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Miami

Fredric Snitzer Gallery

Exhibition Detail
Futile
1540 NE Miami CT
Miami, Florida 33132


March 30th, 2012 - April 28th, 2012
Opening: 
March 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
 
MASCHINE, detail, Zhivago DuncanZhivago Duncan, MASCHINE, detail, 2012
© Courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery
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TAGS:  
sculpture, installation, dioramas
> DESCRIPTION

Fredric Snitzer Gallery is pleased to present the exhibition Futile by internationally recognized artist Zhivago Duncan, who is acclaimed for his intricate paintings, kinetic sculptures, and post-apocalyptic dioramas featured at CFA Berlin, Saatchi Gallery London and the Von der Heydt Museum, Wupertal Germany. Our exhibition of Zhivagoʼs boldly innovative work, MASCHINE, a man-made remote controlled spray painting machine, will open with a reception and performance by Zhivago Duncan at the gallery on Thursday, March 29, from 6-9pm and run from March 29 – April 28, 2012.

With MASCHINE, measuring 16 by 21 by 91⁄2 feet, Duncan channels painterly intuition through a remote controlled spray-painting machine. Rather than employing a trained professionalʼs exacting technique, Duncan captures the childʼs fully present and intuitive act of creation by using the machine to distance the painter from his calculated process. Surrendering control, the artist allows the machine to execute unpracticed marks onto the canvas, resulting in an array of sprayed strokes on a gesso white field. Duncanʼs contemporary response to the calculated, solid color planes of the colorfield painters, MASCHINE diagrams the progression of the machine's life and evokes the struggle between man and machine.

Zhivago Duncanʼs coupling of a painting machine and kinetic sculpture infuses MASCHINE with a Dadaist sensibility that is truly 21st century. Opposed to the painting machine, which is typically subordinate or even irrelevant to the paintings it "creates", MASCHINEʼs structure and function are as integral to the piece as its resulting art. Unlike most kinetic sculptures, MASCHINE has no direct-bound trajectories: despite the ostensibly repetitive motion, the spray can nozzles never cross the same path twice. Duncan, the sole inventor and creator of the machine, not only delights us with his simultaneously organic, instinctive and mechanical pieces but also challenges tradition with his uniquely erratic and unfamiliar creative process.


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