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London

Saatchi Gallery

Exhibition Detail
American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (but not Including the Wounded, nor the Iraqis nor the Afghans)
Duke of York's HQ
King's Road
London SW3 4SQ
United Kingdom


January 8th, 2010 - May 7th, 2010
 
American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (But Not Including the Wounded, nor the Iraqis nor the Afghans) , Emily PrinceEmily Prince,
American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (But Not Including the Wounded, nor the Iraqis nor the Afghans) ,
2004 - to present , Pencil on colour coated vellum. Project comprised of 5,213 drawings, Each image: 4 x 3 in. Dimensions variable
© Courtesy of the artist & Saatchi Gallery
> QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk
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chelsea, belgravia
EMAIL:  
press@saatchigallery.com
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> DESCRIPTION

Emily Prince's American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (but not Including the Wounded, nor the Iraqis nor the Afghans) is a tribute to every American soldier killed in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2004. Comprising of 5,158 drawings - one for every fallen soldier to date - this ongoing memorial project brings attention to the human cost of war, turning statistics back into portraits of real lives sacrificed on the field. Rendered in graphite pencil, each portrait appears on small coloured cards which correspond to the skin tone of soldiers, including details about their appearance, posture, and expression, and personal facts such as their name, age, and place of origin. American Servicemen and Women... pays homage to the individuals who have died and operates as a study of racial demographics for soldiers sent to fight. Previously hung in the shape of the US map, each portrait was pinned on to the soldier's hometown location; as the death toll rose, the installation at the Saatchi Gallery will now instead follow a chronological order, drawing attention to seemingly endless conflict.


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