ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 Group Show - Apexart - June 1st 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">With the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, pundits rejoiced in the dawn of a new era, a world without walls. Instead, walls now permeate our world with 33 nation-states constructing them. Walls now separate Spain from Morocco (in the exclaves of Ceuta and Melilla), India from Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia from Yemen, Botswana from Mozambique, and the United States from Mexico. Many countries, including the United States, view border walls as a key element in their wars on terror, undocumented immigration, and smuggling. These walls are the centerpiece of policies aimed at increased militarization and the reconfiguration of rights and citizenship at borders. Their construction is part of a border security industry that includes collaborations between the public sector and multinational corporations. Even though border walls are a strategic reaffirmation of state sovereignty, states build them with minimal public input on their necessity, location, and design. Concrete walls, metal fences, and concertina wire speak to the overwhelmingly militaristic logic that guides the prevailing approach to borders. More specifically, in the United States, mainstream media, through its reporting and circulation of images, fuels the public&rsquo;s articulation of borders as war zones. Mexican-American residents of border communities, border artists, human rights advocates, leaders of Native American groups, and environmental organizations contest this onslaught of government and corporate domination as well as the mass mediated spectacular. This contestation is a story rarely told and a media imaginary rarely re-imagined.<br /><br /> This bilingual (English and Spanish) group exhibition brings together work by artists, activists, architects, and other public intellectuals who have created alternative designs for or fought the construction of the United States - Mexico border wall. The major questions that this exhibition addresses include: How can we reassert a more populist notion of sovereignty by re-imagining borders? What is the role of art and architecture in providing a bulwark against the erosion of democracy that border walls materialize?<br /><br /> 1,950 mile-long open wound<br /> dividing a pueblo, a culture<br /> running down the length of my body,<br /> staking fence rods in my flesh,<br /> splits me splits me<br /> me raja me raja<br /> <br /> ---Gloria Anzald&uacute;a,<em> La Frontera/Borderlands</em>, 1987, Preface <br /><br /> <em>Raja</em> (split) encompasses how borders not only divide but also scar and wound both the landscape and people (namely, Mexican-American citizens residing in the borderlands) it also describes how the border wall affects borderland culture on the United States side. The painter Celeste De Luna shows the border wall as it cuts through the in-between spaces of border culture while mapping this &ldquo;tearing&rdquo; onto border residents&rsquo; subjectivities and bodies. In Anchor Baby, De Luna represents a pregnant women&rsquo;s torso and upper body as the dividing line between the United States and Mexico, with picket fencing and barbed wire entrapping and severing her bare breasts and limbs. Within her body is a mature fetus encircled by an anchor calling attention to how childbirth is rendered a crime within the militarized framework of the border wall, anti-immigration discourse, and presidential candidates wanting to end birthright citizenship. <br /> <br /> A series of ethnographic photographs invite contemplation about how the border wall splits people, communities, and nature preserves in the United States. A photograph from a community museum and park, Pedestrian Trail (Miguel D&iacute;az-Barriga and Margaret Dorsey), centers the viewer&rsquo;s attention on a sign pointing to hiking trails in South Texas sliced by the wall. In a place where 90% of residents are Latina/o, and the poverty rate is among the highest in the nation, such action slices more than a park. The wall literally cuts into family life as illustrated in a photograph of metal pylons from the border wall rising behind the backyard of a house in Granjeno, Texas. <br /> <br /> The art of Alfred J. Quiroz draws attention to the theological and existential aspects of border crossings, including miracles and deaths. The exhibition includes three border milagros: <em>Mano por Centavo</em>, <em>Brazo de Trabajo</em>, and <em>Sinagua</em> from his binational <em>Parade of Humanity</em> project in which he attached sixteen giant metallic sculptures to the Arizona border wall. The three milagros (icons that reference miraculous events) featured at apexart draw inspiration from religious amulets popular in Mexican vernacular Catholicism, and also highlight the deathly nature of border crossers&rsquo; experiences, as people regularly die in the desert from dehydration. <br /> <br /> Anthropologists also locate the wall in relation to the experiences of migrants, the transformation of the landscape into killing fields, and, in subtler ways, the reshaping of border subjectivities. Photographs provided by Jason De Le&oacute;n feature the border crossing experience from the perspective of migrants themselves, and Carolina Rocha&rsquo;s digital recordings voice migrants&rsquo; fear as they cross the international boundary, border wall, and interior checkpoints. Gilberto Rosas and Randall McGuire&rsquo;s photographs capture anti-militarization graffiti and the paradoxes of border life, focusing on the wall as state violence. Lupe Flores documents United States border residents&rsquo; unease with their community&rsquo;s militarization in his photograph <em>Abrazos No Balazos/Hugs not Slugs</em> in which adolescents hug in front of the border wall. The improvised nature of the graffiti suggests the ephemeral yet embodied and visceral nature of their disappointment with the immense concrete wall that stands in their backyard. Alejandro Lugo interprets late twentieth century borderlands culture through a larger history of conquest, and his photographs of the border wall and the Statue of Liberty are symbolic gestures towards such conquest. <br /> <br /> Architects reimagine the border wall's potential as a generative site of binational cooperation. An installation in the exhibition features architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello&rsquo;s vision for repurposing the wall's concrete and metal into hike and bike trails along the border, solar panels that generate electricity for residents, and water collection stations (a statement on the deaths from dehydration). Another architectural redesign is James Brown&rsquo;s plan for a "friendlier" Friendship Park. Brown&rsquo;s proposal restores cross-border human touch, a small gesture that embodies a much needed turn to Humanism. <br /> <br /> Maurice Sherif&rsquo;s photographs capture the massive and monumental, yet piecemeal and prosaic, nature of the border wall. Sherif spent three years photographing the wall from California to Texas and brings the structure as a whole into public view, inviting scrutiny of its socio-cultural, environmental, and binational impacts. His photographs represent how the wall frames and indifferently militarizes historical and cultural sites, through its rusted metal and severe pretense.In the photograph University of Texas at Brownsville Rio Grande Valley Sector, the border wall intersects a white building generically labelled &ldquo;ART MUSEUM&rdquo; and provides a critical vantage point for pondering the intersection of culture and militarization. In their floor-to-ceiling print that emulates the grand scale of the wall, Scott Nicol and David Freeman photographed muddy footprints moving up the wall&rsquo;s rusty bollard poles. While its title, <em>Section 0-21</em>, mimics the military logic of the border security industrial complex, the footprints signify the humanity of border crossers. <br /><br /> In this exhibition, visitors cross a threshold, a checkpoint where their citizenship becomes suspect and under review. North the Checkpoint, (De Luna), an oil on canvas painting, depicts an interior checkpoint that draws attention to the camera and light arrays through which travelers must pass even though they are 75 miles north of the United States-Mexico border. The camera and light arrays teleport visitors into a virtual world where their images are reticulated onto crisscrossing security grids that compress experiences into a technologically accelerated space-time and transmutes personhood into algorithms and Non Structured Query Language searches. What kind of biometric data and photographs are these cameras capturing, and how are they being correlated with other information in the enormous data aggregators that enmesh citizen and non-citizen alike? The entrance to the exhibition reproduces these cameras and light arrays to provide visitors with an ephemeral sense of their empowerment over them. In this zone, can we challenge their all-seeing power and their infinitely flexible searchability? <br /><br /> The title <em>Fencing in Democracy</em> indexes how the border wall encloses democracy through suspending laws. In building the border wall, the U.S Department of Homeland Security waived thirty-seven laws. United States citizens had no legal standing to either challenge the construction of the wall or to contest its design and placement. In other words, the way in which the DHS organized the construction of the wall "fenced in" democracy&rsquo;s creative power. This exhibition invites participants to ask: Would we have a wall if its proposed construction had occurred in a fully democratic setting with an ethos of democracy? Can border walls and international boundaries become eco-zones that produce green energy and sites of binational cooperation, as suggested by the architects Brown, Fratello, and Rael? <br /><br /> In the case of the actual border wall, democracy&rsquo;s power was constrained; this exhibition allows participants and visitors to imagine alternatives and generate public dialogue about border militarization. While history offers many examples of building walls to restrict and control people, they crumble. But before they crumble, walls imprison, make legitimate human interaction across political borders illegitimate, and reduce democracy to tyranny. We can break down these barriers. De-fence Democracy. <br /><br /> <br /> <em>Fencing In Democracy</em> is a 2015-16 apexart <a href="https://apexart.org/unsolicited.php" target="_blank">Unsolicited Proposal Program</a> winning exhibition along with <a href="https://apexart.org/exhibitions/paris-williams.php" target="_blank"><em>Life After Death and Elsewhere</em></a> (September 2015), and <a href="https://apexart.org/exhibitions/kitchen-ogasian-vincent.php" target="_blank"><em>Setting Out</em></a> (January 2016).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Dr. Miguel Diaz-Barriga</strong> is a Professor of Anthropology at University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and recently served as the The Carol L. Zicklin Endowed Chair for the Honors Academy at Brooklyn College. He received his bachelors degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and his masters and doctorate degree from Stanford University. His research has focused on concepts relating to Mexican-American politics and identity, Latin American social movements, and border studies. He is the recipient of grants and research awards including the National Science Foundation for the project, "The Border Wall, Immigration, and Citizenship on the United States/Mexico Border.&rdquo; Professor Diaz-Barriga served as the President of the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) from 2010-2012. His forthcoming book with Margaret Dorsey is entitled Militarization on the Edge: Necro-Citizenship and the U.S.-Mexican Border Fence.<br /><br /> <strong>Dr. Margaret Dorsey</strong> is currently Associate Professor of Anthropology of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) and was Visiting Associate Professor of Anthropology at Brooklyn College (CUNY) from 2014-2015. Her research focuses on border security, Mexican American folklore, and border studies more generally. In 2014 Dorsey resided in Santa Fe as a Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow at the School for Advanced Research. Dorsey has won numerous grants (National Endowment of the Humanities, National Science Foundation) and published numerous articles on borderlands music and politics and is currently completing a book manuscript with Miguel D&iacute;az-Barriga on border security. Her other book-length projects include <em>Linda Escobar and Tejano Conjunto Music in South Texas</em> (2013) and <em>Pachangas: Borderlands Music, U.S. Politics, and Transnational Marketing</em> (2006). Dorsey is founding curator of the Border Studies Archive at UTRGV.</p> Fri, 20 May 2016 09:48:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Kwon Young-woo - Blum & Poe | New York - June 1st 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div style="text-align: justify;">Blum &amp; Poe is pleased to present a survey of work by Kwon Young-woo (1926-2013), one of the founding figures of Dansaekhwa, the monochrome painting movement that redefined Korean art starting in the mid-1960s. This is Kwon's first solo exhibition with the gallery and his first solo presentation in New York.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Seeking a new alternative to the ink painting traditions that dominated Korea in the 1960s, Kwon initially dispensed with the use of ink and began to scratch at the surface of the&nbsp;<em>hanji</em>&nbsp;paper, creating all-over compositions of rips that emphasized the primacy of the ground. During the 1970s and early 1980s he expanded his repertoire, perforating the paper from behind and tearing it into more ragged strips. Despite the implied aggression in these gestures, the works are serenely calm and meditative<strong>.</strong>&nbsp;Eventually Kwon reintroduced the use of color, pouring gouache and ink with absolute precision into and around the cuts to further accentuate his mark making.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">A decade older than Lee Ufan and the other artists associated with Dansaekhwa, Kwon's practice was fundamental to the development of the movement. Though the term literally translates as "monochrome painting," it is better understood in terms of the processes the artists employed. Variously ripping paper, dragging pencils, pushing paint, and soaking canvas, the artists manipulated the materials of painting in ways that questioned the terms by which the medium was known. Promoted in Seoul, Tokyo, and Paris, Dansaekhwa quickly became the globally recognized face of contemporary Korean art.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Leading up to the opening of the exhibition, Dominique L&eacute;vy, Greene Naftali, Gallery Hyundai, and Blum &amp; Poe will cohost a panel discussion on Dansaekhwa with artist Chung Sang-Hwa and&nbsp;Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Arts, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The conversation will begin at&nbsp;6:30pm&nbsp;on&nbsp;Tuesday, May 31,&nbsp;at&nbsp;Dominique L&eacute;vy Gallery.&nbsp;Seating is limited, please RSVP to&nbsp;<a href="mailto:rsvpny@blumandpoe.com" shape="rect" target="_blank">rsvpny@blumandpoe.com</a>.&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Previously, Kwon was featured in the survey&nbsp;<em>From All Sides: Tansaekhwa on Abstraction</em>, held at Blum &amp; Poe, Los Angeles in 2014, and curated by Joan Kee, Associate Professor of History of Art at the University of Michigan. He was also included in the traveling exhibition of 2016,&nbsp;<em>Dansaekhwa and Minimalism</em>, held at Blum &amp; Poe, Los Angeles and New York - the first overview of Korean monochromatic painting with American Minimalism.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Kwon Young-woo was born in Liwon, Korea, in 1926. He graduated with a BFA in painting from Seoul National University in 1951 and received his MFA in 1957. He spent a decade living in Paris in the 1980s, and has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions in Korea, France, Canada and the United States. The Seoul Museum of Art held a major retrospective in 2007. His work has also been celebrated in important surveys such as&nbsp;<em>When Process Becomes Form: Dansaekhwa and Korean Abstraction</em>, Villa Empain - Boghossian Foundation, Brussels, Belgium (2016);&nbsp;<em>Dansaekhwa</em>, Palazzo Contarini Polignac, Venice, Italy (2015);&nbsp;<em>Dansaekhwa: Korean Monochrome Painting</em>, National Museum of&nbsp;Modern and Contemporary Art, Gwacheon (2012); and<em>Korean Contemporary Art of the 1970s,</em>&nbsp;Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art, which traveled to Tochigi Municipal Museum of Art, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Osaka, Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Fukuoka City Museum, Fukuoka (1983). Kwon was one of the five artists featured in the landmark show&nbsp;<em>Five Kinds of White</em>, held at Tokyo Gallery in 1975. Prior to that, his work was included in&nbsp;the S&atilde;o Paulo Art Biennial (1973), and the Tokyo Biennale (1965).</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 08:16:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Kwon Young-woo - Blum & Poe | New York - June 1st 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <div style="text-align: justify;">Blum &amp; Poe is pleased to present a survey of work by Kwon Young-woo (1926-2013), one of the founding figures of Dansaekhwa, the monochrome painting movement that redefined Korean art starting in the mid-1960s. This is Kwon's first solo exhibition with the gallery and his first solo presentation in New York.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Seeking a new alternative to the ink painting traditions that dominated Korea in the 1960s, Kwon initially dispensed with the use of ink and began to scratch at the surface of the&nbsp;<em>hanji</em>&nbsp;paper, creating all-over compositions of rips that emphasized the primacy of the ground. During the 1970s and early 1980s he expanded his repertoire, perforating the paper from behind and tearing it into more ragged strips. Despite the implied aggression in these gestures, the works are serenely calm and meditative<strong>.</strong>&nbsp;Eventually Kwon reintroduced the use of color, pouring gouache and ink with absolute precision into and around the cuts to further accentuate his mark making.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">A decade older than Lee Ufan and the other artists associated with Dansaekhwa, Kwon's practice was fundamental to the development of the movement. Though the term literally translates as "monochrome painting," it is better understood in terms of the processes the artists employed. Variously ripping paper, dragging pencils, pushing paint, and soaking canvas, the artists manipulated the materials of painting in ways that questioned the terms by which the medium was known. Promoted in Seoul, Tokyo, and Paris, Dansaekhwa quickly became the globally recognized face of contemporary Korean art.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Leading up to the opening of the exhibition, Dominique L&eacute;vy, Greene Naftali, Gallery Hyundai, and Blum &amp; Poe will cohost a panel discussion on Dansaekhwa with artist Chung Sang-Hwa and&nbsp;Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Arts, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The conversation will begin at&nbsp;6:30pm&nbsp;on&nbsp;Tuesday, May 31,&nbsp;at&nbsp;Dominique L&eacute;vy Gallery.&nbsp;Seating is limited, please RSVP to&nbsp;<a href="mailto:rsvpny@blumandpoe.com" shape="rect" target="_blank">rsvpny@blumandpoe.com</a>.&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Previously, Kwon was featured in the survey&nbsp;<em>From All Sides: Tansaekhwa on Abstraction</em>, held at Blum &amp; Poe, Los Angeles in 2014, and curated by Joan Kee, Associate Professor of History of Art at the University of Michigan. He was also included in the traveling exhibition of 2016,&nbsp;<em>Dansaekhwa and Minimalism</em>, held at Blum &amp; Poe, Los Angeles and New York - the first overview of Korean monochromatic painting with American Minimalism.</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: justify;">Kwon Young-woo was born in Liwon, Korea, in 1926. He graduated with a BFA in painting from Seoul National University in 1951 and received his MFA in 1957. He spent a decade living in Paris in the 1980s, and has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions in Korea, France, Canada and the United States. The Seoul Museum of Art held a major retrospective in 2007. His work has also been celebrated in important surveys such as&nbsp;<em>When Process Becomes Form: Dansaekhwa and Korean Abstraction</em>, Villa Empain - Boghossian Foundation, Brussels, Belgium (2016);&nbsp;<em>Dansaekhwa</em>, Palazzo Contarini Polignac, Venice, Italy (2015);&nbsp;<em>Dansaekhwa: Korean Monochrome Painting</em>, National Museum of&nbsp;Modern and Contemporary Art, Gwacheon (2012); and<em>Korean Contemporary Art of the 1970s,</em>&nbsp;Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art, which traveled to Tochigi Municipal Museum of Art, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Osaka, Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, Fukuoka City Museum, Fukuoka (1983). Kwon was one of the five artists featured in the landmark show&nbsp;<em>Five Kinds of White</em>, held at Tokyo Gallery in 1975. Prior to that, his work was included in&nbsp;the S&atilde;o Paulo Art Biennial (1973), and the Tokyo Biennale (1965).</div> Mon, 23 May 2016 08:16:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Carol Kingston, Rita Levinsohn, Ai-Wen Wu Kratz, Zohar Wallach, Marcia Gomes - Ashok Jain Gallery - June 2nd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p class="Default" style="text-align: justify;">Ashok Jain Gallery is pleased to announce Dialogue, an exhibition that encompasses the artists&rsquo; ideals and beliefs which are built into a visual language of their own creation. The exhibition features five renowned artists: Carol Kingston, Rita Levinsohn, Ai-Wen Wu Kratz, Zohar Wallach, and Marcia Gomes. Dialogue will be held at 58 Hester Street and opens on Wednesday, June 1st.</p> <p class="Default" style="text-align: justify;">Carol Kingston focuses on the act of painting as the expression as well as the reflection of one&rsquo;s self. Through this act she forms a symbiotic relationship between the paint and the viewer, the paint is an expression of emotion to which the viewer can responds individually. Over the many different applications of paint Kingston uses, she builds a dialogue with in her work that indicates change and movement. Carol Kingston acquired her M.F.A at Long Island University and is currently an instructor at the Nassau County Museum of Art. Kingston has also participated in many group exhibitions with Ashok Jain Gallery as well as solo shows all over the New York area.</p> <p class="Default" style="text-align: justify;">Rita Levinsohn seeks to analyze herself as a painter speaking out her concerns with the future of the planet. Her paintings<em>, Global Warnings </em>and <em>Vanishing Species </em>are about global warming and the extinction of species which, consequently, changes the biodiversity of the planet. In addition to the main theme of these paintings, the presence of the human figure indicates the human indifference toward these issues. Rita Levinsohn has attended NYU and the Brooklyn Museum Art School; she continued her art education in France and Italy. Ashok Jain Gallery has represented Levinsohn for more than twenty years and participated in many domestic exhibitions as well as exhibitions abroad.</p> <p class="Default" style="text-align: justify;">Ai-Wen Wu Kratz is most recognized for her remarkable command with lines as she combines both abstract and figurative elements. In the process of combining these two different elements she brings forth a breath of new life into her compositions, and exposes the visual world of her own creation through her incredible use of line and color. She was praised by critics for her &lsquo;wide range of competence&rsquo; and &lsquo;standard of excellence.&rsquo; In addition to the U.S., she had Solo Exhibitions in France, Germany, England, Egypt and Austria. Her works are included in collections located in Canada, Germany, Bangladesh and the U.S., including the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, MO.</p> <p class="Default" style="text-align: justify;">Zohar Wallach consistently explores the chemistry of a diverse set of substances that connect the visual effects of colors, textures, and forms. Her works are consumed with the patterns that correlate with change. These patterns form a language that is out of her control, while the layers blend and shift into each other naturally. Originally from Israel, Wallach acquired her Bachelors of Arts degree in Haifa University. Her paintings are being sought after by corporate and private collections all over the world.</p> <p class="Default" style="text-align: justify;">Marcia Gomes transforms the very character of the paper she uses in her collages through layering, juxtaposition, and manipulation. Her technique creates an array of textures and opacities in which are harmonized together in a composition. Each work has a particular vagueness where she purposely hides the original elements of the paper by transforming it into something more mysterious and thought-provoking. She received the Award of Merit in the Herstory Competition and the Award of Excellence in the Eighth Annual Competition at the Manhattan Arts International.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The Artist Reception will be held on Thursday, June 2nd at 6:00-8:00 pm.</p> Mon, 23 May 2016 07:07:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Yuji Ashikawa - Ashok Jain Gallery - June 2nd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Tue, 17 May 2016 08:31:13 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Sol Kjok and Peter Max-Jakobsen - Denise Bibro Fine Art - June 2nd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>In the Air is a collaborative investigation of interconnectivity of visual expression and mystical science theory. Through serendipitous development, Kj&oslash;k and Max-Jakobsen&rsquo;s work parallel in imagery and meaning. Intertwined figures composed by line, mark, and color represent the unity between native spirituality and its growing validation in the scientific community. The repetitive&nbsp;and chaotic figural compositions, alongside fluid, biomorphic forms, convey the sense of oneness while still singularly consistent with spiritual experience. It seems to be an eerie fate that both these artists have found each other.&nbsp;<br /><br />Born in Norway, Sol Kj&oslash;k is a New York based artist whom has been featured in numerous shows worldwide as well as taught and lectured at universities across the United States. Kj&oslash;k is represented in public collections such as the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Nordic Museum of Drawing, and the Osten Museum of Drawing, as well as private collections. She founded NOoSPHERE Arts, a nonprofit exhibition and performance venue, on the Lower East Side, a collaborative arts platform called Last Frontier NYC as well as Mothership NYC, an arts collective in Brooklyn.<br /><br />Peter Max-Jakobsen is an established Danish artist that has been featured in multiple museum exhibitions at the Vendsyssel Museum of Art, Vestjysk Museum of Art and the Kastrupgaard Collection Art Museum. Max-Jakobsen is a board member of the Hj&oslash;rring Graphic Workshop, and taught material experimentation and sketching methods at the Royal Academy in The Hague. He has completed many successful commissions for various associations, including The Criminal Court of Hj&oslash;rring and Bergenser Law Firm.<br /><br />Both artists will be present at the reception.</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 18:38:39 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Chun Kwang Young, Christian Faur, Kathleen Mulcahy, Will Kurtz, Antonio Petracca - Kim Foster Gallery - June 2nd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>The exhibition brings together a wide variety of reliefs by established and younger artists. </p> Thu, 12 May 2016 20:12:53 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list James Tyler, Santi Hitorangi - Edward Hopper House Art Center - June 3rd 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>The Edward Hopper House is pleased to present <em>Sculpture in the Garden 2016 </em>featuring the work of James Tyler and Santi Hitorangi.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>James Tyler</strong> will be exhibiting his <em>Brickhead Assemblage</em> sculptures.&nbsp; The <em>Brickhead </em>installations are unique colossal heads that invite us to identify with the world&rsquo;s ceramic heritages. They bring today&rsquo;s faces together with pre-Columbian, South American, Native American, Asian, African, and Western influences.&nbsp; For ancient peoples, colossal stone and clay heads, often symbolized their connections with the spirits they worshipped, and these, in turn, often represented the elements, such as rain and sun, or other larger-than-life phenomena, such as death and love.&nbsp; For the <em>Brickhead Assemblages,</em> elements of Tyler&rsquo;s larger <em>Colossus</em> and <em>Brickhead</em> series are combined with the found object assembly techniques more often associated with the works of folk or &lsquo;outsider&rsquo; artists.</p> <p><strong>Santi Hitorangi </strong>will be showing some of his carved stone sculptures.&nbsp; As a member of the Hitorangi Atan clan from his native Rapa Nui (Easter Island), he learned the traditional art of sculpting.&nbsp;&nbsp; His clan was known to be the carvers of thousands of Moai (colossal rock statues) that were made from volcanic rock, which can still be found on the island.&nbsp;&nbsp; In 1998, Hitorangi appeared in the NOVA series, &ldquo;The Lost Empires,&rdquo; for which he sculpted a full-scale replica of a Moai. &nbsp;&nbsp;In Rapa Nui&rsquo;s struggle to gain self-determination, he represents their community in various international forums, including the United Nations and Rio+20.</p> Sun, 15 May 2016 18:08:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Erin Dunn - CUE Art Foundation - June 4th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p><a href="http://cueartfoundation.org/erin-dunn" rel="nofollow">CUE Art Foundation</a> is pleased to announce an exhibition by Erin Dunn featuring the premiere of a new stop-motion animation film, <em>Oceanic Dancer</em>. Accompanying the film is a large diorama populated with vignettes from <em>Oceanic Dancer</em>, as well as a series of watercolors. Each of these interconnected bodies of work explores the spiritual potential of the female body, and repurposes surreal imagery from myths, fairy tales, and folk traditions.</p> <p>Central to the exhibition is <em>Oceanic Dancer</em>, a short non-narrative animation featuring a cast of intricate puppets performing in the shadows of a landscape modeled after the Pine Barrens of New Jersey. In psychoanalysis, the term &ldquo;oceanic feeling&rdquo; refers to a sensation of limitlessness or oneness with the universe. Freud attributed this phenomenon to the latent influence of the primitive infant ego, but for Dunn, the concept serves as a lens to examine the mystical power of the body and unpack the conventions of performance and ritual. The stop-motion choreography in Dunn&rsquo;s film recalls the elegance of classical ballet, but her whirling puppets also evoke the transcendent feeling of abandoning inhibition and losing yourself in movement and rhythm.</p> <p>Dunn&rsquo;s multi-faceted practice incorporates a variety of media that she renders in a grotesque fairy tale aesthetic. She crafted each element of <em>Oceanic Dancer</em> by hand, from the layered, psychedelic backdrops to the articulated puppet armatures and elaborate costumes. A diorama, filled with sculptures and paintings featured in <em>Oceanic Dancer</em>, offers a window into her meticulous, labor-intensive process. The film is the conclusion of nearly two years of work.</p> <p>A series of loose, energetic portraits on canvas occupy the project space. Saturated in airbrushed neon watercolors, the feminine, anthropomorphic characters in these portraits share the same mythical provenance as those in <em>Oceanic Dancer</em>. However, here they are removed from the hot-glue glitter world of stop-motion, and captured mid-smile&mdash;or mid-sneer&mdash;like characters from a storybook.</p> <p>Based in Brooklyn, Erin Dunn holds a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, and an MFA from Rutgers University. She has been awarded residencies from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Residency Unlimited, and Stitching Kaus Australis (Rotterdam, Netherlands). Dunn&rsquo;s work has been exhibited at MoMA PS1 (New York, NY); the New Museum (New York, NY); MOCA (Los Angeles, CA); W139 (Amsterdam, Netherlands); and The Kitchen (New York, NY). Her work has been featured in <em>The New York Times</em>, <em>The Los Angeles Times</em>, <em>Bullett Media</em>, <em>DIS Magazine</em>, <em>LA Weekly, V Magazine</em>, and <em>The Fader</em>, among others.</p> <p>This exhibition is accompanied by a 32-page color catalogue, which includes writing by Rujeko Hockley and Rachel Heidenry. The catalogue is available free of charge to gallery visitors.</p> <p>For more information please contact Programs Manager Shona Masarin-Hurst at shona@cueartfoundation.org.</p> Wed, 11 May 2016 16:06:15 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Andras Böröcz - Pavel Zoubok Gallery - June 4th 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">Pavel Zoubok Gallery is proud to present<em> Profound Objects</em>, an exhibition of new works by Andr&aacute;s B&ouml;r&ouml;cz that examines the context and symbolism of everyday objects. During the run of the exhibition, B&ouml;r&ouml;cz will present <em>Leitz &amp; Fuchs </em><em>Escape Through the Chimney</em>, a new performance that utilizes his drawn and sculpted works as theatrical props, satirizing material culture, his own studio practice and the fraught cycle of creation and consumption.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Whether inspired by past performances or used to generate new choreography, objects and the actions they prescribe have&nbsp;been B&ouml;r&ouml;cz&rsquo;s leitmotif for nearly forty years. One such form that embodies perpetual motion is&nbsp;<em>Charger</em>, 2016, an economical assemblage conjoining a wooden rocking horse with a disused darkroom enlarger and a horsehair fly-whisk. <em>Acoustic Studies for Escape Through the Chimney</em>, an accompanying suite of drawings stretched tightly over various pots, plungers and aluminum lampshades, diagram <em>Charger</em>&rsquo;s creation and its potential uses. During the performance, these drawings are drummed as the artist rocks back and forth on the original assemblage, aping creative multitasking and the idiosyncratic tempo of studio labor. In the accompanying catalog essay, art historian Agnes Berecz writes:</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Playing a hybrid role that fuses parts of the homo faber, the homo ludens and the village idiot, B&ouml;r&ouml;cz&rsquo;s performances are satires of studio work. Not unlike Bruce Nauman&rsquo;s late 1960s films and photographs, B&ouml;r&ouml;cz&rsquo;s work employs the performative as a rescue operation to simulate and parody processes of object making and artistic labor.</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Recurring in various media, B&ouml;r&ouml;cz&rsquo;s found materials are whimsical and idiosyncratic, with pencils often making up the body of his art. The current series of works move his signature medium away from figuration into the natural realm. <em>Switch</em> and <em>Douser</em>, both 2015, extend fig and paper mulberry tree limbs found near his studio with a tromp-l&rsquo;oeil accretion of carved pencils. These organic yet highly manufactured works encapsulate the seriousness and generosity of B&ouml;r&ouml;cz&rsquo;s generally absurd endeavors, suggesting an imaginative impulse rooted in natural processes of growth and decay.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Born in Budapest, Hungary, Andr&aacute;s B&ouml;r&ouml;cz has exhibited and performed extensively in Europe and the U.S. since 1983, most notably at the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, HU; The Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York; the Ernst Muzeum, Budapest, HU; the Itami Museum, Japan and the Hungarian Cultural Center, New York, NY. His work is in numerous public collections including the Boston Public Library, the Jewish Museum in New York, the Ludwig Museum&nbsp;of Contemporary Art in Budapest, the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest and Yale University in Connecticut. This is his second solo exhibition with Pavel Zoubok Gallery.</p> Sun, 08 May 2016 08:11:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Kathryn Kost - Rochester Contemporary Art Center - June 4th 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Tue, 17 May 2016 22:04:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Amy Hill - Front Room Gallery - June 5th 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM <p>Please join us on Sunday June 5th at 2pm for a Closing Brunch with the artist, Amy Hill to celebrate the final weekend of her exhibition: "Young and Innocent." We will be serving speciality cocktails and bites to eat, be sure not to miss the final day of this excellent exhibition! <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/646560555495620/#" rel="nofollow">Click here for the link to the Facebook event.</a><br /><br />Amy Hill's inspiration for her most recent body of work is American Folk Art, which served as a reflection of the artists' impressions of society, its needs and mores. A common subject was family, and more specifically, children, often depicted with a focus on their innocence, holding cuddly animals in bucolic settings.&nbsp;<br /><br />In updating these paintings, Hill has depicted urban children decorated by logos, tattoos, piercings, drugs and digital media. This allows for an examination of the phenomenon of innocence, its value, and the possibility of its survival in a fast moving world. With technical proficiency, Hill explores the charm and directness of Folk Art by employing the era's distortions of perspective and anatomy, as well as a highly personal perspective.&nbsp;<br /><br />This new series of paintings continues Hill's examination of earlier eras in art history. The eras are chosen for her stylistic kinship with their respective artists, allowing her to carry on a dialogue with them. Hill revives the styles and makes them her own by exploring themes that can be traced to the present day. Through portraiture, a genre that runs throughout art history, Hill utilizes a variety of poses, gestures, fashion and accouterments to make social, psychological and anthropological statements. Humor emerges through the juxtaposition of modern day fashion and historical figures.&nbsp;<br /><br />Amy Hill received her BFA from Carnegie Mellon University and studied at New York University. She has received grants from the Peter S. Reed Foundation and Art Matters and a studio grant from the Elizabeth Foundation. Hill received nominations for the Catherine Doctorow Prize for Contemporary Painting and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She received a Purchase Award from West Publishing Company, the Juror Award for the 2006 NYU Small Works Show and an Honorable Mention from the National Arts Club. She has attended residencies at Byrdcliffe in Woodstock, NY, The Virginia Center For the Creative Arts in Sweet Briar, Virginia, and Cummington Community of Artists in Massachusetts. She has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally. Her work has been reviewed in The New York Times, Harper's Magazine, Artnet Magazine,&nbsp;<a href="http://artinfo.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Artinfo.com</a>, and Cover Magazine, as well as other national and international publications. She currently lives and works in New York.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 19 May 2016 20:30:18 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Hunterdon Art Museum - June 5th 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sat, 14 May 2016 16:09:51 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Hunterdon Art Museum - June 5th 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sat, 14 May 2016 16:09:54 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Natalie White - WhiteBox - June 5th 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>WhiteBox and Wallplay are pleased to present&nbsp;<em>Natalie White for Equal Rights</em>, an interactive&nbsp;multimedia solo exhibition by Natalie White. Dedicated to raising awareness for the ratification of the Equal Rights&nbsp;Amendment (E.R.A), the show promotes the need for inclusion. &ldquo;Everybody wins if the E.R.A is passed,&rdquo; says White.&nbsp;The exhibition serves as a launching platform for a two week march from New York City to Washington, DC, to raise&nbsp;awareness of the Equal Rights Amendment with the mission of educating people about the issue along the way.</p> <p>The United States is only one of seven countries in the world along with Iran, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, and the&nbsp;two Pacific Island nations Palau and Tonga that have not ratified the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms&nbsp;of Discrimination of Women (CEDAW). Known as the International Bill of Rights for Women, CEDAW has been&nbsp;signed and ratified by 187 countries, virtually every other country on Earth. This fact is what inspired White to&nbsp;dedicate her life to getting the E.R.A passed, raising awareness through her art.</p> <p>&ldquo;The Vietnam War ended in part because rock and roll music brought attention to the issue and a call for peace was&nbsp;transmitted through art. The Civil Rights movement was spearheaded by poets and activists calling out their leaders. I&nbsp;am an artist&ndash; it is my duty to help stop centuries of discrimination against women. Even if it&rsquo;s not convenient or easy,&nbsp;it must be done,&rdquo; says White.</p> <p><em>Natalie White for Equal Rights</em>&nbsp;features White&rsquo;s self-portrait double exposure oversized polaroid images in red, white&nbsp;and blue. A bronze sculpture of White, nude in combat boots holding the American Flag is the centerpiece of the&nbsp;exhibition. The underground exhibition space will feature an interactive study with books on the Constitution, a&nbsp;timeline of the history of the E.R.A and information on steps that can be taken to get it passed. A series of&nbsp;propaganda flags will be shown, &ldquo;Sons of Liberty, Defend the Republic&rdquo; will alternatively read, &ldquo;Sisters of Liberty,&nbsp;Demand Equal Rights&rdquo;. Moreover, instead of the original flag in which the rattlesnake is sliced into pieces that&nbsp;originally represent the states of the Colonial America, White&rsquo;s redefined flag will have abbreviations of the states that&nbsp;have yet to ratify the E.R.A.</p> <p>The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that would&nbsp;expressly prohibit discrimination against girls and women on the basis of gender. The Constitution currently does not&nbsp;guarantee equal rights for women. In her work, Natalie White advocates for a more progressive legislature, rooted in&nbsp;the fact that economic inequality, pregnancy discrimination, violence against women, and other forms of&nbsp;discrimination against women and girls are pervasive and leave women without effective legal recourse. State laws&nbsp;are not uniform and federal laws are not comprehensive. Moreover, these laws can be, and in some cases have&nbsp;been, rolled back at any time.</p> <p>Natalie White is a provocative and progressive feminist artist, best known for her self-portrait work in giant polaroid&nbsp;photography and her contributions as a &ldquo;muse&rdquo; to the work of many of today&rsquo;s art and fashion luminaries, such as&nbsp;George Condo, Olivier Zahm, Will Cotton, Spencer Tunick, and Sean Lennon. &ldquo;Feminist by nature, riot by habit&rdquo;,&nbsp;Natalie White is a leader in advocating for female empowerment and self-affirmation through art. Born in 1988 in&nbsp;Fairmont, West Virginia, White first gained attention internationally as a young model. She is notably the first&nbsp;American ever to be featured in French Playboy. Reclaiming the objectification of her body as her own art in 2013 at&nbsp;<em>Who Shot Natalie White</em>, a retrospective from twenty five artists for whom she had been a muse, White debuted&nbsp;herself as a solo artist. She also has performed at the Art Basel Miami Women in Art benefit in collaboration with the&nbsp;Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth Sackler Center.</p> <p>Laura O&rsquo;Reilly, founder of Wallplay, curated the first installment of<em>&nbsp;Natalie White for Equal Rights</em>&nbsp;entitled &ldquo;Instant&nbsp;Gratification&rdquo;, in September 2015 at Wallplay&rsquo;s store-front project space in The Hole. The installation featured a daily&nbsp;performance piece by White, topless and enclosed in a plexiglass box in the front window with a sign stating that the&nbsp;E.R.A had never been passed, a fact which most women walking by were not aware of.&nbsp;<em>Natalie White for Equal&nbsp;Rights</em>&nbsp;is a platform and exhibition produced with the aim of bringing wit and enjoyment to the daunting process of&nbsp;instigating policy change.</p> <p>White&rsquo;s exhibition at WhiteBox will serve as a launching platform for a two week march from New York City to&nbsp;Washington, DC in protest of the lack of ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. Feminists of all genders, age,&nbsp;religion and race are invited to participate. There will be two stops a day in various cities and towns along the way.&nbsp;The concluding stop of each day of the March For ERA will feature festive speeches, a concert and collaborative art&nbsp;installations. Participants will stay and rest at community centers, rock &amp; roll tour buses and campgrounds. Once the&nbsp;March reaches DC, there will be a final protest asking Congress to vote to extend the deadline on the ERA. A&nbsp;supermajority of Congress (⅔ of Congress) will have to vote to extend the Equal Rights Amendment before&nbsp;ratification would go to the States.</p> <p>Natalie White and WhiteBox are raising money for the march through donations channeled through WhiteBox, a 501&nbsp;c3 organization, as well as crowdsourcing on Kickstarter and donations through art sales from the exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 12 May 2016 19:04:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Museum of Arts and Design - June 7th 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM <div class="description_block_body"> <div class="field field-name-field-exh-body-left-1 field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Eye for Design</em> explores the unique graphic identity created by the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) in the 1960s and 1970s through its imaginatively designed exhibition catalogues and related ephemera. The examples gathered here&mdash;drawn primarily from MAD&rsquo;s archive or that of the American Craft Council&mdash;were designed by many American and international graphic artists, including Emil Antonucci, John J. Reiss, and Linda Hinrichs. At a time when the field of graphic design was becoming increasingly corporate, these designers rejected the minimal abstraction of the brand logo in favor of hand-rendered illustration, playful use of typography, vibrant color, and inventive adaptation of the catalogue form. Instead of promoting an exhibition&rsquo;s actual works, these techniques and treatments were used metaphorically, to communicate distinctive artistic sensibilities that privilege ideals of creativity, experimentation, and hand-making, as well as the value of experience over passive contemplation.<br />&nbsp;<br />The design approaches you see here fuse art world influences&mdash;from Pop art to Henri Matisse&rsquo;s cutouts to Fluxus-inspired multiples&mdash;with popular graphic design styles and technologies, including the visually associative posters of the counterculture and the rise of screenprinting. Along the way, <em>Eye for Design</em> tells a story of MAD&rsquo;s distinctive exhibition program in the 1960s and 1970s, which embraced an expansive definition of craft, including forms of creative practice and sensory experiences that remain unorthodox in the art world today.<br />&nbsp;<br /><em>Eye for Design</em> is organized by MAD&rsquo;s Wingate Research and Collections Curator Elissa Auther and Assistant Curator Samantha De Tillio.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Support for <em>Eye for Design</em> is provided by KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, the Official Airline of MAD.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Sun, 08 May 2016 08:33:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list