy-ness and wistfulness. The figures&rsquo; skin is built up as if made of wax; their facial expressions and half-closed eyes are introverted and withdrawn. All in all, these dancers move closer to the delirious state of a rave than the ferociousness of mock combat.<br />Alluding to a variety of cultural and temporal influences, Upritchard&rsquo;s work intimates how effectively the past can be reinterpreted, even manipulated. Here, the artist takes inspiration from medieval sources such as the 11th century Bayeux tapestry as well as the woodcarvings by Northern-Renaissance sculptor Erasmus Grasser, whose work captured the Moresca pantomime and its origins in the sword and mumming dances performed by troupes of jesters and actors at court and in the streets.<br />A catalog book published on the occasion of Upritchard&rsquo;s exhibition at the Nottingham&nbsp; Contemporary accompanies the exhibition.<br />Upritchard&rsquo;s work has most recently been featured in solo exhibitions at the Marugame Genichiro-<br />Inokuma Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan (2013); Nottingham Contemporary, UK (2012); Cincinnati Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati (2012); 53 Venice Biennale, Italy (2009); Artspace, New Zealand (2005). Her work has been included in group shows such as Lilliput, New York High Line, New York (2012); An Exchange with Sol LeWitt, Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art - MASS MoCA, MA (2011); New Zealand at the Venice Biennale 2009, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, New Zealand (2010); TarraWarra Biennial 2008, Lost &amp; Found: An Archeology of the Present, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Australia (2008).</p> Mon, 12 Aug 2013 12:59:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Edward Redfield, J. Alden Weir, Theodore Robinson, John Twatchman, Childe Hassam - Arkell Museum - October 27th, 2012 - October 20th, 2013 <p>This exhibition features remarkable American Impressionist paintings from the Arkell collections. Twelve paintings recently returned from the Fenimore Art Museum's exhibition "American Impressionism: Paintings of Light and Life" will be featured along with other treasures from the permanent collection. Sun-dappled views of France and America by Childe Hassam, John Twatchman, Theodore Robinson, J. Alden Weir, and Edward Redfield are among the notable paintings in this exhibition. Most American Impressionists spent time in Paris and Monet&rsquo;s hometown of Giverny where they saw the work of French Impressionists. Once they returned to America they made the new Impressionist style their own. Views of the New England countryside, coastal communities and New York City were popular subjects for the American Impressionists. The exhibition includes Twatchtman&rsquo;s "Josephine in the Garden" in Giverny, Hassam's "Provincetown", Twatchtman&rsquo;s "Gloucester Harbor" and Ernest Lawson&rsquo;s "Brooklyn Bridge."</p> Sun, 01 Sep 2013 22:12:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list James McNeill Whistler, John Marin, Mortimer Menpes, Joseph Pennell, Minna Bolingbroke - Arkell Museum - July 28th, 2013 - October 20th, 2013 <p>In 1879 American artist James McNeill Whistler arrived in Italy with a commission from the Fine Arts Society of London to create twelve etchings of Venice. Over the ensuing fourteen months the artist produced a body of prints that are among the most important of his career. The prints from Whistler’s Venice period are distinguished by the artist’s original approach to capturing the unique qualities of the canaled city and his innovative use of the etching process. His prints have arguably become the most studied prints in the history of art– after those of Rembrandt – and they had a significant influence on his followers.</p> <p>This exhibit presents eleven prints by Whistler, placing them alongside the work of followers who were practicing in Italy in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The juxtaposition of these works allows the viewer to appreciate both Whistler’s innovations and the different ways in which his work affected the artists who followed him. While artists such as John Marin are well known today, and Mortimer Menpes and Joseph Pennell still enjoy a modicum of fame, other artists in this exhibit, like Minna Bolingbroke, have faded. Whistler’s legacy lies in his far-reaching vision for both his medium and his subject, which has made his art significant for a remarkably broad range of colleagues.</p> Sun, 09 Jun 2013 23:34:43 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Duane Hanson - Artists Space : Books & Talks - June 30th, 2013 - August 25th, 2013 <p style="cursor: none;">Then there’s the story of Wee Willy, the gangster. <br style="cursor: none;" /><br style="cursor: none;" />Goofy wants to be a children’s nurse so he borrows some clothes from his Aunt Anna, a red-and-white checked calico dress and a big hat. And he tries his luck as a kindergarten teacher, not very successfully though, because the kids all say they’ve never seen such a queer old doll. Goofy gets beaten up by the kids and flings his gear in the trashcan. <br style="cursor: none;" /><br style="cursor: none;" />At that moment, an escaped convict comes by, Wee Willy, the gangster. He’s no bigger than a 3-year-old girl. He finds Goofy’s gear in the trashcan and puts it on. <br style="cursor: none;" /><br style="cursor: none;" />On his way home, Goofy bumps into Wee Willy wearing Aunt Anna’s dress. “Poor little homeless mite,” Goofy thinks and takes the little girl home. He dishes up pheasant and partridges and a whole goose, and Wee Willy stuffs himself full. Goofy’s pretty surprised at the little girl’s appetite. But he’s mighty pleased, too and thumps his fists on the table. Wee Willy behaves terribly, but at last Goofy finds joy looking after a child.</p> <p style="cursor: none;">During the night the house is surrounded by gangsters. No, not by gangsters, by police. They storm the house and find Wee Willy. They recognize him, despite the gear he’s wearing. Goofy’s amazed and asks what they want of a poor little girl. “This is terrible! What has she done? Poor little orphan!” The police inform him that it’s Wee Willy, a wanted criminal. And as the police carry Willy out, explosive as a hand grenade, Goofy says: “Must have been a shock for the poor little girl to find out she’s a crook.”</p> <p style="cursor: none;">– Opening monologue in Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s <em style="cursor: none;">Beware of a Holy Whore</em>, 1971, spoken by Werner Schroeter</p> <p style="cursor: none;"><br style="cursor: none;" />The exhibition includes: a sculpture by Duane Hanson, a replica of a hotel bar and several protagonists that will appear weekly throughout July and August in the hotel bar, always on Thursday and Friday nights. On these occasions Cuba Libre will be served. Please check back here for full and updated list of protagonists.</p> <p style="cursor: none;"><em style="cursor: none;">Pride Goes Before a Fall / Beware of a Holy Whore – An Exhibition in Two Acts</em> takes place across Artists Space’s two venues at 38 Greene Street and 55 Walker Street.</p> Mon, 15 Jul 2013 14:08:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Duane Hanson - Artists Space: Exhibitions - June 30th, 2013 - August 25th, 2013 <p style="cursor: none;">Then there’s the story of Wee Willy, the gangster. <br style="cursor: none;" /><br style="cursor: none;" />Goofy wants to be a children’s nurse so he borrows some clothes from his Aunt Anna, a red-and-white checked calico dress and a big hat. And he tries his luck as a kindergarten teacher, not very successfully though, because the kids all say they’ve never seen such a queer old doll. Goofy gets beaten up by the kids and flings his gear in the trashcan. <br style="cursor: none;" /><br style="cursor: none;" />At that moment, an escaped convict comes by, Wee Willy, the gangster. He’s no bigger than a 3-year-old girl. He finds Goofy’s gear in the trashcan and puts it on. <br style="cursor: none;" /><br style="cursor: none;" />On his way home, Goofy bumps into Wee Willy wearing Aunt Anna’s dress. “Poor little homeless mite,” Goofy thinks and takes the little girl home. He dishes up pheasant and partridges and a whole goose, and Wee Willy stuffs himself full. Goofy’s pretty surprised at the little girl’s appetite. But he’s mighty pleased, too and thumps his fists on the table. Wee Willy behaves terribly, but at last Goofy finds joy looking after a child.</p> <p style="cursor: none;">During the night the house is surrounded by gangsters. No, not by gangsters, by police. They storm the house and find Wee Willy. They recognize him, despite the gear he’s wearing. Goofy’s amazed and asks what they want of a poor little girl. “This is terrible! What has she done? Poor little orphan!” The police inform him that it’s Wee Willy, a wanted criminal. And as the police carry Willy out, explosive as a hand grenade, Goofy says: “Must have been a shock for the poor little girl to find out she’s a crook.”</p> <p style="cursor: none;">– Opening monologue in Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s <em style="cursor: none;">Beware of a Holy Whore</em>, 1971, spoken by Werner Schroeter</p> <p style="cursor: none;"><br style="cursor: none;" />The exhibition includes: a sculpture by Duane Hanson, a replica of a hotel bar and several protagonists that will appear weekly throughout July and August in the hotel bar, always on Thursday and Friday nights. On these occasions Cuba Libre will be served. Please check back here for full and updated list of protagonists.</p> <p style="cursor: none;"><em style="cursor: none;">Pride Goes Before a Fall / Beware of a Holy Whore – An Exhibition in Two Acts</em> takes place across Artists Space’s two venues at 38 Greene Street and 55 Walker Street.</p> Mon, 10 Jun 2013 23:48:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Asia Society Museum - February 26th, 2013 - August 4th, 2013 <p>This exhibition comprises select pieces from Asia Society’s Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection. The show explores the role of patrons of wealth and rank as dominating figures in the production of artistic creations. Approximately fifty examples of sculpture and ceramic from South, Southeast, and East Asia. The selection includes religious art, both Buddhist and Hindu. In addition, ceremonial objects that served as a visual structure for the governing patterns of patrons both for this life and beyond will be on view. Decorative functional objects such as plates and vases, and prized collectables like porcelains, which testify to the legitimacy and supremacy of rulers and aristocrats, round out the exhibition.</p> Sun, 06 Jan 2013 23:34:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list