ArtSlant - Closing soon http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/show en-us 40 Paul Wenham-Clarke - St Martin-in-the-Fields - January 9th, 2013 - February 28th, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">THE WESTWAY: A Portrait of a Community documents the lives of those living beneath and in the shadow of the A40 flyover in west London. Built in the 1960s, the road was bulldozed through the heart of North Kensington taking with it 600 homes and prompting over a 1000 people to leave the community. Today, this monumental structure towers over homes, businesses, sports facilities and educational centres, as local communities seek to make the most of the negative space of the road’s supporting arches and the circumstances in which they find themselves. Together, these communities make up a varied whole; a community which itself is rich in social, spiritual, and cultural diversity. As such, THE WESTWAY is a snapshot of modern, multicultural Britain in a time of change www.wenhamclarke.com</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Please note</strong>: The Gallery will be closing early to the public on the following days during the exhibition:  28 February – 4.00pm</span></p> Mon, 18 Feb 2013 15:26:26 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Louisa Fairclough - Contemporary Art Society - February 13th, 2013 - March 1st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;">The Contemporary Art Society recently purchased a moving image work, Bore Song (2011) by British artist Louisa Fairclough for Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museum. The piece relates to a spectacular Gloucestershire phenomenon — the Severn Bore, a large tidal wave that surges up the River Severn — and will be shown with a companion work at Camden Arts Centre during February, with related drawings on display at the Contemporary Art Society.<br /><br />Louisa Fairclough will be in conversation with Cherry Smyth at 59 Central Street on 21 February at 7pm.</p> Thu, 28 Feb 2013 18:45:58 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Paula Rego - Marlborough Fine Art - January 25th, 2013 - March 1st, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Directors of Marlborough Fine Art are delighted to announce their forthcoming exhibition of new paintings and hand coloured etchings by <strong>Paula Rego</strong>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The centre piece of the exhibition will be a series of six large pastels inspired by Alexandre Herculano’s 19th century story, <em>A Dama Pé-de-Cabra, romance de um jogral</em> (The Goat-Footed Lady, romance of a minstrel), a powerful and captivating tale originally dating back to the XIth Century. This series was shown in collaboration with Adriana Molder (b. 1975) at the Casa das Historias Paula Rego in Cascais from July – October 2012.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Paula Rego has said that her art deals with “the beautiful grotesque”—a contradiction in terms, a synthesis of opposites, at once ironic and absurd--but the figures in her visual re-telling of “Dama per de cabre” however obviously grotesque some are—distorted into unnatural ugliness, so that they seem irreparably monstrous—remain all-too-human, all the more so because they are emotionally unsavoury not simply physically strange. The Goat-Feet Lady is the devil in female form—her goat-feet betray her devilishness, and confirm that the devil is a hybrid of animal and human, strange but after all not so strange, for the devil is also a hybrid of male and female. Like the equally absurd Sphinx, the Goat-Feet Lady is a surreal creature who lives in the dark grotto of the unconscious, but comes to light in dreams.</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">The eight new paintings that Paula has produced are inspired by different subjects including the poem<em> Do you remember an Inn, Miranda?</em> by Hilaire Belloc and Pierrot from the Commedia dell’Arte.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Paula will also be exhibiting for the first time one of the sculptural maquettes,<em> The Playground</em>, that she constructs to create her pastels.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A fully illustrated catalogue of the exhibition will be published with an introduction by Donald Kuspitt.</span></p> Sat, 19 Jan 2013 14:18:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list David Austen, Ian Breakwell, Rudolf Fila, Peter Gallo, Leon Golub, Andrew Mansfield, Jon Thompson, Amikam Toren, Mark Wallinger - Anthony Reynolds Gallery - January 18th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 Mon, 04 Feb 2013 16:55:56 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list - Art14 London - March 1st, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 <p>Art13 London is proud to host a number of high-profile panel discussions that consider the role of collecting and the rise of private museums in a globalised art world. Both discussions take place in the London Room at the Fair. Seats can be reserved prior to the talks at the Information Desk at the entrance of the Fair or by emailing pati@artfairslondon.com. Talks are free of charge but an admission ticket is required to enter the Fair.</p> <p><strong>Friday 1 March </strong></p> <p><strong></strong>3pm, London Room<br /> <strong>‘The China Moment’</strong></p> <p>‘The China Moment’ examines the emergence of Chinese collectors on the art world stage. Whilst this is a noted phenomenon, there has been little analysis of the challenges of being a collector in China and also the role that their collections have to play in the absence of state modern and contemporary art museums. This ground-breaking panel discussion features four of China’s most prominent collectors. Simultaneous translation facilities will be provided.</p> <p><strong>Dai Zhikang</strong> is the founder and owner of the Himalayas Art Museum, one of China’s first private museums. The Himalayas Art Museum aims to lead the campaign to provide world-class exhibition spaces for experimental artists inside China and worldwide. The museum is part of grand development that includes a hotel, a shopping mall and a theatre. Dai writes books and blogs about art and also collects rare ancient scrolls and sculptures.</p> <p><strong>Li Bing</strong> is a leading collector who began collecting over twenty years ago. He has become a strong voice in promoting contemporary art within China through the Art Collectors Club in Beijing. He is the founder and owner of the Beijing He Jing Yuan Art Museum. The collector’s club invites collectors from across the country to come and meet foreign collectors, artists, journalists and curators to facilitate further thinking about contemporary art in China.</p> <p><strong>Liu Wenjin </strong>is the founder and owner of the Yellow River Arts Centre, the largest and most important arts institution in North-West China which is currently being built. Upon completion, the eighty hectare Yellow River Arts Centre will incorporate multifaceted facilities for research, education and leisure.<br /> The museum’s collection of Western and Chinese works is set to highlight the development of Chinese oil painting through cross-cultural exchange of Western and Chinese painting techniques and styles.</p> <p><strong>Wang Wei</strong> is the co-founder and co-owner of the Long Museum, China (along with Liu Yiqian). The 10,000 square metre museum, which opened in December 2012, houses a wide-ranging collection of Chinese contemporary art including artists such as Fang Lijun and Zhou Chunya, Mao-era “Red Classics” from 1949-1979 and traditional works and ancient artifacts with standout works like the one by Emperor Song Huizong (1082-1135).</p> <p>The discussion will be chaired by <strong>Philip Dodd</strong>, Chair of the Made in China UK, Director of China Art Foundation (UK) and Chair of the Art13 London Advisory Board.</p> <p><strong>Saturday 2 March </strong></p> <p>2pm, London Room<br /> <strong>‘The Global Rise of the Private Museum’</strong></p> <p>As state support for modern and contemporary art is cut back across the world, private museums will play an increasing role in the display of art. This panel discussion asks five prominent international collectors to talk about the evolution of their private museums and the role that each has to play in the local art ecology.</p> <p><strong>Dr Oei Hong Djien </strong>is the owner of the OHD Museum in Indonesia with over 2000 artworks in his collection that spans modern and contemporary Indonesian art. He is a well-known art collector, curator, and advisor to The National Art Gallery, Singapore. Dr. Oei Hong Djien started his collections in early 1970s. OHD Museum aims to inspire Indonesia’s younger generations to appreciate, enjoy, treasure and preserve Indonesian art.</p> <p><strong>Don and Mera Rubell </strong>are the founders and owners of the Rubell Family Collection, one of the world’s most renowned collections of contemporary art. Founded in 1964, the Collection has been located in Miami since 1993 and regularly lends works to institutional shows around the word. In addition to displaying internationally established artists, the Rubell Family Collection actively acquires, exhibits and champions emerging artists working at the forefront of contemporary art.</p> <p><strong>Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo </strong>has been collected art since 1992 and founded the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin in 1995 with Francesco Bonami as Artistic Director. The Fondazione’s main aim is to encourage a greater understanding of contemporary art and to showcase international trends through the exhibition programme and an in-depth series of educational activities and conferences as well as courses of contemporary art. The Fondazione is a place where art lovers and experts can come together to refresh their knowledge.</p> <p><strong>Ramin Salsali</strong> is founder of the Salsali Private Museum (SPM), the first private museum for contemporary art in the region. Ramin Salsali started his collection at the age of 21 whilst still a student. For the last 12 years, his vision to share his passion for art with the public has been moving force in establishing a museum for Middle Eastern art in Dubai, the Salsali Private Museum (SPM). The museum opened in 2011 and is the first private museum in the region with over 600 works currently in it.</p> <p>The discussion will be chaired by <strong>Georgina Adam</strong>, Editor at large, The Art Newspaper and columnist, The Financial Times</p> Sun, 17 Feb 2013 03:37:17 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Group Show - Gimpel Fils Gallery - January 17th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 Mon, 07 Jan 2013 08:35:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Robert Adams - Gimpel Fils Gallery - January 17th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 Mon, 07 Jan 2013 08:35:30 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Matt Bryans - Kate MacGarry - January 18th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Kate MacGarry</strong> is pleased to announce <strong>Matt Bryans</strong>' fourth solo exhibition at the gallery. The show consists of an installation of hand-carved bricks and erased newspaper landscapes.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Bryans has recently transferred his process of erasure from newspaper cuttings to brick. As with his newspaper works he has taken a pre-existing, familiar material and eroded the surface, revealing new forms. Bryans has not only used a local material but also one that is heavily associated with Englishness. Bricks are the foundation of England's built environment and were the cornerstone of the industrial revolution. The old lives of these bricks, found in bombsites and other places in and around London, are carved into an odd, organic demeanour. Freed from their mortar they are sculpted into something that appears to have been eroded by nature.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The newspaper collages are Bryans' take on the ancient English theme of landscape. The artist has described them as "annihilated landscapes". They are a profusion of archetypal and empty spaces suffused with a melancholy presence. In Bryans' work a poetic transformation takes place, an alchemy with contemporary and banal found materials, producing something suggestive of worlds that exist in some legendary or fictional past tense. Examining his works there is a sense that we are penetrating the surface of things, getting under the skin of the world. His hallucinatory newspaper landscapes also seem to reflect political issues buried in our contemporary landscape.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Matt Bryans, born 1977 in Croydon, England, lives and works in Norway.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Selected exhibitions: <em>The Future's Not What It Used To Be</em>, Newlyn Art Gallery Cornwall, 2013 and Chapter Gallery, Cardiff, 2012; <em>Matt Bryans</em>, Stavanger Arts Centre, Norway, 2012; <em>Breaking the Land</em>, SFCamerawork San Fransisco, 2011;<em> Matt Bryans </em>- <em>Hibernation</em>, Martin van Zomeren, Amsterdam, 2010; <em>Matt Bryans</em>, Jack Hanley Gallery (presented by Kate Fowle) 2009; <em>Matt Bryans</em>, Kate MacGarry 2008;<em>Recent Acquisitions</em>, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, <em>Matt Bryans</em>, Atlanta Center of Contemporary Art, Atlanta,<em> Collage Effect</em>, 1301PE, Los Angeles, 2006;<em>Pin-up</em>, Tate Modern, London, <em>Picture This!</em>, MMD Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle, Belgium, 2005.</span></p> Tue, 08 Jan 2013 10:19:47 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list David Jablonowski - Max Wigram Gallery - January 16th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Max Wigram Gallery</strong> is proud to announce the opening of <strong><em>Corporate Foresight</em></strong>, the first solo exhibition </span><span style="font-size: small;">with <strong>David Jablonowski</strong>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Comprising sculptural elements constructed from a variety of objects and materials derived from the </span><span style="font-size: small;">equipment of information technology, the exhibition will consist of mixed media installations displayed </span><span style="font-size: small;">on the walls and floors of the gallery space, resulting in one unified environment. The works are </span><span style="font-size: small;">physical manifestations of Jablonowski’s inquiry into the potential of communication in visual culture, </span><span style="font-size: small;">looking at how information can be translated into form through the media. He is fascinated with the </span><span style="font-size: small;">political significance of materials, expressed for instance by their association with branding. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jablonowski’s sculptures are both objects and surfaces. The combination of reflective and transparent </span><span style="font-size: small;">materials, such as the aluminium and Plexiglas used in <em>Untitled</em>, provides at once a ‘body’, and also a </span><span style="font-size: small;">surface, that multiplies the space by reflecting it, and becomes a screen on which information is </span><span style="font-size: small;">displayed in the form of video. By treating reproductive technologies, such as scanners and offset </span><span style="font-size: small;">printing plates, as objects, embedded in the works, Jablonowski’s sculptures are able to present a unity, </span><span style="font-size: small;">they are finite entities.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The artist combines uniquely shaped carbon fiber sculptural elements with the materials and </span><span style="font-size: small;">instruments of reproductive technologies, paralleling the history of sculpture with the history of media. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The formal qualities of the works embody the contrast between digital and analogue, between 2 and 3 </span><span style="font-size: small;">dimension (or the no-dimension of the digital), ‘non-materiality’ and materiality. With <em>Screenshots </em></span><span style="font-size: small;"><em>(detail) I and II</em>, for instance, the greasy traces left by fingers on tablet displays, suggest use and not </span><span style="font-size: small;">function, pointing at the inherent paradox of the disembodied interface of digital information media by </span><span style="font-size: small;">revealing its specific haptic qualities. Jablonowski reminds us that we (subconsciously) interact with the </span><span style="font-size: small;">material itself, not the information transmitted by the equipment.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">The presence of aromatic spice powders on the work <em>Corporate Foresight</em> provides an olfactory element, </span><span style="font-size: small;">while the ‘soundtrack’ taken from found footage, which tells the history of product development, </span><span style="font-size: small;">becomes a unifying aural factor to the exhibition. The tactile qualities of the equipment he presents is </span><span style="font-size: small;">also commented upon by the high resolution images of cherries projected onto a large multi-media </span><span style="font-size: small;">sculpture installation.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jablonowski creates a feedback system, where the works and the viewers engage in a continuous </span><span style="font-size: small;">transmission of information. Such information, though, is limited to the sheer communicative potential </span><span style="font-size: small;">of the materials themselves: there is no directly discernible message. Jablonowski seeks to explore all the </span><span style="font-size: small;">options, and all the possibilities of the material.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>David Jablonowski</strong> (b. 1982, Bochum, Germany) lives and works in Amsterdam. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In the last year, David Jablonowski has been involved in many international projects. </span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">His work is currently presented in Blue Greens at the Westfälischer Kunstverein in Münster, where </span><span style="font-size: small;">Jablonowski has placed new sculptures and installations in the botanical gardens. Jablonowski also held </span><span style="font-size: small;">two major solo shows in 2011. At Dallas Contemporary he exhibited several installations resulting in </span><span style="font-size: small;">one all encompassing environment, under the title <em>Many to Many (Stone Carving High Performance)</em>. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">For his project at Bloomberg Space in London, titled Comma 30, Jablonowski transformed the gallery </span><span style="font-size: small;">through a series of specially commissioned sculptures and film. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Previous exhibitions include: <em>Material Kontingenz</em>, SMBA, Amsterdam (2012); <em>The Global </em></span><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Contemporary Art Worlds After 1989</em>, ZKM, Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe </span><span style="font-size: small;">(2011); <em>Monumentalism—History and National Identity</em> in Contemporary Art, Stedelijk Museum, </span><span style="font-size: small;">Amsterdam (2010); and <em>After Architects</em>, Kunsthalle Basel (2010). Jablonowski has completed </span><span style="font-size: small;">residencies at De Ateliers, Amsterdam and ISCP New York.</span></p> Tue, 04 Dec 2012 14:30:02 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Pavel Büchler - Max Wigram Gallery - January 16th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Max Wigram Gallery</strong> is delighted to announce the opening of <strong>Pavel Büchler</strong>’s first show in the \\BACK GALLERY\\, a new expansion of the current exhibition space at 106 New Bond Street.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A distinguished artist and professor, Büchler recently received the prestigious Paul Hamlyn Foundation Award for Artists. Here we present for the first time a series of <em>Acid and Nicotine </em>drawings.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The drawings are made with car battery acid, which is processed using the heat from the artist’s cigarette. Each carefully crafted image represents the hand of a cultural icon from recent literary and cinematic history. Referencing the fading iconography of the smoker in culture, the works also reflect the artist’s long-term interest in process and materials.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In this selection, the artist’s choices are revealing. We are presented with iconic personalities from 20<sup>th</sup> Century art theory and philosophy, which reflect Büchler’s own influences and interests. Sartre, Barthes, Burroughs – these portraits carry a personal note, particularly in the work entitled <em>The Greatest Minds of My Generation;</em> but they also resonate more widely, to discuss ideas of art education and theory, and its broader interpretation by practitioners.</span></p> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 18:03:07 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list John Kørner - Victoria Miro Gallery - January 19th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Victoria Miro</strong> is pleased to announce the gallery's third exhibition by the Danish artist<strong> John Kørner</strong>. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Fallen Fruit from Frisland</em> comprises a series of new paintings presented as part of an installation that features a carpeted floor, rising wave-like against one wall, and a simple wooden boat made by the artist's great-grandfather</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">The exhibition title refers to Frisia, a coastal area that extends across the Netherlands and Germany to the Danish border. Until the construction of canals during the 1920s and 1930s, this low-lying district, also known as Friesland, Fryslân and Frisland, was flooded for much of the year. In this mutable landscape locals made their farms on top of artificial hills, using boats to travel from field to field. It was here that Kørner's great-grandfather plied his trade as a boat builder. Many decades later the artist discovered that a small wooden rowing boat made by his ancestor had been preserved in a museum. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Transported to London, the ancestral vessel functions as a poetic anchor point for paintings that ask us to consider our relationship to the ever-shifting rhythms, flows and tides of the natural world. On an initial viewing, Kørner's new paintings appear to mark a departure from previous works, such as the fields of hazard yellow populated by abstract and figurative forms in 2006 Problems, or War Problems, the 2008 series in which Kørner addressed head-on the human cost of Denmark's involvement in the 'War on Terror' in Afghanistan.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Smaller in scale, and often deceptively simple in composition, these works seem to spring from a quieter tradition of landscape painting. Canals, trees, houses… it may seem as if these scenes were born in the sleepy ateliers of Northern Europe in the seventeenth century. Yet, in Kørner's hands, landscape becomes an arena rich with transhistorical currents, almost hallucinatory with interminglings of the personal and philosophical. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Kørner's work always encourages musings that can seem contradictory: on the one hand it is apparently open and easy-going, on the other it seems freighted with awkward questions about representation, knowledge, faith. The work speaks unquestionably to our own moment.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Here, the artist's signature use of watered-down acrylics chimes with the work's elemental subject matter. In several images rural idylls appear vulnerable against washes of paint that, like the seas surrounding Frisland, threaten to overwhelm them. In other paintings figurative elements seem about to dissolve or bleed into one another, like spectres or memories, or else they co-exist with forms that, functioning along the lines of the ovals and curlicues in earlier Problem paintings, appear as a kind of pre-thought.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">In two canal paintings, these nascent forms proliferate, agitating the sky. We might think of them as viral, perhaps even architectural, their cell-like shape seeming to denote both a natural code and, en masse, a structure that brings to mind a kind of floating sci-fi city, recalling sources as varied as Jonathan Swift and Buckminster Fuller.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">In another painting we see figures walking through an orchard while apples drop from the trees. These are the fruits referred to in the exhibition title, an allusion to the beliefs of hard-line fruitarians who eat only that which has fallen to the ground (and also, we assume, a nod to Isaac Newton and Adam and Eve). </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">What to believe in, or not, is always at the forefront of any consideration of Kørner's art. In Fallen Fruit from Frisland a romantic idea of the sublime meets a contemporary form of painting that arrives with doubts about the medium built in. Acknowledging the power of landscape painting without ever appearing wistful for a time when it was predominant, unquestioned, Kørner delights in summoning the instantly nameable, even going so far as to flirt with cliché. But, crucially, he always leaves space for ambiguity, some extra work for eye and mind to do - it is surely no accident that those apples resemble thought bubbles.  </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">It is no accident either that Kørner makes reference to a landscape that over the centuries has been under constant attack from the elements, endlessly renewed, one that is now as manmade as it can be said to be natural. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Covered in a geometrically patterned carpet, a manmade 'wave' greets viewers to this exhibition. This breaker, part Hokusai's Great Wave, part skateboard ramp, is a grandiose theatrical element designed to accentuate the drama of looking and thinking about the natural world as depicted in these paintings. Kørner's ancestral boat, by contrast, is utilitarian, humble, freighted with sweetly personal associations. Considering these elements in tandem we come up against some of the problems of representation that have preoccupied Kørner throughout his career - chief among them being the problem of channelling personal experience into art and back out into the 'real' world, whatever we may take that to mean. Looking inside the boat we encounter a series of small ceramic forms that function like the repeated, cell-like shapes in the paintings. The artist also refers to these nubs of clay as Problems. Perhaps, though, like the apple that falls from the tree, they might be thought of as gifts. After all, one person's problem is another's possibility. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">In the end, perhaps Kørner's art can itself be regarded as a kind of vessel, one that transports us across the bright, choppy waters of representation from the known world to a brackish place where the unexpected, inexplicable, even miraculous can occur.</span></p> Mon, 17 Dec 2012 08:30:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Jay Rechsteiner - WW Gallery - February 5th, 2013 - March 2nd, 2013 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">WW is pleased to present the first UK solo show by Swiss artist, Jay Rechsteiner.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>‘JAY GUN, The Most Dangerous Man on the Planet</strong>’, is an exhibition which ridicules the absurdity of gun-toting machismo. A collection of home-made guns and ‘other gun-related stuff’ satirically takes its cue from American gun culture and weapon infomercials.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>‘JAY GUN, The Most Dangerous Man on the Planet’</strong> dramatises the blur between fantasy and reality, child’s play and fatal consequences: Rechsteiner states, “Guns have always held a great fascination, especially for boys. They equip you with the perceived power and invincibility that transforms you into a hero, a cowboy, the saviour of the world!”</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">The gun, as a signifier of masculinity, is concerned with aggression - a tool which although frequently dangerous becomes useful in certain circumstances. It is also a totem of freedom, a penis substitute, a toy for the uncivilised, a symbol of power and a marker of the real American ‘manly’ man. And yet within the play and parody, a critical eye falls upon gun culture; it is sad and maddening that gun violence in the form of periodic massacres or gang-related killings appears out of control and unstoppable.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">JAY GUN is one of Rechsteiner’s idiot personae: the epitome of a soldier, a mercenary, a gangster, and product of a militia state. You are invited to kill him off in the exhibition’s shooting range. Crudely-drawn guns, a Blue-Peter style weapons arsenal, an accompanying infomercial and a manifesto are all presented in Rechsteiner’s inimitable madcap style.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p><strong>web:</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.wilsonwilliamsgallery.com/jaygun.htm" rel="nofollow">http://www.wilsonwilliamsgallery.com/jaygun.htm</a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.jayrechsteiner.com/jay_gun.htm" rel="nofollow">http://www.jayrechsteiner.com/jay_gun.htm</a></strong></p> <p><strong>FB event: <a href="http://www.facebook.com/events/467322806648746/?ref=ts&amp;fref=ts" rel="nofollow">http://www.facebook.com/events/467322806648746/?ref=ts&amp;fref=ts</a></strong></p> <p><strong>twitter (WW Gallery): @WWGallery</strong></p> <p><strong>twitter (Jay Rechsteiner): @JayRechsteiner</strong></p> Tue, 26 Feb 2013 15:44:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list - Art14 London - February 28th, 2013 - March 3rd, 2013 <h3>Opening Times</h3> <table class="styled"> <tbody> <tr> <td><em>Thursday 28 February <br /></em></td> <td align="right" valign="bottom">6pm-9pm</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Friday 1 March</td> <td align="right">11am-6pm</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Saturday 2 March</td> <td align="right">11am-6pm</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sunday 3 March</td> <td align="right">11am-5pm</td> <td></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>Ticket Prices</h3> <table class="styled"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Adult</td> <td></td> <td>£16</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>First Night</td> <td></td> <td>£30</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Concessions, Groups<strong><br /> </strong></td> <td></td> <td>£13</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td></td> <td></td> <td></td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Children (Under 16yrs)</td> <td></td> <td>Free</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h3>GALLERIES 2013</h3> <ul> <li>2902 Gallery, Singapore, Singapore /<strong> H12</strong></li> <li>Akinci, Amsterdam, the Netherlands / <strong>H9</strong></li> <li>Albemarle Gallery, London, UK / <strong>C11</strong></li> <li>Art Sawa, Dubai, UAE / <strong>E10</strong></li> <li>Artspace Dubai | London, UAE/ UK /<strong> D9</strong></li> <li>aye gallery, Beijing, China / <strong>E6</strong></li> <li>Jack Bell Gallery, London, UK / <strong>H17</strong></li> <li>Boers-Li, Beijing, China / <strong>C6</strong></li> <li>Brancolini Grimaldi, Florence/ Rome/ London, Italy/ UK / <strong>A2</strong></li> <li>Nadja Brykina Gallery, Zurich/ Moscow, Switzerland/ Russia /<strong> B8</strong></li> <li>Cais Gallery, Hong Kong/ Seoul, Hong Kong/ South Korea / <strong>B10</strong></li> <li>Cda-Projects, Istanbul, Turkey / <strong>G9</strong></li> <li>Circle Culture Gallery, Berlin/ Hamburg, Germany / <strong>H4</strong></li> <li>Cynthia-Reeves, Hanover/ New York, USA / <strong>H13</strong></li> <li>DAM Gallery Berlin|Frankfurt, Berlin/ Cologne, Germany / <strong>C2</strong></li> <li>Dark Matter Studio, London, UK /<strong> D11</strong></li> <li>Deweer Gallery, Otegem, Belgium / <strong>F6</strong></li> <li>Domobaal, London, UK / <strong>E9</strong></li> <li>Eleven, London, UK / <strong>D12</strong></li> <li>FaMa Gallery, Verona, Italy / <strong>G1</strong></li> <li>Selma Feriani Gallery, London, UK / <strong>I4</strong></li> <li>The Fine Art Society Contemporary, London, UK / <strong>B2</strong></li> <li>Flowers, London/ New York, UK/ USA /<strong> B4</strong></li> <li>Fold Gallery, London, UK / <strong>I7</strong></li> <li>Galleria Fumagalli, Milan, Italy / <strong>A6</strong></li> <li>Gajah Gallery, Singapore, Singapore / <strong>F3</strong></li> <li>Gana Art, Seoul, South Korea / <strong>H16</strong></li> <li>Gazelli Art House, London/ Baku, UK/ Azerbaijan / <strong>C12</strong></li> <li>Geukens &amp; De Vil, Antwerp/ Knokke, Belgium / <strong>D8</strong></li> <li>Michael Goedhuis, London, UK /<strong> B9</strong></li> <li>HackelBury Fine Art, London, UK /<strong> F4</strong></li> <li>Hakgojae, Seoul, South Korea / <strong>A4</strong></li> <li>Purdy Hicks Gallery, London, UK / <strong>B11</strong></li> <li>Kashya Hildebrand, Zurich, Switzerland /<strong> F7</strong></li> <li>Michael Hoppen Gallery, London, UK / <strong>E5</strong></li> <li>Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery, London/ New York, UK/ USA / <strong>G4</strong></li> <li>Hua Gallery, London, UK / <strong>H18</strong></li> <li>Jealous Gallery, London, UK / <strong>B12</strong></li> <li>Amelia Johnson Contemporary, Hong Kong / <strong>D6</strong></li> <li>Ivo Kamm, Zurich, Switzerland / <strong>H1</strong></li> <li>Robin Katz Fine Art, London, UK / <strong>E4</strong></li> <li>Kleinschmidt Fine Photographs, Wiesbaden, Germany / <strong>H14</strong></li> <li>Pearl Lam Galleries, Shanghai/ Singapore/ Hong Kong, China/ Singapore/ Hong Kong / <strong>A3</strong></li> <li>Lazarides, London, UK / <strong>C3</strong></li> <li>Leehwaik Gallery, Seoul, South Korea /<strong> C4</strong></li> <li>Levy Galerie, Hamburg, Germany / <strong>E7</strong></li> <li>Diana Lowenstein Gallery, Miami, USA / <strong>H2</strong></li> <li>maerzgalerie, Leipzig/ Berlin, Germany /<strong> I2</strong></li> <li>Kálmán Makláry Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary / <strong>C5</strong></li> <li>Primo Marella Gallery, Milan/ Beijing, Italy/ China / <strong>C9</strong></li> <li>Laura Mars, Berlin, Germany / <strong>I1</strong></li> <li>John Martin Gallery, London, UK / <strong>G5</strong></li> <li>Meshkati / Austin Desmond, London, UK / <strong>D5</strong></li> <li>Metro Gallery, Armadale, Australia / <strong>D3</strong></li> <li>Galerie Van Der Mieden, Brussels, Belgium / <strong>D1</strong></li> <li>Galerie Minsky, Paris, France / <strong>C8</strong></li> <li>Galerie du Monde, Hong Kong/ Macau, Hong Kong/ Macau / <strong>H11</strong></li> <li>Anna Nova Art Gallery, St Petersburg, Russia / <strong>C10</strong></li> <li>Alexander Ochs Galleries Berlin | Beijing, Berlin/ Beijing, Germany/ China / <strong>C7</strong></li> <li>October Gallery, London, UK / <strong>H5</strong></li> <li>The Outsiders, London/ Newcastle, UK / <strong>D10</strong></li> <li>Paragon, London, UK / <strong>B5</strong></li> <li>Galerie Paris-Beijing, Paris/ Beijing/ Brussels, France/ China/ Belgium / <strong>H10</strong></li> <li>ph-projects, Berlin, Germany / <strong>D2</strong></li> <li>Pifo Gallery, Beijing, China / <strong>F5</strong></li> <li>Galerie Ramakers, The Hague, The Netherlands /<strong> H16</strong></li> <li>Everard Read, Johannesburg, South Africa /<strong> G6</strong></li> <li>Riflemaker, London, UK / <strong>F2</strong></li> <li>Ronchini Gallery, London, UK / <strong>G10</strong></li> <li>Rossi &amp; Rossi, London, UK / <strong>B7</strong></li> <li>Galerie RX, Paris/ Ivry sur Seine, France / <strong>H6</strong></li> <li>Galerie Vincenz Sala, Berlin/ Paris, Germany/ France / <strong>E2</strong></li> <li>Richard Saltoun, London, UK / <strong>E3</strong></li> <li>Karsten Schubert, London, UK / <strong>E3</strong></li> <li>Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago, USA / <strong>E8</strong></li> <li>Alon Segev Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel / <strong>H8</strong></li> <li>Paul Stolper Gallery, London, UK / <strong>D7</strong></li> <li>Galerie Heike Strelow, Frankfurt, Germany / <strong>G2</strong></li> <li>Gallery Sumukha, Bangalore/ Chennai, India / <strong>G3</strong></li> <li>Sundaram Tagore, New York/ Beverly Hills, USA/ Hong Kong/ Singapore /<strong> B3</strong></li> <li>Galerie Tanit, Munich/ Beirut, Germany/ Lebanon / <strong>G11</strong></li> <li>Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne, Australia / <strong>G7</strong></li> <li>Torch, Amsterdam, The Netherlands /<strong> F9</strong></li> <li>Vanguard Gallery, Shanghai, China / <strong>C1</strong></li> <li>Galerija Vartai, Vilnius, Lithuania /<strong> I5</strong></li> <li>Volte Gallery, Mumbai, India /<strong> E1</strong></li> <li>Galerie Olivier Waltman, Paris/ Miami, France/ USA /<strong> I6</strong></li> <li>Workshop | Michela Bruzzo, Venice, Italy / <strong>I3</strong></li> <li>XVA Gallery, Dubai, UAE / <strong>F8</strong></li> <li>ZieherSmith, New York, USA / <strong>D4</strong></li> <li>Galeri Zilberman, Istanbul, Turkey / <strong>G8</strong></li> <li>Zipper Galeria, São Paulo, Brazil / <strong>H15</strong></li> <li>Jerome Zodo Contemporary, Milan, Italy / <strong>H3</strong></li> <li>Faur Zsófi Gallery, Budapest, Hungary /<strong> H7</strong></li> </ul> <h3>LONDON FIRST</h3> <ul> <li>Aranapoveda Gallery, Madrid, Spain /<strong> LF15</strong></li> <li>Athr Gallery, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia /<strong> LF13</strong></li> <li>Brundyn + Gonsalves, Cape Town, South Africa /<strong> LF6</strong></li> <li>Chan Hampe Galleries, Singapore / <strong>LF9</strong></li> <li>Galerie Dukan, Paris, France / <strong>LF5</strong></li> <li>Gallery Em, Seoul, Korea / <strong>LF17</strong></li> <li>Patrick Heide Contemporary Art, London, UK / <strong>LF11</strong></li> <li>IMT Gallery, London, UK / <strong>LF2</strong></li> <li>Galerie Martin Kudlek, Cologne, Germany / <strong>LF10</strong></li> <li>Lawrie Shabibi, Dubai, UAE / <strong>LF14</strong></li> <li>Ani Molnár Gallery, Budapest, Hungary / <strong>LF16</strong></li> <li>Galerie Tatjana Pieters, Gent, Belgium / <strong>LF8</strong></li> <li>rahncontemporary, Zurich, Switzerland / <strong>LF12</strong></li> <li>Scaramouche, New York, USA / <strong>LF1</strong></li> <li>Temnikova &amp; Kasela, Tallinn, Estonia / <strong>LF4</strong></li> <li>Yeo Workshop, London, Singapore /UK / <strong>LF7</strong></li> <li>Galerie Zimmermann Kratochwill, Graz, Austria/ Philippines / <strong>LF3</strong></li> </ul> <h3>Participating Young Galleries 2013</h3> <ul> <li>16th Line, Rostov-on-Don, Russia / <strong>YG14</strong></li> <li>Aando Fine Art, Berlin, Germany / <strong>YG15</strong></li> <li>Magda Danysz Gallery, Paris/ Shanghai, France/ China / <strong>YG7</strong></li> <li>Galerie E.G.P., Paris/ London, France/ UK / <strong>YG12</strong></li> <li>Eb&amp;Flow, London, UK / <strong>YG6</strong></li> <li>Hada Contemporary, London, UK / <strong>YG5</strong></li> <li>Ceri Hand Gallery, London, UK / <strong>YG4</strong></li> <li>The International 3, Manchester, UK / <strong>YG1</strong></li> <li>alexander levy, Berlin, Germany / <strong>YG9</strong></li> <li>Man&amp;Eve, London, UK / <strong>YG8</strong></li> <li>mc2gallery, Milan, Italy / <strong>YG2</strong></li> <li>Pertwee, Anderson &amp; Gold, London, UK / <strong>YG10</strong></li> <li>Daniela da Prato Gallery, Paris, France / <strong>YG3</strong></li> <li>Hidde van Seggelen Gallery, London, UK /<strong> YG13</strong></li> <li>Gallery SoSo, Seoul, South Korea / <strong>YG11</strong></li> <li>Maria Stenfors, London, UK / <strong>YG18</strong></li> <li>Salon Vert, London, UK / <strong>YG16</strong></li> <li>Viltin Galéria, Budapest, Hungary / <strong>YG17</strong></li> </ul> <h3>Not-For-Profit Institutions</h3> <ul> <li>Cass Sculpture Foundation, UK / <strong>M9</strong></li> <li>Daegu Art Museum, South Korea / <strong>M10</strong></li> <li>Dundee Contemporary Arts, UK / <strong>M4</strong></li> <li>Iniva, UK / <strong>M5</strong></li> <li>The Photographers’ Gallery, UK / <strong>M3</strong></li> <li>Positive View Foundation, UK / <strong>A5</strong></li> <li>Royal Academy of Arts, UK / <strong>M7</strong></li> <li>Saatchi Gallery Store, UK / <strong>A1</strong></li> <li>Serpentine Gallery, UK / <strong>M1</strong></li> <li>UCCA Limited Editions, China / <strong>MG</strong></li> <li>Whitechapel Gallery, UK / <strong>M8</strong></li> <li>Zabludowicz Collection, UK / <strong>M2</strong></li> </ul> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> Sun, 17 Feb 2013 03:26:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Group Show - Art14 London - February 28th, 2013 - March 3rd, 2013 <table class="postPage" cellspacing="4px"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h2>Thursday 28 February</h2> <p>4pm    Alice Anderson (b.UK), <em>From Performance to Sculpture (3 hours)</em> <strong>Riflemaker</strong></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/aa-dance-main-0112-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="aa-dance-main-01[1]" title="aa-dance-main-01[1]" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Friday 1 March</h2> <p>12pm  Myriam El Haik (b. Morocco), <em>Still Working… </em>(40 mins) <strong>Galerie Vincenz Sala</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/1-Myriam-ELHAIKjpg-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="1 Myriam ELHAIKjpg" title="1 Myriam ELHAIKjpg" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1pm    Tony Morgan (b. UK), <em>Beefsteak (Resurrection)</em>, 1968, <em>Double Happening</em>, 1970 and <em>Düsseldorf ist ein gutter Platz zum schlafen</em>, 1972 <strong>Richard Saltoun</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/2-TONY-MORGAN-jpg-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="2 TONY MORGAN jpg" title="2 TONY MORGAN jpg" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>2pm    Feiko Beckers (b. the Netherlands),<strong> </strong><em>Accident with Red Car </em>(24 mins) <strong>Yeo Workshop</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/3-Feiko-Beckers-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="3 Feiko Beckers" title="3 Feiko Beckers" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>3pm    Helena Hunter (b. UK), <em>Conversation Piece </em>(55 mins) <strong>Jerome Zodo Contemporary</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/4-Helena-Hunter-385x266.jpeg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="4 Helena Hunter" title="4 Helena Hunter" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>4pm    Juneau Projects (b. UK), <em>The Infocalypse Stack </em>(15 mins) <strong>Ceri Hand Gallery</strong></p> <p> </p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/5-Juneau-Projects-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="5 Juneau Projects" title="5 Juneau Projects" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>5pm    Plastique Fantastique (b. UK), <em>Welcome Neuropatheme Feedback Loops </em>(20 mins) <strong>IMT Gallery</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/6-Plastique-Fantastique-jpg.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="6 Plastique Fantastique jpg" title="6 Plastique Fantastique jpg" height="214" width="320" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Saturday 2 March</h2> <p>12pm  Myriam El Haik (b. Morocco), <em>Still Working…</em>(40 mins) <strong>2902 Gallery</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/1-Myriam-ELHAIKjpg1-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="1 Myriam ELHAIKjpg" title="1 Myriam ELHAIKjpg" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1pm    Joel Yuen (b. Singapore), <em>Anthem </em>(20 mins) <strong>Galerie Vincenz Sala</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/2-Joel-Yuen-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="2 Joel Yuen" title="2 Joel Yuen" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>2pm    Bedwyr Williams (b. UK), <em>Expedit </em>(20 mins) <strong>Ceri Hand Gallery</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/3-Bedwyr-Williams-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="3 Bedwyr Williams" title="3 Bedwyr Williams" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>3pm    Helena Hunter (b. UK), <em>Conversation Piece (50 mins)</em> <strong>Jerome Zodo Contemporary</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/4-Helena-Hunter2-385x266.jpeg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="4 Helena Hunter" title="4 Helena Hunter" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>4pm    Tom Benson (b. UK) with Manuela Barczewski, Claudia Doms, Kati Kärki, Kyra Kordoski, Mary Rinebold and Beatrice Schulz, <em>Tones, Terms, Tracks</em> (1hr 45 mins) <strong>Hidde van Seggelen Gallery</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/5-Tom-Benson-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="5 Tom Benson" title="5 Tom Benson" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Sunday 3 March</h2> <p>12pm  Hugo Dalton (b. UK), <em>Movement and Mark </em>(45 mins) <strong>The Fine Art Society Contemporary</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/1-Hugo-Dalton-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="1 Hugo Dalton" title="1 Hugo Dalton" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1pm    Tony Morgan (b. UK), <em>Beefsteak (Resurrection)</em>, 1968, <em>Double Happening</em>, 1970 and
 <em>Düsseldorf ist ein gutter Platz zum schlafen</em>, 1972 <strong>Richard Saltoun</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/2-TONY-MORGAN-jpg1-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="2 TONY MORGAN jpg" title="2 TONY MORGAN jpg" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>2pm    Ingrid Mwangi Robert Hutter (b. Kenya, b. Germany), <em>The Fourth Stomach </em>(20 mins)
 <strong>Alexander Ochs Galleries Berlin | Beijing</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/3-Ingrid-Hutter-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="3 Ingrid Hutter" title="3 Ingrid Hutter" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>3pm    Bedwyr Williams (b. UK), <em>Expedit </em>(20 mins) <strong>Ceri Hand Gallery</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/4-Bedwyr-Williams-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="4 Bedwyr Williams" title="4 Bedwyr Williams" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>4pm    Rebecca Lennon (b. UK), <em>That thought had a brother (a history of the zero) (10 mins) </em><strong>Ceri Hand Gallery</strong></p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/5-Rebecca-Lennon-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="5 Rebecca Lennon" title="5 Rebecca Lennon" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Sun, 17 Feb 2013 03:34:49 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Group Show - Art14 London - February 28th, 2013 - March 3rd, 2013 <table class="postPage" cellspacing="4px"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>El ANATSUI (b.Ghana) P14</h2> <p>In the World but Don’t Know the World, 2009<br /> aluminium and copper wire, 560 x 1000 cm, photo: Jonathan Greet<br /> <strong>October Gallery / H5</strong></p> <p>El Anatsui’s practice emerged from the vibrant post-independence art movements of 1960s and 70s West Africa. His work has addressed a vast range of social, political and historical concerns and embraced an equally wide range of media and processes. Using anything from chainsaws and welding torches to an intricate ‘sewing’ process of found objects, he has become one of Africa’s most recognised contemporary artists.<br /> His work is in collections around the world including the British Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art and the Centre Georges Pompidou.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Anatsui.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Anatsui- In the World but Don’t Know the World, 2009," title="Anatsui- In the World but Don’t Know the World, 2009," height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Younes BABA-ALI (b. Morocco) P2</h2> <p>Call for Prayer – Morse, 2011<br /> loudspeaker, computer dimensions variable<br /> <strong>FaMa Gallery / G1</strong></p> <p>Born in 1986 in Oujda, Morocco, Younes Baba-Ali lives and works in Brussels and Casablanca. After graduating from the School of Decorative Arts in Strasbourg in 2008, Baba-Ali participated in several international exhibitions and biennials including the Biennale of Marrakech and the Biennale Skopje.<br /> <em>Morse</em> is a sound installation consisting of a loudspeaker broadcasting the Muslim call to prayer in Morse code at prayer times corresponding to the city in which the piece is exhibited. The work evokes the relationship between religious ritual and the absence of presence of spiritual experience.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/4_Call_for_Prayer_Morse_Younes_Baba-Ali-385x266.jpeg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Younes BABA-ALI, Call For Prayer, 2011" title="Younes BABA-ALI, Call For Prayer, 2011" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Harmen BRETHOUWER (b. the Netherlands) P7</h2> <p>F (Bellbronze Series), 2012<br /> cast bronze on Belgian hard stone plinth, rubber coated steel and leather hammer, 280 x 120 x 120 cm<br /> <strong>Hidde Van Seggelen Gallery / YG13</strong></p> <p>Harmen Brethouwer (b. 1960) lives and works in The Netherlands. Recent solo exhibitions have taken place at Hidde van Seggelen Gallery, London and Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam. Brethouwer’s practice is concerned with the study of the history of man-made artefacts. He began work on the series titled ‘Bellbronzes’ in 2005, and presents the seventh work in the series at Art13 London, the most ambitious ‘Bellbronze’ to date. Hanging on an internal structure, the bell rests just millimetres above its base. During its installation at Art13, the bronze bell will be struck at regular intervals by a performer, at which time the static cone will transform into an instrument tuned to the key of F.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Brethouwer-2.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Harmen Brethouwer, F (Bellbronze Series), 2012" title="Harmen Brethouwer, F (Bellbronze Series), 2012" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Eric CHAN (b. Malaysia) P18</h2> <p>Hitchcock’s Love Affair with Abstract Expressionism, 2012<br /> mixed media, variable dimensions<br /> <strong>Chan Hampe Galleries / LF9</strong></p> <p>Singapore-based artist Eric Chan often ventures into the surreal with his work, balancing dark and dreamlike imagery with a touch of twisted pleasure. The concept for this installation continues in that vein with a nod to the cinematic exploits of Alfred Hitchcock and in particular his use of the uncanny. Chan plays with the multiplicity of meanings inherent in the iconic image of the black bird and the act of the bird defecating. On one level the work references the decidedly Eastern perspective of the notion that good luck that is bestowed upon the unsuspecting individual by a defecating bird. Located in the West, however, this act is considered not so lucky.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/rsz_bondages_of_desire_22-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Eric CHAN - Hitchcock’s Love Affair with Abstract Expressionism, 2012" title="Eric CHAN - Hitchcock’s Love Affair with Abstract Expressionism, 2012" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Szilárd CSEKE (b. Hungary) P12</h2> <p>Deep Look, 2012<br /> tyres, polystyrene balls, electric fans, florescent tube, electric control, iron, wood,<br /> 182 x 184 x 95 cm<br /> <strong>Ani Molnár Gallery / LF16</strong></p> <p>In his most recent works Cseke maps the post-socialist situation in Hungary. He focuses on the situation of workers whose lives are defined by globalisation, subject to the whims of economic migration.  This piece belongs to the Jobcentre East series with labour as a key idea behind it. Found truck tyre from a tower with rotating lights, destabilising the viewer. In his exhibition ‘Jobcentre East’ at Ani Molnár Gallery he uses the brand of a British job agency – Jobcentre Plus. The artistic interpretation of the Jobcentre could be a 21st century paraphrase of the Delphoi Oracle, a certain “factory of fate”.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/AniMolnarGallery_Cseke_DeepLook_Art13cat_dubble1-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Szilárd CSEKE,Deep Look, 2012" title="Szilárd CSEKE,Deep Look, 2012" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Ella FINER (b. UK) P17</h2> <p>Public Address System, 2013<br /> sound, loudspeakers<br /> <strong>Yeo Workshop / LF7</strong></p> <p>Ella Finer’s practice – sited in theatre, photographic and sound space – explores the relationship of the gendered body and voice. Her performance and installation work often composes the live and the recorded together, layering the two as material elements with their own distinct temporalities.  <em>Public Address System</em> is recorded speech composed for, and played over, loudspeaker.  Engaging with forms and scales of ”public address” from speech-making to public service announcements, the content refers back to the particular medium through which it is played. Played in three parts – at the beginning, middle and end of each day at the fair as entrance, interval and exit “music” – each broadcast will sonically mark the duration of the day.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Finer_.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="WEBSITE.Finer" title="WEBSITE.Finer" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Romuald HAZOUME (b. Benin) P5</h2> <p>Petrol Cargo, 2012<br /> mixed media installation, 120 x 450 x 180 cm<strong><br /> October Gallery/ H5</strong></p> <p>Romuald Hazoumè was born in 1962 in Porto-Novo, Republic of Benin. His work has been widely shown in many major international galleries and museums, including the British Museum, London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and GOMA, Brisbane. Mastering a wide range of media, Hazoumè creates masks, photographs, works on canvas, sculptures and multi-media installations. Whether confronting the legacy of the slave trade or creating witty, contemporary portraits, Hazoumè’s work documents the irrepressible diversity of African life today. <em>Petrol Cargo</em> was first shown at the October Gallery, London, in 2012; the installation reflects on the illegal petrol smuggling trade between Benin and Nigeria. This dangerous trade is responsible for horrific injuries and potentially an ecological catastrophe as the trade continues to damage Benin’s water supply.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/PLEASE-USE-OctoberGallery.Romuald_Hazoume_Petrol_Cargo_2012NO_PHOTO_photoCjonathan_greet@dumdum.co_.uk_-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Romuald Hazoumè, Petrol Cargo, 2012" title="Romuald Hazoume- Petrol Cargo, 2012," height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Ranbir KALEKA (b. India) P2</h2> <p>Cul-De-Sac in Taxila, 2010<br /> single channel HD video projection on painted canvas (video still) 3:55 min loop with sound 70 x 94 cm<br /> <strong>Volte Gallery / E1</strong></p> <p>Ranbir Kaleka’s single channel video projection on painted surface, ‘Cul-de-sac in Taxila’ provides a narrative puzzle that dwells on desire and struggle. The work features a man dressed in a black suit sitting still and holding a hammer. When he suddenly raises the hammer to strike the air, a white horse appears before him. The title springs from Kaleka’s fascination with the city of Taxila, an important stop on ancient trade routes as well as a centre of learning, which was destroyed in the fifth century. Kaleka’s work suggests that the man has aspirations to explore Taxila but can’t find the road to it. The horse appears and disappears, and the man’s interminable wait is only disturbed by the persistent sound of a drop of water falling into a pan behind him.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/culdesac-voltegalleryart13-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Ranbir KALEKA, Cul-De-Sac in Taxila, 2010" title="Ranbir KALEKA, Cul-De-Sac in Taxila, 2010" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Žilvinas KEMPINAS (b. Lithuania) P13</h2> <p>Fountain, 2011<br /> fan, magnetic tape, metal ring, 330 cm diameter<br /> <strong>Galerija Vartai / I5</strong></p> <p>Fountain, Žilvinas Kempinas’ latest work using a fan, encapsulates an important creative phase in the artist’s oeuvre and inspired him to begin a new series of works, employing shapes and freezing motion, something that emerged from his previous works. Fountain is a kinetic installation consisting of a fan, magnetic tape and a metal ring. A fan is placed face down on the ground causing the movement of the strands  of magnetic tape fixed to the metal ring in a way that is reminiscent of jets of water. The constant sound of the fan and the rustling of the tape provide an ambient soundtrack to the work. The interplay between movement, sound and airflow provides a meditative ambience into which viewers can immerse themselves.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/P13-Kempinas-lo-res-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Žilvinas KEMPINAS, Foundation, 2011" title="Žilvinas KEMPINAS, Foundation, 2011" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Zena EL KHALIL (b. Lebanon) P6</h2> <p>A’ Salaam Alaykum: Peace Be Upon You, 2009<br /> rotating sculpture, mirror tiles on polyurethane, 400 x 400 x 400 cm<br /> <strong>Galerie Tanit / G11</strong></p> <p>The interactive sculptural installation “A’ Salaam Alaykum: Peace Be Upon You” by Zena el Khalil displays the word “Allah” in Arabic letters. A rotating 4-meter-tall sculpture made of glass mirror tiles reflects the lights and environment around it, including the viewer. The artist portrays a generation living with war as a constant presence, always aware that it might start again any time, but still longing for peace, and hoping to get back to normality. For her, “dancing, it seems, helps us to forget why we turned against each other.” The work will be ‘activated’ during the preview of Art13 London with music and dancing. Subsequently to that the piece will slowly revolve like a disco-ball born from the history of religion and conflict.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.ElKhalil.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="A’ Salaam Alaykum" title="A’ Salaam Alaykum" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Peter LEMMENS (b. Belgium) P15</h2> <p>Proxy, 2013<br /> variable materials (oak, pine, self-adhesive foil (oak, print), self adhesive foil (pine, print, MDF), each approx. 20 x 30 x 80 cm<br /> <strong>Galerie van der Mieden / D1</strong></p> <p>A proxy is used as a temporary substitute for something that is not known or must remain generic. It reserves a place for something to come later and used as an unspecific placeholder to be able to continue a discussion, a process.  For Art13 London<em> </em>one work has been created, consisting of a set of proxies. Although they are physical objects, each one refers in several ways to another possibility. For example, a piece of marble is partially covered with a self-adhesive sticker displaying a pine woodprint. In turn, a piece of real oak wood is partially covered with another self-adhesive sticker displaying a pine woodprint. Each element of the work points to something else, something exterior.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Lemmens-copy.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Lemmens- Proxy, 2013" title="Lemmens- Proxy, 2013" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Chris LEVINE (b. Canada) P11</h2> <p>Flower of Light, 2013<br /> dimensions variable<br /> <strong>The Fine Art Society Contemporary / B2</strong></p> <p>Chris Levine is a light artist who works across many mediums in pursuit of a heightened sensory experience. Levine is perhaps best known for creating the much commented upon work, The Lightness of Being. With light at its core, the unique portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II presents an utterly fresh depiction of the most famous woman in the world. In 2012 his work was exhibited at The Saatchi Gallery and The National Portrait Gallery and seen by over 750,000 people. He has worked with a wide range of collaborators, including Anthony and the Johnsons, Philip Treacy, Massive Attack, Grace Jones and The Eden Project.</p> <p>In ‘Flower of Light’ Levine invites viewers to step into an immersive experience where lighting plays a key role, bringing the viewer to an awareness of their own subjectivity in a world that has suddenly expanded. The work provides a momentary escape from the fair, allowing the viewer moments of quiet contemplation.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Levine.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Chris Levine, Flower of Light, 2013" title="Chris Levine, Flower of Light, 2013" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Roelof LOUW (b. South Africa) P8</h2> <p>Soul City (Pyramid of Oranges), 1967<br /> approx. 6,000 oranges, 152 x 193 x 193 cm<br /> <strong>Richard Saltoun / Karsten Schubert / E3 </strong></p> <p>Roelof Louw’s<em> Soul City (Pyramid of Oranges)</em> (1967), consists of roughly 6,000 oranges carefully stacked and arranged in the shape of a pyramid. Visitors are invited to take an orange, by doing so changing the shape and dimensions of the sculpture. The artist has written: “By taking an orange, each person changes the molecular form of the stack of oranges, and participates in “consuming” its presence. (The full implications of this action are left to the imagination)”. The work was originally exhibited at the Arts Lab, Covent Garden (1967), and later at <em>Live in Your Head</em> (Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2000) and <em>United Enemies: The Problem of Sculpture in Britain in the 1960s and 1970s </em>(Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, 2011-12).</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/MG_45091-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Roelof LOUW, Soul City (Pyramid of Oranges), 1967" title="Roelof LOUW, Soul City (Pyramid of Oranges), 1967" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Handiwirman SAPUTRA (b. Indonesia) P3</h2> <p>Tak Berakar, Tak Berpucuk – no.7 (No Roots, No Shoots – no. 7), 2011<br /> plywood, cloth, corrugated roof sheet, screen print puff ink, steel, acrylic paint, 3 parts, each 220 x 150 x 150 cm<br /> <strong>GAJAH GALLERY / F3</strong></p> <p>Handiwirman Saputra uses regular everyday materials such as cotton, hair, wood and repositions them in a manner contrary to convention. He studies the relationship between the extraordinary and the mundane; how the power of perception can seize imagination and alter one’s impression of the ordinary. Saputra works in both paintings and sculptures, mysteriously evoking a faint recognition of something that had been seen before but is essentially unidentifiable. The artist has said: “I actually discovered the shapes (of my works) around me, everyday. I found them through my interest in observing a variety of minute things around me. There are rarely big objects. Often only the small and mundane things.”</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Saputra.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Saputra- Tak Berakar, Tak Berpucuk – no.7 (No Roots, No Shoots – no. 7), 2011" title="Saputra- Tak Berakar, Tak Berpucuk – no.7 (No Roots, No Shoots – no. 7), 2011" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Astrid SVANGREN (b. Sweden) P10</h2> <p>Nocturnal extras, a dark continent, madder red, murex and alizann, a witch hazel saturated in dew, stumbling, longing, high up in a tree, 2013<br /> silicone, latex, cocoon paper, wax, fabric and paint, 150 x 15 x 20 cm<br /> <strong>Maria Stenfors / YG18</strong></p> <p>Astrid Svangren’s paintings and installations work towards describing a physical state or phenomenon, stressing the importance of a motion and the dividing of space the installations create. In a cycle of layering, breaking and mending, the work’s intrinsic strength hides in the appearance of lightness and fragility. For Art13 London Svangren presents a site-specific installation, consisting of three cylindrical objects. Measuring around 1.5m tall they stand suspended, trailing towards the floor.These sculptures are akin to organic growths of flora and fauna; cocoons, weeds, trailing plant growth, buds, chrysalises and pupae, harking back to the Victorian era of exploration and discovery.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.MariaStenfors.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="MariaStenfors- Nocturnal extras, a dark continent, madder red, murex and alizann, a witch hazel saturated in dew, stumbling, longing, high up in a tree, 2013" title="MariaStenfors- Nocturnal extras, a dark continent, madder red, murex and alizann, a witch hazel saturated in dew, stumbling, longing, high up in a tree, 2013" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Mhairi VARI (b. UK) P1</h2> <p>LOL Memory, 2013<br /> silk ties, polystyrene balls, jubilee clips, dimensions variable<br /> <strong>DOMOBAAL / E9</strong></p> <p>Mhairi Vari’s practice routinely reanimates discarded possessions and redundant technologies to create conceptually rigorous works that confront the boundary between sculpture and installation. Vari, for Art13 London is using the worn, luxurious (almost too) colourful silk ties to form a skeletal structure that appropriates the read-only memory used in the Apollo Guidance System. As digital components of once cutting-edge technologies are rendered redundant by perpetual development; so, silk ties, symbols of societal status, are fast becoming a hangover from a bygone era. LOL Memory has no limits and contains the potential to grow exponentially in the same manner as the mathematical principle that dictates its form. There is potentially is no end to this piece; it will only ever be a fragment of something potentially infinite.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/domobaal-mhairi-vari-coreropememory-07-2013-385x266.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Mhairi VARI, Memory, 2013," title="Mhairi VARI, Memory, 2013," height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>John WALLBANK (b. UK) P4</h2> <p>Untitled, 2012<br /> paint, paper, wire mesh, plywood, wire, polystyrene, 300 x 200 x 100 cm (image illustrated shows earlier work)<br /> <strong>TATJANA PIETERS / LF8</strong></p> <p>Three sheets of standard 8’x4’ plywood form a rudimentary structure over which a freely modelled form of wire mesh and glued and painted paper is applied. Wire stitching is used to bind the areas of mesh and also to attach the mesh to the plywood through drilled holes. The modelled mesh areas are like a thin skin that forms pockets growing away from the rigid plywood sheets. These also partly envelop two of the sheets so as to act as a means of joining them together. The third element simply rests against the other two. The artist’s basic motivation is to create a large sculptural statement by simple means; the essential aesthetic principle being to both occupy and contain space while minimizing mass and building time.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Wallbank.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Wallbank- Untitled, 2012" title="Wallbank- Untitled, 2012" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>Bedwyr WILLIAMS (b. UK) P21</h2> <p>Sentry Box, 2012<br /> wood, paint, 277 x 100 x 100 cm<br /> <strong>Ceri Hand Gallery / YG4</strong></p> <p>Bedwyr Williams imagined version of an upturned sentry box is based on Action Man toys and some war films. It is candy-striped, militaristic and vaguely sinister, suggesting disruption and inversion. Williams recounts a potential influence for this piece: “Someone was hurt when a toilet tent was toppled at a sheep dog trials where my grandfather was competing once”. As he adds: “If you were standing sentry and it was blown over you’d have to go with it. Like a tall dog in a tall kennel.” Williams will represent Wales at the Venice Biennale later this year with an exhibition that will comprise a site-specific work <em>The Starry Messenger</em> conceived specifically for the Santa Maria Ausiliatrice (Ludoteca).</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Williams.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Williams- Sentry Box, 2012" title="Williams- Sentry Box, 2012" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> <tr></tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 4px; width: 100%;"> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h2>ZHU Jinshi (b.China) P16</h2> <p>Boat, 2013<br /> 12 x 3.5 x 6 metres<br /> <strong>Pearl Lam Galleries / A3</strong></p> <p>The monumental 12m-long installation ‘Boat’ which is constructed of bamboo, cotton and 8,000 sheets of Xuan (rice) paper, embodies the artist’s desire to “infinitely extend every moment.” Xuan paper, commonly used in Chinese calligraphy and traditional painting, was originally produced in Anhui province during the Tang Dynasty (618 – 907 AD). As well as its historical and cultural significance the paper is renowned for being soft, strong, fine textured and resistant to creasing. The sheer size and visual impact of the Boat is in stark contrast with the delicate nature of the material from which it is made. The meditative layering process, also evident in Zhu’s paintings, is testament to his belief that it is only through the contact and dialogue with his chosen materials that he can express his perception and understanding of the world.</p> </td> <td style="width: 4px; background-color: transparent; padding: 0;"> <div style="height: 100%; width: 4px;"> </div> </td> <td><img src="http://artfairslondon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/WEBSITE.Jinshu.jpg" class="attachment-thumbnail" alt="Jinshu - Boat, 2013" title="Jinshu - Boat, 2013" height="266" width="385" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 01 Mar 2013 13:42:25 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Random International - Barbican Art Gallery - October 4th, 2012 - March 3rd, 2013 <p></p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="340"> <tbody> <tr valign="top"> <td colspan="2" width="340"> <h1>Random International: Rain Room</h1> 4 October 2012 - 3 March 2013<br /> The Curve</td> </tr> <tr width="230" valign="top"> <td width="220"> <div style="width: 220px; float: left;"><b>Tickets</b>:<br /> <a style="color: #000000;" href="http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/admission-prices">Admission Free</a> <br /> <br /> <b>Times</b>: <br /> <a style="color: #000000;" href="http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/admission-prices"><br /> View gallery opening hours</a><br /> Open daily 11am - 8pm; Thu until 10pm; 1 Jan 12-8pm (last admission to the queue approximately two hours before closing) <strong></strong><br /> <br /> Current queuing time approx 3 hours<br /> <br /> It is possible that you may get wet especially if wearing dark clothing<br /> <br /> Flat shoes are advisable<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /><br /> subject to availability</div> </td> <td class="artform" width="120"> <div style="width: 120px;"> <div style="text-align: left; padding-left: 19px; height: 30px; position: relative;"></div> <div style="height: 23px; text-align: left; padding-left: 22px;"><a title="ShareThis via email, AIM, social bookmarking and networking sites, etc." class="stbutton stico_default">share this</a></div> </div> </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td class="artform" colspan="2"><br /> <br /> <div id="nav-tab-area"> <div class="nav-tab-current">Description</div> <div class="nav-tab"><a href="http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/event-detail.asp?id=13723&amp;pg=4091"><b>Visitor info</b></a></div> <div class="nav-tab"><a href="http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/event-detail.asp?id=13723&amp;pg=4168"><b>Wayne McGregor</b></a></div> <div class="nav-tab"><a href="http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/event-detail.asp?id=13723&amp;pg=4180"><b>Press</b></a></div> </div> </td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td colspan="2" class="afbody"><br /> <strong></strong><br /><br /><strong>Random International</strong> invites you to experience what it’s like to control the rain. Visitors can choose to simply watch the spectacle or find their way carefully through the rain, putting their trust in the work to the test. <br /><br />More than the technical virtuosity necessary for its success, the piece relies on a sculptural rigour, with the entire Curve transformed by the monumental proportions of this carefully choreographed downpour and the sound of water. <br /><br />Random International are known for their distinctive approach to digital-based contemporary art. Their experimental artworks come alive through audience interaction and staged performance. <br /><br />Random International are represented by Carpenters Workshop Gallery, London and Paris. <br /><br /><strong>In order for visitors to enjoy the sensory experience of <i>Rain Room</i>, there is a limited capacity of 5 people at a time in the rain. <br /></strong><br /><strong>Please be aware that due to the popularity of <i>Rain Room</i>, the queue time currently stands at around two hours, at peak times including evenings and weekends up to three hours.<br /><br />We advise visitors to arrive as early in the day as possible, a minimum of two hours before closing time. Entry to the queue is subject to the number of visitors already waiting. Anyone arriving later may not be allowed to join the queue as we are unable to admit visitors after the gallery closes. Thank you for your patience.</strong><br /> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 08 Jan 2013 03:10:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list