ArtSlant - Contemporary Art Network http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/show en-us 40 Art or Not? <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Art or Not?</strong>&nbsp; Visitors to the museum or fine art institution are often concerned about being the butt of an artist's joke, not privy to some marketing ploy, where they are statiscial cogs in a machine churning out money for ideas. But wouldn't it be a fine thing if we could make artworks out of experience&mdash;removing the need for product, structure, and market, altogether?</span></em><em style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This week: Awkward mishaps happen. But which of the images described below is a clandestine capture of a situation staged by a very radical visual artist?</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">#1</span></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150828004913-JS32360240-6702830.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">A declared radical, an&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">anti-materialist and staunch immaterialist, the artist insists on creating protean artworks refered to as "involuntary actions"; he once transmitted a Robert Barry-inspired piece directly to the imagination of an Austrian collector for $500,000.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">#2</span></strong></span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150828005005-20150827212634-tino_seghal_2.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&ldquo;It&rsquo;s very 2015,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It looks good, it&rsquo;s social, it&rsquo;s inclusive&mdash;now, if it&rsquo;s art or not, I&rsquo;m not sure it matters. It&rsquo;s a certain kind of approach to contemporary life, and I don&rsquo;t think this thing could have been possible seven years ago.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43816"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</em><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Click to reveal the answer!</strong></span></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/43670"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><strong>&nbsp;</strong></em></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><strong><em><strong><em>&lt;&lt;</em><em>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43768" target="_self">Last Week's Art or Not</a>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/42022">&nbsp;&nbsp;</a></em></strong><em><strong>Next Art or Not</strong><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/42686" target="_self">&nbsp;</a>&gt;&gt;</strong></em></em></strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><strong><em><em><strong>&nbsp;</strong></em></em></strong></em></span></p> Fri, 28 Aug 2015 09:51:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Knock-Off Art and Tales of Artistic Production in Advanced Capitalism <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I was recently at an art fair where one gallery&mdash;that shall remain nameless&mdash;presented the work of a young artist in a solo booth. The work, while distinct in some ways, was at the very least derivative of Anish Kapoor&rsquo;s wall mounted discs. Enameled aluminum panels in sweeping gradients, they were perfectly suited to the market of the fair: take it home, put it on a wall. They were robust, large works that shouted &ldquo;wealth.&rdquo; Sold for $800-$2000 apiece. By the third day of the fair, the gallery was taking commissions on new works for twice the price because they had already sold what they&rsquo;d brought.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When you think of the cost of fabrication that would go into producing these works&mdash;metal fabrication isn&rsquo;t cheap, usually&mdash;the artist could not be making much. There was nothing illegal about these works. In fact, the artist&rsquo;s oeuvre as a whole is pretty interesting, but the combination of extremely low-priced (read industrially fabricated) and unchallenging work left a sour taste in my mouth, as it did other gallerists who exhibited more challenging, appropriately priced works and sold little.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Sculpture in shape of oil bubble is built at site of 1st oil well in Karamay, <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Xinjiang?src=hash">#Xinjiang</a> <a href="http://t.co/AqbugmJr7o">http://t.co/AqbugmJr7o</a> <a href="http://t.co/jl0cATljTA">pic.twitter.com/jl0cATljTA</a></p> &mdash; People's Daily,China (@PDChina) <a href="https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/631034336188301312">August 11, 2015</a></blockquote> <p><br /> <script charset="utf-8" type="text/javascript" src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js"></script> </p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In other Kapoor news, Hyperallergic recently published the story of a mysterious <a href="http://hyperallergic.com/228921/a-poor-mans-kapoor-china-unveils-knockoff-of-chicagos-bean/" target="_blank">&ldquo;oil bubble sculpture&rdquo; </a>that appeared in China. Very obviously a rendition of Anish Kapoor&rsquo;s famous <em>Cloud Gate</em>&nbsp;that adorns Chicago&rsquo;s Millennium Park, this object looks to be a bit more globular and unrefined. It is also closer to the ground, has a less refined finish, etc. Basically, the stitching is off.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Earlier this month a jury in California <a href="http://hyperallergic.com/228701/billionaire-must-pay-sculptor-for-unauthorized-copies-but-he-gets-to-keep-them/" target="_blank">awarded</a> sculptor John Raimondi $640,000 after a developer was found to have had copies of the sculptor&rsquo;s work fabricated in China and installed at his properties. This is the second time this developer, Igor Olenicoff, was found guilty of such a crime. The twist in this case is that the judge has ordered that Olenicoff may keep the sculptures, which will now be attributed to Raimondi. Effectively, the judge reduced the value of the artist&rsquo;s work as a whole by denying the artist the right to control their own production. The final compromise was that the judge ordered that the knock-offs be marked as &ldquo;unauthorized copies.&rdquo; That should do the trick.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Knock-off culture or &ldquo;shanzhai&rdquo; (山寨) in China is <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2012/07/22/in-china-why-piracy-is-here-to-stay/" target="_blank">huge</a>. Computer programs, movies, cellphones, fast food franchises, the list goes on and on. <em>Shanzhai</em> is linguistically tied to Robin Hood-like figures whose duty it was to distribute objects of great power and wealth fairly and justly. The term is also tied to a classic Chinese fable &ldquo;Water Margin&rdquo; (<em>Shui Hu Zhuan</em>), where 108 outlaws gather in a remote province and form a large enough army that they become officially sanctioned by the government. A kind of &ldquo;fake it til you make it&rdquo; strategy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The philosophy of <em>shanzhai</em>-ism (山寨主義) is one part opportunistic and two parts necessity. Opportunistic is not a negative here. Instead, it may seem very much in line with cultural practices online where users process cultural ephemera as they would process information, transforming it into their own for the purpose of personal advancement. It is difficult to theoretically stand behind multi-billion dollar companies who often get the short end of the stick in situations like these (Windows even went so far as to run <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS1Y3JuVjzM" target="_blank">anti-piracy advertisements</a> in China). Yet even the most respected Internet philosopher-cum-<a href="https://lessigforpresident.com/" target="_blank">presidential candidate</a>, Lawrence Lessig, is for upholding fair IP practices saying in his seminal treatise, <em>Free Culture</em>, &ldquo;A culture without property, or in which creators can't get paid, is anarchy, not freedom.&rdquo; Culture as it currently exists progresses through borrowing and adaptation. However, it behoves the fetishized object of advanced capitalism (be it an art object or a Playstation) to ensure that this process is slow&mdash;when ideas moved slowly, this process is much easier to control and much easier to profit from.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150827133148-Ibrahim_Mahama.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Ibrahim Mahama, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Civil Occupation</em>&nbsp;at Ellis King, Dublin, December 2014. Courtesy&nbsp;<a href="http://ellisking.net/ibrahim-mahama-civil-occupation/" target="_blank">Ellis King</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On Tuesday, ArtNews published an <a href="http://www.artnews.com/2015/08/25/jute-sack-artworks-are-at-the-center-of-simchowitz-lawsuit-against-venice-biennale-artist/" target="_blank">article</a> by Sarah Douglas and Andrew Russeth that relates a bizarre tale of mass-production, verbal contracts, and culminates in a lawsuit filed by the art market&rsquo;s most <a href="http://www.vulture.com/2014/03/saltz-on-the-great-and-powerful-simchowitz.html">notorious art flipper</a>, Stefan Simchowitz, against the young Ghanaian artist, Ibrahim Mahama, who makes work from jute (burlap) sacks used by miners to haul coal. Simchowitz and dealer Jonathan Ellis King allege that Mahama reneged on a verbal arrangement:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 30px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Simchowitz introduced him to Ellis King, and in October 2013... they made an oral agreement with Mahama to each give him &pound;45,000&mdash;a total of about $148,500&mdash;in exchange for a large amount of jute-sack material, divided into six lots&hellip; Two of the lots would remain intact and be used to make an installation for a show at Ellis King&rsquo;s gallery in Dublin. The other four would be divided up and used to make works in three sizes&mdash;108 by 54 inches, 96 by 48 inches, and 72 by 36 inches&mdash;mounted on stretchers and signed by the artist... Simchowitz and Ellis King paid for the shipping of the jute sacks to the U.K. last year and paid a fabricator $67,000 to stretch them into artworks. During that time, Mahama was on hand in London to &ldquo;oversee and approve the stretching process.&rdquo; On December 3 and 4 of last year, they say, he signed 294 such works at Ellis King&rsquo;s gallery in Dublin.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Shortly thereafter, Mahama begin to back out of the arrangement. First, saying that he was not satisfied with the works made by the fabricator and making 20 stretched-canvases for an unnamed collector. Then, asking that he not be represented by Ellis King and finally, in May of this year, notifying Simchowitz and Ellis King that none of the works created by the fabricator were authentic and that they were &ldquo;not to display, sell or otherwise exploit that material, complaining that he had not agreed to the commercialization of his artworks.&rdquo; Simchowitz and Ellis King are now suing Mahama for $4.45 million in damages.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This weird tale ends with Simchowitz assuring the readers that his lawsuit won&rsquo;t devalue his investment:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left; padding-left: 30px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I love Ibrahim Mahama&hellip; Ibrahim could call me tomorrow and say, &lsquo;Simco, you know what? I&rsquo;m so sorry. I&rsquo;m young. I&rsquo;ve made a series of absolutely borderline-fatal decisions&hellip;I&rsquo;m naive and I&rsquo;m young,&rsquo; and I&rsquo;d be like, &lsquo;Ibrahim, it&rsquo;s fine. I think you&rsquo;re wonderful. You&rsquo;re an amazing artist.&rsquo; And I would support him. I would invest in him.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What do all these tales have in common?&nbsp;If anything, they reveal how complicated the subjects of authenticity, ownership, authorship and value really are to understand&mdash;conceptually, ethically, legally, theoretically&mdash;at a time when more forms of artwork than ever can be easily copied and fabricated, or even mass-produced. So what&nbsp;<em>do&nbsp;</em>these tales have in common?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Here are a few observations:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Outsourced, mass fabrication should be used only as a form of critique (<a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/41410-danh-vo" target="_blank">Danh Vo's <em>We the People</em></a>, and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/41012">Jonas Lund </a>come to mind), not as a business plan.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rarity is artificially controlled, not by the lifespan of an artist but by their handlers and national and international laws.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rarity does not serve art. It serves the market and those who would profit off of it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">If you as an artist can use real or artificial rarity to critique the market, do it&mdash;but do not rely on it to determine the value of art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Don&rsquo;t go into business with Stefan Simchowitz.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Check the stitching.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/153044-joel-kuennen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Images at top: Above,&nbsp;<em>Big Oil Bubble</em>,&nbsp;screenshot via&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/631034336188301312" target="_blank">@PDChina on Twitter</a>. Below, Anish Kapoor<em>,&nbsp;Cloud Gate</em>, photo via Flickr user <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/josh/414896/in/photolist-38ko-7i8mfj-pvzR8p-RSzeB-517k85-517jJW-9GN1nH-eaFMp3-ubqypF-kKm88n-7dfPp8-g6Ben-cusue-sMVY1V-5YaBo9-8mhNXH-dqJTUK-3i5x-517ktS-amYWgx-dqJUqz-dqJUb8-cJHbS-4CyAG9-boJ9wo-rXh5jF-82aiL8-s1jXik-dJeNRW-6hmgAd-5Xcx9S-e7yLaD-5p8QiN-dqK5a1-6gVCCw-84Tm9g-5KCw2-fjBgCK-4weJzb-7W4Q8p-9u9MmF-4tv8Rz-8TZCTe-btXNWa-srBxAg-obFjNb-4wMKuN-6hbiEv-8mhXgK-cErJ1" target="_blank">jmcmichael</a>)</span></p> Thu, 27 Aug 2015 15:47:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Artists' Desks <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In today's mode of techno-voyeurism, we're constantly peeking into the factory to see how the sausage is made. The artist's studio has always had an allure, the inchoate site of creativity, the setting for private practice&mdash;like an escort's boudoir, the biggest mystery is, what do they do when they're alone in there?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We zoom in closer to see what artists keep on their most personal work space: their desk. What does it reveal about them, or about their art? We invite artists from very different disciplines to share their images and reflect on what is going on, in, on top of, and around their worktop&mdash;and why.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.jesselizotte.com/"><strong>Jesse Lizotte</strong><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Photographer, Sydney</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150722035120-IMG_2264.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Here is my tiny Japanese desk right now: this photo doesn&rsquo;t really do it justice. The only way to approach it is by sitting on the floor crosslegged, or on top of my camera bag. This can get uncomfortable pretty quick when editing, so I have to get up and move around a lot...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I have a bunch of different cameras with me, film and digital. I don&rsquo;t really have a preference, it's just always good to have a back up with you in case one melts down. Two paper rolls in the corner I can carry with me to throw up a backdrop anywhere, passports, hard drives, and a t-shirt I picked up in Harajuku.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since I&rsquo;ve been in Tokyo my go-to for food is the convenience store up the street. There&rsquo;s an assortment of snacks on the desk to keep me motivated: onigiri rice balls, cookies, grape hi-chew candy, American spirit cigarettes, and BOSS coffee, so I can feel like Tommy Lee Jones.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://amaliaulman.eu/"><strong>Amalia Ulman</strong><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Artist, Los Angeles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150805013631-amalias_office.jpg" alt="" /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: left;">My Office is one of my biggest accomplishments in my life so far. When I was little, my favorite game was to pretend to be a very stressed and angry business woman. I'm still pretending.&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My Office is the room-of-my-own I always wished for. As soon as I close the doors of Suite 1717 I have the freedom to work on my desk or read on the sofa, but also to get naked, stretch, dance, practice choreographies and sing. It is the safe space therapists always promise. &nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">During lunch break I get dressed, leave the suite, nod to the lawyers and accountants I share the floor with, say goodbye to the secretary at the front desk, pick up my mail and go get a salad somewhere between Grand and 6th.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">After grabbing a coffee I come back.</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Most afternoons there&rsquo;s a golden light of a pinkish hue that fills up the room. When that happens, I like to sit on the floor and meditate. Sometimes I do this later in the day, after hours, and scare the janitor who comes by everyday to empty my bin.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I feel sorry about that, and do the job for her.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Then I keep on working, or staring at the ceiling, or painting my nails listening to Mexican radio.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="http://www.katybinks.com/" target="_blank">Katy Binks</a></strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Printmaker, London</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150805013858-KatyBinks_Studio_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My desk tends to look like it&rsquo;s on the verge of chaos most of the time, mostly because it is. For someone who makes quite precise abstract work I always feel that my studio should reflect this but more often that not it&rsquo;s an absolute mess! I&rsquo;ve been doing a bit of painting lately, gouache, so there are brushes, water pots, paper etc. I have a to-do list on the wall&mdash;if it&rsquo;s not there in front of me I tend to forget and I like to have what I&rsquo;m working on around me so there are always bits on the wall.</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The way I use my desk changes quite often depending on what I&rsquo;m up to. I&rsquo;ve got my cutting mat and ruler around as I do a lot of stencil cutting and finishing off of prints here as well as using it a screenprinting table&mdash;I&rsquo;ve been doing some 56 x 76 cm monoprints on here in preparation for heading back into the print studio.</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">There&rsquo;s also a hard ground etching plate that I&rsquo;ve been carrying around with me since 2009 and flowers from my sister that are already dead so I can&rsquo;t kill them.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Thu, 27 Aug 2015 13:40:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list The Broad Collection: Inside LA's New Free Art Museum with Director Joanne Heyler <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.thebroad.org/" target="_blank">The Broad Museum</a>&rsquo;s September 20 opening in downtown Los Angeles is just under a month away. &ldquo;You had to remind me of that,&rdquo; Joanne Heyler laughs&mdash;her humility doesn&rsquo;t quite feel nervous, more pragmatic. If there is anyone capable of executing the huge task ahead, it&rsquo;s her.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;<em>Ars longus, vita brevis.</em>&nbsp;I&rsquo;m living that,&rdquo; says Heyler, describing her long-standing career with the Broads.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Heyler began working at The Broad Art Foundation back in 1989, and is currently its Director and Chief Curator. Under her direction, the Foundation&rsquo;s collection has grown by 65 percent, adding upwards of 70 artists.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;No August vacation for me this year,&rdquo; says Heyler, who now adds Founding Director of the brand new museum to her list of job titles, &ldquo;but we&rsquo;re incredibly excited to be so close to throwing open the doors to The Broad, finally, after many years of planning.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The building itself has been in the works since 2010, when Diller Scofidio + Renfro proposed the design while in competition with five other architectural firms.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Looking at the finished product on Grand Avenue, the gridded cement fa&ccedil;ade that somehow appears fabric soft alone seems a clear enough indication as to why Heyler and the Broads chose this design above the rest, but &ldquo;it wasn&rsquo;t just unusual and interesting for its own sake as a piece of almost sculptural architecture, it was also really, really attentive to our history as an institution,&rdquo; says Heyler.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; display: block;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150827100211-20150723184523-BroadRendering.jpeg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">A digital rendering of The Broad Art Museum. Courtesy&nbsp;The Broad and Diller Scofidio + Renfro</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">By the time the building was commissioned in 2010, Eli and Edythe Broad had been collecting for roughly 40 years and sent out 8,000 loans to 500 different museums and university galleries around the world through the Foundation&rsquo;s &ldquo;lending library&rdquo; program from two of the most prominent collections of postwar and contemporary art worldwide: The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Collection and The Broad Art Foundation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The collections together consist of 2,000 works that had been stored in 4 or 5 different warehouses rented throughout Los Angeles for more than 30 years. Heyler, alongside the Broads, decided that among the top priorities for the public gallery space, beside aesthetics and a place to headquarter the Foundation, was enough on-site storage space to house the entire collection under one roof for the first time in its history.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.dsrny.com/projects/the-broad/" target="_blank">DSR&rsquo;s proposal</a> stood out. The other firms in the competition attempted to hide the storage facility out of sight, but Elizabeth Diller decided to allow the storage requirement to become the so-called &ldquo;protagonist&rdquo; of the building design. The concept was to expose the storage &ldquo;vault&rdquo; at the center level of a three level 120,000-square-foot building, as a sort of unavoidable nucleus one must pierce through when ascending from the gallery at level one to the sky-lit gallery or &ldquo;veil&rdquo; at level three either by escalator or a clear, tube-like elevator.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150826204933-The_Broad_photo_by_Iwan_Baan_5317.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: Iwan Baan<br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;This is a building that makes itself, and its purpose, and its function more transparent the more you experience the building,&rdquo; says Heyler. &ldquo;What starts as a bit of a mystery when you enter the lobby actually is quite fully revealed when you journey through the entire building.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The second level, better known as the vault, is not only 21,000-square-feet of on-site storage but administrative offices and a multipurpose space called Oculus Hall located at the dimple in the building&rsquo;s exterior where Heyler plans to hold talks, lectures, and occasional screenings.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;I would encourage people to come to the second floor.&rdquo; There, Heyler says, will be a prime opportunity to peer through a plate glass window straight into the painting racks to see screen after screen with many of the two-dimensional works in the collection that are not on view at that moment. &ldquo;I will stop to ask the collections management team to move a painting that has a more active edge into view from that window as opposed to something that might be more monochromatic, or what have you. I will admit to that,&rdquo; she says, &ldquo;But I wouldn&rsquo;t say I&rsquo;m all-out curating storage.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The inaugural show will allow Heyler to flex her seasoned curatorial muscles in the 50,000-square-feet of prime public exhibition space between two floors and feature some 250 works by over 60 artists drawn from the Broad Collection.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The veil on the top level, named for the geometric effect the coved nine-foot-wide skylight &ldquo;monitors&rdquo; create, floods the column-free third floor with natural light and will contain works from the 1950s up to approximately the year 2000.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In the mid-1990s, Heyler and the Broads decided to look back in time in an attempt to represent a fuller arc of important pop artists from the 1960s, who were represented in the collection but only with works from about 1980 onward. During this time, a great number of 1960s Warhols were added to the collection along with 1960s Lichtenstein&mdash;all of which will be on view in the upcoming installation.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150826205238-Eli_and_Edythe_Broad_with_Joanne_Heyler_photo_by_Elizabeth_Daniels_108_best_of.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Eli and Edythe Broad with Joanne Heyler. Photo: Elizabeth Daniels</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;We have a long, long track record of collecting artists&rsquo; works in great depth,&rdquo; says Heyler. &ldquo;For example, Cindy Sherman is represented in the collection with almost 125 works. They won&rsquo;t all be on view for the inaugural show but they&rsquo;ll be on view over time.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The first floor will boast a selection of recent acquisitions&mdash;anything within the last fifteen years, post 2000&mdash;and will be less about chronology, more thematic and exploratory. This is where museum goers will find a monographic gallery of works by Takashi Murakami, a nine-screen video piece by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson entitled <em>The Visitors&nbsp;</em>that the Broads acquired in 2013, and a space off the lobby that Heyler has dedicated to Yayoi Kusama&rsquo;s <em>Infinity Mirrored Room&ndash;The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away</em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;There will be quite a few artists, all media: video, photography, painting, sculpture,&rdquo; says Heyler of the first floor exhibition space, &ldquo;It will give you a taste of what we&rsquo;ve been up to for the last ten or fifteen years in terms of collecting.&rdquo; Beginning in 2016, on a date that will be announced later on, the first floor will also host rotating special exhibitions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">According to Heyler, well over half of the 200 artists in the collection are represented by five or more works that show the scope of that artist&rsquo;s career, work, and interests&mdash;a collecting practice proven tried and true.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;I find that when you listen to artists, you&rsquo;re generally going to be led in the right direction and so that&rsquo;s what I continue to try to do,&rdquo; she says.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Broad Collection is ever evolving, and every good broad-based museum collection attempts to present a certain portrait of an era&mdash;in this case, postwar America: &ldquo;You find a lot of artwork with challenging social and political themes, but of course not everything. That would be impossible for any museum to do no matter how vast, and so it is a particular portrait, but it would be arrogant to say it was in any way complete.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Visitors can also expect to find a healthy dose of Los Angeles-based artists already present in the collection: those &ldquo;venerated masters&rdquo; like Ed Ruscha and John Baldessari all the way through to Sharon Lockhart and Diana Thater. Within the last month, Heyler, who grew up in Los Angeles, has made a couple of studio visits regarding potential new LA-based artist acquisitions:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I think that LA is in something of a sweet spot&mdash;it&rsquo;s established enough that everyone is paying attention but it&rsquo;s not entrenched so much that it doesn&rsquo;t feel like a place of great potential, it still feels that way to me. There&rsquo;s so much more to come and that&rsquo;s a very exciting time to be based in Los Angeles and the Broads are thrilled to be opening a museum coincidentally at that moment for this great city.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Broad will join the Getty and the Hammer in being <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/43564" target="_blank">the only free general admission museums in Los Angeles</a>.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;Heyler believes the museum will have a critical role in the city&mdash;one affecting more than just the local art scene:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I think that contemporary art museums have an important role to play, frankly, in a healthy democracy because I think it&rsquo;s through art that we&rsquo;re constantly seeking the truth about who we are as a society and who each of us is as individuals. That&rsquo;s kind of lofty stuff, but I think at the end of the day that&rsquo;s what any serious museum tries to do and that&rsquo;s what we&rsquo;re going to try to do.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/431064-lauren-mcquade?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Lauren McQuade</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Hours of Operation:</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">The Broad will be open to the public six days a week at the following times: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Broad will be closed to the public on Mondays, as well as on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Tickets:</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">General admission to The Broad is free. Advance online reservations are encouraged, but not required. For visitors who want to ensure a specific date and time for their visit, and avoid wait times during busy periods, The Broad provides advance reservation of timed tickets online at no charge. Tickets have entry times beginning every half hour. Free tickets will be available for reservation at www.thebroad.org/tickets beginning Monday, Aug. 31 at 10 a.m. PDT for visits beginning on Sept. 20 and running through the end of the year. Tickets are also available for same day or future visits onsite at the museum, 221 S. Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles, beginning Sept. 20.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top:&nbsp;The Broad. Photo: Iwan Baan)</span></p> Thu, 27 Aug 2015 10:49:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Amir H. Fallah Creates a Portrait in Cactus and Lava Lamps in <em>The Caretaker</em> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amirhfallah.com" target="_blank">Amir H. Fallah&rsquo;s</a> portraits resemble the site of an archaeological dig. When Howard Carter discovered King Tut&rsquo;s tomb, the young pharaoh&rsquo;s body was wrapped in shrouds with his material possessions painstakingly arranged around him. Likewise, Fallah incorporates everyday objects from a subject&rsquo;s home into ornate, unconventional portraits that obscure the figure&rsquo;s face, finding profound connections in the seemingly mundane and charm in the ugly. It&rsquo;s not coincidental that much of his work incorporates elements of collage&mdash;a medium that at its root is a collection of often-disparate objects.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><a href="http://www.nermanmuseum.org/exhibitions/caretaker-2015-05-28.html#.Vdwis0sWSlI" target="_blank">The Caretaker</a></em>, Fallah&rsquo;s installation at <a href="http://www.nermanmuseum.org" target="_blank">The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art</a> in Kansas City, grapples with the human tendency to nurture the dying and the vulnerable, through an exhibition wholly devoted to local professor Mark Raduziner and his predilections for lava lamps, cactuses, and Coogi sweaters.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Fallah, who is a notorious night owl, works from Los Angeles in a home studio based in his garage. Here is an excerpt of our insomniac Skype session:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825100606-A_Walk_Among_The_Living_white_background.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">All images: Courtesy of the artist and The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Danna Lorch:</strong> &nbsp;<strong>How did you come to discover Mark Raduziner and choose him as the subject for your show at the Nerman?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Amir H. Fallah:</strong> During our discussions, Bruce Hartman, the museum&rsquo;s director, had seen that in previous exhibitions some of my old installations had used plants, and asked if I had any ideas that could integrate those elements. He mentioned that he&rsquo;d read a <a href="http://www.kansascity.com/living/home-garden/article5491665.html" target="_blank">crazy article</a> about Mark Raduziner&rsquo;s cactus collection.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL:</strong> <strong>It&rsquo;s completely unnatural to find cactuses, let alone to keep them alive through Kansas City&rsquo;s brutal winter.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> He has 200 plants that should have died in that climate, yet every winter before the first freeze he carries all these potted plants&mdash;which are life size or larger&mdash;inside the house, puts his furniture into storage, then turns it into a grow house with artificial lights. I asked Bruce how he&rsquo;d feel about me doing a show about this guy whom I&rsquo;d never met. When Mark first heard about it he thought it was bizarre, but then I spent a few days with him in his home and we got to know each other. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825100800-Nerman_-_Spring_2015-7091.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL:</strong> <strong>Did Mark recognize himself in the show?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> He had a very emotional response walking into the museum. The plants ended up being a metaphor for the idea of taking care of someone who is sick [in this case a parent] and about to die, and nurturing them. These are universal themes. Although you don&rsquo;t see Mark&rsquo;s face throughout the exhibit, I tried to capture his essence without showing his likeness, which is what I&rsquo;m interested in with all my work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825101106-Protect_Me_From_What_I_Want_whitebackground.jpg" alt="" height="300" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825101131-Perpetual_Grip_whitebackground.jpg" alt="" height="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL:</strong> <strong>Does it matter to you if the subject of your work is actually someone you have met and spent time with?</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> Actually, for my last project [<em><a href="http://www.cjamesgallery.com/show-detail/from-the-primitive-to-the-present" target="_blank">From The Primitive To The Present</a></em>] I randomly chose an estate sale where I purchased all the belongings of several family members who had recently died. I conducted an archaeological dig, and became an investigative reporter in a sense, creating a series of portraits of a family I&rsquo;d never met. For me, what is exciting is the unknown. When we think of portraiture, we think of the familiar. It&rsquo;s always someone posing in front of you and you&rsquo;re drawing his or her likeness. I&rsquo;m taking that concept and turning it on its head.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825100003-Nerman_-_Spring_2015-7131.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL:</strong> <strong>The diamond-shaped sculpture that stands twelve feet high, almost feels like a religious shrine. &nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> I wanted to create a terrarium that would not only contain a life size portrait of Mark, but also have a grow house for some of his plants. I wanted it to be as though he were looking over and sheltering these plants so they could thrive. The hourglass shape comes from a lava lamp, which is another thing that Mark obsessively collects in the hundreds.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL: Now I&rsquo;m picturing his house. It must be zany and crowded.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> He&rsquo;s no hoarder. It&rsquo;s actually tastefully curated.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825101252-Lost_In_The_Garden_Of_My_Mind_whitebackground.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL:</strong> <strong>Your studio is based in your Los Angeles garage. How did you prepare for such a large museum show from California?</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> I made the seven paintings in my studio. Then there is a large Coogi sweater tapestry, which was also constructed in LA. I had a seamstress come and help me stitch it all together, and it&rsquo;s so huge we had it lying out in my driveway while we worked.<img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825100837-Nerman_-_Spring_2015-7047.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150825100919-Nerman_-_Spring_2015-7199.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>DL:</strong> <strong>How did the Bill Cosby-like sweaters come to have a place in the show?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AHF:</strong> When I was visiting Mark, I asked him if he had kept anything that belonged to his late father. He showed me this collection of Coogi sweaters, an Australian hand made wool brand made famous by Bill Cosby and Biggie Smalls the rapper. They were really big in the hip-hop world back in the day. What&rsquo;s funny is Mark&rsquo;s father was a Mid Western <em>fashionista</em>, a white man in Kansas wearing these crazy-patterned sweaters. In the big portrait I made of Mark, he&rsquo;s actually wrapped in his father&rsquo;s sweater.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409513-danna-lorch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danna Lorch</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 10:33:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list The Best B Movies About the Art World <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">When art and artists appear as a subject in cinema, it's typically in the form of a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">too lengthy/</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">too sexy biopic (think:&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mr. Turner</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> or </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Frida</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">) or a hyperbolic thriller that suffuses the clich&eacute; of scintillating glamor with filthy corruption (<em>The Thomas Crown Affair</em>, anyone?)</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The big screen is always attracted to prurience, but there are some movies in the straight-to-dvd crate that, w</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">hether they present artifice or archetype, deserve to be revived for the morsels of wisdom they impart about the art world. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Salubrious, salacious, gory, or grimy: here our our favorite art-themed B movies and their best harbingers of the arts and life.</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824011159-incognito-jason-patric-painting-forgery.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbWjf6CtBX8" target="_blank"><strong><em>Incognito</em> (1997)</strong><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">John Badham</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A frustrated and exceptional American artist "wastes" his talent on painting forgeries&mdash;until a deal with some evil English gents goes wrong. Cue chases across England, a very bizarre scene with a pub landlord and a red telephone box, and some hideous 90s fashion. The moral of the story, though, is that forging a Master still pays more than doing your own work.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line: <em>I just don't understand why you guys have to sit here and piss on other people, let alone Rembrandt.</em></span></p> <p class="p3" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824011345-stend1.jpg" alt="" /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2M65XeIKQss" target="_blank"><strong><em>The Stendhal Syndrome</em>&nbsp;<em>(La Sindrome di Stendhal)</em>&nbsp;(1995)</strong><br /></a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dario Argento</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stendhal_syndrome" target="_blank">Stendhal Syndrome</a> is a genuine psychosomatic disease, that can be induced by experiences such as looking at artistic masterpieces. Argento himself suffered from it as a child&mdash;not ideal when you live a stone's throw from the Uffizi. Argento's arthouse horror is, as you'd expect, extremely gruesome, with savage rape and a lot of blood. If the film's plot isn't already disturbing enough, there's also the fact that Argento directs his daughter Asia as the lead.&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824011319-americansplendor2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjJmwXtEGA" target="_blank"><em>American Splendor</em> (2003)<br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A deadpan indie drama of the painfully monotonous working-class life of Cleveland's late comic artist Harvey Pekar. Moving between documentary and fiction, Pekar appears as himself in the film, narrating episodes from his life about events and friends, who turn into characters&mdash;much in the way he created his <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Splendor" target="_blank">comic series</a> of the same title. There's nothing glamorous about the anti-hero's offbeat world, but it's a truthful, humorous account told with a lot of affection. Not your usual biopic.</span></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line:&nbsp;<em>Ordinary life is pretty complex stuff.</em></span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824011633-maxresdefault.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p class="p2" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkT5yzZrml8" target="_blank"><em>Headhunters (Hodejegerne)</em> (2011)<br /></a></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Morten Tyldum</span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Another movie in thrall of the art world's corruption and money, this Norwegian thriller follows the drama of a victim of capitalism (with a beautiful gallerist wife). Pushed to the edge by keeping up appearances, Roger, the protagonist, decides to steal a very valuable painting. Grisly and with an absurd ending&mdash;Scandinavian crime cinema at its most over-the-top.</span></p> <p class="p6" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<em><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824012041-Trance-nueva-pelicula-Danny-Boyle_TINIMA20130604_1379_5.jpg" alt="" /></em></span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4_bdS3_gr0" target="_blank"><em>Trance</em> (2013)<br /></a></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Danny Boyle&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">One of Boyle's trashiest productions, this sexy noir follows yet another art theft gone wrong when a debt-ridden employee at a London Auction house steals a Goya painting (<em>Witches in the Air</em>).&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line:</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;No work of art is worth a human life.</span></em></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824012456-art-of-the-steal-review-2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbqvELZ1-P8" target="_blank"><em>The Art of the Steal</em> (2013)<br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jonathan Sobol</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Another art heist film, but this time it's a comedy! With motorcycles, suits, paintings, robbery, forgery, AND Kurt Russell. Completely implausible and with absolutely no real value, this film is n</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">ot to be confused with 2009's&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Art of the Steal</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, a documentary about control over the Dr. Albert C. Barnes' collection in&nbsp;Philly.</span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line: <em>Some shitty aliases, you all sound like chocolate bars.</em></span></p> <p class="p4" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<em><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824011858-beltracchi_the_art_of_forgery.jpg" alt="" /></em></span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TS6a3XochQU"><em>Beltracchi: The Art of Forgery</em> (2014)<br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Arne Birkenstock</span></p> <p class="p5" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A humorous documentary about silver fox Wolfgang Beltracchi, a forger par excellence who spent 6 years in prison. He is so good that some of his works are still in Museum collections around the world: only 60 of his 300 fake paintings have been identified. The moral is, we are stupid, because we are hung up on the gesture of a name.</span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line:&nbsp;<em>I can paint anything. Leonardo? Of course. But why? You couldn't sell it.</em></span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824012823-f51e1a3c6ee6e303020c8bacedf9cb7b.jpg" alt="" /></em></span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAQRCcQlXXE" target="_blank"><em>I Shot Andy Warhol</em> (1996)<br /></a></strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mary Harron</span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Based on the real life of radical feminist writer Valerie Solanas, briefly a fringe member of Andy's Factory scene, and who shot the iconic artist and curator Mario Amaya in 1968 (both survived, though Wahol, wounded in the chest, would suffer the physical effects for the rest of his life). Solanas is known for her SCUM Manifesto (Society of Cutting Up Men). It's a compelling tale but if you believe men and women are equal, Solanas' theories will make you wince.</span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line:&nbsp;<em>You spend one day with the hippies, and you realize how truly refreshing and unpretentious, hard core, New York degenerates are.</em><br /></span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;<em><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824013023-untitled-7.jpg" alt="" /></em></span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C543t9FDYLU" target="_blank"><em>Art School Confidential</em> (2006)<br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Terry Zwigoff</span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A young aspiring artist follows his dream and heads to art school, only to discover the art world isn't quite as he imagined. The school in the movie is reportedly based on NYC's Pratt Institute.</span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line:&nbsp;<em>Most artists become artists because they have no way to attract a mate.</em></span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;<img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150824013111-ttk_2.jpg" alt="" /></em></span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6GbbFXxNpw"><em>Style Wars</em> (1983)<br /></a></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tony Silver&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This made-for-TV classic documents the New York graffiti and hip hop scene in the 70s and 80s and the often violent beefs between crews. As well as asking the young bombers their thoughts and opinions on art, vandalism, and rebellion, at one point, the camera follows the graf writers to the opening of a gallery show where their work appears, and asks them how they feel about selling their work in the white cube, which reminds you just how long this dialogue has been going on. A fascinating film for anyone who is into subculture movements and the social history of the city.</span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Best line: <em>People look at a person, what you write on trains? Oh, you vandalism and all that. Yeah I vandalism alright, but still in general I know what I'm doin'. I did somethin' to make yo eyes open up. Right? So why is you talking bout it for?</em></span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p9" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a><br /></span></p> <p class="p8" style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Mon, 24 Aug 2015 10:30:12 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Moscow Orthodox Protester Smashes Soviet Era Art <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://moscowmanege.ru/en/the-sculptures-we-do-not-see/" target="_blank"><em>Sculptures We Do Not See</em>,</a> an</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"> exhibition showcasing Soviet Era art, opened last Friday at Moscow's Manege Center. The exhibition included works from participants of the LeSS group, active in parallel to conventional art of the Soviet era, including artists such as Vadim Sidur,&nbsp;Nikolai Silis, and Vladimir Lemport. Topics surrounding the works include religious themes&mdash;a censored subject during Russia&rsquo;s Soviet reign between 1922 and 1991.</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Decades after creation, and the sculptures still show themselves capable of inciting controversy.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"Delusional people came to the exhibition who broke several works belonging to the Manege collection, by Vadim Sidur," Yelena Karneyeva, spokesperson for the&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://moscowmanege.ru/en/" target="_blank">Manege Museum</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">,&nbsp;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://news.yahoo.com/orthodox-activists-smash-blasphemous-sculptures-moscow-181549806.html" target="_blank">told AFP</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Head of the conservative religious organization God's Will, Dmitry Tsorionov&mdash;who uses the pseudonym Dmitry Enteo&mdash;confirmed he was present opening day of the exhibition when the incident took place. "We called the police," he said. "They will close the exhibition for offending believers."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Enteo is notorious figure among Moscow&rsquo;s cultural sectors. Earlier this year, he <a href="http://www.news.com.au/world/europe/most-brutal-arrest-in-moscow-pride/story-fnh81p7g-1227376455457" target="_blank">attempted to stop</a> a gay pride rally in Moscow. In 2012, he took part in a <a href="http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/30/following-pussy-riot-verdict-christian-culture-warriors-run-riot-in-moscow/?_r=0" target="_blank">threatening display</a> against Moscow&rsquo;s G-Spot Museum of Erotic Art. This time last year, following a lecture he gave, Enteo was criticized for <a href="http://www.vocativ.com/world/russia/people-think-putin-is-a-god/" target="_blank">his statements</a> comparing Russian President Vladimir Putin to God. Enteo&rsquo;s most recent alleged attack is heating up the digital media world with outrage from various sources criticizing his protesting methods. Radio journalist, Vladimir Varfolomeev of Echo of Moscow tweeted: "Now Orthodox warriors are smashing a sculpture exhibition in the center of Moscow. Hail the Russian IS."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">However, Vladimir Legoida, spokesperson for the Orthodox Church, told RIA Novosti news agency there should be a "legal assessment" of the attack, adding that believers "undoubtedly have the right to protest." At the moment, whether Enteo will be charged with vandalism or any other charges is unclear.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/379784-kimberly-b-johnson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Kimberly B. Johnson</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: Protestor&nbsp;Dmitry Serebryakov, image via Yahoo News)</span></p> Thu, 20 Aug 2015 21:15:34 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list The Best Non-Profit Art Spaces in New York <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Like other industries, the art world should come under the scrunity of fair and equitable business practices. With so much privatization in the gallery and museum world, it's as good a time as any for consumers of culture to question where funds come from&mdash;and where profits are going. This summer, we're seeking out the best not-for-profit and community conscious art spaces in the most commercial cities on the global art circuit. As part of our mission to give art a social slant, the second stop in our series exploring these venues is New York City. You can check out our Los Angeles guide <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/43630" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0aoVkdeYqw">&ldquo;There are eight million stories in the Naked City&rdquo;</a>&mdash;and a decent chunk of them are think pieces about whether or not living (and for our purposes, making art) in New York is still a tenable enterprise. The older generation&mdash;the <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/oct/07/new-york-1percent-stifles-creative-talent" target="_blank">David Byrnes</a> and <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/03/patti-smith-to-artists-do_n_560794.html" target="_blank">Patti Smiths</a>, the <em><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/realestate/moving-out-of-brooklyn-because-of-high-prices.html?_r=0" target="_blank">New York Times</a></em>&mdash;keeps telling us that New York is dead, that we should move somewhere else: <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/10/all-the-places-the-new-york-times-has-compared-to-brooklyn/381315/" target="_blank">&ldquo;the next Brooklyn,&rdquo;</a> perhaps, whether that means Detroit, northern New Jersey, or wherever. Despite these obituaries, however, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/42940" target="_blank">artists keep moving to New York and making art there</a>; they just do it in different places and in different ways than their predecessors. Yes, rents are unfairly high. Yes, you can see bad art and hear bad music any given night in the city. But if you know where to go, you can also consume the opposite; in 2015, as in 1977, New York brims with exciting venues.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">An issue, of course, is that these venues are often ephemeral. Because of real estate prices and business licensing obstacles, maintaining an art space over an extended period of time is&mdash;as people like Byrne have noted&mdash;more difficult than it once was. As a result, up-and-coming New York venues increasingly manipulate and expand the definition of &ldquo;gallery,&rdquo; &ldquo;concert venue,&rdquo; or &ldquo;art space&rdquo; in a dual effort to integrate the arts into city neighborhoods and keep the venue&rsquo;s own existence vital. There are a host of non-profit spaces in New York&mdash;some brick-and-mortar, some roving&mdash;that, besides showing art, engage the artistic community and the community at large in myriad ways. Concerts, classes, workshops, barbecues, and more: the role of an &ldquo;art space&rdquo; in a thriving, self-aware New York scene changes by neighborhood. The not-for-profit spaces listed below&mdash;new and old, big and small, just ten of countless others&mdash;stay fervently active in the arts and in their respective communities, fostering art, education, and social justice all the while.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://artistsspace.org/" target="_blank">Artists Space</a></span></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a style="color: #545454; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://artistsspace.org/" target="_blank"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819171226-Installation_view_from_Tom_Finland_-_The_Pleasure_of_Play__Artists_Space__photo_by_Daniel_P_rez.jpg" alt="" /></a></span></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation view from <em>Tom Finland - The Pleasure of Play</em>, Artists Space. Photo: Daniel Pérez<br /><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The oldest organization on this list and a continual fixture in Manhattan&rsquo;s experimental arts scene, Artists Space was founded by Trudie Grace and Irving Sandler in SoHo in 1972, with help from the New York State Council on the Arts. As its name implies, it puts artists first: letting them curate the exhibitions, providing artists-in-need with materials, fostering artistic discourse through shows, performances and conversations. Since its inception, Artists Space has proven itself an instrumental supporter of noteworthy artists in NYC&mdash;including Joan Jonas, Jeff Koons, Laurie Anderson, and many more. Four decades on, Artists Space keeps a fairly busy exhibition schedule and, this summer in particular, a full calendar of talks and performances, often held at its offshoot space opened in 2012, Artists Space Books &amp; Talks, a few blocks south of Artists Space&rsquo;s current Greene Street home.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://creativetime.org/" target="_blank">Creative Time</a></span></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819162223-Creative_Time_-_View_of_Drifting_in_Daylight._Kindly_credit_with_Lauri_Stallings___glo__Drifting_in_Daylight__Photography_by_Tara_Rice__Courtesy_Creative_Time..jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;Lauri Stallings + glo,&nbsp;<em>Drifting in Daylight</em>, 2015. Photo: Tara Rice, Courtesy Creative Time</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Younger than Artists Space by only a year, Creative Time is one of the aforementioned spaces-without-walls. Instead, the organization uses every corner of New York City as its exhibition space: commissioning <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/43024" target="_blank">eye-opening, site-specific installations </a>that aim to challenge New Yorkers&rsquo; conceptions of history and geography. A recent newsworthy endeavor was Kara Walker&rsquo;s <em>A Subtlety </em>(2014), an inspired and confounding work set in Williamsburg&rsquo;s soon-to-crumble Domino Sugar factory. But Creative Time has presented perplexed audiences with countless other challenging pieces over the years by artists like Jenny Holzer, Vito Acconci, and Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Creative Time circumvents the issue of finding an audience for boundary-pushing art by putting the art in conspicuous but often overlooked locales, forcing viewers to consider not only the art itself but the storied environment around it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="https://eyebeam.org/" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a></span></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819162605-Eyebeam__courtesy_of_Eyebeam.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Eyebeam. Courtesy of Eyebeam</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Like many of the spaces on this list, the &ldquo;art and technology center&rdquo; Eyebeam wears many hats. Besides hosting multi-media and -sensory exhibitions, the Sunset Park, Brooklyn-based organization funds research, artist residencies, and public workshops&mdash;using each of its ventures as a means of discovering new technical and ideological possibilities for art, technology and the intersection thereof&mdash;and the social and ethical implications of such developments. (It sponsors several research groups, for instance, that focus on sustainability, urbanism, open source culture, and game design.) Founded in 1997 by John S. Johnson III, David S. Johnson, and Roderic R. Richardson, Eyebeam also recently set up shop at South Street Seaport with an exhibition showcasing wearable technology, giving the non-profit a home base for producing futuristic projects on both sides of the East River.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.fluxfactory.org/" target="_blank">Flux Factory</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819163052-Flux_Factory_exterior__courtesy_Flux_Factory.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Flux Factory exterior. Courtesy Flux Factory</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.fluxfactory.org/">&nbsp;</a></span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Flux Factory story is an all-too-familiar one for New Yorkers. It started in 1993 as a collective of young artists shacked up in a former factory in then-gritty Williamsburg. The living conditions, the story goes, may not have been pristine, but artists were meeting artists and making art, fueling a creative community in opposition to the Manhattan art hegemony in a neighborhood that would, by the early 2000s, become an international epicenter for contemporary art and music. Of course, when the Williamsburg bubble began to burst, rents skyrocketed, and in 2002 Flux Factory&mdash;which had earned non-profit status three years earlier&mdash;relocated to Long Island City, Queens. Now in its second LIC space (since 2009), the organization is a leader in the rich LIC artistic community and the larger alternative New York art world, funding residencies and commissioning installations that prize interactivity, socio-political engagement, and creative uses of technology&mdash;all the while organizing frequent exhibitions and discussions in their space.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.nolongerempty.org/" target="_blank">No Longer Empty</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819163136-No_Longer_Empty__installation_shot_of_Bring_in_the_Reality__2015__courtesy_No_Longer_Empty.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">No Longer Empty, installation shot of <em>Bring in the Reality</em>, 2015. Courtesy No Longer Empty</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">No Longer Empty&rsquo;s modus operandi is right there in the title. Established in 2009, the organization teams with artists and curators to install exhibitions in vacant storefronts and buildings, rendering the spaces, well, no longer empty. Throughout the current decade, No Longer Empty has collaborated with artists like Nari Ward and Dread Scott to offer New York viewers from any number of different neighborhoods and walks of life opportunities to interact with works of art (and their city&rsquo;s history) which may have previously been skipped over or inaccessible. In addition to their expansive exhibitions&mdash;currently, <em>Bring in the Reality</em> at the Nathan Cummings Foundation&mdash;No Longer Empty organizes more frequent &ldquo;curatorial labs&rdquo;: shorter-run shows put together by young curators, likewise in unique spaces throughout New York City.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://pioneerworks.org/" target="_blank">Pioneer Works</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819174827-Installation_view_of_Tongue_Stones_exhibition__art_by_Andy_Romer___courtesy_Pioneer_Works.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation view of <em>Tongue Stones</em> exhibition (art by Andy Romer). Courtesy Pioneer Works</span><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Opened in 2012 by the artist Dustin Yellin, Pioneer Works, like many of the above spaces, hosts art exhibitions (currently, Hyon Gyon) and concerts (recently teaming with Issue Project Room for a few this summer). It also nurtures residencies, teaches classes, prints publications (<em>Intercourse</em> magazine) and promotes awareness about the surrounding community, the once-dilapidated seaside neighborhood of Red Hook, Brooklyn. What makes Pioneer Works unique above all, though, is its space&mdash;breathtakingly enormous. Occupying a cavernous former iron factory and possessing copious outdoor room, Pioneer Works provides spacious exhibition halls in an environment that is somehow both jaggedly industrial and intimately homey. It affords its artists numerous unique ways to play with scale and dimensions, with materials and backgrounds. Because it is so big, too, Pioneer Works sometimes exudes a carnival-like feel, especially during its monthly Second Sundays, a crowded day of open studios and performances.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.powrplnt.org/" target="_blank">POWRPLNT</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819164124-POWRPLNT__Hunter_East_Harlem_Gallery__photo_by_Natalie_Conn.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">POWRPLNT, Hunter East Harlem Gallery. Photo: Natalie Conn</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Among the most recently-established organizations on this list, POWRPLNT curates shows in spaces such as the Hunter East Harlem Art Gallery and, importantly, offers classes and workshops free of charge that teach a variety of approaches to making art with a computer. Although they conduct workshops for learners of all ages, POWRPLNT provides special instruction for East Harlem teenagers, teaching them music production, digital painting, online publishing, digital modeling, and much more. In a time when art is increasingly made with a computer&mdash;moreover, in a time when young people should have familiarity with any manner of digital creation techniques&mdash;POWRPLNT brings equipment and tutelage to those who otherwise may not have access to such things. Founded by the multimedia artist Angelina Dreem, POWRPLNT has a young and endlessly creative staff, and (to be blunt) unlike some old-fogey educational cooperatives, they promote the creation of really cool, up-to-the-minute stuff.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.secretprojectrobot.org/secretprojectorobot/Home.html" target="_blank">Secret Project Robot</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819174047-Black_Dice_performing_at_Secret_Project_Robot__2011__photo_by_Andrew_Russeth.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;Black Dice performing at Secret Project Robot, 2011. Photo: Andrew Russeth</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Under the direction of Rachel Nelson and Eric Zajaceskowski, Secret Project Robot opened in Bushwick in 2011, rising from the ashes of shuttered Williamsburg space Monster Island Basement. The newer venue&rsquo;s building and adjacent yard are sights to behold; the yard, in particular, is an artfully-curated explosion of handbuilt wooden structures and eye-catching junk. Inside, the space is home to a rotating series of playful art installations: a comic book library; many stuffed animals; studios; and a stage where house favorites like Oneida, Black Dice, and old Brooklyn friends the Yeah Yeah Yeahs play periodically. Besides concerts and art openings, though, Secret Project Robot puts together small theater productions, food events (such as a &ldquo;Surrealist Dinner Party&rdquo;), and film screenings, notably being the site for Pornhub&rsquo;s NYC Porn Film Festival this past spring. Unassuming from the outside, Secret Project Robot inspires childlike wonder from both first-time visitors and regulars&mdash;and sure enough, more than at other such spaces, there are often little kids running around the art.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://silentbarn.org/" target="_blank">Silent Barn</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819164248-Silent_Barn_stage_installation__photo_by_Francesca_Ferreira.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-size: 12px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana;"><br /></span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Silent Barn stage installation. Photo: Francesca Ferreira</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Started in Queens in 2005 and re-opened in Bushwick in 2013, the Silent Barn's mission in an art world still beholden to semi-exclusive spaces and institutional hierarchy is to promote even-handed collectivity and inclusion. Run by a revolving cast of volunteers and residents (often totalling around seventy), the venue hosts fairly-priced all-ages concerts many nights a week that feature a wide palette of musical styles, from noise to punk to pop, by artists from New York and across the globe. Beyond its concerts, though, the space frequently showcases visual and performance art, discussions and lectures, community events, and previously, a barber shop-record store, Deep Cuts. Everything they do is the product of a collaborative effort on the part of the organization&rsquo;s members and outside participants; indeed, the Silent Barn demonstrably feels a social responsibility to everyone even remotely in its geo-social sphere. This summer, for example, they ran a class on Intersectional Activism, offering readings and discussions with regards to multiculturalism, safe spaces, the prison industrial complex, and other important, overlooked subjects pertaining to queer theory, radical politics, and more.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.thetranspecos.com/" target="_blank">Trans-Pecos</a></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150819170112-Workshop_at_Trans-Pecos__courtesy_Trans-Pecos.png" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Workshop at Trans-Pecos. Courtesy Trans-Pecos</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Another fairly young space, Trans-Pecos occupies the Ridgewood building that in the mid-&rsquo;00s housed the Silent Barn. Organizer Todd P, a presence in Brooklyn&rsquo;s underground music scene throughout the twenty-first century, opened the space with the intention of having it be not only a haven for avant-garde music but also a community center for any and all of Ridgewood&rsquo;s inhabitants and visitors. The musical programming takes over Trans-Pecos most nights and features an adventurous mix of practices, coordinated by a changing group of curators that has included important New York musicians like James Chance, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/43705" target="_blank">Matana Roberts</a>, David Grubbs, and Hisham Bharoocha. During the day, however, Trans-Pecos is a coffee shop, sometimes-yoga studio, platform for workshops and discussions, or alternately, just a nice spot to hang out. The organization&rsquo;s community engagement comes, more specifically, in the form of its support for the Zebulon Institute of Music and Art, which facilitates musical performances by developmentally-disabled adults; Representing NYC, which supports artists primarily in poorer communities; and FYREZONE, which provides art instruction and empowerment to local young people.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/431528-joe-bucciero?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joe Bucciero</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Sun, 23 Aug 2015 16:29:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Anonymous Art: Secret Sale Trend Plays on the Psychology of the Purchasing <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Secret Art Sale Exhibition has been popping up all over the place lately: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/9/articles/show/42404" target="_blank">we reported</a> from Art Dubai on the RCA's Secret Dubai&nbsp;and the democratizing power of the anonymous auction.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Now London's <a href="http://www.foldgallery.com/" target="_blank">Fold Gallery</a> in partnership with social art enterprise&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artboxlondon.org/" target="_blank">Artbox</a> are hosting a summer inspired secret postcard sale. Starting August 20 and running for a week, Artbox London has taken the RCA format&mdash;exhibiting the work of 30 artists with learning disabilities alongside internationally acclaimed names. The funds raised will go back into organizing future workshops at the gallery for people with learning disabilities. Artbox is a social art enterprise that supports the art of adults with learning disabilities through raising awareness and encouraging interaction.</span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150818165348-photo_12.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">So why&nbsp;<em>are</em>&nbsp;we so enthralled by events such as these? It seems to hang on the feeling that we can get a bargain on work by a well-know artist. Ostensibly, it reveals how much importance we give to the "author" of the art object&mdash;the Foucault "author-function." It's not just the name of the artist but the imprint of everything that name represents.</span><img style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150818165824-photo_35.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">By taking the economy into their own hands, the gallery organizing a "secret sale" demonstrates the onset of a post-capitalist purchasing model, a "shared economy," where the producers work with businesses to control the process of buying art, and where we consume things simply because we enjoy them.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150818171140-photo_26.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">However, since the artists' names will only be disclosed after purchase of the postcards, it's also clear that art buyers are very unlikely to purchase work by artists who are not known, suggesting the integration is still superficial. The secret sale is a way for the gallery to forcibly democratize the art economy&mdash;but it is uncertain as to whether it can make an enduring difference. &nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-char-jansen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Char Jansen</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(All images courtesy of Fold Gallery &amp; Artbox)</span></p> Fri, 21 Aug 2015 12:08:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Working (it) Out with Gillian Dykeman: Nicole Miller <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Welcome to the eighth installation of the Artslant podcast series, <em>Working (it) Out</em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My name is Gillian Dykeman, and I'm a visual artist living in Toronto, Ontario. This summer, I am interviewing artists to ask about the role of audience in their practice. Each interview will begin with one question: "Does art require an audience?"</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219689104&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="450"></iframe></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Working (it) Out </span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Episode Eight |&nbsp;<strong>Nicole Miller: Conducting Subjectivity</strong></span></p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Laughing yoga (4:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />The audience completes the work (5:45)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Show and Tell (6:05)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" /><em>The Borrowers</em>&nbsp;(7:42) &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Anthony Aquarius, the Jimi Hendrix impersonator and artistic witchery<em>&nbsp;</em>(9:50)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&ldquo;David&rdquo; and the phantom limb&nbsp;(12:25)</span><span style="text-align: center;"><br /></span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Invoking active viewing and bodily response&nbsp;(15:25)</span><span style="text-align: center;"><br /></span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Therapeutic practice for the artist and subject&nbsp;(17:45)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Remapping the history of Hollywood and black actors via uncovering overlooked narratives.&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">(19:15)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />The artist as conductor of her practice<em>&nbsp;</em>(21:40)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />&ldquo;Daggering&rdquo; and Ballet<em>&nbsp;</em>(23:14)</span><span style="text-align: center;"><br /></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">I met this week with video and installation artist Nicole Miller. Miller and I discuss her year and a half-long residency with LACMA&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.lacma.org/series/redlands-artfilm-lab" target="_blank">Redland&rsquo;s Art + Film Lab</a> and commission to create a project in collaboration with community contributors from neighborhoods around Los Angeles, as well as her <a href="http://koenigandclinton.com/exhibitions/nicole-miller/" target="_blank">recent show at Koenig &amp; Clinton</a> in New York. Miller considers audience from the conception stage of her projects, and for this artist, the audience completes the work. We delve into the therapeutic effects woven into her practice, and her desires to evoke a bodily and empathic response from her viewers. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Music: Chromatics, "At Your Door"</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818163931-NMiller_TheBorrowers_2014_DetailNdinda_7_300dpi.jpg" alt="" width="640" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Ndinda</em>, detail from <em>The Borrowers</em>, 2015,Koenig &amp; Clinton, New York. <br />Photos: Jeffrey Sturges, New York.&nbsp;Images courtesy the artist and Koenig &amp; Clinton, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818164054-NMiller_TheBorrowers_InstallationView_2_300dpi.jpg" alt="" width="640" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>The Borrowers</em>, 2015, Installation view<em>&nbsp;</em>at Koenig &amp; Clinton New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818164408-NMiller_TheBorrowers_InstallationView_DetailAnthony_300dpi.jpg" alt="" width="640" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>The Borrowers</em>, 2015, Installation view<em>&nbsp;</em>at Koenig &amp; Clinton New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818164453-NMiller_TheBorrowers_2014_DetailDavid_3_300dpi.jpg" alt="" width="640" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Detail of David&nbsp;from&nbsp;<em>The Borrowers</em>, 2015,<em>&nbsp;</em>Koenig &amp; Clinton, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818164731-Miller3.jpg" alt="" width="640" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Still from <em>The Conductor</em>, 2009</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818164807-Daggerstill1.jpg" alt="" width="640" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Still from <em>Daggering</em>, 2013</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman">Gillian Dykeman</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 16:50:01 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list AICAD Announces New Residency for Non-Students <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), purveyors of the prestigious <a href="http://nysrp.aicad.org/" target="_blank">New York Studio Residency Program</a> (NYSRP) have announced a new initiative for non-student artists called the Studio Practice Residency. The Studio Practice Residency, <a href="http://nysrp.aicad.org/apply-to-the-aicad-studio-practice-residency-this-fall/">currently accepting applications</a>, is lead by <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/3788-william-powhida">William Powhida</a>, Artistic Co-Director of NYSRP, and is comprised of six, four-month residencies in the AICAD facility in DUMBO. The Studio Practice program will include visits with prominent New York critics and artists including Paddy Johnson, Ben Davis, Letha Wilson, Christopher K. Ho, Carolyn Salas, Jules de Balincourt, and Adam Parker Smith.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150817200102-Versteeg.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Siebren Versteeg and&nbsp;Nicole Brunel in the NYSRP studios. Image courtesy of AICAD</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Mr. Powhida sees this new initiative as a great way to foster a more collaborative workspace between students and practitioners within the studio environment. The Studio Practice Residency will focus on bringing in &ldquo;working artists who have been out in the world, making their artwork for a while.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">These two programs will share more than the same building. NYSRP brings in a number of visiting artists each year and the Studio Practice Residents will be able to take full advantage of these studio visits. Mentors will meet with residents at least once per month but the schedule will ultimately be determined by the mentors and the needs of the residents.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150817201618-IMG_1651.JPG" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Jayson Musson (Hennessy Youngman) and&nbsp;Kizi Spielman Rose.&nbsp;Image courtesy of AICAD</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"We see this as an opportunity for artists to develop a more professional practice," says Powhida, and perhaps the most distinct module of this new program will actually have this effect. The Studio Practice Residency will provide professional development seminars with Amy Whitaker, a former professor at the Sotheby&rsquo;s Institute. These seminars will focus on building a sustainable artistic practice through financial planning, a skill set often overlooked in the creative class, much to its own detriment. These seminars will focus on marketing, business, and managing a studio-based practice.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ben Davis and Paddy Johnson will also be leading a workshop in the second half of the residency on gaining visibility as an artist within critical discourse. "Artists will be able to think about how their practice fits within a critical dialogue. It is geared towards helping artists use writing to frame their artwork," says Powhida.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The studios are housed in DUMBO alongside the NYSRP studios in a building owned by the famed David Walentas redevelopment organization, Two Trees. Two Trees single-handedly rebuilt DUMBO and has most recently been in the news for their redevelopment plans for the Domino Sugar factory parcel in Williamsburg. Walentas himself is quite the figure, <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/calebmelby/2014/01/22/brooklyns-billionaire-how-one-man-made-a-fortune-rebuilding-dumbo-next-up-williamsburg/" target="_blank">rags-to-riches fable and all</a>. Two Trees' most recent renovation was of the old Galapagos Art Space building which has been converted to house four galleries: <a href="http://www.klompching.com/" target="_blank">KLOMPCHING GALLERY</a>, <a href="http://maste.rs/" target="_blank">Masters Projects</a>, <a href="http://www.minusspace.com/" target="_blank">Minus Space</a> and <a href="http://www.unitedphotoindustries.com/" target="_blank">United Photo Industries</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-size: medium;" href="http://www.artslant.com/website/joel-kuennen" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">(Image at top: Studio of&nbsp;Nate Ethier, a&nbsp;Sharpe Walentas Studio Program&nbsp;2014 resident.)</span></p> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 03:58:04 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Late Summer Reading List: 15 Novels About Art and Artists <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I&rsquo;m a proud escapist and year-round fiction reader, but summer&rsquo;s a particularly good time to catch up on my to-read list. If you&rsquo;re anything like me, right now you&rsquo;re thinking you&rsquo;ve got a couple more weeks to squeeze in another book&mdash;or two, or four&mdash;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">before gallery openings and art fairs start vying for your autumn attentions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Heading for a final lounge on the beach or loaf in the park, I&rsquo;ll be loading up my Kindle and packing in those paperbacks. And maybe even throwing some art into the mix.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You&rsquo;ve probably already read <em>Girl with a Pearl Earring</em> or, oh I don't know,&nbsp;<em>The Da Vinci Code</em>&nbsp;but what about some other titles that turn art into fiction? From classics to page-turners, mysteries to postmodern tomes, here&rsquo;s fiction fit for an art lover. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Theft-Love-Story-Peter-Carey/dp/0307263711" target="_blank">I</a> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Moon-Sixpence-W-Somerset-Maugham/dp/1484917979" target="_blank">know</a> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/An-Object-Beauty-A-Novel/dp/B00B9ZD73M" target="_blank">there</a> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Girl-Hyacinth-Blue-Susan-Vreeland/dp/014029628X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439905727&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=girl+in+hyacinth+blue&amp;refinements=p_n_feature_browse-bin%3A2656022011" target="_blank">are</a>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Map-Territory-Vintage-International/dp/0307946533" target="_blank">oh</a>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Swanns-Way-Search-Penguin-Classics-ebook/dp/B004GUTMJK/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439905754&amp;sr=1-3&amp;keywords=proust" target="_blank">so</a> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Painter-Peter-Heller/dp/0804170150" target="_blank">many</a> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Adventures-Kavalier-bonus-content/dp/0812983580" target="_blank">more</a>, so if you&rsquo;ve got further faves, leave them in the comments&mdash;I'd especially love to know about works in translation I might have missed. I&rsquo;m always looking for my next art-filled escape!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818134210-petting_zoo.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Petting-Zoo-Novel-Jim-Carroll-ebook/dp/B00466IM3Q/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;qid=1439895770&amp;sr=8-2" target="_blank"><em>The Petting Zoo</em> (2010)</a></strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Jim Carroll</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Artist Billy Wolfram is the golden boy of the New York art scene&mdash;and he&rsquo;s losing it. Jim Carroll, of <em>The Basketball Diaries</em> fame, died before the publication of this short novel about the struggles and psyche of a successful artist. It isn&rsquo;t what you&rsquo;d call a light read&mdash;the protagonist is plagued by guilt, suffering, and metaphysical angst&mdash;but it gets at the baggage and uncertainty we all bring to our creative endeavors, in spite of, or even because of success. (Bonus: Preface by Patti Smith, and book cover by Raymond Pettibon)&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Portrait_of_the_Artist_as_a_Young_Man#/media/File:JamesJoyce_Portrait1916.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818111456-JamesJoyce_Portrait1916.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Portrait-Artist-Young-Thrift-Editions/dp/0486280500/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439896084&amp;sr=1-2&amp;keywords=portrait+of+the+artist+as+a+young+man" target="_blank"><em>A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man</em>&nbsp;(1916)</a></strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">James Joyce</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Hated it in high school? Me too. But you shouldn&rsquo;t necessarily trust your 15-year-old self on the merits of fine literature. Like <em>The Petting Zoo</em>, this modernist coming of age novel is a dark portrayal of the mind during artistic development. If you&rsquo;ve spent the first part of the summer on murder mysteries and YA dystopian lit, this hallmark of fiction-about-artists could be a good place to wind things down.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Picture_of_Dorian_Gray#/media/File:Lippincott_doriangray.jpg" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818111401-800px-Lippincott_doriangray.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Picture-Dorian-Dover-Thrift-Editions/dp/0486278077/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439896373&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=The+Picture+of+Dorian+Gray" target="_blank"><strong><em>The Picture of Dorian Gray</em> (1890)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Oscar Wilde</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As for the hallmark of fiction-about-artworks, you can&rsquo;t do better than Dorian Gray. If for some reason you haven&rsquo;t read Wilde&rsquo;s Faustian standard-bearer, please do&mdash;and not only to fill yourself in on the meaning of all those<a href="https://simpsonswiki.com/wiki/Dorian_Gray" target="_blank"> pop cultural references</a> you&rsquo;ve been missing all these years.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Beauty#/media/File:OnBeautybookcover.jpg" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818111844-OnBeautybookcover.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Zadie-Smith-ebook/dp/B000PC0SKU/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439896737&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=on+beauty" target="_blank"><strong><em>On Beauty</em> (2005)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Zadie Smith</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Dueling art historians, family feuds in a small college town, an investigation of race and beauty in America and the UK&hellip; If you&rsquo;ve been curious about Zadie Smith, but are frightened by that lingering &ldquo;hysterical realism&rdquo; moniker, <em>On Beauty</em>&mdash;perhaps Smith&rsquo;s most accessible work&mdash;isn&rsquo;t a bad place to start.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818112059-what_i_loved.jpeg" alt="" width="300" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/What-Loved-Novel-Siri-Hustvedt-ebook/dp/B009AEM1EU/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439896813&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=What+I+Loved" target="_blank"><strong><em>What I Loved</em> (2004)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Siri Hustvedt</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>What I Loved</em> is a very different tale of two families. After art historian Leo Hertzberg buys a painting by an unknown artist in a SoHo gallery, he tracks the artwork to Bill Wechsler and their families become intimately involved. Hustvedt often writes about painters and artists, most recently in her 2014 novel <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Blazing-World-Novel-Siri-Hustvedt-ebook/dp/B00DPM7TB8/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439896813&amp;sr=1-2&amp;keywords=What+I+Loved" target="_blank"><strong><em>The Blazing World</em></strong></a>, in which a female painter tired of poor critical reception adopts male pseudonyms to present her work, suspecting gender bias might play a role. You won&rsquo;t be surprised by the results...</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818112313-The-ARt-Forger-cover-small.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Art-Forger-Novel-B-Shapiro-ebook/dp/B00AFKISKO/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439897003&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=the+art+forger" target="_blank"><strong><em>The Art Forger</em> (2012)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Barbara A. Shapiro</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Twenty-five years after the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist, the case remains open. Just this month the FBI <a href="https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/08/10/quincy-attorney-says-client-has-identified-man-gardner-museum-video/F51Idh65S4zw1TReDsMlSO/story.html">revealed new security video evidence</a> (still no sign of the artwork though). <em>The Art Forger</em>&rsquo;s premise is a bit outlandish&mdash;it begins with a struggling artist who agrees to forge a stolen Degas in exchange for a solo show at a famous gallery&mdash;but this fun mystery is a testament to how the world&rsquo;s most famous unsolved art theft still captures the imagination.</span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Name_Is_Red#/media/File:MyNameIsRed.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818111640-MyNameIsRed.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/My-Name-Red-Orhan-Pamuk/dp/0375706852" target="_blank"><strong><em>My Name Is Red</em>&nbsp;(1998, English translation 2001)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Orhan Pamuk</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Like the Chaim Potok favorite,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Name-Asher-Lev-Chaim-Potok-ebook/dp/B002GKGAZG/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439896644&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=my+name+is+asher+lev" target="_blank"><strong><em>My Name Is Asher Lev</em>&nbsp;</strong></a>(1972), this novel chronicles gifted artists working within a cultural milieu that doesn&rsquo;t always support their work. The similarities end there, however. Set amongst miniaturist painters in the Ottoman Empire, Pamuk&rsquo;s postmodern detective story kicks off with a murder in the first chapter, which is narrated by the assassinated artist himself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_the_Lighthouse#/media/File:ToTheLighthouse.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818112501-ToTheLighthouse.jpg" alt="" /></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Lighthouse-Wordsworth-Classics-Virginia-Woolf-ebook/dp/B00O26S1J0/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439897135&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=to+the+lighthouse" target="_blank"><strong><em>To the Lighthouse</em> (1927)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Virginia Woolf</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Woolf&rsquo;s seminal, semi-autobiographical novel focuses on perception, and understanding by the act of looking. This is shown through constantly shifting narrative perspectives, somewhat like the turning beam of a lighthouse. Among the cast of academics and intellectuals, the transformation of a passionate young painter, Lily Briscoe (a character inspired by Woolf&rsquo;s painter sister), is interwoven into the story&mdash;a beautiful account of overcoming the struggles and challenges of the creative process.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818113004-the-portrait-of-a-lady.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Portrait-Lady-Oxford-Worlds-Classics-ebook/dp/B0066KU742/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439897416&amp;sr=1-7&amp;keywords=portrait+of+a+lady" target="_blank"><strong><em>The Portrait of a Lady</em> (1881)</strong></a><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Henry James</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Unhappy marriages; opulent settings in Italy and England; scheming, adultery, and existential crises; <em>The Portrait of a Lady</em> is in many ways James&rsquo; finest work, a vivid painting in words of Isabel Archer, a wealthy young American who ends up married to the spiteful egomaniac, Osmond.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Though a minor character, the young art collector Edward Rosier, a suitor for Osmond&rsquo;s illegitimate daughter, gives a beautiful insight into the art world of the day.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tell_The_Wolves_I%27m_Home#/media/File:Tell_The_Wolves_I%27m_Home_cover_page.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818113251-Tell_The_Wolves_I_m_Home_cover_page.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></a>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Tell-Wolves-Im-Home-Novel/dp/0812982851/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;qid=&amp;sr=">Tell the Wolves I&rsquo;m Home</a> </em>(2012)</strong><br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Carol Rifka Brunt</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;A portrait is a picture where somebody gets to choose what you look like. How they want to see you.&rdquo; A valuable portrait painted by a beloved uncle is a central device in Carol Rifka Brunt&rsquo;s heartbreaking novel about family, friendship, love, shame, secrets, and forgiveness, set during the aftermath of the AIDS epidemic in the 80s.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Flamethrowers#/media/File:TheFlamethrowersKushner.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150817192413-TheFlamethrowersKushner.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></a>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Flamethrowers-Novel-Rachel-Kushner-ebook/dp/B008J4NBHI/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439897628&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=the+flamethrowers" target="_blank"><em>The Flamethrowers</em> (2013)</a><br /></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Rachel Kushner</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Flamethrowers made quite an impression following its 2013 release. It's often discussed with that &ldquo;Great American Novel&rdquo; sort of reverence. Nationalizing accolades notwithstanding, the work is also a <em>K&uuml;nstlerroman</em> (naturally,&nbsp;German has a word for a coming-of-age-artist-novel): it follows an art school grad as she moves from Reno to New York City in the late 70s. There&rsquo;s land art, creatives colonizing SoHo, and motorcycle racing. What&rsquo;s not to love?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_Eye_(novel)#/media/File:Cat%27s_Eye_book_cover.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818113617-Cat_s_Eye_book_cover.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Cats-Eye-Margaret-Atwood/dp/0385491026" target="_blank"><em>Cat&rsquo;s Eye</em> (1988)</a><br /></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Margaret Atwood</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Earlier this year Margaret Atwood submitted the manuscript for <em>Scribbler Moon</em>, a book no one living today will likely ever get to read. As part of artist Katie Paterson&rsquo;s <em>Future Library</em>,<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/40728" target="_blank"> Atwood&rsquo;s book won&rsquo;t be published for another 100 years</a>. (<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/may/27/margaret-atwood-scribbler-moon-future-library-norway-katie-paterson" target="_blank">David Mitchell is next up</a> in the <em>Future Library</em> catalogue. As an aside: Katie Paterson, I implore you. Stop recruiting my favorite authors to write books I can&rsquo;t read. Thanks.) One novel you<em> can</em> read now is <em>Cat&rsquo;s Eye</em>, the story of a seasoned artist reflecting on her life as she returns home to Toronto for a retrospective of her work.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818113810-woman_upstairs.jpeg" alt="" width="300" />&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Woman-Upstairs-Vintage-Contemporaries-ebook/dp/B00A1O4L50/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439897820&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=the+woman+upstairs" target="_blank"><em>The Woman Upstairs</em> (2013)</a><br /></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Claire Messud</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This book&rsquo;s protagonist isn&rsquo;t an artist&mdash;but she wanted to be one. She once dreamed of having the epithet "Great Artist" on her tombstone, but now she&rsquo;d settle for: "FUCK YOU ALL." <em>The Woman Upstairs</em> is a story of disappointments, thwarted ambition, renewed feminism, and deep-rooted anger. These all come to the surface when the narrator meets the person she always dreamed she would be.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Artist_of_the_Floating_World#/media/File:ArtistOfTheFloatingWorld.jpg"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818114040-ArtistOfTheFloatingWorld.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Artist-Floating-World-Vintage-International-ebook/dp/B008WOUI5I/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439897986&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=an+artist+of+the+floating+world" target="_blank"><em>An Artist of the Floating World</em> (1986)</a><br /></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Kazuo Ishiguro</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Ishiguro is the undisputed master of nostalgia, memory come undone, and the unreliable narrator. Set in postwar Japan, Ishiguro&rsquo;s second novel follows artist Masuji Ono as he reckons with his role during the Second World War, a time when he set aside his ideals of beauty to work for his country&rsquo;s propaganda machine. The title references the Japanese woodblock print tradition <em>Ukiyo-e</em>, whose literal translation means &ldquo;pictures of the floating world.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150818114309-goldfinch-large.jpg" alt="" width="300" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Goldfinch-Novel-Pulitzer-Prize-Fiction-ebook/dp/B00BAXFECK/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1439898207&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=the+goldfinch" target="_blank"><em>The Goldfinch</em> (2013)</a><br /></span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Donna Tartt</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">You didn't think you'd make it through the list without this one, did you? You can&rsquo;t catch the eponymous artwork at the Frick anymore (it&rsquo;s safely home in the Mauritshuis in The Hague), but it&rsquo;s not too late to read last summer's bestseller, spawned by Carel Fabritius&rsquo; intimate painting. James Wood thinks Donna Tartt&rsquo;s such a good writer<a href="http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/10/21/the-new-curiosity-shop" target="_blank"> she doesn&rsquo;t need to rely on the drama her novel provides</a>. But that very drama makes a nearly 800-hundred-page opus centered on a theft of a Dutch Golden Age painting a perfect summer read.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 14:46:27 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Paris Tear Sheets: Hiraeth <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paris Tear Sheets is the blog of&nbsp;ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence, Lara Atallah, who will be undertaking her residency in Paris during July and August 2015. &ldquo;Paris tear sheets&rdquo; refers to daily snapshots taken during the artist&rsquo;s peregrinations in the city. She will use the blog to chronicle her encounters in Paris as well as her observations of the city.</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>You can find more information about ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency <a href="http://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I was introduced to Hind through a common friend. Upon meeting her, the first thing that struck me, after her heart-warming hospitality, was the tattoo on her forearm. I asked candidly: &ldquo;What is &lsquo;hiraeth&rsquo;?&rdquo; I was far from expecting that the answer I would receive would lead me to naming this iteration of <em>Tales of a Non-Country</em> after that conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Similar to the Galician word &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudade">saudade</a>,&rdquo; &ldquo;hiraeth&rdquo; is a Welsh word referring to the longing one feels for a home one cannot go back to. I reflected on the degree of conviction required in order to make an indelible mark on one&rsquo;s own body. Acknowledging such a sentiment predicates a self-assigned exile that is not to be confused with displacement or dispossession in which the subject lacks the luxury of choice. A pre-existing level of privilege conditions self-assigned exile. However, it also places its subjects in their own category within the overarching umbrella of a diaspora.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814171043-1.jpg" alt="" /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814171136-7.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a lot of ways, &ldquo;hiraeth&rdquo; became the subject underlying many of our conversations. Speaking with Hind, I felt like I had found a mirror voice. Unlike, others I&rsquo;ve met before her, Hind does not long for a home she sees through rose-colored glasses. The statement does not necessarily speak to all those in her age group who have left the country. That said, hers is an opinion that I have encountered among many. While the longing for a home persists, it is also amalgamated to an understanding that home will have to be elsewhere.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Can there be a way back once you&rsquo;ve left? The bigger question is: would you want it? Within that context, the idea of defining identity resurfaces. Expatriation implies a certain negotiation of one&rsquo;s identity and a perpetual editing process that stems from events and people encountered in a foreign setting radically different than the one that the expat had been immersed in since birth.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">We started spending more time together as the weeks were leading up to her yearly visit back home. I was invited to her apartment by the Moulin Rouge. The voyeur in me gleans all the little details: books, the disco ball in the living room, the photographs on closet doors. There&rsquo;s something oddly joyous about building the puzzle of a person&rsquo;s life based on the clues they leave in their environment. Entering another person&rsquo;s world is both gleeful and terrifying. It supposes agreeing to carry some of their secrets but implies also a camaraderie without which photographs would fail.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814174125-6.jpg" alt="" width="325" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814174153-4.jpg" alt="" width="325" /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814171114-3.jpg" alt="" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814171234-5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/398157-lara-atallah" target="_blank">Lara Atallah</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Lara Atallah (born Beirut, Lebanon, based in Brooklyn, NY) is a visual artist working with photography.&nbsp;</em><em>You can find the full list of blog posts from her Paris residency&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/398157-lara-atallah?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">here</a>. Additional&nbsp;images from Lara's residency are on Instagram,&nbsp;<a href="https://instagram.com/explore/tags/paristearsheets/" target="_blank">#paristearsheets</a>.</em><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;">(All images: Lara Atallah)</span></p> Wed, 26 Aug 2015 01:23:16 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Immersive Light Artworks to Illuminate Chicago's Garfield Park Conservatory <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Chicago&rsquo;s century-old Garfield Park Conservatory&mdash;one of the largest greenhouse conservatories in the country&mdash;has been referred to as &ldquo;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;" href="http://www.garfieldconservatory.org/campus/conservatory-history.html" target="_blank">landscape art under glass</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.&rdquo; This fall, landscape art will meet contemporary art when <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/349327-luftwerk" target="_blank">Luftwerk</a>,&nbsp;the artistic vision of Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero,&nbsp;brings a series of large-scale, responsive light and sculptural installations to the horticultural monument. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/rackroom/349327"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Check out our interview with the artists from 2014 here.</span></strong></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Luftwerk&rsquo;s <em>solarise: a sea of all colors</em>, presented in collaboration with the City of Chicago, opens September 23, and will last for a year, beginning and ending on the autumnal equinox. <em>Solarise </em>will honor the Conservatory, a paragon of naturalistic landscape design, which opened in 1908, as well as its principal designer, landscape architect Jens Jensen (1860&shy;&shy;&shy;&shy;&ndash;1951). Jensen saw the importance of preserving and celebrating local and native plants and materials and believed that urban populations needed opportunities to interact with nature. <em>Solarise </em>will celebrate Jensen&rsquo;s ideals and shine a (literal) light on the Conservatory, underscoring the importance of nature in urban society and city planning&mdash;vital themes we've seen in <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/articles/show/43488" target="_blank">other Chicago public art installations</a> this year.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Solarise</em>&nbsp;will comprise five immersive, site-specific installations:</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150814132037-unnamed__38_.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&bull;&nbsp;The Beacon</em></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"> will comprise arcs of dynamic LED lights over the Palm House Dome that reflect shifts in wind speed across the city. The lights&rsquo; responsive movements will mimic the sway of Midwestern prairie grass blowing in the wind.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150814132053-redeye-garfield-park-conservancy-art-installat-003" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em>&bull;&nbsp;</em></strong>In </span><strong><em style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Portal</em></strong><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, mirrored panels will frame the reflecting pool and &ldquo;prairie waterfall,&rdquo; drawing visitors&rsquo; gazes onto themselves and back into the center of the Conservatory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150814132117-unnamed__39_.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong><em style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em>&bull;&nbsp;</em></strong>Florescence</em></strong><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> will be a patterned web of red and blue petals suspended above the Show Room. Using sunlight during the day and LEDs at night, the installation will draw attention to the light spectrum necessary for photosynthesis.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150814132135-redeye-garfield-park-conservancy-art-installat-005" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em>&bull;&nbsp;</em></strong>For the kinetic chandelier </span><strong><em style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Seeds of Light</em></strong><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, drops of water caught in trays will create dynamic ripples in the light in the Horticulture Hall.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150814132154-redeye-garfield-park-conservancy-art-installat-004" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong><em style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><em>&bull;&nbsp;</em></strong>Prismatic</em></strong><span style="line-height: 26px; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> will employ responsive light and sound elements in the Desert House.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The energy used to power the LED light installations will be offset by solar panels.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="http://luftwerk.net/about/" target="_blank">Luftwerk</a> explores &ldquo;what makes a space a place and how art plays a vital role within urban and natural environments.&rdquo; They are known for their immersive site-specific light art installations at architectural landmarks, such as Frank Lloyd Wright&rsquo;s Fallingwater and the Millennium Park in Chicago. Bachmaier and Gallero spoke with ArtSlant in 2014 about <em>INsite</em>, Luftwerk&rsquo;s installation at Mies van der Rohe&rsquo;s Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, last October. <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/rackroom/349327" target="_blank">Read the complete interview here</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Images courtesy of the artists and the City of Chicago)</span></p> Fri, 14 Aug 2015 13:29:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list America Is Hard to See, But Could Performance Offer the Clearest Lens? <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For five days New York-based saxophonist and multimedia artist <a href="http://matanaroberts.com/" target="_blank">Matana Roberts</a> took over the Whitney&rsquo;s third-floor theater for the latest installment of <em>i call america</em>, her &ldquo;extended research residency&rdquo;-cum-performance, situated as a response to the Whitney&rsquo;s inaugural exhibition, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/376284-america-is-hard-to-see" target="_blank"><em>America Is Hard to See</em></a>. &ldquo;America is hard to see&rdquo; compels us to <em>look</em>, to try to understand the complexities of America&rsquo;s visual history; &ldquo;I call America,&rdquo; meanwhile, establishes an agent, compelling us to <em>act</em>. Understanding requires more than simply looking, after all. How, then, can we best understand American art? History? Ideals?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Roberts&rsquo; performance&mdash;an action in itself&mdash;dug into American history with a wide shovel, demonstrating the importance of multisensory, spatio-temporal engagement with the country&rsquo;s past, present, and future. The performance took the form of a open studio, the space cluttered with markers and documents of America from the nineteenth century to the present. Four large canvases hung on the side walls, projections lined the back, and a crumpled tarp sat squarely in the center of the room, surrounded by countless objects and artifacts. Roberts painted and collaged the canvases and added to the materials on the ground, all the while spontaneously composing her sprawling brand of free-form, electronics-infused jazz using a mixer and a variety of woodwinds. Watching the performance just below the Whitney&rsquo;s expansive exhibition, one could see echoes of Arthur Dove&rsquo;s <em><a href="http://collection.whitney.org/object/560" target="_blank">The Critic</a></em> and Robert Rauschenberg&rsquo;s <em><a href="http://collection.whitney.org/object/7506" target="_blank">Satellite</a></em> resonate in Roberts&rsquo; splatter-painted, newspaper-plastered canvases. The tarp on the floor, coupled with its surrounding detritus, recalled David Hammons&rsquo; assemblage <em><a href="http://collection.whitney.org/object/8275" target="_blank">Untitled</a></em>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150814160358-IMG_8717.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Matana Roberts,&nbsp;<em>i call america,</em>&nbsp;August 9, 2015, at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Photo: Lindsay Keys</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150813090053-unnamed1.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">All images, unless otherwise noted: Matana Roberts,&nbsp;<em>i call america</em>, Performance at the Whitney Museum of American Art, August 5&ndash;9, 2015. Photo: the author</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Most salient among the objects strewn across the floor were a handful of <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=stereoscopic+cards&amp;espv=2&amp;biw=1048&amp;bih=617&amp;source=lnms&amp;tbm=isch&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0CAcQ_AUoAmoVChMI-67ShN2exwIVAaQeCh1OrAL2" target="_blank">stereoscopic cards</a> picturing a man peering at a grave, a black golfer, and a jolly post-bellum clown whose white, pointed hat eerily resembled a Klansman&rsquo;s. These cards transported viewers to the late 1800s, when optical entertainment like stereoscopy first took hold&mdash;and more importantly, when the subjects that course through Roberts&rsquo;s oeuvre (slavery, Reconstruction, migration) most palpably infected American society. But the cards served a higher purpose too: stereoscopy juxtaposes two near-identical images that require an external lens to make them cohere. By the same token, Roberts&rsquo; critique of the United States in <em>i call america</em> hinges on presenting disparate American images, ideas, and consciousnesses side by side, tracing them through history, searching for the correct lens through which to view them.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Questioning, even dismissing, American nationalism and idealism is not a recent phenomenon, of course; but in the wake of the tumultuous past 12 months, it has justifiably become a more prevalent and pointed practice. Ta-Nehisi Coates&rsquo; new book <em>Between the World and Me</em>, for example, dismantles the American Dream using evidence of injustices as old as slavery and new as the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. Coates reminds us, however, that dismissing American Idealism does not mean dismissing America. &ldquo;I propose to take our countrymen&rsquo;s claims of American exceptionalism seriously,&rdquo; he writes in his book&rsquo;s opening pages. Far from defeated, he implores his readers to keep questioning and, more so, fighting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150813090324-unnamed3.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In <em>i call america</em>, Roberts likewise serves as America&rsquo;s interlocutor. Like Coates, she displays clear reverence for her source material, skillfully and fervently weaving together strands of American art (from early photography to assemblage) and music (from spirituals to free jazz and noise). Roberts holds America to its self-appointed exceptionalist tradition, too, but believes more emphatically in the possibility of the exceptional moving forward. &ldquo;It seems like this country is waking up in new ways,&rdquo; she said in a recent interview with <a href="http://wwd.com/eye/people/matana-roberts-whitney-museum-99-objects-jazz10197854-10197854/" target="_blank">WWD</a>. But where do we go next? Roberts calls America, spurring its riled citizens to action, offering directions through time and space for the angry-but-aimless.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">She draws gestural, directive lines between the art-historical documents at hand, placing them next to one another in an effort to understand them as a unit. Performance it seems, and specifically music, is Roberts&rsquo;s stereoscopic lens&mdash;predicated on motion, able to engage time, space, and senses, and allow contact with the myriad physical objects she collects in a way that painting cannot. Sure enough, during <em>i call america</em> the theater overflowed with music, beyond even Roberts&rsquo; continual ambient soundtrack: from the kitchen timer she periodically set, connecting real time with musical time and historical time; to the conductor-like strokes she made on her canvases; to the way she walked about the room, high-stepping and with purpose, as if part of a marching band. Periodically she even played her instrument while marching, as if in a parade. But parades, like history, can <a href="http://api.ning.com/files/kV4MbYiv7oS39AWHRaGykgVWmEfpftTqGcICWZW5A3YR3IRyK5sLZzvxC6guCSpPlxtua-Oix985KKxyrTbNy8*u6Twu46mJ/1082036292.jpeg" target="_blank">celebrate</a> or <a href="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/Funeral_procession,_Goderich,_Ontario,_1913.png" target="_blank">mourn</a>, <a href="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2010/08/27/marchonwashington_wide-845c949aca1f29c6de6ea4f72fb574b60d7492d0-s6-c30.jpg" target="_blank">include</a> or <a href="http://www.bookwormroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/kkk-rally.jpg" target="_blank">exclude</a>.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">What is this parade&rsquo;s mission? What traditions are at play&mdash;or at stake? Roberts resisted divulging the answers; rather, she meandered through the space, refusing linearity, alternating her musical delivery between atonal blurts and more &ldquo;acceptable,&rdquo; traditional melodic runs. She riffed vocally on &ldquo;My Country Tis of Thee,&rdquo; manipulating a song about America&rsquo;s past and present with different inflections, neither celebrating nor satirizing the tune. Instead, she was simply feeling it out, questioning its formation and implications.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150813090151-ligon_america.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">Glenn Ligon, <em>R&uuml;ckenfigur</em>, 2009, Neon and Paint. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Purchase, with funds from the Painting and Sculpture Committee. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Glenn Ligon&rsquo;s <em><a href="http://whitney.org/WatchAndListen/AudioGuides?play_id=386" target="_blank">R&uuml;ckenfigur</a></em> ultimately serves as the Whitney&rsquo;s best ideological conduit for Roberts&rsquo; performance. At first, it looks to be a simple neon sign that says &ldquo;AMERICA&rdquo;; after a moment, though, it becomes clear that each letter is backwards. We are forced to think about &ldquo;America,&rdquo; the word&mdash;interrogate its construction, its sound. Ligon&rsquo;s piece continues on the other side of the wall: &ldquo;negro sunshine,&rdquo; it says.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Both parts of Ligon&rsquo;s work lack a coherent stance or message but nevertheless cohere in and of themselves. We view them as single entities&mdash;confusing, perhaps, but condensed into one image, rich with contradictions and unbalanced rhetoric, cultural signifiers and American history. Roberts&rsquo; performance worked in a similar manner, throwing fragments of America about the room, fusing them with a liberated, improvisational stream of boundary-pushing music that&mdash;though in terms of ideas and technology, is quintessentially of the twenty-first century&mdash;booms with the spirit of the ages. She highlighted images and artifacts (slave photos, jazz music) often fixed into a certain &ldquo;American&rdquo; narrative and then jumbled them beyond recognition. The &ldquo;American&rdquo; ideal does not exist as it is written in the history books, she suggests; slavery is not one thing, nor is jazz, nor is a museum, nor is Coates&rsquo; main target, the &ldquo;Dream.&rdquo; Each possesses a popular narrative, told, as history always is, by the &ldquo;winners&rdquo;: in this case, the white American patriarchy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150813090251-unnamed4.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For Roberts, though, these histories and ideals are not obsolete, just misguided. In<em> i call america</em> she offers nothing concrete, just a demand for questioning, co-mingling, improvising, lyrically skipping across boundaries, all mitigated through her powerfully scattershot musical performance. But is anyone listening? In a museum predicated on identifying and reifying &ldquo;American Art&rdquo;&mdash;as complex as it might be&mdash;Roberts' message unfortunately lost some steam, drifting into the theater&rsquo;s rafters. I never saw more than ten visitors in the space at a time; often, I was alone with Roberts. Visitors who did watch showed <em>i call america</em>&rsquo;s incongruity on their faces, some grimacing and covering their ears (then quickly heading upstairs) when Roberts&rsquo; music became particularly unhinged. American art and history are still beholden to the institutions that display them&mdash;institutions that, despite forward movement, are largely yet to fully integrate the type of free-ranging, boundless work that Roberts proffers, keeping it instead in a dark theater literally beneath the primetime art. In <em>i call america</em>, though, Roberts picks away at these cultural totem poles slowly but surely, scattering their fragments gleefully&mdash;and hopefully&mdash;across the museum floor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/431528-joe-bucciero?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joe Bucciero</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;" dir="ltr"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All images, unless otherwise noted: Matana Roberts, <em>i call america</em>, Performance at the Whitney Museum of American Art, August 5&ndash;9, 2015. Photos: the author.)</span></span></p> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 16:03:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Nasher Sculpture Center Establishes Acquisition Fund for Art by Women <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">On Monday, the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas announced its establishment of a new acquisition fund dedicated to the purchasing of work by women artists.&nbsp;A seed gift from the Kaleta A. Doolin Foundation will provide an&nbsp;initial $750,000 for the fund's creation. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The announcement follows last week&rsquo;s <em>New York Times</em> <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/arts/design/the-guerrilla-girls-after-3-decades-still-rattling-art-world-cages.html?_r=0">profile of the Guerilla Girls</a>&mdash;an article that did much to underscore how little has changed in the three decades since the radical collective first began donning gorilla masks and counting the number of women exhibited in museums. As editors at ArtSlant <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/39451" target="_blank">personally learned</a> following a <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/39142" target="_blank">2014 April Fool&rsquo;s joke</a>&nbsp;about MoMA exclusively exhibiting women artists, the visibility of female artists in museums (<a href="http://gallerytally.tumblr.com/">and galleries</a>) remains a critical and contentious issue&mdash;one that has been slow to see substantive change.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Here's a breakdown of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MoMA?src=hash">#MoMA</a> acquisitions by (estimated) artist gender. <a href="https://twitter.com/foe">@foe</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/mkurlandsky">@mkurlandsky</a> <a href="http://t.co/BPVuxZqW2L">pic.twitter.com/BPVuxZqW2L</a></p> &mdash; Eamon Caddigan (@EamonCaddigan) <a href="https://twitter.com/EamonCaddigan/status/626861365546848256">July 30, 2015</a></blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In a statement to the press, museum director Jeremy Strick said:</span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px; align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">It is the Nasher Sculpture Center&rsquo;s great fortune to be granted this generous acquisitions gift, and we could not be more grateful to Ms. Doolin or excited about the possibilities this gift affords. To be able to expand and enrich the Collection&rsquo;s holdings of work made by women artists is of paramount importance, helping round out the permanent collection and highlight the tremendous contributions that women have made, and continue to make, to sculpture.</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The fund&rsquo;s first purchase will be Phyllida Barlow&rsquo;s <em>untitled:hangingmonument2015</em>, a work developed especially for the Nasher, which is currently installed in <em>tryst</em>, the British artist&rsquo;s solo exhibition at the institution. The museum has hosted a number of high-profile solo shows and temporary installations around Dallas featuring female artists like Katharina Grosse, Rachel Harrison, and Lara Almarcegui. Nevertheless, <a href="http://www.nashersculpturecenter.org/art/collection" target="_blank">the Nasher&rsquo;s collection</a> is overwhelmingly commanded by male artists. A mere handful of women artists are currently represented, including Magdalena Abakanowicz, Nancy Grossman, Barbara Hepworth, and Beverly Pepper.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150812162211-phyllida-barlow-untitled-hangingmonument2015-side.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">This significant gender discrepancy makes abundantly clear the importance of this sort of targeted donation&mdash;ideally in conjunction with <a href="https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/council_for_feminist_art/" target="_blank">other strategies</a> for collection and exhibition diversification. The Nasher is not the first institution to allocate acquisition funds specifically for women artists. As MoMA <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/39451" target="_blank">was careful to point out</a>&nbsp;following our call for exhibitions highlighting women artists in 2015, the museum&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.moma.org/explore/publications/modern_women/history#lexicon25" target="_blank">Modern Women Fund</a>, established in 2005, sets aside a sizeable fund to purchase works by women artists for the museum&rsquo;s collection.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Moreover, in June <a href="http://www.artnews.com/2015/06/11/valeria-napoleone-xx-to-bring-work-by-female-artists-to-sculpturecenter-uk-museums/">ARTNews reported</a> that collector Valeria Napoleone had started an initiative to donate a new commission by a female artist to Long Island City&rsquo;s SculptureCenter every 12&ndash;18 months, and a &ldquo;significant work by a living female artist&rdquo; to a different United Kingdom-based museum each year. In an even more creative approach, in April <a href="http://www.thestranger.com/features/feature/2015/05/06/22172125/the-most-unusual-art-gift-ever">the Seattle Art Museum acquired artworks by seven women and queer artists</a> donated by local artist Matthew Offenbacher and his partner Jennifer Nemhauser. The artworks were purchased using $25,000 Offenbacher had won in an art prize. This gesture and everything leading up to it was ultimately as part of an artwork Offenbacher called <em>Deed of Gift</em>.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Donations like these are a drop in the bucket in terms of overall museum acquisitions&mdash;for example, including&nbsp;<em>Deed of Gift</em>'s donations, in the past two years, the Seattle Art Museum acquired 221 new artworks: 186 by men and only 35 by women. Even so, donations like these demonstrate that some benefactors are recognizing and taking seriously their role, and the role of money more generally, in the creation of art history and the museum collections that help shape it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Andrea Alessi</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Images: Phyllida Barlow, <em>untitled:hangingmonument2015</em>, 2015, lumber, polyurethane foam, polystyrene, cement, bonding plaster, steel, plywood, fabric, scrim, paint, and PVA adhesive, 196 7/8 x 275 5/8 x 118 1/8 in. Courtesy of the artist Hauser &amp; Wirth)</span></p> Thu, 13 Aug 2015 09:55:44 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Exploring <em>Bau</em>: A Giant Sketchbook for Ideas <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;We both agree, sometimes archives can be fun!&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Just before everyone disappears to their holiday hideouts, I meet with ICA London curator Juliette Desorgues to explore her new exhibition about the Austrian architecture magazine <em>Bau</em>.&nbsp;We browse through the show together and compare personal favorites.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808171014-artsalnt_desousa_bau8.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Bau:&nbsp;Magazine for Architecture and Urban Planning</em>, Issue 2, 1965</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Bau: Magazine for Architecture and Urban Planning</em> (1947-71), similar to the <a href="http://www.ribaj.com/" target="_blank">RIBA</a>&nbsp;Journal, existed as a trade magazine for the Central Union of Austrian Architects. The exhibition at the ICA focuses on the period 1965-71, when a group of experimental young architects and artists took over editing the magazine and turned it into a giant sketchbook for their ideas. They were playful with the term "architecture," the magazine format, and pretty much everything else.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808171210-artslant_De_Sousa__Bau_1.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Hans Hollein, &lsquo;Technik&rsquo; (technology), <em>Bau</em>, Issue 2, 1965 pp 52-53.&nbsp;On loan from the Architectural Association Library</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Bea de Sousa: I confess that I am completely psyched about industrial refineries. I don't know why, but I am eternally grateful to Bernd and Hilla Becher who did a whole series on those in the eighties. In 1965, Bau dedicated a whole page to similar images. Were they architect-designed structures?</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>Juliette Desorgues:</strong> They are so called &ldquo;non-architectural spaces.&rdquo; Hans Hollein and Walter Pichler wanted to start a whole new dialogue about what architecture could be, hence their slogan &ldquo;<em>Everything is architecture</em>.&rdquo; They created page designs, where they juxtaposed models of functional architecture with anything that could be construed as a 3D structure. Architecture became a kind of blank canvas, which could be redefined from scratch. The most extreme example is perhaps the page entirely dedicated to an image of one pill for the treatment of claustrophobia. The pill case with its dissoluble membrane and the half white, half transparent domes containing the powder of a mind altering drug was revered as an architectural shape.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808171244-artslant_desousa_bau3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Bau</em>,&nbsp;Issue 4, 1968 (Front cover, image by Rotofoto, <em>Bau</em> archive)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">BdS: The group also showed other influences from the psychedelic culture of the late sixties: flower power, free love, and sci-fi ideas. We can see that on the magazine covers...</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>JD:</strong> The covers speak of themselves but the films show how the prototype structures could be used. They make the correlation between utopian experiments and popular culture very clear. Films made by collectives of architects and performance artists such as Coop Himmelb(l)au and Salz der Erde really show the spirit of fun connected with experimentation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808171323-artslant_desousa_bau7.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&lsquo;The Greater Number 14 Triennale di Milano 1968&rsquo; <em>Bau</em>, Issue 4, 1968, pp 72-73.&nbsp;On loan from the Architectural Association Library</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">BdS: Yes Coop Himmelb(l)au&rsquo;s film <a href="http://www.coop-himmelblau.at/architecture/projects/restless-sphere" target="_blank"><em>Restless Sphere&nbsp;</em></a>has to be my absolute favorite with two naked Adam and Eve performers walking around in a transparent plastic sphere with the opulent baroque structure of Schloss Sch&ouml;nbrunn as the backdrop and, better yet, a traditional Austrian brass band in the background. If I could I would teleport myself there.</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>JD:</strong>&nbsp;Talking about teleportation&mdash;have you seen my absolute favorite page from <em>Bau Magazine</em> 1969 with the hand drawn studies for what would be VR helmets today? I am guessing that they were inspired by the moon-landing in July 1969.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">BdS: It feels really current. Some of the blow-up spheres that appear as prototypes in the magazines, such as the "Mindexpander"&nbsp;from 1967, are so forward thinking they are only just becoming viable options in architecture right now.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808171359-artslant_desousa_bau6.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>Bau: Magazine for Architecture and Town Planning</em>, Issue 4-5, 1967</span><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>JD:</strong> In a way yes, but the <em>Bau</em> editors did not just look at futuristic concepts. You can also see that they juxtaposed historical buildings with new concepts, as a beginning of the postmodernism that Hollein later became so famous for.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">BdS: Hollein went on to design the <a href="http://mmk-frankfurt.de/en/about/the-museum/" target="_blank">Museum of Modern Art in Frankfurt</a>, which looks a bit like a large slice of cake. I have really enjoyed experiencing shows in there. Talking of enjoying architectural space, which concept from <em>Bau 1965-70</em> would be your dream house?</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>JD:</strong> It would have to be the Yellow Heart, which you can see in the film made by the group <em>Salz der Erde</em> (Salt of the Earth). It&rsquo;s one of the first Eco-structures, designed to be a free-standing bouncy bubble pod in nature through which you can appreciate the sky and the trees. Yes, I think that would be my ultimate dream pad.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/409489-bea-de-sousa?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Bea de Sousa</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;<em>Bau: Magazine for Architecture and Town Planning</em>, Issue 1, 1969. All:&nbsp;Published by Zentralvereinigung der Architekten &Ouml;sterreichs.&nbsp;Courtesy the artists and their estates)</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> Mon, 10 Aug 2015 19:28:00 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Paris Tear Sheets: Breaking Bread <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paris Tear Sheets is the blog of&nbsp;ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence, Lara Atallah, who will be undertaking her residency in Paris during July and August 2015. &ldquo;Paris tear sheets&rdquo; refers to daily snapshots taken during the artist&rsquo;s peregrinations in the city. She will use the blog to chronicle her encounters in Paris as well as her observations of the city.</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>You can find more information about ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency <a href="http://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">About a year ago, I attended a lecture by David Alan Harvey, one of photography's most well spoken orators, who is both poignant and fiercely dedicated to the medium. I remember him saying that in order to get to the crux of a person&rsquo;s story, you should break bread with them, live with them for a few days and build an intimate connection. Intimacy is an act of bravery. It requires transcending boundaries within yourself first, and reducing all the folds and threads that mediate a story away from its essence.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I realize that in the past couple of weeks, my posts have been a little taciturn. This lack of loquaciousness stems from some of the attachments I&rsquo;ve weaved with my subjects. Telling their story in words can be an arduous endeavor, as I&rsquo;ve felt not only enriched by their presence but also wary of certain boundaries; I&rsquo;m constantly wondering what should and should not be told to an audience.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150809084848-3.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><img style="text-align: center;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150809085039-6.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Last week, I met a friend visiting Paris who decided to introduce me to a relative of hers: a lovely lady called Tamima. Having settled in France decades ago, Tamima worked as an interior designer shaping her life with objects and colors that embellish&nbsp;her Parisian home. With splashes of red and curious little artifacts sitting on shelves and side tables, the apartment is a shrine for beauty in all its manufactured forms. As we prepare a lunch, Tamima talks about her love Beirut, a city she has never ceased to long for. She looks around and says spaces here are too small. She misses living in a city that&rsquo;s always basking under sunlight.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150809085005-5.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150809085330-4.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150809085130-8.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As I listen to her nostalgic musings, the same way I&rsquo;ve listened to every expat&rsquo;s walk down memory lane, my mind takes me back to&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Future of Nostalgia&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">by Svetlana Boym, who passed away last week</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">I've used her book as a key reading since I started&nbsp;</span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Tales of a Non-Country.&nbsp;</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">First believed to be a disease found amongst soldiers fighting on foreign land, nostalgia has since evolved into the imaginary space one believes once existed and longs for. One question pokes the back of my mind with each encounter: is nostalgia a delusion that is essential for basic survival?&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/398157-lara-atallah" target="_blank">Lara Atallah</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Lara Atallah (born Beirut, Lebanon, based in Brooklyn, NY) is a visual artist working with photography.&nbsp;</em><em>You can find the full list of blog posts from her Paris residency&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/398157-lara-atallah?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">here</a>. Additional&nbsp;images from Lara's residency are on Instagram,&nbsp;<a href="https://instagram.com/explore/tags/paristearsheets/" target="_blank">#paristearsheets</a>.</em><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;">(All images: Lara Atallah)</span></p> Mon, 10 Aug 2015 10:08:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Solidarity, Visibility, and Tactical Activism: Responding to Police Brutality with Art on the Street <blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; padding-left: 30px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&ldquo;Artists to my mind are the real architects of change, and not the political legislators who implement change after the fact.&rdquo; &mdash;William S. Burroughs</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><em>Where do we go from here?</em> It is usually the first question pondered and the most difficult to answer. The Sandtown/Winchester communities are still in the process of healing over three months after what the media has named the Baltimore Riots. Both neighborhood residents and Baltimoreans citywide have been attempting to make sense of the complex and multilayered events that happened back in April. Freddie Gray&rsquo;s death is a tragedy and no human being should ever be subjected to the neglect and the inhumane conditions that he experienced.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.nether410.com/#!nether/mainPage" target="_blank">NETHER</a> is a native Baltimorean and a street artist who believes that art is a tool to help draw attention to ignored issues and to tell forgotten histories. His artistic practice relies on the relationships he has in communities and listens to the concerns and stories of passersby. Many of the individuals and their stories serve as the inspiration for his installations and murals. Most recently, NETHER is working with residents and artists to paint murals in Sandtown/Winchester as a way to memorialize, celebrate, and drawn more attention to the area.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808172439-NETHER_Freddie_Gray_Mural__Mount_and_Presbury.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">The completed Freddie Gray Mural at Mount and Presbury Streets, the site where Gray was&nbsp;arrested.&nbsp;Photo: Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>Samantha Redles:</strong> <strong>We should start from the beginning. The project started within the midst of what people are calling the Baltimore Riots. During the peaceful protests you started brainstorming ideas. At what point did you decide to approach Brandon Ross and talk to him about the idea for the Freddie Gray mural?</strong></span><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>NETHER:</strong> It really started when I was following the news of Freddie Gray, before he died, when he was in the hospital. I had done a lot of work having to do with police brutality and police brutality in Baltimore. So this type of issue is very much on my radar.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Presbury and Mount are really the beginning of the Gilmore Homes or the split that goes down the middle of them. I know the area and I was originally looking at the vacant property across the street, thinking of doing a wheat paste on the side of that. At that point, I had no idea&mdash;nor did anybody else&mdash;that the news about Freddie Gray and everything that happened was going to catch as much wind as it did. So that was my original plan. I visited the site and then when he died there was the candlelight vigil protest. I was at that protest and I hooked up with this community activist, Kenji Scott, and he had some deeper connections within Gilmore and he hooked me up with a bunch of his friends, who then led me to Brandon. Everyone in that area holds him [Brandon] in extremely high regards and he makes things happen. I went up to him, kind of casually, and showed him some of my work&mdash;he recognized some of it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The next day&nbsp;he hit me up. From there we started developing a concept before the uprising or riots, whatever the media decides to call this, and it really changed everything in terms of imagery.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">SR:</strong><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> Who is Brandon Ross and what is his relationship to the neighborhood and Freddie Gray?</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Brandon Ross is Freddie's god-brother and his best friend. He has grown up in Gilmore, on the North side right at Presbury, his entire life. He knows almost every single person in the community; he is a really popular guy.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Brandon facilitated everything from figuring out the wall, getting permission for the wall, and starting a dialogue with the owner. Talking to friends, passing concepts through the family, and deciding who is in the mural&mdash;every single aspect in terms of on the ground management.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>So, the final piece on the wall, that was not purely your imagery and you worked with people in the community to form it?</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Yeah, absolutely. At first it was only Freddie and some protesters. That was the only content of the mural and then we let it develop&mdash;the projects, the mood effects, the sky was added information.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808172851-NETHER_Left_detail_of_Freddie_Gray_Mural.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King, Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall, and other civil&nbsp;rights leaders (left detail).&nbsp;Photo: Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>Who are some of the people in the mural? Both on the [left] side that reflects the past&mdash;images from the civil rights movement&mdash;and who are the ones from the present?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Brandon can probably answer that better in terms of all the people's names&mdash;I am putting a lot of people in it [laughs]. But Freddie is in the middle and then on the left side and the right side there is a pretty symmetrical scene of protesters. On the left side there are some [historical] protestors: Thurgood Marshall, Coretta Scott King, Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">On the right side, it really is the exact same composition and the same movement. And we are trying to say this is the same damn thing and it needs to be treated like that! With the respect and dignity that we gave leaders like Martin Luther King&mdash;that was the idea. It is a lot of his friends, Freddie's friends and family&mdash;mother, stepfather, sisters, Brandon, his closest friends.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808172634-NETHER_Right_detail_of_Freddie_Gray_Mural.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Brandon Ross; Freddie Gray&rsquo;s mother, Gloria Darden; Gray&rsquo;s sister, Fredericka Gray; and&nbsp;Gray&rsquo;s friends and family (right detail).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">SR: There was one other person that helped with really developing that project: J.C. Faulk. What was his role and how did he help to push the project along?</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Yeah, well this mural is really in two parts&mdash;like most things in Baltimore, it really goes deeper. It is not just the mural. It is not just a pretty picture on the wall. There is a whole story before and, usually, after it. And this is unlike any mural I have ever done. Super true.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">As I was painting it, two big things happened that I started brainstorming on. First, people started coming up and offering us their walls, so Brandon started making a list and trying to manage that&mdash;just for the future, you know, because Brandon is trying to get set up in the area and this is his job, improving the area and managing things. He was like: "this is my database, right here."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Right in front of the mural was patchy crabgrass&mdash;it was just really torn up; it was some bad turf. And a lot of people were saying, "This is the Freddie Gray site. We need some landscaping in front of it." Well, J.C. really came down at the right time [laughs]. That&rsquo;s what&rsquo;s up. We had all this desire to landscape and we were trying to figure out what we could do. At first one of the neighbors came to the spot and mowed it all down just so my ladder could stay up straight&mdash;honestly. J.C. and Brandon went to Home Depot and I was just chillin' there finishing up the painting. All of a sudden they come back with two trucks worth of supplies and then tell me another one is coming tomorrow with some workers. It popped off really quickly. I called up my best friend, Elise Victoria, who is a landscape designer and with the people from the community&mdash;some volunteer help, it just all came together. It was really amazing! The combination of murals and landscaping is a great way to make a place.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">I think that this is an area that has been completely ignored&mdash;well, not completely, but pretty much effectively ignored by the city, ignored by the state. It is not just the mayor. It is the Governor. It is the whole systematic creation of this problem and a lot of it is that the people in the area feel disrespected by this city and state.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>So this project has really developed into something bigger. I know that you had two other artists who have some walls in the area&mdash;where did they come in and how did they select their imagery? Who are they and what was the relationship between them and the neighborhood?</strong></span><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808173052-SORTA_North_and_Mount_Streets.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">SORTA&rsquo;s mural at Mount Street and North Avenue. Photo: Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Well, this project in general started off because well we didn't have the chance to raise funds.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>It was very DIY.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong>&nbsp;Very do it yourself, throw it together&mdash;let's start digging, start a garden, start painting, or anything, like, "Hey, we need to water it. Who has water? Let's start knocking on doors." [Laughs] Just stuff like that, ya know? But as we are realizing, we can really do something here.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The other two installations came in the time that we have been trying to get more organized and more formal. So there was the corner store right at King Grocery&mdash;right at Mount and North&mdash;two blocks up from my mural. A guy came to us saying, "Hey, we want something painted on the wall." So me and Brandon were talking about it and SORTA, this buddy of mine, he was into the idea of doing something. With SORTA's wall there was an image that he really liked that J.M. [Giordano] took. So, we hit up J.M. and made it happen.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">You know this mural project, this movement, and everything. In my opinion, I know everyone has their different opinions, but I think a lot of this has to do with reclaiming the American flag and, also, showing what it means to you by putting it out there. And putting the community's opinions of the American flag out there. A lot of people were asking about the American flag and why it was black and white, why some are the pan-African Flag. Just between mine, Pablo's, and SORTA's we have all three.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Pablo [Machioli] started painting and developing by talking to people&mdash;his process is kinda similar to how I paint, a little bit slower, a lot of conversation, and letting it develop. Just between having SORTA's at the furthest north point in that intersection, then the next one down is Pablo's, and the next one down is Freddie Gray and that is the corridor. If you think about the path that people walked on for this movement, it really went from there down to the police station. So Mount is the central corridor of Gilmore, the movement, it is really important. That first protest inspired so much.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808173254-Pablo_Machioli_Westwood_and_Mount.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pablo Machioli&rsquo;s mural at Westwood and Presbury Streets. Photo: Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>So, the area and the sites that you are choosing really have a connection to the protests and the peacefulness of the movement, and making sure that people recognize the area here needs more support from the city and state. It seems to be about, "please don't ignore us anymore."</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Well, yeah! And it is a weird sorta, twisted beautification. The fact of the matter is there are a lot of politicians stepping in right now trying to pretend like they haven't ignored us and there are a lot of people in the neighborhood being like, "My council person just showed up now. Never seen her before. Never seen him before." There is a lot of that and that is fair. We are calling out the issues that led to a Sandtown. We're putting them in people&rsquo;s faces and then they can pick their sides. They can pick whether or not they are going to continue to ignore places in Baltimore like this or they are going to continue to help them. But every time they are going to drive by one of these murals, it is going to be a reminder about what happens when the state fails its people. That is the heart of the project.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Also, showing the solidarity that has been so evident in the movement: this is Baltimore's best chance at redemption, fixing its problems and I am just so happy that so many people&mdash;you know I have been bitchin' and hollering about these problems forever&mdash;but for so many people it hit them, like <em>this is important</em>. This is really important and that is a great thing. That is progress.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>There really seems to be a political and social activism that runs through your work, both in your past work and, evidently, in this present work. What are some of the qualities and outcomes that will make this collaboration, these murals and installations, be successful?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> This is a movement that stood up for this neighborhood but let's all remember there is not one Sandtown. This is the hot spot, the spot of attention, the spot that will get attention for all the other neighborhoods.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">I think of my artwork as a formula to get attention on important issues. Through radical, bold moves that are able to capture media attention and, as a result, a lot of people hear about those efforts and are inspired by them. Showing a community standing up&mdash;people helping out with the imagery, the landscaping&mdash;the community stood up and did this. And the community is also the one at the end of that police baton, ya know? That is kinda the principle&mdash;what I like to talk about is Gandhi's principle of Satyagraha, which is that the best way to nonviolently succeed is to show the evils of your oppressor. The people that stood up, those are the people at the end of the baton. Those are the people that the police have been striking down in Gilmore for decades. Shit, it was in <em>The Wire</em>&nbsp;[laughs]. You know it is police brutality and it is the spot that police get out a little anger, it has been like that for a little while.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150808173817-Pablo_Machioli_Detail.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Pablo Machioli&rsquo;s mural at Westwood and Presbury Streets (detail). Photo: Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>It's really taking the concept of what true non-violence is: it is a civil disobedience; it is turning the other cheek and exposing the wrongs through peacefulness. And the reaction of what your oppressor will do when you do that, [you acting] in a way that is not violent in any way, shape, or form. I think this is something that has gone beyond just the marching and the protesting, and it is great to see that we are 2-3 months since&nbsp;</strong></span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and there are still efforts in different communities that are like yours. And it's great to see because it shows that this wasn't a once and done thing. People recognized that it needs to continue, and the effort needs to continue.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> You were talking about outcomes that are additional to what we are trying to do something to aide the movement in the community. That's the primary outcome, but there have been a lot of different types of mural projects in Baltimore. And Baltimore has had a really interesting active DIY and official public art history from the <a href="http://www.promotionandarts.org/arts-council/baltimore-mural-program" target="_blank">Baltimore Mural Program</a> to graffiti, to...</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>...to the <a href="http://openwallsbaltimore.com/About-Open-Walls-Baltimore" target="_blank">Open Walls projects</a>, to Wall Hunters.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> ...to the activist projects. There are a lot interesting and different [projects]. And it has all been very experimental. The mural program crashed and a lot of stuff birthed in its absence. These murals are for Baltimore and they need to be influenced by Baltimore, all over the city. I think that's really important! Even just with our curated list we are trying to build here. Everyone is talking about "one Baltimore"&mdash; it&rsquo;s really important that people show one Baltimore in their mural projects. Having just a bunch of MICA kids... And you know I didn't go to MICA, and I am from Baltimore, but at the same time you can be damn sure everyone assumes I'm from MICA [laughs].&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">We are trying to get some people from the neighborhood&mdash;some older muralists. And then artists whose work translates really well into murals, and have not painted a mural yet. We are really trying to build and develop the street art scene in many ways and in a very radical way. This city&mdash;five almost six years ago now, when it was just me, Ways, and Nook, Mata Ruda, Gaia&mdash;it was <em>very </em>experimental at first. We all went in and developed our practice due to experience, due to talking people, screwing up, trying to figure out ways to do it without being caught&mdash;because we didn't know that people really actually liked it!</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">It has been really great how much people have cared through artwork, but we are trying to bring everybody together to create Baltimore's art identity. And it's the type of situation that if something is fucked up in this town, whether you disagree with something that is happening in Station North, or disagree with something that created Sandtown, or [you] have something to say about the east side development&mdash;artists have a lot of power! And it is not just because they tend to be a little more privileged and have a lot more freedom in life. It is because of the artwork. And they need to aide these struggles that people are having in Baltimore.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">I see a lot of art that is dead on content in Baltimore, and I can't even tell you, I don't try to think of what to paint anymore. There is just so much material that is so interesting in this city! So many parts of the fabric [of the city] that it&rsquo;s just endless.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150811192312-The_Mountain_Top.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">NETHER's most recent mural for the VISIONS Mural Project in Sandtown/Winchester at W. North Ave. and Division Street.</span><span style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><em>The Mountain Top,&nbsp;</em>Photo: NETHER</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>You have been doing this for a very long time and you have been developing relationships. You are listening and aren't going in with the idea. For someone who's not from Baltimore, they could easily just assume that you are a 25-year-old white male just parachuting into these different neighborhoods that you don't live in. How do you respond to people who do not know what your practice is? Who say you are imposing things on the neighborhood, and you are just thinking of this as beautification? What are some of the ways you have developed relationships specifically with Sandtown/Winchester communities, but also Baltimoreans across the city and other areas?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> Race and sex are the two easiest ways you can divide people. And everybody has a race problem: I have a race problem, you have a race problem, America has a race problem. It is all of us. And we are all trying to work stuff out in our minds. Actually thinking about those things and having those conversations and those thoughts, is the best way we can develop it. I see a lot of people come up to me and they&rsquo;re shocked. The conversation, about me being a white boy in these neighborhoods, they come up to me questioning, and they are working through their own thoughts about racism. I think me being out there is progress just in the way that it looks weird and forces people to think. I'm really used to it. This is the founding of my whole entire process, meeting people just as normal people meet people. Not just hit them with an email and say, "I'd like to set-up an interview." Nah, I just walk up and knock on the door and say "Hey, what&rsquo;s up?"&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>It is very organic and natural. And it's not forced.</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> It's certain areas&mdash;well it's all post-segregation in America&mdash;but it is all still <em>very</em>&nbsp;segregated in Baltimore. It is a little bit shocking when you see me. And it&rsquo;s also this idea that we can't fix our neighborhoods so this white person is coming in. Then I pretty much represent that happening! The reality is that this is a community process. This is part of a community process and I am part of the Baltimore community too. But the mural is just one step here. It&rsquo;s a catalyst. I'm not coming in as a developer. I can't tell you the amount of times I've painted a mural or curated the painting of a mural, and there will be weeds coming out of the sidewalk, and that will get cleaned up. Or the city might have an interest in doing a little bit more street cleaning right there.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Seeing all parts of Baltimore come together is part of the healing. It makes me feel like a hater because I am looking at a lot of the responses that people have had and it's a lot of emotion and care&mdash;but part of me says, "Well, you are late."</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>Are you saying, not necessarily the community's response, but Baltimore as a whole, or even...</strong></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> It&rsquo;s not even just the Baltimore artist community too, but it's artsy Baltimoreans. At the end of it, I am just really excited that the learning process, and those conversations and those thoughts about race&mdash;and this is not just race of course, but economics, and the creation of these neighborhoods, there's a lots of stuff that leads to it&mdash;it's great that people are trying to learn now. And they will make mistakes. I've made mistakes, especially when we were starting out. The paper shit on the wall, we didn't know whether or not we were going to get arrested for it, or celebrated for it. There was this kind of "Where's Waldo" game in it&mdash;one of the elements of it was this fly-by-night thing. At first it was without as many direct conversations with the community, but then you went back in the day to get your day shot of it, and then I'd start talking to some people. They would say, "Hey, hit this vacant [house] over here for us." And then you've got your in in Sandtown, and you're just rolling! The Baltimore way!</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150811191946-North_and_Greenmount__2014.jpg" alt="" /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">NETHER's act of civil disobedience to publicly call attention to an incident of police brutality that happened at North Ave. and Greenmount Ave. in 2014.&nbsp;<br /></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">North Ave. and Greenmount Ave., 2014,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: NETHER</span></p> <div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>What is the community's response to the project&mdash;the murals, about the landscaping, the imagery&mdash;so far?</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> It&rsquo;s been incredibly positive! Like with Wall Hunters, it was a little bit more controversial, I am realizing. It's interesting, people's perceptions, about how bad it is! I guess people think it&rsquo;s radical, like I am some crazy white boy for doing this. Or maybe, I am just stupid, or I'm taking too many risks. It&rsquo;s really peaceful over there. The community reaction has been great. I'm really cool with a ton of neighbors now in the area. I'm talking to people all the time who are helping me out. It&rsquo;s really coming together. If we need some landscaping there are people to do that, and who could use the work too.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>What are some of those ways in which people can get involved? The readers, what can they do? What can a local do? If I want to help out, what can I do?</strong></span><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong> I think a great general guideline is only do stuff with organizations that have been on the ground before this. And there are quite a few in the area! Like Elder Harris, <a href="http://jubileeartsbaltimore.org/" target="_blank">Jubilee </a>Sandtown&mdash;there are organizations on the ground there. There's a community association, along with other neighborhoods around there. There's a rich and deep Baltimore history, and they have resources. They have been underfunded, but projects need to have a connection to people on the ground. That's why Brandon is heading this project. He's the shot-caller. Wall Hunters was more of a cross-city pop-up installation, but this is <em>this</em>&nbsp;neighborhood. And if there's going to be 18 murals popping up, I think it&rsquo;s really important that the person calling the shots on those murals is somebody who has a lot of influence in that neighborhood.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>SR:</strong> <strong>If someone wants to stay up-to-date on the project, where should they go?</strong></span><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><strong>N:</strong>&nbsp;We have a Facebook group "<a href="https://www.facebook.com/sandtownmuralproject" target="_blank">Vision Sandtown Mural and Arts Project</a>". That's where we are going to announce volunteer days where folks will help with the setting-up and the skilled labor, and then there will be days where (like with my mural) we needed to get 30 plants and trees in the ground. We hit everybody up on Facebook and <a href="https://instagram.com/nether410/" target="_blank">Instagram</a> last minute. And having just a few people come out was really great! And we are going to need that again.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">For individual donations we set-up a <a href="http://www.gofundme.com/txyb3m9s" target="_blank">Go Fund Me page</a></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">. You can donate money there, and there's information about the project.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&mdash;Samantha Redles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">ArtSlant would like to thank NETHER for his assistance in making this interview possible. This interview was transcribed with the help of Kirsten Walsh.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: &nbsp;<span style="text-align: left;">Freddie Gray (center detail).&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">Photo: Samantha Redles)</span></span></p> Wed, 12 Aug 2015 09:57:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Working (it) Out with Gillian Dykeman: Roya Akbari <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Welcome to the seventh installation of the Artslant podcast series, <em>Working (it) Out</em>. </span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">My name is Gillian Dykeman, and I'm a visual artist living in Toronto, Ontario. This summer, I am interviewing artists to ask about the role of audience in their practice. Each interview will begin with one question: "Does art require an audience?"</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/217109442&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" width="100%" height="450"></iframe></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Working (it) Out </span></strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with Gillian Dykeman</span></p> <p class="p1" style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Episode Seven |&nbsp;<strong>Roya Akbari: Destiny's Child</strong></span></p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />The Vivian Maier question&nbsp;(2:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Censorship and the political realities as limiting factors in finding audience&nbsp;(3:00)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Inner dialogue and intimate dialogue as integral to Akbari&rsquo;s process&nbsp;(4:50)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Love Letter&nbsp;(5:05) &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" /><em>Dropping Off the Face of the Earth&nbsp;</em>(8:42)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Nomadic experimental film&nbsp;(10:14)</span><span style="text-align: center;"><br /></span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Evoking empathy and making space for your audience&rsquo;s baggage&nbsp;(12:52)</span><span style="text-align: center;"><br /></span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Using the language one feels connected to for intimate speech&nbsp;(15:50)</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Censorship further explored<em>&nbsp;</em>(19:05)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Is it art if it&rsquo;s left in a drawer?<em>&nbsp;</em>(20:47)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Destiny&rsquo;s Child<em>&nbsp;</em>(21:09)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> <li class="li1"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605145809-artslant-social-logo.png" alt="" width="15" />Art as therapy: A-OK<em>&nbsp;</em>(22:10)</span><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Roya Akbari is an experimental filmmaker and visual artist. When we met to discuss her work, she brought up important issues around censorship and the politics of what is allowed to be shown where. For Akbari, discourse <em>isn&rsquo;t</em> a precursor to categorizing a culture product as art. Akbari&rsquo;s experimental films and installations feel intimate and personal, but withdraw just enough from the edge of explicit to allow space for audience to enter the work. Akbari doesn&rsquo;t consider audience during process, but rather addresses an aspect of herself, or in the case of <em>Only Image Remains</em>, audience is addressed through a love letter to Iranian Cinema.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">Music: War on Drugs, "An Ocean Between the Waves"</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111533-only_image_remains_still.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111550-onlyiamgeremainsstill2.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><img style="text-align: left;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111631-Onlyimageremainsstill4.jpg" alt="" width="600" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111610-onlyimageremainsstill3.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Four images above: Film stills from&nbsp;<em>Only Image Remains</em>,&nbsp;2014, 30 minutes, Color, Farsi / English subtitles</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111806-droppingoffstill.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111826-droppingoffstill1.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111918-droppingoffstill4.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: left;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150803111934-droppingoffstill5.jpg" alt="" width="600" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Four images above: Installation views from&nbsp;<em>Dropping Off the Face of the Earth</em>, 2015, 5-channel video installation. Photos: Jesse Boles<em><br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;">&mdash;</span><a style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 26px;" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/374197-gillian-dykeman">Gillian Dykeman</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Aug 2015 15:24:46 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list The Best Non-Profit Art Spaces in Los Angeles <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Like other industries, the art world should come under the scrunity of fair and equitable business practices. With so much privatization in the gallery and museum world, it's as good a time as any for consumers of culture to question where funds come from&mdash;and where profits are going. This summer, we're seeking out the best not-for-profit and community conscious art spaces in the most commercial cities on the global art circuit. As part of our mission to give art a social slant, the first stop in our series exploring these venues is gallery hotspot, Los Angeles.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://artandpractice.org/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>ART + PRACTICE</strong></span></a></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802231009-A_P_from_hammer.ucla.edu.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Art + Pratice. Courtesy A+P and The Hammer Museum</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art + Practice (A+P) is a nonprofit founded by artist and Leimert Park native Mark Bradford, philanthropist and collector Eileen Harris Norton, and social activist Allan DiCastro. With the South Los Angeles neighborhood&rsquo;s reputation as an African American cultural destination, the so-called &ldquo;Leimert Park Renaissance&rdquo; will no doubt feed off of A+P&rsquo;s community-centered programming&mdash;A+P has already been providing the 90008 ZIP code with life-skill training for foster youth and will soon provide free, museum-curated art exhibitions and moderated art lectures to the Leimert Park community, encouraging education and culture in the area.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The organization encompasses nearly 20,000 square-feet and multiple buildings that will not only be exhibition space for visual arts, a bookstore and classrooms, but space for artists&rsquo; studios. Committed to art and social practice, the multi-use space works in partnership with UCLA&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/venues/show/10-hammer-museum" target="_blank">Hammer Museum</a> that will curate exhibitions and public programs on the A+P campus; The RightWay Foundation, which oversees the foundation&rsquo;s foster youth services by delivering mental health services and job training to foster youth (the highest concentration of the county&rsquo;s foster youth live in South Los Angeles); and EsoWon Bookstore, a black-owned business, community hub, and neighborhood institution, which directs A+P&rsquo;s lecture series. Also part of its mission: A+P has been providing studios to three artists in residence since last August, and among the first to participate is Dale Brockman Davis, founder of LA&rsquo;s first African American-owned commercial gallery, Brockman Gallery, which operated in Leimert Park from 1967 to 1989.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong><a href="http://artsharela.org/" target="_blank">ART SHARE LA</a></strong></span></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802232421-Art_Share_LA.JPG" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">Art Share LA.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Art Share LA is a self-described sanctuary for the arts in the heart of downtown LA&rsquo;s Arts District. The 28,000 square-foot former warehouse provides 30 subsidized live/work lofts for artists on the second level and a community-focused programming facility on the ground floor, offering affordable studio space for local artists, classes, an exhibition space, and a theater for performances and community council meetings.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The building has gone through a couple of phases, starting as a single family residential home in 1912 and transitioned into a textile recycling, or &ldquo;rag shop,&rdquo; in 1928. The building was purchased in 1997 and Art Share LA has made it their permanent home, adding a necessary safe-haven for artists in a developing area that is <a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/43457" target="_blank">becoming less and less affordable for practicing, up-and-coming artists</a>. Today, Art Share LA acts as the Arts District&rsquo;s only low-income housing option, easily attracting arts practitioners with its artist-friendly aesthetic and resources. Their upcoming programming includes dance workshops, poetry readings, and film screenings.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.santafeartcolony.org/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>SANTA FE ART COLONY</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans, 'Trebuchet MS', Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px; text-align: left;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802232255-SFAC_-_LA_Art_Tours_visiting_Don_Lewis__studio.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">Santa Fe Art Colony, LA Art Tours Visiting Don Lewis' Studio. </span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Santa Fe Art Colony (SFAC) is a live/work studio complex in Downtown Los Angeles whose residents work to teach and promote art not only in the region but also across the globe. SFAC residents are professional artists who have been holding an annual open studios walk-through for outsiders to see where artists who show in commercial galleries live and create since 1988, when the building was renovated and developed into artists&rsquo; lofts.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The annual tours equip those curious with knowledgeable guides who spout historical factoids and insight into this rather hidden community located on the industrial outskirts of DTLA. There are 57 spaces in total, giving residents solitude to work and engage with the greater community&mdash;those who do opt for the annual tour of the SFAC have the opportunity to meet the artists in person, see them at work, and even interact with them in ways not possible in the conventional gallery setting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://avenue50studio.org/"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>AVENUE 50 STUDIO</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802232139-Avenue_50_Studio.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: x-small;">Photo:&nbsp;Martha Benedict</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Avenue 50 Studio calls Highland Park home. Since its founding in 2000, the self-described arts presentation organization has been committed to providing a space where the life and artistic interests of an under-served community can become visible. Avenue 50 works to represent their Northeast Los Angeles community by providing an ongoing structure that enhances public recognition and appreciation of their multicultural art community with supporting visual artists, writers, and poets.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The nonprofit has grown from a small gallery to an active arts nexus in a part of the city known for being a traditional arts enclave. A now important arts destination in Northeast Los Angeles, Avenue 50 grounds itself in Chicana/o and Latina/o culture and visual arts with emphasis on showing art rooted in the Highland Park neighborhood. The space operates as a venue for up-and-coming local artists and poets and includes two galleries, a community art space, and three resident artist studios. Their monthly art openings and varied literary events, including workshops and poetry readings, are part of their efforts to bridge the diverse cultures of Los Angeles. The space hosts an annual Dia de los Muertos event and is currently exhibiting renowned Chicano artist Roberto Gutierrez&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.facebook.com/sixthstreetviaductbridge/posts/902722523119570" target="_blank">latest series </a>that grapples with upcoming demolition of the iconic 83-year-old 6th&nbsp;Street bridge along the LA River.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://sparcinla.org/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>THE DUR&Oacute;N GALLERY @ SPARC</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802232040-SPARC_-_Interpretive_Green_Bridge.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: normal; text-align: center;">Judy Baca and SPARC have collaborated with wHY Architects to complete the designs for a &ldquo;Green Bridge&rdquo; which will be composed in part from the debris of the Los Angeles River with interpretive panels along the expanse of the Bridge from which the public can view the river and the &frac12; mile of mural along its banks. <br />&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC), located in Venice, Los Angeles, was founded in 1976 by Chicana muralist and educator Judy Baca, filmmaker/director Donna Deitch and artist/teacher Christina Schlesinger. The gallery at SPARC became the Dur&oacute;n Gallery, named after Armando and Mary Dur&oacute;n, art collectors and long time SPARC supporters, and seeks to bring socially conscious art to underserved audiences by way of exhibitions and performances in an effort to engage. SPARC aims to communicate with the larger public through forms including architectural monuments, murals, or new technology spaces such as the internet.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since 1976, SPARC has been working across Los Angeles, including poor and immigrant communities, with youth and their families as participants in the production of public monuments, which make these communities' stories visible to local, national, and international audiences alike.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Center operates under the notion of art as public property&mdash;as expressed by famed Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros. SPARC&rsquo;s Artistic Director and Founder, Professor Judy Baca, asserts that the ideals of the Mexican social mural movement, which began in 1913, inspired Los Angeles muralists in the 1970s. Her work, too, was inspired by the art movement: Baca painted murals with at-risk youth, forming the basis of the first citywide mural program eventually leading to the creation of SPARC.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://machineproject.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>MACHINE PROJECT</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802231949-Machine_Project_-_Forest.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">Forest</em><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">, 2009, by Sarah Newey and Christy McCaffrey. Courtesy&nbsp;Machine Project</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Machine Project in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles is an educational institution that teaches whatever Executive Director and Founder Mark Allen and his loose group of artist/performer collaborators find interesting: electronics, sewing, pickling, computer programming, and car theft&mdash;among other niche topics not otherwise supported by educational institutions in the LA area. The artist, educator, and curator has directed over 1,000 free events, workshops, and installations at the non-commercial gallery space since its founding in 2003.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Allen and his colleagues use the art gallery as a vehicle for other social interests. They work together to create, study, and share new forms of culture and ways of living by collaborating with artists, thinkers, and local communities to produce non-commercial projects in the space and beyond that encourage conversations. These projects investigate art, performance, technology, science, music, literature, and new ideas for creative engagement.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The nonprofit keeps the lights on by hosting workshops at about $20 a contact hour (materials included) and, of course, through receiving tax deductible donations either online or in person with their pneumatic cash machine. At certain events, there is a &ldquo;beerhole&rdquo; in the corner of the space that dispenses cold cans of beer through the floorboards after a thirsty patron first rings a doorbell above and places $2 in a mechanical hand.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://clockshop.org/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>CLOCKSHOP</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802231442-Clockshop_-_Con-Safos.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">Sarah Dougherty and Iris Hu opened Rafa Esparza&rsquo;s new revolving installation <em>Con/Safos</em> with new works created specifically for the <em>C/S</em> surface, February 28&ndash;March 31, 2015. Photo: Matt Rose Photography</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Clockshop, located in what is known as &ldquo;Frogtown&rdquo; along the banks of the LA River, is a multifaceted arts organization working at the intersection of politics, urban space, and cultural production. The nonprofit uses its varied artist projects and collaborations along with events and screenings as a means to explore the forces that shape our lived environment. Clockshop operates out of <a href="http://www.elysianla.com/" target="_blank">Elysian</a>, a bar/restaurant and event venue, and also works throughout the city in uncommon and undiscovered locations to bring people together to share in the strange particularities of Los Angeles and the global creative practices and politics that affect its residents.</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Bowtie Project, a collaboration between Clockshop and California State Parks, activates an otherwise overlooked 19-acre post-industrial lot known as The Bowtie, located along the LA River in Northeast Los Angeles. The site had been closed to the pubic for over a decade until Clockshop was invited to bring a broad and experimental blend of artists&rsquo; projects and collaborations to the desolate outdoor space. <em>Con/Safos (C/S)</em> by Rafa Esparza is the most recent Bowtie program in collaboration with <a href="http://www.selfhelpgraphics.com/" target="_blank">Self Help Graphics &amp; Art </a>and California State Parks. <em>C/S</em> is a site-specific sculpture built with 1,500 adobe bricks handmade by Esparza and his father on site that form two intersecting walls. The adobe walls will act as a year-long revolving installation where graffiti artists, painters, and sculptors are invited to design, paint, and build onto the surface of <em>Con/Safos</em>, creating temporal artworks.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="http://womenscenterforcreativework.com/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>WOMEN&rsquo;S CENTER FOR CREATIVE WORK</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802232539-WCCW_-_Dinner_in_the_City.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">A Women&rsquo;s Dinner in the City,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">November 16, 2013.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">In the shadow of the historic Woman&rsquo;s Building, in the Anabolic Monument Native Plant Garden, LA State Historic Park, near Downtown LA.,&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">100 women formed a gathering in the urban landscape to examine our civic histories of place-making&mdash;<br />thinking about intentional spaces old and new.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Photo: Gilda Davidian</span></p> <p style="line-height: normal; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The Women&rsquo;s Center for Creative Work (WCCW) is a Los Angeles-based network of self-described "rad women" who are engaged in conversations about contemporary feminisms and creative practices. WCCW exists as both a women-led creative co-workspace and, on a broader scale, an enabling architecture providing professional, emotional, and artistic nourishment for female-driven creative projects. Since its founding in November 2013, the WCCW has built a network of over 1,500 women who are committed to support each other socially, creatively, and economically by building the structures&mdash;physical and transcendental&mdash;that maximize connectivity and empowerment.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">WCCW's founders recognized a need for a contemporary feminist community center of sorts. Artist Katie Bachler, graphic designer Kate Johnston, and producer Sarah Williams filled the void themselves. The three women decided to bring their community together to talk about the present state of feminism with two large dinner events: one in Yucca Valley and one near Downtown Los Angeles. The two events galvanized their community in unanticipated ways and WCCW was born. WCCW is growing its female and female-identifying creative community in Los Angeles as the organization readies itself to move into new offices geared toward even more creative practices like writing, design, sculpture, weaving, filmmaking, painting, and more, while also working to expand the definitions of what is considered creative work to encourage finding creativity and a feminist angle in all labor.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><a href="mailto:emailanalogdissident@gmail.com" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><strong>ANALOG DISSIDENT</strong></span></a></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150802231239-Analog_Dissident_-_Artist_Amy_Von_Harrington.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Artist Amy Von Harrington presents her work. Courtesy of Analog Dissident. Photo: Jimena Sarno</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Analog Dissident functions as a free monthly discussion group aimed at queer/radical/feminist/politically inclined artists to critically engage outside of traditional art institutions, gallery openings and social media. Since December 2014, artist Jimena Sarno runs the space at her studio to feed a need for unmediated, meaningful interactions between artists beyond so-called &ldquo;virtual nods of approval&rdquo; within social media or mere minutes at art events or openings. Sarno curates the programming to engage an inclusive dialogue that goes well beyond the traditional white, male, straight, gender-conforming privileges rampant within mainstream and traditional art institutions.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The events offer a non-hierarchical discussion group aimed at&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">"queer/radical/feminist/politically inclined"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">artists and curators that features two guest artists in an informal, open studio visit. Guests are encouraged to bring work in progress or that is being completed for a specific exhibition and all in attendance engage in the discussion. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Analog Dissident is being displaced due to DTLA&rsquo;s rapid development, which is kicking out low-income artists and residents. The space will host a group show in August to bid farewell to its current location and will continue its monthly gatherings at a TBD location that Sarno hopes to eventually expand into an exhibition space.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.papillionart.com/" target="_blank"><strong>PAPILLION</strong></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">PAPILLION, founded by Michelle Joan Papillion, moved into historic South Los Angeles neighborhood Leimert Park in 2010 and was the first gallery space to contribute to the area&rsquo;s so-called &ldquo;renaissance.&rdquo; The contemporary art gallery&rsquo;s decided focus is on emerging artists and includes a project space in Downtown LA called P.I.A. Projects, which serves as an artist residency to start or complete a new project.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The space has some historic roots in the noted African American cultural hub: brothers and artists Dale and Alonzo Davis opened the Brockman Gallery in 1967, where PAPILLION&rsquo;s pink neon sign now stays lit day and night. The neighborhood was once home to iconic African American figures like Ella Fitzgerald and Ray Charles, along with many important black LA artists, like David Hammons, Samella Lewis and A+P founder and artist Mark Bradford. Up next for PAPILLION is performance artist and filmmaker Terence Nance performing&nbsp;<em>Black boys 1-18</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Black girls 1-18</em>&nbsp;to a live soundtrack. The gallery is currently closed for the summer.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150811194752-Papillion_via_papillionart.com.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Image courtesy Papillion&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/431064-lauren-mcquade?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Lauren McQuade</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top:&nbsp;Art +Practice, Map of Leimert Park, LA)</span></p> Mon, 24 Aug 2015 15:46:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list The New Director of Tate Britain Set to Broaden the Museum's Audience <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As the chief founding director&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of Nottingham Contemporary&mdash;one of the U.K&rsquo;s largest art centers&mdash;Alex Farquharson knows all about&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">tackling artistic ventures on a large scale. A long time curator with more than 20 years' experience,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Farquharson has worked with some of the foremost leading contemporary British artists, such as Pablo&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Bronstein, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Jeremy Deller, Gary Hume, Richard Long and Gillian Wearing. When&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Farquharson launched Nottingham Contemporary in the fall of 2009, little did he know the gallery would&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">go on to attract more than one million visitors in its first five years&mdash;defining and solidifying him as a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">strong presence in the British art industry.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Farquharson studied English and Fine Art at the University&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">of Exeter, and soon after, received his Masters in Arts Criticism at City University in London. He&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">is set to replace former Tate Britain director, Penelope Curtis, who announced in the spring that she was&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">stepping down in order to take the director&rsquo;s position at Lisbon's Museu Calouste Gulbenkian.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Upon gaining his new position, Farquharson told the <em>London Evening Standard </em></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">that, &ldquo;as the home of 500 years of British art, Tate&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Britain has a unique and fascinating position in the cultural life of the nation. I look forward to working&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">with a highly skilled and experienced team of curators to share these histories with audiences of all&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">kinds.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/379784-kimberly-b-johnson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Kimberly B. Johnson</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at the top: David Baird)</span></p> Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:37:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Paris Tear Sheets: Of Hummus and Other Stories <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paris Tear Sheets is the blog of&nbsp;ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist-in-Residence, Lara Atallah, who will be undertaking her residency in Paris during July and August 2015. &ldquo;Paris tear sheets&rdquo; refers to daily snapshots taken during the artist&rsquo;s peregrinations in the city. She will use the blog to chronicle her encounters in Paris as well as her observations of the city.</em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>You can find more information about ArtSlant's Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency <a href="http://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Immigrants tend to carry with them the one concrete thing that connects them back to their homeland: food. When I started &ldquo;Tales of a Non-Country,&rdquo; food played a key role in some of the <a href="http://www.lara-atallah.com/abandoned-dinner-party#1" target="_blank">earlier works</a>. I produced still lifes, paired with reconstructed archival images that spoke to the nature of the historical recollection. With this new chapter in the tales, I want to reduce the level of mediation that the studio environment provided and give voice to the people behind the food.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Paris is replete with Lebanese restaurants in just about every corner of every arrondissement, but I&rsquo;ve chosen to visit the doyen who has been thriving at the art of balancing chickpeas and olive oil since 1952. </span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150731195002-4.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150731195126-7.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150802092324-IMG_1306.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">A red tablecloth; a water carafe; a spread of mezze with ambrosial tangs mix with the delectable aromas that permeate the air of this family owned restaurant. Warmth is one of the keywords of this establishment: it is draped in rich colors and dotted with vivacious characters.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150731195257-3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150731195423-5.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The father, Kamal, will spend hours talking about farming in his native village and what makes a good <em>muhallabiyya;&nbsp;</em>while Matthieu, his son, brainstorms PR strategies.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150725155311-IMG_1304.JPG" alt="" width="600" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150725155209-PopeBlessings.jpg" alt="" width="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Here and there, one spots an icon of the Virgin Mary or a postcard of the Pope. As friends of the church and devout Christians, the Nassifs are often visited by congregation members of Syrian, Lebanese, or Palestinian descent who all come together to pray on Sundays and have made the restaurant a frequented outpost. I am introduced to members of the congregation who take pleasure in giving me a tour of the Lebanese Church nearby, and suggest I attend the Sunday service and meet their fellow congregants.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150731195720-8.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/101642/4cut/20150731195755-9.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">As the days go by and my encounters begin to weave themselves into a larger tapestry of faces and lives, I am slowly discovering the stories of satellite communities that form the greater whole of a disparate identity. </span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/398157-lara-atallah" target="_blank">Lara Atallah</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>Lara Atallah (born Beirut, Lebanon, based in Brooklyn, NY) is a visual artist working with photography.&nbsp;</em><em>You can find the full list of blog posts from her Paris residency&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/398157-lara-atallah?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">here</a>. Additional&nbsp;images from Lara's residency are on Instagram,&nbsp;<a href="https://instagram.com/explore/tags/paristearsheets/" target="_blank">#paristearsheets</a>.</em><br /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: xx-small;">(All images: Lara Atallah)</span></p> Mon, 03 Aug 2015 13:45:33 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list We Contain Multitudes: the Hybrid Identities of Andrea Crespo <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Within the first few minutes of David Cronenberg&rsquo;s 1999 movie </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">eXistenZ</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, video game designer Allegra Geller is referred to as both &ldquo;goddess&rdquo; and &ldquo;demoness.&rdquo; The polarizing reaction to Geller&rsquo;s games sets the stakes for the ensuing narrative&mdash;one in which &ldquo;realists&rdquo; fight against gamers, who, according to the realists, &ldquo;deform&rdquo; reality. Indeed, in immersive games like </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">eXistenZ</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">, players are never sure if they are themselves or their characters. Buried under several layers of &ldquo;reality,&rdquo; everyone in the film ends up with a multitude of identities; Allegra is goddess </span><em style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">and</em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> demoness at once.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Although the muted, sterile objects in Andrea Crespo&rsquo;s <em>polymorphoses </em>do not resemble the veiny, grotesque <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=existenz+gamepod&amp;espv=2&amp;biw=1041&amp;bih=617&amp;source=lnms&amp;tbm=isch&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0CAgQ_AUoA2oVChMI9ZSHkI7ZxgIVwdSACh3g4gjB#tbm=isch&amp;q=existenz+game+pod" target="_blank">game pods</a> in <em>eXistenZ</em>, Crespo asks Cronenberg-ian questions: must we establish a single identity when it is so easy, because of video game and internet avatars, to assume multiple? How can we feel secure, if at all, while navigating alternate &ldquo;realities&rdquo;? In <em>polymorphoses</em>, as in <em>eXistenZ</em>, beings and their projections are constantly splitting and re-joining, doubling and reducing, disappearing and reappearing. Are such dimensional shifts necessarily negative, or can a confusion of identities open up new (inter)personal possibilities?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150715080833-Installation_Shot_2-min.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">Installation view of <em>polymorphoses</em>, 2015. Photo: Fran Parente. Courtesy of the artist and Hester, New York</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Crespo addresses these themes most saliently in <em>parabiosis: neurolibinal induction complex</em>, the exhibition&rsquo;s sole video piece. Evocative words and Game Boy images appear on a black screen. A glowing bar wipes them away, or perhaps copies them, acting as a Xerox machine. The devices we use&mdash;scanners, Game Boys, and their contemporary counterparts&mdash;play both goddess (creator) and demoness (destroyer) every day. Throughout <em>polymorphoses</em>, then, Crespo navigates the boundaries between these two roles in a post-<em>eXistenZ</em>, post-internet, cultural climate: one a bit more comfortable with hybridity.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/132575599" frameborder="0" width="600" height="338"></iframe></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/132575599">parabiosis 2.2 excerpt</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user12061539">Andrea Crespo</a>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">In <em>plurisim (incubator)</em>, one of five &ldquo;data security boxes&rdquo; hanging on Hester&rsquo;s back wall, Crespo interrogates our digital relationships. Nintendo Game Link cables connect on one end (not unlike the umbilical cord cables and bio-ports in <em>eXistenZ</em>), their other ends growing outwards. In conventional use, the cables allow Game Boy players to &ldquo;interact&rdquo; across platforms. Even though the cables are secured within a box, they suggest a possible union between human avatars. Is this&mdash;multiplayer gaming&mdash;a &ldquo;real&rdquo; connection? In <em>eXistenZ</em>, the answer is no; no relationship is firm, or even physically safe. In <em>polymorphoses</em>, however, even with glimpses of techno-exclusivity (i.e., objects locked in data security boxes), it seems as though Crespo wants to unlock some sort of personal &ldquo;reality&rdquo; and potential for &ldquo;real&rdquo; connectivity.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150715080924-Plurisim.jpg" alt="" height="400" /><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150715080954-Somatospasm.jpg" alt="" height="400" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">(left) <em>plurisim (incubator)</em>, 2015, Data security box, UV print on acrylic glass, poly mesh, Nintendo Game Link Cables, sprites by rockiecuff.deviantart.com<br />(right) <em>somatospasm (disinterface)</em>, 2015, Data security box, inkjet print on paper, UV print on acrylic glass<br />Photos: Fran Parente. Courtesy of the artist and Hester, New York.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">The printed surface of another box, <em>somatospasm (disinterface)</em>, affirms Crespo&rsquo;s grasp for the personal&mdash;anthropomorphically, with hands clutching the box, and aesthetically, with the images&rsquo; hand-drawn look. Despite being mass-produced objects, the boxes&rsquo; function is private: for security, safekeeping. By using small, portable hardware that is industrially fabricated but for individual use, Crespo renders potentially alienating processes of production and replication single. The <a href="http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31i9G5RiDOL.jpg" target="_blank">mobile scanners</a> that hang two of the prints, then, illustrate our ability to take replication literally into our own hands. When we scan, we create. Are we &ldquo;goddess,&rdquo; or do our relationships with these devices &ldquo;deform&rdquo; reality, regardless of the resultant creations?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Since before <em>eXistenZ</em>, people have been wary of the dissociating effects of video games. Countless <a href="https://scholar.google.nl/scholar?q=video+games+and+violent+behavior&amp;hl=en&amp;as_sdt=0&amp;as_vis=1&amp;oi=scholart&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0CB4QgQMwAGoVChMIoKCfjbbbxgIVRaNyCh3LHwFU" target="_blank">studies</a> have questioned whether gamers bring on-screen violence to the &ldquo;real&rdquo; world. Although Cronenberg&rsquo;s moral position remains unclear, <em>eXistenZ </em>ultimately presents something negative: a violent dystopia. Crespo addresses this paranoia explicitly in the 2014 series <a href="http://andreacrespo.com/complexcases/2014.html" target="_blank"><em>Complex Cases</em></a>, which questions the motives and psychoses (often linked to video games) of notable young male killers like Adam Lanza and Elliot Rodger. And in <em>polymorphoses</em> the artist elaborates; interactive exhibition centerpiece <em>polymist: echolalic transponder</em> specifically fights perceived dissociating effects while being, in some ways, a game itself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20150715081631-Polymist.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">Andrea Crespo, <em>polymist: echolalic transponder</em>, 2015, EMDR light bar kit, stereo mixer, media player, 9m12s digital audio file, foam tiles, 30 x 49 x 49 inches. Photo: Fran Parente. Courtesy of the artist and Hester, New York</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">To view the work you sit on a mat, wearing headphones and watching moving lights&mdash;much like the experience of playing a video game. But the EMDR light bar Crespo uses is borrowed from PTSD therapy; as such, the &ldquo;game&rdquo; cures the negative mental consequences of violence and gaming (PTSD or, for instance, Dissociative Identity Disorder). Simultaneously cause and cure, <em>polymist </em>evades definition (its subtitle is, more or less, &ldquo;meaningless communication device&rdquo;). Meaning is scattered like, well, <em>mist</em><em>, </em>or the bar&rsquo;s photons splashing from left to right and back again. We are there all the while, though, participating in the creation and destruction of our psyches.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">Crespo&rsquo;s pieces ultimately outline the ways in which technologies both distinguish and form&mdash;<em>not </em>&ldquo;deform&rdquo;&mdash;our realities. The objects in <em>polymorphoses </em>point to reproduction (scanners), even intercourse (inserted cables); they also suggest memories (PTSD) and dreams (the transient dotted images in <em>parabiosis</em>). They receive abstruse names like <em>echolalic transponder </em>or <em>teratosyzygy</em>&mdash;but like PTSD or DID, these jargon-y words have simple implications: we are hybrid beings feeling for our roots.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">View the </span></em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">polymorphose</span><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"> press release video by Andrea Crespo <a href="https://player.vimeo.com/video/130706759?autoplay=1&amp;loop=1" target="_blank">here</a>.</span></em></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/431528-joe-bucciero" target="_blank">Joe Bucciero</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-small;">(Image at top: Installation view of <em>polymorphoses</em>, 2015. Photo: Fran Parente. Courtesy of the artist and Hester, New York)</span></p> Wed, 15 Jul 2015 11:06:32 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list Exposing Visual Rhymes: An Interview with Mario Ybarra Jr. <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><em><strong>This interview was <a href="http://www.artslant.com/chi/artists/rackroom/450" target="_blank">originally published</a> way back on ArtSlant Chicago, in May, 2008, on the occasion of&nbsp; Mario Ybarra Jr.'s exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The LA-based artist is known for his installations drawing from pop and street culture, including a recent solo show examining the mythos of Scarface at LA's Honor Fraser Gallery. Right now his work can be found <a href="http://nomadicdivision.org/exhibition/mario-ybarra-jr/" target="_blank">on a billboard in Mobile, AL</a>, part of Los Angeles Nomadic Division's Manifest Destiny Project.</strong></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"> Mario Ybarra, Jr. is a LA-based visual and performance artist who has created room-sized installations all over the world and most recently right here in Chicago for the Art Institute of Chicago. This year Ybarra was also selected to participate in the Whitney Biennial. Beneath Ybarra's friendly demeanor lies a keen observer who is quick to expose visual rhymes in seemingly unrelated sources and to expand and build upon those connections until a cohesion is reached, or as he might say, a story. Ybarra graciously met with ArtSlant's Abraham Ritchie while putting the finishing touches on his installation at the Art Institute. Ever the raconteur, Ybarra talked about his native LA, baseball and King Arthur. Below is an excerpt of our conversation.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px auto; vertical-align: middle; display: block;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0018.JPG" alt="" /></span></p> <hr style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;" /> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>Abraham Richie: I think a lot of Chicagoans, and everyone, might want to know what the connection is between Southern Los Angeles, Catalina Island and Wrigley Field? It&rsquo;s kind of funny to think that Wrigley Field had a &ldquo;secret brother&rdquo; or something like that on the West Coast, because I am not sure that many people remember or know about this other Wrigley Field.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>Mario Ybarra, Jr.:</strong> Well that&rsquo;s where this whole project started for me. About a year ago Lisa Dorin, the Assistant Curator in the Contemporary Art Department, asked me if I wanted to come up with a proposal to do a Focus project here at the Art Institute of Chicago, and I said I would think about it a little bit. The way that I try to work is that I try to make some kind of relationship between a personal experience, or my personal understanding or knowledge and the place that I show. I don&rsquo;t like the idea of coming in and claiming an expertise on a place that I know nothing about. I&rsquo;ve found that doing something that starts in the realm of the personal and then taking it out to another place and trying to make relationships between those two places is the most successful tactic for me. . . I try to make bridges, so to speak.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">As a kid we would take trips out to Catalina Island, which is part of the Channel Islands, about 26 miles off the coast of Los Angeles. I remember part of the tour was the local history. They&rsquo;d always tell us that William Wrigley, Jr. owned Catalina Island and he had famous movie stars of the time going out there, like Clark Gable. His Chicago Cubs would go out and have their spring training there. The main town there is called Avalon and it gets its name from [Wrigley&rsquo;s] niece, who told [Wrigley] to name it that after the Avalon of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and those stories. So it has this mythological side of it too. It has real histories, the local histories, of it being owned by Wrigley, and it has this mythological history through the King Arthur association. My studio back in LA is on Avalon Boulevard and they named [the street] that because that&rsquo;s where the boats used to take people out to Avalon Harbor on the island. I started doing research about that, I&rsquo;m like a de facto historian, and I found that Wrigley, along with owning the island, owned this other Wrigley Field that was in South Central Los Angeles on Avalon and 66th street. So we had the Avalon Harbor on Catalina Island, my studio on Avalon, this field that Wrigley owned was also on Avalon, I just kept following the line. I thought I could take this story from Avalon, to Avalon Boulevard, to my studio, to Avalon were the stadium was, to all the way down Highway 66 to Chicago and the Art Institute.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I&rsquo;m figuring out ways to make these relationships between historical figures like William Wrigley, who was important to historical cities like Los Angeles and Chicago, and bring these stories together somehow, make bridges between the stories. Between what I know and my experiences and the places that I go.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Sports are the site of an obvious physical conflict and throughout the exhibit are interesting juxtapositions: the Mexican flag and the U.S. flag, the sword and the baseball bat, the fist of the Revolution and an image of a capitalist&rsquo;s private island. The history of the island reflects conflict as well, in the seventies it was occupied by the Brown Berets. How are sports, especially baseball, viewed both literally and metaphorically for this project, and the issues it raises?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Well I have always thought of the history of baseball as particularly related to the United States. It&rsquo;s billed as &ldquo;the American Game;&rdquo; it&rsquo;s not really played around the world at all other than some Latin American countries, like the Dominican Republic where all these new players are coming from and where young people are specifically groomed to be ball players. But in relation to the United States, and this comes from the different things that I have watched or read, the developments of social movements in the United States almost always came ten years later than in the ball game itself. Baseball has been very slow to change, and it hasn&rsquo;t changed really over the few centuries its been played here. But it still has these kind of leading edges. Let&rsquo;s take for example the story of integration and civil rights. Jackie Robinson starts playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950's and certain places, like schools, weren&rsquo;t integrated until the early sixties or late sixties. Baseball reflects a little bit in advance the kind of social movements that will happen in the United States.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Another thing that I think is very interesting in terms of conflict and it being a spectator sport, even though there are rival teams and most big cities have their own team, [there is a sense of unity]. Before professional baseball, each little town would have a team, even though there was a sense of rivalry or competition, the people were brought together as spectators to cheer on their team. So even though there was a site of conflict, it wasn&rsquo;t like it was Rome and gladiators were getting fed to lions [laughter]. There is a sense of sportsmanship [. . .]</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Related to issues of capitalism and revolution, or acts of civil disobedience, there is a sense of teams. I play off that with the posters, we have here a baseball with two bats crossed, but instead of a regular team you have the Brown Beret guys who tried to occupy the island in 1972 so they&rsquo;re like &ldquo;the team.&rdquo; The idea of &ldquo;the team&rdquo; is important too and the metaphor of a team. The idea that everyone has their positions but also act as a unit is very important and is a metaphor for myself.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="/userimages/3151/PICT0019.JPG" alt="" width="338" height="443" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: The idea of teams is also apparent in this wall of flags you have installed. What are the flags we have here?</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> This is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag. The flags are also stadium-esque, they always have them. The other thing, again about making relationships, is this is the state of Illinois&rsquo; flag, which has an eagle perched on a rock holding a shield and in his mouth is a banner. I thought that is very interesting, because over here is the Mexican flag, and again we have the eagle, this time perched on the cactus, and the snake in his mouth pretty much mimics the banner in the Illinois flag. Those kinds of aesthetic relationships and symbolic choices are very interesting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img style="margin: 10px; vertical-align: middle;" src="/userimages/3151/PICT0015.JPG" alt="" width="430" height="328" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong><em>AR: Even looking at the Illinois flag, that&rsquo;s more of an Aztec style eagle than a typical American-style eagle.</em></strong></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><strong>MY:</strong> Yeah. Those are the kinds of things I noticed in my visits to Chicago to prepare for this show, last year and earlier this year. I started seeing these kinds of relationships, like the Illinois flag&rsquo;s similarity to the flag of Mexico.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">This row of flags will start off with the U.S. flag, the state of Illinois flag, Chicago flag, Los Angeles flag, state of California flag, and the Mexican flag. We have these different relationships between these two places starting with the cities and then going to the states. We have the state of Mexico flag, even though California is not part of Mexico, it used to be part of Mexico, but it&rsquo;s related to the histories that we have here. Catalina Island was occupied by the Brown Berets because in the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which separated the Southwest from Mexico after the Mexican-American War, the island wasn&rsquo;t specifically mentioned. This is why the Brown Berets tried to occupy it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">There are interrelationships between the two places [Chicago and LA]. I thought that was another kind of metaphor for the show, in terms of Wrigley being this character and starting with him, saying no man is an island, or no city, or no country or land is an island. They&rsquo;re all in relationship, in context, to their neighbors. Imagine if we thought that we could do everything, under our own power, we&rsquo;d get ourselves in trouble. We can talk about it in relationship to land, in relationship to people. Or no island is a man, we could even switch it.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I wanted to draw these kinds of relationships together, one between Los Angeles and Chicago, two between Mexico and the States, three between baseball and mythology. Different symbolic orders, things like ships or bubble gum.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Mario Ybarra, Jr., Jenny Gheith and Lisa Dorin for their assistance in making this interview possible. Additional thanks to the Anna Helwing Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">-<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16747-abraham-ritchie?tab=REVIEWS"><span style="color: #000000;"> Abraham Ritchie</span></a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">(Top image: <strong>Mario Ybarra Jr</strong>, Manifest Destiny Project billboard, 2014; Courtesy of LAND. All other images are installation views of <em>Take Me Out. . . No Man Is an Island</em>, 2008; Courtesy of the Artist)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:52:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list F.A.T. Lab, F.A.T. GOLD Europe: Five Years of Free Art & Technology <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I crouched down, picked up a marker, and tried to remember the illegible scribble that used to be my &ldquo;tag&rdquo;: a gesture of sharp points and steady curves punctuated by a strategic line slashed through the whole inscription. In high school I would trace it onto book covers and notepads and think I was cool. It came to me eventually, the first delivery unsteady as I carefully considered which shapes fit where; in a second, more successful attempt, I let my arm do the work, confidently forging my mark in muscle memory.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140558-me_tagging.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Yours truly, tagging the graffiti wall, <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>; Photo: Ben Harvey.</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"> <br /></span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">I was in Eindhoven attending the Free Art and Technology (F.A.T.) Lab&rsquo;s exhibition <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>&nbsp;at <a href="http://www.mu.nl/" target="_blank">MU</a>, which ended in January. The show, which also took place in April last year at <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/venues/show/335-eyebeam?tab=VENUE" target="_blank">Eyebeam</a> in New York, was a sort of five-year anniversary round up of the Internet collective&rsquo;s practice. (F.A.T. Lab has now entered its seventh year, but the originally scheduled retrospective was put on hiatus in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.) But back to the incident at hand. Why, at an exhibition dedicated to a network ostensibly operating online, was I contributing my meager tag to a sanctioned graffiti wall?</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140845-installation_view1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.</span></div> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">The connection isn&rsquo;t so far fetched. Some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s twenty-five <a href="http://fffff.at/people/" target="_blank">members</a>&mdash;an international network of artists, engineers, scientists, lawyers, and musicians&mdash;are themselves graffiti artists. Their core values, which include &ldquo;spreading open source and free ideals into popular culture&rdquo; through DIY entrepreneurship, open source, and activism, have more than a few intersections with street art. On the one hand, art on the Internet can be viewed through a street lens: it can bypass normal distribution channels, appealing directly to viewers. Turning the comparison on its head, street art can be seen as a form of &ldquo;hack&rdquo;&mdash;an unendorsed appropriation of space, medium, or idea.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302135918-ideas_worth_spreading.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Evan Roth</strong><em>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank">Ideas Worth Spreading</a> (TED Talks)</em></em>, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In his recent book, <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/" target="_blank"><em>Viral Art</em></a>, <a href="http://blog.vandalog.com/" target="_blank">Vandalog</a> blogger RJ Rushmore looks at how the future of street art, with its focus on &ldquo;unmediated distribution,&rdquo; might find a natural home in the digital domain. He uses the term &ldquo;Viral Art&rdquo; to describe both shareable and invasive online practices that have an affinity, if not a direct evolutionary line, to street art (n.b. &ldquo;Viral&rdquo; here implies a level of approachability that excludes some older forms of Internet Art. The pioneering duo JODI, for example, have a great exhibition at <a href="http://www.showroommama.nl/nl/" target="_blank">Showroom MAMA</a> in Rotterdam right now that isn&rsquo;t particularly accessible or viral). F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">projects</a> don&rsquo;t always fall within the categories Rushmore outlines either&mdash;viewers may seek out content rather than encounter it serendipitously&mdash;yet they do open onto notions of self-dissemination, egalitarianism, activism, and anonymity. In fact, there are examples at MU of some of the <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/google-bombs/" target="_blank">very</a> <a href="http://viralart.vandalog.com/read/chapter/katsu-getting-up-in-digital-space/" target="_blank">works</a> discussed in Rushmore&rsquo;s text&mdash;namely, <a href="http://fffff.at/ideas-worth-spreading/" target="_blank"><em>Ideas Worth Spreading</em></a>, a mock-up TED Talk stage where visitors can record images of their own &ldquo;talk&rdquo; to share online, and <em>40,000 GML Tags</em>, a massive screen showcasing graffiti gestures in <a href="http://fffff.at/tag/gml/" target="_blank">GML</a>, or Graffiti Markup Language, &ldquo;a file format designed to be a universal structure for storing digitized graffiti motion data.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140719-kopyfamo.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Geraldine Juarez, <a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://fffff.at/kopyfamo-free-copyright/" target="_blank">Kopyfamo'</a>, watermark on mirror, at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Some F.A.T. Lab projects exist in the real world, others are strictly manifest online, and many straddle the two&mdash;that is, projects shaped in the real world and shared online. The MU exhibition, curated by <a href="http://www.lindsayhoward.net/" target="_blank">Lindsay Howard</a>, highlighted them all, offering documentation, online viewing stations, and even physical objects and artworks. Where <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> differed from the typical exhibition was that most works were not autonomous objects, but rather reproducible examples of a wider practice. Motivated viewers could (and can) recreate many of these works on the web or at home*, and the materials for some projects, like an <a href="http://fffff.at/obama-google-glass-prism-mask/" target="_blank">Obama PRISM mask</a>, were even available at the exhibition.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140049-free_universal_construction_kit.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view with&nbsp;<a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank"><em>Free Universal Construction Kit</em></a>, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">Good fun is always on the menu: in <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> there was a sub-genre of works touting the douchiness of Google Glass and its adopters, and a presentation of Greg Leuch&rsquo;s viral Add-on <a href="http://fffff.at/shaved-bieber/" target="_blank"><em>Shaved Bieber</em></a>, which censors all mentions of Justin Bieber online (earning Leuch more than a little hate mail from teenage fans). But some of the best and most shareable projects are greater than their capacity for the lulz. The <a href="http://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/" target="_blank">Free Universal Construction Kit</a> is a set of adapters that makes ten brands of children&rsquo;s construction sets, like Lego and K&rsquo;Nex, interoperable. It&rsquo;s eminently cool/novel/clever, but it also visualizes the ways in which childhood playthings ostensibly meant to spark creativity are limited by proprietary measures. The F.U.C.K. undermines these protective implements, removing barriers to cross-trademark creativity. The exhibition featured a complete set of adapters, a construction/play station, and a 3D printer that staff members kindly set to printing new pieces whenever visitors turned up. (3D models of the adapters in .STL format are available online for <a href="http://www.thingiverse.com/uck/designs" target="_blank">free download</a>.)</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140151-facebook_id_card.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/tag/fb-bureau/" target="_blank">Facebook Identity Card</a></em>, video presentation of ARTE Creative, <em><a href="http://fbbureau.com/" target="_blank">Social ID Bureau</a></em>, 2012,&nbsp;portrait of Mark Zuckerberg,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s perspective seems carefully poised between an irreverent techno-optimism (&ldquo;look at these cool things we can do!&rdquo;) and deep skepticism at the ways in which technologies can be regulated, marketed, and used for power and control. Given these positions, in which use of certain technologies seems self-evident, it&rsquo;s easy to forget that not everyone has access to the distributional paradigm shift that is the digital domain. Rushmore&rsquo;s account also overstates viral art&rsquo;s present accessibility: an encounter with this type of work is more likely to be spread within specific enclaves of Internet activity, with limiting factors being not geography, but usage. The case for &ldquo;unmediated&rdquo; distribution is further undermined by the cryptic algorithms used by Facebook and Google for post placement and search results&mdash;the very systems F.A.T. Lab exploits when images of their fake TED Talks turn up in search results. In a destabilizing twist, F.A.T. Lab often coopts the very technologies and systems it protests (or defends).</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302140313-skatekeyboard.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Tobias Leingruber</strong>, <em><a href="http://fffff.at/skatekeyboard/" target="_blank">Skatekeyboard</a></em>, keyboard attached to skateboard deck,&nbsp;at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span><em> <br /></em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">In a way, that&rsquo;s why it was such a treat to see some of F.A.T. Lab&rsquo;s works in physical form, Away From Keyboard as it were. <em>F.A.T. GOLD</em> did a great job of making works and ideas accessible to people who might not be tech-savvy or know what terms like &ldquo;net neutrality&rdquo; and &ldquo;Open Web&rdquo; mean. Or those who aren&rsquo;t necessarily ready to accept or understand this sort of practice as &ldquo;art.&rdquo; The exhibition was forward looking, but also rooted in the past and present&mdash;a thought-provoking bridge between time, technologies, and disciplines. Be it in a subway tunnel or on a homepage, a mark on the wall is a sign of presence; it can be a declaration of ego, of resistance. Or like my clumsy signature, it can be an affirmation, a &ldquo;Like&rdquo; or an &ldquo;upvote&rdquo;: I was here, with so many others, and I want to be counted.</span></p> <p><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20140303002936-compubody_interface.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Becky Stern</strong>,&nbsp;<em><em><a href="http://fffff.at/knitted-compubody-interface/" target="_blank">Knitted Compubody Interface</a>&nbsp;</em>(<a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop-Compubody-Sock/" target="_blank">knit one</a> yourself!), at MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; </em>&copy; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">*The MU exhibition ended on January 26th, but interested readers can see the projects <a href="http://fffff.at/category/projects/" target="_blank">online</a> or in the new <a href="http://fffff.at/the-fat-manual/" target="_blank"><em>F.A.T. Manual</em></a> (available for purchase or <a href="http://www.lulu.com/shop/domenico-quaranta-and-geraldine-ju%C3%A1rez/the-fat-manual/ebook/product-21251172.html" target="_blank">free download</a>), released on the occasion of the exhibition and the collective&rsquo;s five-year anniversary.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&mdash;Andrea Alessi</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #000000;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140302141000-installation_view3.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <div>&nbsp;<span style="font-size: x-small;"><em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">&nbsp;</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: x-small;">Image on top: <em>F.A.T. GOLD Europe</em>, installation view, MU | De Witte Dame, Eindhoven; Photo: Andrea Alessi.<span style="color: #000000;">]</span></span></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:40:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list http://www.artslant.com/mia/Articles/list