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A prolific painter and printmaker closely related with the ‘Pop' Art Mov ement\, Patrick Caulfield is best known for his ironic\, iconic and vibrant depictions of modern life that reinvigorated traditional artistic genres s uch as still life. Stylistically\, Caulfield's work draws upon a simplified visual language recalling sign painting and graphic art\, depicting everyd ay objects using vibrant colour and streamlining their representation with a slick\, black line\; in doing so he transforms the banal in to emblems of mystery.

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He began his studies at Chelsea School of Art in 1956\, one ye ar below many of the originators of pop art\, and continued at the Royal Co llege of Art in the early 60s\, where he studied alongside David Hockney an d Allen Jones. His far-reaching influence can be seen in the practice of ar tists such as Julian Opie\, and the world of graphic design and illustratio n.

The exhibition at A lan Cristea will present a survey of Caulfield's prints\, ranging from his very first print\, Ruins (1964) to his last ever print\, Les Demoiselles d' Avignon vues de derrière (1999).

DTEND:20130713 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130605 GEO:51.5107952;-0.1418735 LOCATION:Alan Cristea Gallery - 31 Cork St\,31 Cork Street \nLondon\, W1S 3 NU SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Prints 1964 - 1999\, Patrick Caulfield UID:277955 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

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"I want the things that I make with this material to receive as much consideration as painting\, sculpture\, drawing\, photograp hy\, so I make an effort to enter them into public viewing places... to ele vate them further in the eyes of those who look at the art of our time".

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Sheila Hicks\, 'The Weaving of Art'\, a film directed by B ernard Monsigny\, Paris\, 1987

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Alison Jacques Gallery is delighted to present Sheila Hicks's first solo e xhibition in the UK. The artist describes her work as 'unbiased weaves'\, a phrase which not only reflects her fascination for language and poetry but her interest in classifications. Crucial components of Hicks's language in clude colour with embedded texture\, and structure that employs unexpected materials such as recycled and reappointed objects from hospitals\, rubber bands and porcupine quills. She fuses ancient textile traditions with the B auhaus principles of colour\, form and scale.

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Hicks also holds the firm belief that material be allowed to express its inherent nature. She avoids armatures\, preferring to stack and twist her chosen materials: bound ropes \, twisted skeins\, steel wrapped bundles\, intertwined lines of silk and c ascading linen. Hicks's 'Minimes'\, a series of small\, complex wall-based works\, reflect her memories and observations of places and moments lived\; whereas the large-scale monumental sculptures tackle complex architectural contexts often tumbling from ceilings or consuming the spaces in which the y inhabit.

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In the entrance and m ain gallery space Hicks will show several new works including Procession Temuco which cascades in a parade of earth-coloured linens: pearl\, luminous beige\, chestnut brown\, rust and deep red. In Cordes Sauvages\, wrapped linen chords spring out of a hive in a riot of colours\, disobeying any sem blance of order\, while twisted steel filaments and fractured medallions ar e woven and captured into the confines of natural linen canvasses in Acier I and II. In contrast to these\, Co mpass Arica is almost sedentary: chal k-white linen bricks are precariously stacked into a huge mound\, appearing to be hacked or carved\, piled into glacial shapes while a weathered iron compass stands nearby as a sentry measuring time and place. In the second s pace\, Hicks exhibits thirteen 'Minimes' indicating the importance of these intimate works\, which she has consistently made throughout her practice. 

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Sheila Hicks (born Hastings\, Nebraska in 1934) g raduated with a BFA and MFA from Yale University and has lived and worked i n Paris since 1964. Recent major exhibitions include the Sao Paulo Biennial curated by Luis Pérez-Oramas (2012) and a touring retrospective 'Sheila Hi cks: 50 Years'\, organised by the Addison Gallery\, Andover\, MA and the In stitute of Contemporary Art\, Philadelphia (2012). A survey show of the 'Mi nimes' travelled from the U(P)M Museum of Decorative Arts\, Prague to Museu m Boijmans Van Beuningen (2012). In 2010 Hicks was awarded the Smithsonian Archives of American Art Medal.  Her work is currently on show at MoMA\, Ne w York as part of the displays from the permanent collection. Other museum acquisitions include Centre Pompidou\, Paris\; Stedelijk Museum\, Amsterdam \; Metropolitan Museum\, New York\; Philadelphia Museum of Art\; and the Mu seum of Fine Arts\, Boston.

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To vi ew a poem written by Luis Pérez-Oramas inspired by the work of Sheila Hicks \, please click here.

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F or more images of Sheila Hicks' works\, please click here .

DTEND:20130629 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130524 GEO:51.5175225;-0.1366877 LOCATION:Alison Jacques Gallery\,16-18 Berners Street \nLondon\, W1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pêcher dans la Rivière\, Sheila Hicks UID:275511 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5175225;-0.1366877 LOCATION:Alison Jacques Gallery\,16-18 Berners Street \nLondon\, W1 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Pêcher dans la Rivière\, Sheila Hicks UID:275512 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Artists John Lawrence and Roy Voss have conceived the exhibi tion 'For What It Is' for ANDOR. Developed through collaborative processes\ , the exhibition features new works by both artists including sculptural in stallations and gallery texts informed and influenced by ANDOR's invitation \, and by the specific architecture of the gallery spaces.

John Lawrence lives and works in London. He graduated from the Royal Academy Sch ools in 2010. Selected recent exhibitions include Original Carbon Copy\, FO LD Gallery\, London\, and SCREENING\, Standpoint Gallery\, London. In 2012 Lawrence also curated the video exhibition AFTER/HOURS/DROP/BOX at ANDOR.
Roy Voss lives and works in London and is represented by Matt's G allery\, London. Recent exhibitions include Cast Matt's Gallery &\; Dils ton Grove\, London\; The London Open\, Whitechapel Gallery\; Switch at Balt ic 39\, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

The exhibition 'For What It Is' is kindly supported by Arts Council England as part of a series of gallery pro jects supporting artistic collaboration and the production of new artwork a t ANDOR.

DTEND:20130629 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130601 GEO:51.5312557;-0.0689591 LOCATION:ANDOR\,237 Hackney Road \nLondon\, E2 8NA SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:For What It Is\, John Lawrence\, Roy Voss UID:278358 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:210000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5312557;-0.0689591 LOCATION:ANDOR\,237 Hackney Road \nLondon\, E2 8NA SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:For What It Is\, John Lawrence\, Roy Voss UID:278359 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

A major exhibition of works by Leon Kossoff focusing on the artist’s dra wings and paintings of London will go on show at Annely Juda Fine Art from< strong> 8 May - 6 July 2013.

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The exhibition is curated by Andrea Rose\, Director\, Visual Art\, British Council and curat or of Kossoff’s Venice Biennale exhibition in 1995.

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London is the city w here Leon Kossoff was born and grew up\, and which he has mined with extrao rdinary invention throughout his working life.

The exhibition includes over 90 drawings and 10 p aintings\, many rarely shown before\, and spanning the artist’s career: fro m City bomb sites of the early 1950’s to recent drawings of Arnold Circus\, a community of redbrick buildings off Shoreditch High Street that were Lon don’s most radical experiment in social housing when they were unveiled in 1900. Kossoff’s London opens up between these two poles to reveal his feel for quickness and change: buildings on the point of demolition\; the railwa y network as the process of electrification begins\; swimming pools swarmin g with children\; streets\; schools\; grand London churches that serve succ essive waves of immigrants (Huguenot\, Jewish\, Bengali)\; stations\; back gardens\, and trains - overground and underground - carrying millions of Lo ndoners in and out of the city\, day after day\, as the city transforms its elf around them.

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Kossoff has said: “London seems to be in my bloodstream . It is always moving - the skies\, the streets\, the buildings. The people who walk past me when I draw have become part of my life."
The exhibition provides a unique oppo rtunity to see Kossoff’s drawings and related paintings in such a historic sweep\, and to inhabit the London that he has made peculiarly his own.

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T he exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.< /p>\n

Foll owing its exhibition at Annely Juda Fine Art\, it will travel to Galerie Le long\, Paris\; Mitchell-Innes and Nash\, New York and L.A. Louver\, Los Ang eles.

DTEND:20130706 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130508 GEO:51.514238;-0.1457835 LOCATION:Annely Juda Fine Art\,23 Dering Street \nLondon\, W1s 1AW SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:London Landscapes\, Leon Kossoff UID:272909 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Over ten years ago\, Andrew Mansfield made a series of exquisite paintin gs derived from images in Karl Blossfeldt’s Art Forms in Nature. Blo ssfeldt’s work\, first published in 1928\, made a profound impact on the de velopment of the photographic image in the 20 century and the current magni ficent exhibition at The Whitechapel Gallery demonstrates the astonishing b eauty of these images and their remarkable union of Arts and Crafts ornamen tation with a new modernist formalist aesthetic. These works sit as happily with Moholy Nagy as they do with Owen Jones.

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In a review of the first p ublication of Blossfeldt’s images\, Walter Benjamin commented that ‘Ever y calyx\, every leaf confronts us with pictorial essentials which range thr ough all stages of creation: metamorphosis in Nature has the final word.’ Mansfield’s paintings take up the challenge implied by this observation\ , absorbing the image into the paint to the point where the one is the gene sis of the other\; a blurred precision where the sweep of the brush stroke drags the paint over the plant’s silhouette and surface becomes form. The c aptured nature idealized in Blossfeldt becomes in Mansfield’s work the blur red evocation of that natural form conjured out of the paint whilst still r etaining the photo-mechanical aesthetic of the source. ‘The difference b etween technology and magic’ (Benjamin). This is the first time this se ries of paintings has been exhibited.

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As a further dimension to our asse mbly of closely observed flora\, for one week only we are screening a class ic film by Stanley Brakhage\, The Garden of Earthly Delights (1981). As Brakhage said: ‘At the time I made The Garden\, I was very annoyed w ith Hieronymus Bosch’s painting of the same name\, which envisions nature a s puffy and sweet\, while the humans are suffering these torments. After al l\, nature suffers as well. As a plant winds itself around\, in its despera te reach for sunlight\, it undergoes its own torments. We are not the only ones in the world.’ Blossfeldt’s plants are specimens under the microsc ope\, laid out for visual dissection (the Surrealists were attracted by the morbid sadism with which Blossfeldt decapitates his flowers). In Brakhage’ s collaged film a panic struck hoard of foliage scrambles for life imprison ed in the projector’s beam. The pathological stillness of Blossfeldt is com plemented by the agitation of Brakhage. Mansfield’s hand-made paint surface mediates their condition.

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< strong>A Garden of Delights: Andrew Mansfield\, Karl Blossfeldt\, Stan Brak hage - An Encounter

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22 May - 30 June (Brakhage 3-15 June only)

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DTEND:20130630 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130522 GEO:51.5145236;-0.1371166 LOCATION:Anthony Reynolds Gallery\,60 Great Marlborough Street \nLondon\, W 1F 7BG SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:A Garden of Delights\, Andrew Mansfield\, Karl Blossfeldt\, Stan Br akhage UID:277983 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

One Submission | Two shows | Two selectors

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 2 x Opening Receptions: Sat 4 Ma y 3-6pm and Sat 8 June 3-6pm 2013

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Selected by Paul Noble 2-26 May | Selected by Ceri Hand 6-30 June 2013

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See link below to see whic h are artists were selected by which selector.  Some were selected by both and will be in both exhibitions.

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A.P.T has launched t he fifth Creekside Open competition for visual artists living or working in the UK. Two exhibitions are selected from one open submission. 

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The anonymous selection will be made independently by Paul Noble for th e first exhibition in May 2013 and Ceri Hand for the second exhibition in J une 2013.  Both exhibitions will be held at the A.P.T Gallery on Creekside\ , Deptford\, London SE8 4SA.

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A.P.T set up the Creekside Open in 200 5 to celebrate its tenth anniversary and since its inception the Creekside Open has become one of London's foremost open competitions for visual artis ts. 

2005 | Eileen Cooper RA and David Tremlett (May exhibition)

2007 | Matthew Collings &\; Emma Biggs (May exhibition) and Victoria Miro (June exhibition)

2009 | Jenni Lomax (May exhibiti on) and Mark Wallinger (June exhibition)

2011 | Dexter Dalwood ( May exhibition) and Phyllida Barlow (June exhibition)

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http://www.creeksideopen.org/apt.htm

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Opening Hours: Thursday to Sunday from 12noon to 5pm

DTEND:20130630 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130502 GEO:51.4770661;-0.021002 LOCATION:APT Gallery\,Harold Wharf 6 Creekside\, Deptford\nLondon\, SE8 4SA SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Creekside Open 2013\, Cos Ahmet\, Andrea Artz\, Helen Ashton\, ATOI - Amy Thomas and Oliver Irvine\, MARTA BAKST\, Aglaé Bassens\, Dominic Bea ttie\, Jessica Blackwood\, Allan Boston\, Shane Bradford\, Denise Bryan\, L indsey Bull\, Richard J Butler\, John Butterworth\, Laura Bygrave\, Emmanue lle Camus\, Jane Cattlin\, CHRISTOPHER CLACK\, Paul Cole\, Stephen Cooper\, Gemma Cossey\, Emma Cousin\, Daniel Crews-Chubb\, Alex Crocker\, Blue Curr y\, Nicholas Dedics\, AIDAN DOHERTY\, Claire Dorsett\, Richard Ducker\, And rew Ekins\, James Epps\, Luci Eyers\, Hayley Field\, Craig Fisher\, Gordon Flemons\, Grant Foster\, Mariano Gana\, Natsue Golden\, Stewart Gough\, Hel en Grant\, Luey Graves\, Kate Groobey\, Neil Haas\, julia hamilton\, Aly He lyer\, Lesley Hilling\, Nicky Hirst\, Andrew Hladky\, Luke Humphries\, Bruc e Ingram\, Benjamin Jenner\, Frank Jennings\, Andrew Kerr\, Caroline King\, Amanda Knight\, Alec Kronacker\, Tamiko Kusuhara\, Simon Leahy-Clark\, Cat erina Lewis\, Lana Locke\, David Lucas\, Lorrain Mailer\, E J Major\, enzo marra\, MASLEN & MEHRA\, Jan May\, Oliver McConnie\, Andrew Miller\, Stuart Moller\, Ebrel Moore\, Eleanor Moreton\, Ange Mukeza\, Amy Owen\, Nicholas Owens\, Matthew Pagett\, Jitka Palmer\, Kyu Eun Park\, James Parkinson\, D avid Pike\, Ruth Piper\, Justin Piperger\, Tom Pitt\, Emily Platzer\, Nick Powell\, JASMINE PRADISSITTO\, Katherine Reekie\, Reka Ritt\, dai roberts\, Tania Robertson\, Carole Romaya\, Sam Rountree Williams\, Michal Rubin\, M elanie Russell\, Anna Salamon\, Lizi Sanchez\, Margot Sanders\, Ed Saye\, A ndrew Seto\, Fay Shin\, Claire Smith\, Sophia Starling\, Christy Symington MRBS\, Shubba Taparia\, Mia Taylor\, Ernesto Torres Alarcon\, Rebecca Townr ow\, Stella Tripp\, Vanesa van Vlerken\, Pepe Vives\, Robin von Einsiedel\, David R Watson\, Gethin Wavel\, Ashley West\, Paul Westcombe\, Tisna Weste rhof\, Caleb Whitefield\, Lucy Whitford\, Sarah Kate Wilson\, Damian Wojcik \, Diana Wolzak\, Robert Worley\, Eric Wright\, William Wright\, Yi Xin Yan \, Guimi You\, Eve Ackroyd\, Tony Antrobus\, Miriam Austin\, Juan Bolivar\, John Brennan\, Agnes Calf\, Melanie Carvalho\, Cordelia Cembrowicz\, Georg e Charman\, Martyn Cross\, Mark Davey\, Rose Davey\, Anita Delaney\, Adam D ix\, Geoff Dunlop\, Dexter Dymoke\, Annabel Elgar\, Rita Evans\, Cadi Froeh lich\, Sofie Grevelius\, Hannah Hewetson\, Vicky Hodgson\, emilia izquierdo \, Paul R Jones\, Robin Kirsten\, Maria Konstanse Bruun\, Alex Lawler\, Bet han Lloyd Worthington\, Alex March\, Nigel Massey\, Georgina McNamara\, Cla re Mitten\, Gorka Mohamed\, Doireann Ni Ghrioghair\, Alejandro Ospina\, Ali cja Rogalska\, Rachel Russell\, Miho Sato\, Lisa Selby\, Elizabeth Shuck\, David Brian Smith\, Christine Stark\, Callum Sutch\, David Theobald\, Abbi Torrance\, Jack West\, Hannah Wooll\, Isabel Yellin\, Fantich and Young UID:274588 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:180000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:150000 GEO:51.4770661;-0.021002 LOCATION:APT Gallery\,Harold Wharf 6 Creekside\, Deptford\nLondon\, SE8 4SA SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Creekside Open 2013\, Eve Ackroyd\, Cos Ahmet\, Ernesto Torres Alar con\, Tony Antrobus\, Andrea Artz\, Helen Ashton\, Miriam Austin\, MARTA BA KST\, Aglaé Bassens\, Dominic Beattie\, Jessica Blackwood\, Juan Bolivar\, Allan Boston\, Shane Bradford\, John Brennan\, Maria Konstanse Bruun\, Deni se Bryan\, Lindsey Bull\, Richard J Butler\, John Butterworth\, Laura Bygra ve\, Agnes Calf\, Emmanuelle Camus\, Melanie Carvalho\, Jane Cattlin\, Cord elia Cembrowicz\, George Charman\, CHRISTOPHER CLACK\, Paul Cole\, Stephen Cooper\, Gemma Cossey\, Emma Cousin\, Daniel Crews-Chubb\, Alex Crocker\, M artyn Cross\, Blue Curry\, Mark Davey\, Rose Davey\, Nicholas Dedics\, Anit a Delaney\, Adam Dix\, AIDAN DOHERTY\, Claire Dorsett\, Richard Ducker\, Ge off Dunlop\, Dexter Dymoke\, Andrew Ekins\, Annabel Elgar\, James Epps\, Ri ta Evans\, Luci Eyers\, Hayley Field\, Craig Fisher\, Gordon Flemons\, Gran t Foster\, Cadi Froehlich\, Mariano Gana\, Doireann Ni Ghrioghair\, Natsue Golden\, Stewart Gough\, Helen Grant\, Luey Graves\, Sofie Grevelius\, Kate Groobey\, Neil Haas\, julia hamilton\, Aly Helyer\, Hannah Hewetson\, Lesl ey Hilling\, Nicky Hirst\, Andrew Hladky\, Vicky Hodgson\, Luke Humphries\, Bruce Ingram\, ATOI - Amy Thomas and Oliver Irvine\, emilia izquierdo\, Be njamin Jenner\, Frank Jennings\, Paul R Jones\, Andrew Kerr\, Caroline King \, Robin Kirsten\, Amanda Knight\, Alec Kronacker\, Tamiko Kusuhara\, Alex Lawler\, Simon Leahy-Clark\, Caterina Lewis\, Lana Locke\, David Lucas\, Lo rrain Mailer\, E J Major\, Alex March\, enzo marra\, Nigel Massey\, Jan May \, Oliver McConnie\, Georgina McNamara\, MASLEN & MEHRA\, Andrew Miller\, C lare Mitten\, Gorka Mohamed\, Stuart Moller\, Ebrel Moore\, Eleanor Moreton \, Ange Mukeza\, Alejandro Ospina\, Amy Owen\, Nicholas Owens\, Matthew Pag ett\, Jitka Palmer\, Kyu Eun Park\, James Parkinson\, David Pike\, Ruth Pip er\, Justin Piperger\, Tom Pitt\, Emily Platzer\, Nick Powell\, JASMINE PRA DISSITTO\, Katherine Reekie\, Reka Ritt\, dai roberts\, Tania Robertson\, A licja Rogalska\, Carole Romaya\, Michal Rubin\, Melanie Russell\, Rachel Ru ssell\, Anna Salamon\, Lizi Sanchez\, Margot Sanders\, Miho Sato\, Ed Saye\ , Lisa Selby\, Andrew Seto\, Fay Shin\, Elizabeth Shuck\, Claire Smith\, Da vid Brian Smith\, Christine Stark\, Sophia Starling\, Callum Sutch\, Christ y Symington MRBS\, Shubba Taparia\, Mia Taylor\, David Theobald\, Abbi Torr ance\, Rebecca Townrow\, Stella Tripp\, Vanesa van Vlerken\, Pepe Vives\, R obin von Einsiedel\, David R Watson\, Gethin Wavel\, Ashley West\, Jack Wes t\, Paul Westcombe\, Tisna Westerhof\, Caleb Whitefield\, Lucy Whitford\, S am Rountree Williams\, Sarah Kate Wilson\, Damian Wojcik\, Diana Wolzak\, H annah Wooll\, Robert Worley\, Bethan Lloyd Worthington\, Eric Wright\, Will iam Wright\, Yi Xin Yan\, Isabel Yellin\, Guimi You\, Fantich and Young UID:274589 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

"The world is beautiful\, but has a disease called man". Fri edrich Nietzsche

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In a jolting new exhibition\, artists Steele and Frimpong (aka Freeakpong) collaborate and join together in a savage-like force\, forming an al liance against humanity. Their somewhat violent works comment upon everythi ng they believe is wrong with the world (and that's a lot). They seem to ha te us all - white\, black\, religious\, atheist\, homosexual\, bisexual\, h eterosexual\; relationships\, families\, babies...every single form of huma nity\, every single one of us\, and whatever category we might fall under\, they despise.

Both artists expose the worst in us\, the audien ce. Both together as an artistic team and as individual artists\, they desc ribe how wrong we are\, and remind us of our felonies and misdeeds\, of our immorality and our ignorance. Nothing is ever good\; negativity is inescap able and flows through every part of us into the deepest\, darkest corners of ourselves\, polluting our souls.

Freeakpong 's child-like watercolour drawings explicitly confront and expose our inner most fears\, darkest thoughts and corrupt fantasies. Sexism\, hatred and po litical error are especially prevalent themes and play important roles with in her obsessively detailed work. We are often caught off-guard as a specta tor and pushed into feeling like the heroine character of the painting: def enceless\, hopeless and naked\, void of any excuses or answers - we have al l done wrong.
Steele's work\, on the other hand\, is n't a representation of fantastical occurrences. He creates first-hand scen es within space\, where the space is his canvas. He creates tangible experi ences with which the audience can interact with\, drawing them in\, to beco me part of them almost instantaneously. Ever wanted to be a porn star or a suicide bomber?! His central installation will decimate everything we belie ve in by freezing a moment in time\; he glorifies a bomb and kneels apprais ingly to the bomber\, inviting you to do the same.

"This is the pit of my soul. I spit my thoughts and in feelings onto the canvas. It's di sgusting to see". Freeakpong

"I am terrified that I exist. I fil l my work with violence and anger as a distraction". Joseph Steele    

www.arbeit.org.uk
www.getonthewall.com
www.nicolafrimpong. co.uk

DTEND:20130623 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130604 GEO:51.5428731;-0.0228743 LOCATION:arebyte gallery\,4 White Post Lane Queens Yard\nLondon\, E9 5EN SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Steele vs Freeakpong\, JOSEPH STEELE\, Nicola Frimpong UID:274852 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:210000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5428731;-0.0228743 LOCATION:arebyte gallery\,4 White Post Lane Queens Yard\nLondon\, E9 5EN SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Steele vs Freeakpong\, Nicola Frimpong\, JOSEPH STEELE UID:274853 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Berlin is a radically transformed city from the one Margaret Hun ter came to know when she moved there in 1985. She witnessed the h eady moments in 1990 when in a triumphant celebration of the defeat of comm unism\, the Wall was pulled down\, and she joined 119 international artists to mark this precise moment of liberation with paintings\, on a specific s ection of the previously inaccessible eastern side of the wall. Joint Ventu re portrays two heads\, the two Germanies\, lying side by side surrounded b y small figures responding to their new situation.

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The East Side Gallery \, as it came to be known\, is now an international memorial for freedom\, 1.3 km long and to commemorate Germany’s unification and a twentieth annive rsary\, a renovation was completed in 2009 to international acclaim.

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Rec onnected in this way with an earlier work\, Hunter has recreated a version of her Wall painting\, this time on large sheets of paper. It is the focus of her new show\, which includes sculptures in wood and metal and a series of vibrant drawings and richly coloured and textured panel paintings.

DTEND:20130621 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130515 GEO:51.5167654;-0.1378973 LOCATION:Art First Contemporary Art\,21 Eastcastle Street \nLondon\, W1 8DD SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Stepping Places\, Margaret Hunter UID:274260 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5167654;-0.1378973 LOCATION:Art First Contemporary Art\,21 Eastcastle Street \nLondon\, W1 8DD SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Stepping Places\, Margaret Hunter UID:274261 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

This exhibition of intimate works by Will Maclean is a variation of the School of Art History’s exhibition at St Andrew’s Universi ty in November 2012. In the accompanying catalogue\, Tom Norman’s illuminat ing essay places the two groups of new small works into the mainstream cont ext of Maclean’s overall project.

The Post Card Series and The Lantern-Slide Series incorporate e lements of layering and collage\, and both the cards and the slides are in themselves culturally defining ‘totems’ as Normand explains\, deriving from Maclean’s childhood. Whereas the postcards refer to travel in a seafaring community\, the lantern slides reference aspects of the war at sea during t he period 1939–45.

‘In reflecting upon this exhibition of small works\, it is important to re cognise the immense scale of the vision that is presented’\, Normand r emarks. ‘Maclean has explored\, in an evocative visual language\, the everyday narratives of the Gaelic co mmunity\; the life and work of a people\, the stories of a diaspora\, the s pirit-world of a margianalised community. In consequence the works in this exhibition both look and feel like reliquaries\, holding the relics and tri butes of an entire culture.

DTEND:20130621 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130515 GEO:51.5167654;-0.1378973 LOCATION:Art First Contemporary Art\,21 Eastcastle Street \nLondon\, W1 8DD SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Reliquaries\, Will Maclean UID:274262 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5167654;-0.1378973 LOCATION:Art First Contemporary Art\,21 Eastcastle Street \nLondon\, W1 8DD SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Reliquaries\, Will Maclean UID:274263 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

One of China's most distinguished artists\, resident in Pari s since 1986\, Ma Desheng was one of the founder members of The Star Group  which included fellow artists Huang Rui\, Wang Keping\, Qu Leilei and Ai We iwei.   

Selected Works 1978–2013 is a mini retrospective giving a broad overview of his paintings including his sensuous ink works from th e late 1970s as well as his large almost overwhelming paintings of rocks fr om 2007-2012 and his more recent nudes. His boldly graphic wood block print s from the late 70s-early 80s\, a set of which were recently acquired by th e British Museum\, will also feature in the show.

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As the filmmaker and contributing editor to ArtAsiaPacific\, Andrew Cohen writes in his essa y to the 84 page catalogue accompanying the exhibition:

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Cool an d calm on the outside\, fiery-spirited on the inside\, the radical Beijing- born artist Ma Desheng is as gentle a man as his paintings of rocks are har d edged. Despite his relaxed exterior\, Ma’s art is forged through decades of oppression and strenuous commitment to freedom of expression. Like his r ocks\, beneath the smooth surface simmer passion and pent-up emotions that belie a rebellious nature ready to explode.

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DTEND:20130725 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130607 GEO:51.5196545;-0.1463925 LOCATION:Asia House\,63 New Cavendish street \nLondon\, London W1G 7LP SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Selected Works 1978–2013\, Ma Desheng UID:279448 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5196545;-0.1463925 LOCATION:Asia House\,63 New Cavendish street \nLondon\, London W1G 7LP SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Selected Works 1978–2013\, Ma Desheng UID:279449 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Developed over a three-year period\, Geoffrey Farmer’s  The Surgeon and the Photographer will be shown for the first time in its completed form for its UK premiere. 

The work consists of hundreds of puppet-like figures\, co mposed of images cut from old books and magazines mounted onto fabric forms \, and is accompanied by a new film commission. His work blends the collage and assemblage traditions of Hannah Höch and Robert Rauschenberg\, the ele ment of chance employed by John Cage and Merce Cunningham\, and an animist perspective from Pacific Northwest Coast cultures.

DTEND:20130728 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130328 GEO:51.5198644;-0.0916989 LOCATION:Barbican Art Gallery\,Silk Street \nLondon\, EC2Y 8DS SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Surgeon and the Photographer\, Geoffrey Farmer UID:277080 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Bartha Contemporary is delighted to announce German art ist Henrik Eiben’s (b. 1975\, Tokyo) first UK solo exhibit ion entitled ‘Now’s the Time’. The exhibition wil l feature new sculptures as well as abstract paintings and works on paper. Please join us for the private view on Thursday May 16th from 6.30 – 8.30PM . Exhibition continues until June 22th 2013.

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For his first solo-exhibiti on at Bartha Contemporary\, Henrik Eiben developed a suite of new works\, w hich reflect on the architecture of the gallery space and reference several key works\, which were recently shown at the Hamburger Kunsthalle and Kuns traum Alexander Bürkle in Freiburg.
An elegant elongated suspended metal sculpture dominates the front sp ace. It’s airy linear composition navigates the room and implies both direc tion and volume. Unlike Alexander Calder’s dynamic Mobiles this static work \, a metal line drawn in space\, conveys a notion of movement. It is this s elf-contradicting quality that signifies many of Eiben’s works. Influenced by an American minimalist aesthetic the artist’s installations\, works on p aper as well as sculptures evolve intuitively from a reduced geometric voca bulary. Often further matched by the use of unorthodox materials\, mixing f abrics ranging from cheap fake leather to cashmere felts or knitted wool wi th everyday construction materials as well as applying a variety of paintin g techniques. The works pristine appearance is not undermined by this surpr ising mix of materials but rather plays with pre-conceived attributes of cr aftsmanship and inherent materialistic values.

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Many of Eiben’s pieces at first appear as clearly defined abstract art-works\, however on closer ins pection their often skilfully hidden sub-context reveals a broader and more nuanced approach to abstraction. The clever interaction between distinctly different mediums as well as highly contrasting colour schemes allow Eiben an artistic freedom\, which result in exceptionally engaging works of art.

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Henrik Eiben lives and works in Hamburg\, Germany but was born in Tokyo in 1975.  He studied in USA\, The Netherlands and Germany and has exhibite d across Europe and the US.

DTEND:20130622 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130517 GEO:51.5166342;-0.1415935 LOCATION:Bartha Contemporary\,25 Margaret Street \nLondon\, W1W 8RX SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Now's the Time\, Henrik Eiben UID:274264 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:203000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:183000 GEO:51.5166342;-0.1415935 LOCATION:Bartha Contemporary\,25 Margaret Street \nLondon\, W1W 8RX SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Now's the Time\, Henrik Eiben UID:274265 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

Ben Brown Fine Arts presents a major solo exhibition of Gavin Turk’s highly influential works to coincide with th e long - awaited publication of the first monograph of the artist. Entitled The Years\, to signify over two decades of remarkable output with deep er r esonances throughout art history\, the exhibition features a number of wo rks that have never been shown before in the UK\, as well as new pieces ins pired by the distinct methods and styles of two 20th Century Italian master s: Lucio Fontana and Michelangelo Pistoletto.

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Turk’s artworks frequentl y bear his own name or image but also refer to the works of artists before him. He paradoxically began his career with a blue heritage plaque announci ng his own demise and posthumous recognition\, but his subsequent work has drawn on art - historical icons to play with the idea of various reincarnat ions. Among the most recognisable on display is Triple Pop Black and Wh ite (2011)\, a variant o n Turk’s famous waxwork Pop (1993)\, in which the artist portrays himself as Sid Vicious in the gunslinging pos e of Warhol’s ‘ Elvis ’ . In this latest work\, Turk’s appropriation of War hol comes full circle with the use of the same silkscreen process. By contr ast\, Oscar II (2000)\, a curious bust of Turk with a shotgun nos e and bulging eggs for eyes\, draws on the figure in Magritte’s L’ellip se .

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Symbolising life\, creation and originality\, eggs recur in n ew works inspired by Fontana’s buchi (‘holes’) and tagli (‘slashes’) series . Turk’s ovoid canvases are punctured with painstaking p recision to spell his initials \, as part of his on - going exploration of process and authorship. Similarly\, b roken egg shells fixed to a canvas sp ell out Turk’s signature in One Thousand\, Two Hundred and Thirty - Fou r Eggs (1997). O n the surface the work is a statem ent of artistic id entity\, but it also acknowledges its debt to Belgian Surrealist Marcel Bro odthaers and the textured white canvasses of Manzoni’s ‘Achrome’ paintings.

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 At the exhibition Turk will also premier e a new work inspired by the defining ‘Mirror Paintings’ Pistoletto began in the Sixties. Pistolett o’s Rubbish (2013) cleverly fuses the highly polished surfaces associa ted with the Italian master with a silkscreened im age of Turk’s own iconic bi n bag sculptures. This latest work adds another layer of illusion to th e artist’s subversion of the rules of commercial art. Turk pioneered a new British trompe l’oeil when he first began casting bronze sculptures that he then painted to look like ephemera or urban waste. While Refuse (2012) is an exquisitely detailed sculpture that resembles a bin bag\, Habitat (Z ingy Purple) (2004) and Burnt Out (2008) make provocative ref erence s to sleeping rough.

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< span style="font-size: small\;">Over the past 25 years\, Turk has solidifie d a reputation for challenging notions of value and the myth of artistic in tegrity. Th e exhibition at Ben Brown Fine Arts runs from 26 April to 14 Ju ne 2013 and surveys with acuity over two decades of i nfluential a nd signi ficant work . It will accompany a monograph of the artist published by Pres tel on 26 April . Featuring numerous colour illustrations\, this impressive vol ume includes Turk’s major works since the early 1990s\, an original es say by Iain Sinclair \, contex tu alizing the artist’s work under t he umbr ella of psycho - geography – including the impact of London on Turk’s perso nae – and an introductory essay by Judith Collins.

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Gavin Turk was born 1967 in Guildford and went to the Royal College of Art in London. In his MA exhibition show\, Cave (1991)\, he presented a w hitewashed studio space containing only a blue heritage plaque commemoratin g his presence. Though refused a degree\, his subs equent notoriety attract ed the attention of Charles Saatchi and he became part of a loosely associa ted group known as the ‘Young British Artists’ (YBAs). He has since been re presented by many major galleries throughout the world and is known for pio neering many forms of contemporary British sculpture now taken for granted\ , including the painted bronze\, the waxwork\, the recycled art - historica l icon and the use of rubbish in art. He was recently commissioned to make several public sculptures including Nail (2011) \, a 12 - metre sc ulpture next to St Paul’s Cathedral in the City of London.

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Gavin Turk Monograph Launch: Thursday 25 April\, 5-6pm

DTEND:20130614 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130426 GEO:51.5124884;-0.1461211 LOCATION:Ben Brown Fine Arts Ltd\,12 Brook's Mews \nLondon\, W1K 4DG SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Years\, Gavin Turk UID:267954 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:170000 GEO:51.5124884;-0.1461211 LOCATION:Ben Brown Fine Arts Ltd\,12 Brook's Mews \nLondon\, W1K 4DG SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:The Years\, Gavin Turk UID:272108 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

"Regardless of the medium\, whether it is in Eliot or Picasso or a TV th irty-second advertisement\, I think collage is the twentieth century's grea test creative innovation"
-Rob ert Motherwell

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Bernard Jacobson Gallery is proud to ann ounce its forthcoming exhibition \;Robert Motherwell: Colla ge\, the most comprehensive exhibition of Motherwell's collag es ever to be held. The exhibition will run from 5 June - 27 July\, and wil l coincide with the Peggy Guggenheim Collection's upcoming exhibition \ ;Robert Motherwell: The Early Collages\, which opens concurrently with the Venice Biennale in late May. In acknowledgment of this revolutiona ry 20th century invention\, these two exhibitions survey its most important American practitioner.

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In 1943 three young American painters\, Jackson Pollock\, William Baziotes and Robert Motherwell\, were approached by Peggy Guggenheim and asked to produce work for the first exhibition of collages in the United States\, at her Art of This Century gallery in New York. Moth erwell was only in his 20s - the youngest of the three painters - but his p owerful new experiments were exhibited alongside the great European moderni sts including Picasso\, Ernst\, Miro\, Braque\, and Arp. As he recounts\, " Pollock and I didn't really know much about collage except that you pasted things on. We were both intimidated by the project\, so we decided to try i t together." Pollock and Baziotes soon abandoned the form\, but Motherwell discovered a passion and aptitude for the medium which spurred him to conti nue with it throughout his career. As he says\, "I felt a magical release. I took to it\, as they say\, as a duck to water."

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Motherwell's major inn ovation with the form is the torn paper edge - a technique that reflected h is love of working with paper\, and his commitment to automatism. Further\, he worked on a much larger scale than his European counterparts had attemp ted\, and Americanized the medium to reflect his views that "in Europe...pe ople take it much more for granted that certain things are for certain peop le. But in America\, people believe everything is for everyone\, including abstract act." To this end\, Motherwell believed collage to be "a necessary invention"\, in which "one has the whole world and human history as subjec t matter\, juxtaposition inconceivable before modern times."

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While the u pcoming Guggenheim show focuses on his 1940s collages\, the exhibition at B ernard Jacobson Gallery presents over thirty works from the 1950s up until 1991\, the year of his death. In his 1960s collages\, Motherwell incorporat ed "everyday" fragments\, echoing Schwitters' merz technique developed 40 y ears earlier. Collages such as \;Bowes &\; Bowes\, Cambridge (1966)\, which includes a torn mailing wrapper from the Cambridge booksel lers\, and \;La Cuisiniere \;(1967)\, featuring a shopping bag from a Madison Avenue kitchen supply store\, are examples of this.&nbs p\;

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In the 1970s and 80s\, Motherwell developed entire series of collage s. The collage elements in these later works were often cut and torn fragme nts of proofs of his own prints that he embellished with gestural brushstro kes and painted compositions\, and are demonstrative of his work with the t orn edge. This technique of incorporating print fragments occurs in works s uch as \;French Revolution Bicentennial No. 5 \;(1987)\,&n bsp\;Irish Book(1989)\, and the haunting \;Night Dream \;(1988).

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Other highlights from the exhibition include the earlies t work from 1959\, \;Sun and Sea\;Collaged Wall VI \;< /em>(1986)\, which incorporates sheet music from lifelong friend and compos er Arthur Berger's Trio for Guitar\, Violin and Piano (1972)\; \;U. S. Art\, New York\, NY \;(1962)\, which Motherwell originally inte nded as being part of his Beside the Sea series before adding the collage e lement\; and \;Open\, Bolton Landing \;(1969)\, which serv ed as a model for his elegy to the sculptor David Smith\, \;Open No . 121 (Bolton Landing Elegy) \;now in the collection of the Tate.< /span>

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Robert Motherwell continues the trajectory of modern European visionarie s Picasso\, Braque\, Schwitters\, and Matisse\, and his advancements with A merican collage are unrivalled. As Robert Hughes suggests\, in making colla ge Motherwell became "the only artist since Matisse in the fifties to alter significantly the syntax of this quintessentially modernist medium."

DTEND:20130830 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130605 GEO:51.510442;-0.1416912 LOCATION:Bernard Jacobson Gallery\,6 Cork Street \nLondon\, W1S 3NX SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collage \, Robert Motherwell UID:277240 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.510442;-0.1416912 LOCATION:Bernard Jacobson Gallery\,6 Cork Street \nLondon\, W1S 3NX SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Collage \, Robert Motherwell UID:279807 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:
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"I wish only to indicate…that \, as the language or vocabulary of photography has been extended\, the emp hasis of meaning has shifted-shifted from what the world looks like to what we feel about the world and what we want the world to mean."

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-  Aaron Siskind

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Photography has lately become an unstable term\, a fluid category that describes a wide variety of practice s between pure image (infinitely reproducible and untethered from its role as an index to the real world of things) and pure material (monoprints made without camera or negative). In Sheree Hovsepian's work the collapse of ph otography as a categorical definition is not a crisis\, but a binding of th e eye and the body - of likeness (what the world looks like) to sensation ( what we feel about the world).

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There are several distinc t yet interrelated aspects of Hovsepian's practice: the positive\, color ne gative worked on in multiple exposures\; the black and white photogram\; an d the cast bronzes fabricated from pieced-together wax. Each of these serie s has a physical\, performative element linked to direct action or what Car tier-Bresson called "the decisive moment\," the simultaneous recognition of an event and the precise organization of its forms.

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The photograms begin as shapes that Hovsepian cuts quickly from large sheets o f construction paper that are then used to mask areas of light-sensitive pa per during exposure to artificial light. Fox Talbot (1800-1877) called the unique photogram\, which cannot be reprinted\, "photogenic drawing\," but r ather than using it to mechanically perfect the eye\, Moholy-Nagy (1895-194 6) developed it as a means to explore light itself as a plastic medium\, "p ainting-with-light." Hovsepian's "Domes" respond to this aspect of the tech nique\, registering light passing through a swift\, arcing incision that sh e makes with the full length of her arm. The immediacy of her movements bui lds an intentional link to gestural abstraction and the title of the series \, "Haptic Wonders\," further emphasizes the importance of touch and the bo dy to the process and scale of the work.

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The largest pri nts in this grouping are subject to the limits of the artist's reach and th e endurance of the medium. At this size\, the paper buckles in the darkroom and resists flattening. These are some of the small visual clues that we a re looking at a photograph rather than a drawing. The thin\, animated curve s and monolithic apertures are made first by Hovsepian's blade\, but we are aware from the quality of the line and the blurred edges that this is an a fterimage\, an interpretation of the artist's spontaneous movements in the studio.

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Hovsepian's austere appropriation of a gesture more commonly associa ted with abstract painting brings with it an acute awareness of time and th e contingency of experience. As a medium\, photography is often awarded a p rivileged relation to time\, especially to the past tense: memory\, history and death. Hovsepian's gestures\, on the other hand\, invoke a continuous present. Photography such as this\, constantly under negotiation\, finds af filiation and affinity with other forms of mark-making.

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In contrast\, Hovsep ian's "Sleight of Hand" series may seem to rely on a relatively rigid set o f rules. Hovsepian photographs an object against the studio wall\, and then moves it between exposures\, creating a graduated final image of increasin g color saturation. But the subject here\, like the "Haptic Wonders\," is t he effect of light and time in space\, a "light-chronology." Although these two modes of her practice have a minimal\, bare quality\, her abstractions are utilitarian rather than pious. Setting aside modernist abstract painti ng's refusal of language and representation\, Hovsepian invites her viewer toward identification and enjoyment.

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We find evidence of her acceptance in t he ambiguous title "Domes" - a simultaneous reference to a basic geometric shape and comical\, almost anachronistic\, slang for the head. Hovsepian no t only embraces these language games and visual associations\, she treats t hem as guides\, following them suggestively to the next step. When she reco gnized the shapes from her photograms as strangely mute\, mysterious heads\ , she projected them into three-dimensions\, fully realized in bronze. For something so solid\, these bronze forms remain as provisional as the rest o f her work - sculpted from wax scavenged from another artist's studio floor \, the material melts away in the lost-wax casting process\, leaving just t his single impression of its existence.

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In each of these projects\, we see H ovsepian aware of how inescapable the eye is from the body in space. The en tire exhibition explores the mutability between two kinds of photography\, one an extension of vision and a kind of scientific manipulation of experie nce\, the other rooted in irreducible\, physical relationships. That these experiments find themselves suddenly expressed in three-dimensions is unsur prising. Moholy-Nagy wrote\, "Real spatial experiences rest in simultaneous interpenetration of inside and outside\, above and beneath\, on the in and out flowing of space relationships\, on the often invisible play of forces present in the materials."

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Text by Rachel Furnari

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DTEND:20130629 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130508 GEO:51.5090703;-0.143644 LOCATION:Bischoff/Weiss\,14a Hay Hill \nLondon\, W1J 8NZ SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Domes\, Sheree Hovsepian UID:272910 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:210000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5090703;-0.143644 LOCATION:Bischoff/Weiss\,14a Hay Hill \nLondon\, W1J 8NZ SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Domes\, Sheree Hovsepian UID:272911 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DESCRIPTION:

The Directors of Blain|Southern are delighted to present Fru strated Actions and Futile Gestures\, a museum-scale exhibiti on of nine new works by the internationally renowned video artist B ill Viola. Created between 2012 and 2013\, both on location and in the artist’s studio in Southern California\, the exhibition presents three distinct bodies of works\; the Frustrated Actions\, the Mirag e and the Water Portraits series. Through these works\, Viola engages with complex aspects of human experience\, including mortality\, t ransience and our persistent\, yet ultimately futile attempts to truly and objectively understand ourselves and the meaning of our brief lives. 

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The Chapel of Frustrated Actions and Futile Gestures (2013)\, from w hich the exhibition derives its name\, incorporates a grid of nine horizont al screens that depict figures perpetually repeating various activities. Pr esented in real time\, we witness a man pulling a cart up a hill\, only to let it roll back down again as soon as he reaches the top – a palpable refe rence to Albert Camus’ The Myth of Sisyphus\, a philosophical essa y based on the Greek myth\, which calls into question the significance of o ur daily accomplishments. In another screen\, we observe a man continuously digging and refilling a hole in the ground at night.  The central panel sh ows a glass bowl being filled with water from a jug\, which slowly seeps ou t through a crack in the glass until it has emptied – at which point the bo wl is then refilled. Every action is repeated in ritualistic fashion\, grad ually and purposefully\, rendering each unsuccessful endeavour all the more poignant. 

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The three works that complete the Frustrated Actions series engage with ideas relating to the subconscious\, the perception of ‘self’ and the ephemerality of life. In Man Searching for Immortality/ Woman Searching for Eternity (2013) a man and woman in the later stage s of their lives emerge out of the darkness\, pausing to explore their own naked bodies with torches\, a daily routine search for disease and decay. T he figures are projected onto two seven-foot high black granite slabs\, sug gestive of tombstones\, which evoke a sense of impending mortality. The dip tych\, Man with His Soul (2013) presents us with a man sitting on a chair\, waiting\, though we will never discover exactly what he is waitin g for. The left hand screen – in high-definition video – depicts his consci ous self\, while the right – shot in grainy black and white – portrays his soul\, his inner being. Thus\, the viewer is confronted with a juxtapositio n of physical and psychological realities. Angel at the Door (2013 ) continues to explore this theme of the ‘inner self’\; a cycle develops wh ereby a man hears a knocking at the door\, but each time he opens it\, he f inds no one there – only a dark void. When he opens the door for the final time\, however\, there is an explosion\, revealing a mirror image of himsel f – offering a thought-provoking insight into man’s inevitable and unavoida ble confrontation wtih his ‘inner self’.

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Four works from the Mirage series\, Ancestors (2012)\, The Encounter (2012)\, < em>Walking on the Edge (2012) and Inner Passage (2013)\, were recorded at El Mirage – a six-mile long\, dry lake bed in the Mojave Deser t. Presented in horizontal and vertical formats\, they portray figures from a distance through the distorting haze of a mirage\, becoming increasingly visible as they walk towards the camera. Shot in high definition and slowe d down\, the vast arid landscape takes centre stage\, as the travellers nav igate the strong winds and the searing heat of the desert.

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The Dream ers (2013) consists of seven individual screens\, which depict underwa ter portraits of people who appear to be sleeping. Presented in the gallery on the lower-ground floor\, and accompanied by the gentle sounds of water\ , the viewer is led to feel as if they themselves are submerged with these figures. In this spiritual\, immersive subterranean environment\, ultimate interpretation is left for the viewer to define\, through the lens of their own experiences.

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For over forty years\, Viola’s practice has continuous ly transformed our understanding of video as an artform\, expanding its tec hnological scope and historical relevance. He draws from a range of influen ces\, including Eastern and Western art and the spiritual traditions of Zen Buddhism\, Islamic Sufism and Christian mysticism\, to express fundamental truths underpinning human existence. Bill Viola’s profound visual language captures and expresses thoughts\, feelings and memories that have a univer sal appeal\, offering viewers a vehicle for the exploration and contemplati on of their own circumstances and emotions.

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The exhibition will be accom panied by a fully illustrated catalogue\, with an introduction by Blain|Sou thern’s Head Curator and Director of Exhibitions\, Mario Codognato\, and ed ited by Kira Perov.

DTEND:20130727 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:20130605 GEO:51.5138885;-0.1433184 LOCATION:Blain|Southern - London Hanover Square\,4 Hanover Square \nLondon \, W1S 1BP SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Frustrated Actions and Futile Gestures\, Bill Viola UID:275513 END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTEND:200000 DTSTAMP:20140730T091516 DTSTART:180000 GEO:51.5138885;-0.1433184 LOCATION:Blain|Southern - London Hanover Square\,4 Hanover Square \nLondon \, W1S 1BP SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY:Frustrated Actions and Futile Gestures\, Bill Viola UID:275514 END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR