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Exhibition Detail
A space without a use
Curated by: Ariella Yedgar
27 Margaret Street
London W1W 8RY
United Kingdom


July 30th, 2011 - August 20th, 2011
Opening: 
July 30th, 2011 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
 
Lettiga II, Flavio FavelliFlavio Favelli, Lettiga II,
2005 , wood, marble, paint and floor tiles
© Courtesy Thomas Dane, London
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Whilst IBID PROJECTS are away for their summer break Anthea Hamilton has been given the keys  and will be occupying the building. Alongside this project are collaborations with Prem Sahib and Ariella Yedgar. 

Concurrent to her own activity, Hamilton invited Prem Sahib and Ariella Yedgar each to make presentations during her tenure at 35 Hoxton Square. Her ongoing dialogues with both have been instrumental to the entirety of the project. They each use a separate part of the building in a distinct way:

 

‘A space without a use’ is a group exhibition inspired by one room at IBID Projects.

I have several times tried to think of an apartment in which there would be a useless room, absolutely and intentionally useless. It wouldn’t be a junkroom, it wouldn’t be an extra bedroom, or a corridor, or a cubby-hole, or a corner. It would be a functionless space. It would serve for nothing, relate to nothing.

(Georges Perec, ‘A space without a use’, Species of Spaces, 1974)

 

‘A space without a use’ is an exhibition inspired by one room. Since 2009, IBID has 
occupied the recently vacated three-storey workshop of Kashket & Partners, former
hatters to the royal court of Russia and, more recently, appointed manufacturers of coats
and uniforms to Queen Elizabeth II. Remnants of the building’s former function
abound, from the faux wood-panelled showroom and clocking-in machine to the clothes
presses in the back room. Like a townhouse, each chamber has a different function and
character. There is a particular room that could be said to produce ‘a statute of the
inhabitable’; a useless room: part manager's office, part washroom, a metal door adorning
the chimney breast. It is long and narrow, and bathed in natural light. Inside this space,
the works in the exhibition emphasise the ‘a-functional’, and stand for what might have
populated what George Perec called an 'unattainable space'. They are themselves standins
or representations for things that have gone, are not yet possible or never spoken of.

Located at the room’s entrance, Anthea Hamilton’s double-sided moveable screen
alters the very nature of the exhibition space as it covers or uncovers the doorway,
depending on the activities taking place on the film set in the adjacent room.
Laure Prouvost longs literally to push the limits of habitable space, both in her
obscured video Deeper and the self-reflexive handwritten sign Ideally this wall would be
pushed 4 or 5 meter further. This presence of absence is felt both in Amalia Pica’s
postparty decorations (Final de Fiesta, or End of the Party) and in her homemade analogue

aerial, an Unintentional Monument soon to be superseded by its digital counterparts. In
another sense, seen through the prism of Jewish law, Liang & Liang’s discreet objects
speak of a state beyond use. Imbued with the history of Italian architecture and design,
Flavio Favelli’s hybrid objects possess a seductive elegance that belies their inherent
impracticality. Lettiga II (the name for an Ancient Roman portable sofa) is reminiscent of
a historical daybed, yet unusable as such, for it is inlaid with a black-and-white tile and
marble checquerboard, like a Mediterranean floor. Made of pieces of black glass Archivio
(Archive or Memory) is a mirror that obscures and distorts more than it reflects.
Curated by Ariella Yedgar.
Anthea Hamilton’s ‘Open Set’ runs concurrently.


I have several times tried to think of an apartment in which there would be a useless room,
absolutely and intentionally useless. It wouldn’t be a junkroom, it wouldn’t be an extra
bedroom,
or a corridor, or a cubby-hole, or a corner. It would be a functionless space.
It would serve for
nothing, relate to nothing.

For all my efforts, I found it impossible to follow this idea through to the end. Language
itself, seemingly, proved unsuited to describing this nothing, this void, as if we could only
speak
of what is full, useful and functional. […]
I imagined myself living in a vast apartment, so vast that I could never remember how
many rooms it had (I had known, in the old days, but had forgotten, and knew I was too
old now
to start again on such a complicated enumeration). All the rooms, expect one,
were used for
something. […]
(Georges Perec, ‘A space without a use’, Species of Spaces, 1974)

‘BIJOU’ hosted by PREM SAHIB

Saturday 13 August, 9.00pm.

Prem Sahib in conjunction with Anthea Hamilton and IBIDProjects is pleased to present a screening of Wakefield Poole’s 1972 classic ‘Bijou’, accompanied by a 77min live DJ set. Please note that this event has been prepared for a limited, adult audience for their information, education and entertainment and is strictly RSVP only.

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Anthea Hamilton (b.1978) is a British artist based in London. Recent solo shows and projects include ‘Anthea Hamilton’, IBID Projects, London (2009), ‘Turnhalle’, Kunstverein Freiburg, Freiburg (2009) and ‘Gymnasium’, Chisenhale Gallery, London (2008). Group shows include: ‘Savage Messiah’, Rob Tufnell Gallery, London (2011), ‘Small Collections’ Nottingham Contemporary (2009), and ‘Art Now: Strange Solution’, Tate Britain, London  (2008). Forthcoming shows and projects will be at Montehermoso Art Centre, Vitoria, Spain (2012) and London 2012 Olympic Posters, UK wide (2012).

Prem Sahib (b.1982) is a British artist based in London, currently studying at the Royal Academy. He holds a BA from the Slade School of Fine Art and graduated from University College London with an MA in Material and Visual Culture.  In 2010 he co-curated ‘Boyfriend Material’ with LIANGWEST. Group shows include: ‘Overzealous’, Guest Projects, London (2010), ‘Make Your Own Kaleidoscope’, Tricycle Gallery, City (2009), ‘Ctrl Alt Delete’, Gallery Priestor, Bratislava (2009) and ‘New Work by…’, Truck Art in arrangement with Art: Concept, Paris  (2008).

Ariella Yedgar is an independent curator and writer based in London. Recent and upcoming projects include: ‘In the Belly of the Whale’, Cartel, London (2011); Quad, Derby (2011); and Montehermoso, Vitoria, Spain (2012).


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