ArtSlant - Closing soon http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/show en-us 40 Jake Harvey - Art First Contemporary Art - June 28th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <div class="exhibition"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In 2007 Harvey co-conceived and was Principal Investigator on the STONE Project. The four-year research project was funded by The Arts and Humanities Research Council and undertaken through the Edinburgh College of Art where he is Emeritus Professor of Sculpture. Culminating in a major publication - STONE: A Legacy and Inspiration for Art, (2011, Black Dog Publishing), it includes work by Atsuo Okamoto and Jessica Harrison, who also contributes an essay titled <em>Body and Stone</em>.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">For his first solo exhibition in Art First's new space in Fitzrovia, Harvey has invited Okamoto and Harrison to exhibit in AF Projects, under the unifying title, STONE.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Harvey is a sculptor of elemental works. He carves granite, basalt, marble and limestone, imbuing the stillness of stone with a Zen-like quality and charged sensuality. Abstracted forms affixed to the wall form a dialogue with the floor and space-occupying sculptures.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In a new series of wall pieces created for this exhibition, small white marble sculptures, no larger than 30 cm in any direction, project from a white wall like discrete dream forms. They invite touch and contemplation, assuring the viewer of their existence in corporeal space. Others pierced with holes possess a darker sonorous presence and are carved from mottled granites and basalts. With smooth polished surfaces, some are tactile and rounded, while others deploy a squared geometry. The small scale and feeling of floating on the wall, denies any sense of weight, while the slightly larger group, placed on a long shelf, introduces upright biomorphic forms that possess a sense of rootedness to the earth and an assertive elegance.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The work ’Chair’ resembles a small, timeless throne hewn from Kilkenny blue limestone. Stool forms, and a carved stone ’bench’ conceptually invite us to be seated. Combined with ’Rest’ a sculpture inspired by head rests found throughout Africa and in China and Japan, these sculptures promote tranquility and meditation. Throughout his work, Harvey enjoys a formal fluency redolent with archeological and artifact references trawled from cultures around the world. Often the works retain the indexical mark of the maker, the trace of man, and imply an indeterminate use or function.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Photography, drawing and maquette-making inspired by forms and objects encountered through extensive travel, become precursors to the simplification and evolution of Harvey’s sculptures. This reductive vision is evident in the small collaged drawings which reveal a mode of visual thinking characteristic of the work throughout this exhibition.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jake Harvey studied sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art (1966-72) and went on to become the Head of School of Sculpture for eleven years. He is currently Emeritus Professor of Sculpture and lives and works in Maxton near St Boswells in the Scottish Borders. He was elected RSA in 1989. His work can be found in public collections throughout Scotland, including Aberdeen Art Gallery, Edinburgh Museums and Galleries, the Hunterian Museum, Kelvingrove Museum, and the Fleming Collection, London, the Kulturtoget Collection, Sweden and the Eda Garden Museum in Tokyo.</span><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> </div> Thu, 21 Jun 2012 13:21:57 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Atsuo Okamoto - Art First Contemporary Art - June 28th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">‘Splitting and returning’ or ‘wari modoshi’, embraces a traditional Japanese method of stone carving in which larger blocks are split into manageable portions, then to be fused into a single sculpture. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">Taking this convention to engage with issues of contemporary life and art making, Okamoto entrusts his fragments of stone to selected people around the world for five years. During this time, the stones absorb their surrounding environment through an ‘infiltration of life’ as he describes it. The aim is for each piece of stone to remain beside the collaborator; kept in a pocket or a bag, on a table in the home, on a desk, in a workshop, a kitchen, a bathroom or even outdoors on a veranda. This slow weathering and the traces of contact result in a unique colouring so that there is a tonal, patchwork effect in the reassembled ‘Turtle’ pieces. “Stone keeps huge memories inside it, ever since the planet came into existence. I feel that stone is the most romantic and intellectual object on earth”, he says. “The pieces of stone scattered to various people of different cultures, jobs and life styles will be infiltrated by a life, hence ‘Volume of Lives’ as the title”.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">For his AF Projects show, Okamoto has made a new work, ‘Volume of Lives – from London’ 2012 – 2017, to take its place alongside two completed works. 49 stone pieces, all marked with delicately inscribed numbers, are presented in their assembled form. During the exhibition ‘collaborators’ will be recruited. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">Okamoto has exhibited world wide, and lives in Tokyo, where he teaches at the Joshibi University of Art and Design. He trained at the Tama Art University and his work is in public collections including The University of Warwick UK and The Water Art Museum, Japan.</span></p> Thu, 21 Jun 2012 13:36:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Jessica Harrison - Art First Contemporary Art - June 28th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">The 'Touchstones' (all untitled) are the culmination of research into the role and significance of the body in sculpture. 'Untitled (1)' and 'Untitled (1) Inverted' look at the interaction and interdependence of touch and vision in order to unravel the relationship between the body of the maker and the body of the viewer. Starting with a hand--]sized ball of soft clay, the subject, a different person for each piece, works the material blindly, manipulating the clay within the felt rather than the seen space. Uninterrupted by the eye, the resulting shape describes the space in--]between the fingertips, with imprints left to document touch, to map the space just beyond the end of the finger.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;"> The clay shapes are scaled up from impressions that fit within the palm of the hand to a size around which the whole body can wrap itself. Carved into stone by the artist, she becomes both viewer and maker. In this process of replication, the felt space is opened up and made accessible for another eviewingf body, introducing through the stone, a new element of touch. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">In a continuing process of handling, the stones are then cast in white silicone, which is turned inside out. Impressions now press outwards into the space around the object, inverting the maker and viewerfs touch, as inside becomes outside and vice versa. Shown together, the stone and silicone forms represent the same felt body movements, and the same space between the hands. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span size="2" style="font-size: small;">Harrison studied at the Edinburgh College of Art and is completing a practice-based PhD in sculpture. She has been awarded prizes and scholarships, most recently the John Watson Prize, and has exhibited in Britain, Germany and the USA since 2006. Her work is already in collections including Pallant House, The New Art Gallery Walsall and the Fingal County Public Art Collection, Ireland.</span></p> Thu, 21 Jun 2012 13:35:31 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Mike Meiré - Bartha Contemporary - July 6th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">For his first solo-exhibition at <strong>Bartha Contemporary</strong>, German artist<strong> Mike Meiré</strong> (B. 1964) will present a series of new large-scale works on paper alongside recent ceramic sculptures. Entitled “<strong><em>Economy of Attention</em></strong>” the exhibition embraces the medium of newsprint and highlights its structural beauty.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Mike Meiré’s latest body of work follows on from a series of singular paintings on newsprint, which examine existing grids in newspapers and primarily reflect on the prioritization of information through graphic design.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The artist has been working as an art-director for many years and it is his intrinsic understanding of this medium, which allows him to strip the composition of his works to a bare minimum. By adding an element of repetition and juxtaposition to the compositions of his larger works, Meiré embraces a highly minimalist mantra, akin with Judd’s stacked sculptures or Walter de Marias installations. A coded language of design, inherent in any layout is reduced to bars of colour, composed to reveal a repetitive sequencing of information.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Mike Meiré describes his work as a continued investigation into life's evolutionary processes, which the artist interprets in three phases, birth, biography and death. Central to all of Meiré's work is a delicate interplay between the highly refined against mundane everyday materials. The intriguing juxtaposition of organic often sexually explicit or gender-orientated ceramic objects with anodyne geometric elements play an increasingly important role in Meiré's work. These somewhat evoke a sense of ambivalence towards modernity.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Within Meiré's continuing work as a creative director, he has for many years navigated and in some cases deliberately trespassed the boarders between Advertising, Design and Fine Art. As a designer Meiré has worked on several installation-based projects, which were commissioned by a variety of commercial companies as subversive means of product placement.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">More recently Meiré has clearly defined his practice as an independent artist. As one line of work continues to inform the other Meiré's paintings and ceramic sculptures reveal a profound understanding of popular culture. It is this knowledge, which allows the artist to explore the deep-rooted neurotics that inhibit today's societies and in turn challenges these through his work.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Mike Meiré</strong> lives and works in Cologne, he is the recipient of numerous awards and has exhibited internationally for several years. Concurrent with this exhibition works by Mike Meiré also form part of group exhibitions at the Kloster Wedinghausen in Arnsberg Germany (Sammlung Schroth : Information, until 19.8.) and at von Bartha Garage in Basel Switzerland, (Off the beaten track, curated by Lena Friedli, until 14.7.).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A catalogue entitled “Day In / Day Out” was published by Meurer Verlag, Cologne in 2010, a catalogue documenting 25 years of editorial design is currently in production.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">For further information or to receive reproduction quality images please contact the gallery.</span></p> Wed, 27 Jun 2012 09:38:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Group Show - CHARLIE SMITH london - August 3rd, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p>CHARLIE SMITH london is pleased to announce its second edition of the annual juried exhibition <i>Anthology, </i>in association with <b><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.winsornewton.com/community/" rel="nofollow">Winsor &amp; Newton</a></span></b>, suppliers of the world’s finest artists’ materials; <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://re-title.com/" title="http://go.madmimi.com/redirects/3f55b831512cd3a51aa3e581f9ad83da?pa=3661686136" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><b>re-title.com</b></a></span>, the international directory service for contemporary artists and galleries; <b><span style="text-decoration: underline;">WelcomeToCOMPANY,</span></b> the website for collectors by collectors; <b><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.spoonfed.co.uk/london/art/" rel="nofollow">Spoonfed</a></span></b>, the ultimate guide to what's on in London; and <b>The Mark Clannachan Collection.</b></p> <p> </p> <p>Selected and curated by internationally respected art world professionals, <i>Anthology </i>will be a multi-disciplinary exhibition that will reach out democratically to artists worldwide. Presented at the CHARLIE SMITH london gallery in Old St, London, the exhibition will continue to be a key barometer of emerging and established talent.</p> <p> </p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Prizes</span></p> <p> </p> <p>Ten finalists will be curated into the exhibition <i>Anthology </i>and one winner will be presented with:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>A cash prize of      £1,000 presented by CHARLIE SMITH london</li> <li>A cash prize of      £500 presented by the Mark Clannachan Collection</li> <li>A cash prize of      £500 presented by a private donor</li> <li>£500 worth of      artists’ materials awarded by Winsor &amp; Newton</li> <li>Lifetime      membership<b> </b>provided by      re-title.com</li> <li>Winner      announcement with re-title.com (42,000+ subscribers)</li> <li>A feature in      WelcometoCOMPANY’s newsletter (70,000+ subscribers)</li> </ul> Fri, 03 Aug 2012 11:47:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list - FOTO8 Gallery - July 7th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Foto8 Summershow is London’s greatest photographic spectacle, a veritable ‘salon de photographie’ – an inspiring array of framed and mounted images of all shapes and sizes, installed from floor to ceiling. London’s prestigious FOTO8 Gallery is the setting for the fifith annual Summershow which will features 159 framed photographs, selected from some 3200 entries spanning over 30 countries.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br />The 2012 Summershow runs <strong>7 July</strong> to <strong>18 August</strong>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /><br /><strong>The Awards</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The title of ‘Best In Show’ with prize money of £2000 will be ammounced and awardesd on the opening night of 6th July. The single winning photograph will be judged on 5th July. The 'People’s Choice", determined by votes cast by visitors to the gallery during the weeks of the exhibition, will be announced during August.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">All shortlisted work is included in a printed catalogue on sale from 6th July and will also feature as Foto8's online story of the week. Prints from the exhibition will be available for sale to the public from the gallery.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong> </strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>The 2012 Best in Show Jury comprises:<br /></strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Gerry Badger, </strong>photography curator and critic</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Phil Coomes, </strong>Director Photography, BBC Online</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Alison Jackson, </strong>Photographer</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Simon Roberts</strong>, Photographer</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Ossian Ward,</strong> Time Out Associate Editor and art critic</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Event<br />Foto8 Summershow Launch Party<br />6 July 2012, 6pm</strong> <br /><br />An additional 50 tickets have now been released. Tickets are free to reserve in advance but an entry fee of £10 will be charged on the night for those who haven't reserved.</span></p> Thu, 21 Jun 2012 18:39:05 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Henry Moore - Gagosian Gallery - Britannia Street - May 31st, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Everything I do, I intend to make on a large scale... Size itself has its own impact, and physically we can relate ourselves more strongly to a big sculpture than to a small one.</em></span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">—Henry Moore</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Gagosian Gallery</strong>, in collaboration with <strong>The Henry Moore Foundation</strong>, is pleased to present a major exhibition of large-scale sculptures by <strong>Henry Moore</strong>, some of which are being presented indoors for the first time.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Moore’s <em>oeuvre</em>, emblematic of modern British sculpture, is informed by elements of the abstract, the surreal, the primitive, and the classical. His rolling corporeal forms are as accessible and familiar as they are distinctly avant-garde. Moore’s first solo sculpture exhibition was held in London in 1928; by the late 1940s he had become one of Britain’s most celebrated artists with a diverse <em>oeuvre </em>that encompassed drawings, graphics, textiles, and sculpture. In the following decades he continued to receive increasingly significant sculpture commissions, following a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1946 and winning the international prize at the Venice Biennale in 1948.  His heightened success and fame provided him with the means to work increasingly in bronze rather than direct carving, thus achieving the monumental scale that he had always desired for his work. His large-scale sculptures have been placed in indoor and outdoor environments all over the world including Kenwood House, London; Dallas City Hall Plaza; Tiergarten, Berlin; the University of Chicago; Exchange Square, Hong Kong; UNESCO headquarters, Paris; Lincoln Center, New York; The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; the United Nations Headquarters, New York; the Houses of Parliament, London; St Paul’s Cathedral, London; and the City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Moore’s large-scale sculptures celebrated the beauty and power of organic forms at a time when traditional representation was largely eschewed by the vanguard art establishment. Their prodigious size and forceful presence have an overwhelming physicality that promotes a charged relation between sculpture, site, and viewer. In <em>Two Piece Reclining Figure No. 2</em> (1960) the rough texture of the patinated dark surface infuses the large corpus with a certain brutalism, the stunted head and blocky limbs akin to arched geological formations, weathered from time immemorial.  <em>Reclining Figure: Hand</em> (1979) is immediately identifiable as a human form despite its modulated stylization; the softly rounded, cloud-like body attests to Moore’s more exploratory impulses when compared to <em>Large Four Piece Reclining Figure</em> (1972–73) and <em>Reclining Connected Forms</em> (1969), where he alludes to body parts using the vocabulary of mechanical components. <em>Large Two Forms</em> (1966) and<em> Large Spindle Piece</em> (1974) evidence an interest in both natural and man-made objects.</span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;"> It was Moore’s intention that these large-scale forms be interacted with, viewed close-up, and even touched. In order that their heft and mass be perceived in myriad of settings, they were most commonly placed outdoors, subject to the effects of changing light, seasons, and terrain. Within the controlled white environment of the gallery space, the sheer volume and mammoth proportions of the sculptures are more keenly felt. Brimming with latent energy, their richly textured surfaces and sensual, rippling arcs and concavities can be seen to new effect.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition, featuring essays by Anita Feldman and Anne Wagner.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Henry Moore</strong> was born in West Yorkshire, England in 1898 and died in East Hertfordshire, England in 1986. His public commissions occupy university campuses, pastoral expanses and major urban centers in 38 countries around the world. His sculpture and drawings have been the subject of many museum exhibitions and retrospectives, including the Tate Gallery, London (1951); Whitechapel Gallery, London (1957); Tate Gallery, London (1968); Forte di Belvedere, Florence (1972); Tate Gallery and the Serpentine Gallery, London for the occasion of Moore’s eightieth birthday (1978); Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (1983); Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield (1987); Royal Academy of Arts (1988); Shanghai Art Museum (2001); Henry Moore, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (2001); CaixaForum, Barcelona, (2008); Kunsthal, Rotterdam (2006, travelled to Didrichsen Museum, Helsinki in 2008); Kew Botanical Gardens, London (2007–08); Tate Britain (2010); Kremlin Museum, Moscow (2012).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Henry Moore Foundation was founded by Moore in 1977 to increase public enjoyment of the arts, especially sculpture. Today it opens his restored Hertfordshire home, studios and sculpture grounds to the public, tours the world's largest collection of his work, and runs sculpture exhibitions and research at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. It also supports sculpture through an active grants programme. For 2012, The Foundation has launched Henry Moore Friends, an opportunity to help promote the artist's legacy.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><a href="http://www.henry-moore.org/">www.henry-moore.org</a></p> Mon, 16 Apr 2012 15:47:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Elizabeth McAlpine - Laura Bartlett Gallery - June 29th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 Wed, 27 Jun 2012 09:47:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Roger Dean, Andrew Cross, Jonathan Gent, Merlin James, Peter Kinley, Bob Law, George Shaw, Mark Wallinger - Mummery + Schnelle - June 29th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em>A Bucolic Frolic: Distractions from the Modern</em> takes a look at some tendencies to be found in English </span><span style="font-size: small;">art, design and music from 1960s to the present day which indicate a particular refusal to accept an </span><span style="font-size: small;">inevitable onslaught of economic and technological modernity, preferring instead visions of alternative </span><span style="font-size: small;">worlds and reinterpretations of the existing one. The exhibition groups together painting, </span><span style="font-size: small;">photography, graphic design, architectural propositions and material related to the music and politics </span><span style="font-size: small;">of the outdoor free festival movement.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Rather than an un-tethering from earlier cultural reference, or seeking the comfort of a nostalgic </span><span style="font-size: small;">Romanticism, suggested in this exhibition is something that is much more of an awkward but </span><span style="font-size: small;">necessary renegotiation with landscape and the ancient to be found in expressions of the sometimes </span><span style="font-size: small;">fantastic and utopian; a desire to embrace the past as part of the future, the combining of the spiritual </span><span style="font-size: small;">with the directly political, the local with the cosmic, the wandering and ephemeral as much as the </span><span style="font-size: small;">permanent.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">The exhibition will feature drawings and sketchbooks by designer Roger Dean. Famous for his LP </span><span style="font-size: small;">cover designs from the 1970s, the architectural propositions shown here extend his distinctive </span><span style="font-size: small;">visionary landscapes into realisable places for future utopian living. Forging his own distinctive </span><span style="font-size: small;">trajectory, at variance with the much more strictly formal art of the time, Dean’s otherworldly blend </span><span style="font-size: small;">of the ancient and the future pre-empted the highly eclectic styles of art and design seen today.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">Central to much late 20</span><span style="font-size: small;">th </span><span style="font-size: small;">century English modernism was a fine line between figurative art and </span><span style="font-size: small;">abstraction. It was a tussle explored particularly well by Peter Kinley and Bob Law. In his paintings of </span><span style="font-size: small;">rural Wiltshire Kinley renders a quintessential landscape into the simplest set of painting motifs to </span><span style="font-size: small;">provide a highly specific mapping and description of place. The more abstract art of Bob Law </span><span style="font-size: small;">possessed a formal rigor often far greater than many of his contemporaries yet it was also informed </span><span style="font-size: small;">by a sensitivity to ideas of mythology and place. His Field Drawings are a diagrammatic account of </span><span style="font-size: small;">landscape experienced as a site for temporary artistic and spiritual occupancy.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">By contrast the highly representational paintings of George Shaw comprise a sustained enquiry into </span><span style="font-size: small;">the memory of lived places on the suburban fringe; the characteristic landscape of childhood </span><span style="font-size: small;">adventure and teenage boredom. Yet these places are the inspiration for an artistic vision in the </span><span style="font-size: small;">Romantic tradition that invests all landscapes whether of an ancient past or modern present with </span><span style="font-size: small;">equal poignancy. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The photographs of Andrew Cross are a revisit to the landscape of his childhood Wiltshire, a </span><span style="font-size: small;">landscape often at variants with the rustic idyl informed by agricultural expediency, military occupancy </span><span style="font-size: small;">and hard fought battles over rights.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">The desire to escape from the urban jungle of Glasgow leads Jonathan Gent to depict himself as a </span><span style="font-size: small;">knight embarking on a grail quest to Glastonbury, whereas Merlin James’s painting of a piper in motley, </span><span style="font-size: small;">taken from a seventeenth century garden sculpture, harks back to an earlier age of pastoral music </span><span style="font-size: small;">making.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">Mark Wallinger’s maquette for his 52m high monument of a white horse to stand alongside the A2 at </span><span style="font-size: small;">Ebbsfleet in Kent reflects on both the historical English landscape and the modern transport system </span><span style="font-size: small;">that links the UK to continental Europe. England’s pastoral island utopia now only twenty minutes by  </span><span style="font-size: small;">train under the Channel to France.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">As part of the exhibition a selection of archival material exploring aspects of the 1960s counterculture and the free festival movement will also be displayed. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">The <em>A Bucolic Frolic</em> project will also include screenings from 4-8 July at the Dye House in South </span><span style="font-size: small;">London of two films by Andrew Cross exploring the relationship between music and space. The Solo, </span><span style="font-size: small;">a film featuring the music of Carl Palmer, and a new work featuring the music of Nik Turner. Cross </span><span style="font-size: small;">brings Turner and Palmer together for the first time since the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival. It was on </span><span style="font-size: small;">the official Festival stage that supergroup Emerson, Lake &amp; Palmer made their highly successful first </span><span style="font-size: small;">major public appearance while Nik Turner and Hawkwind famously performed for free on an </span><span style="font-size: small;">unofficial stage outside the festival’s notorious steel boundary fence.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p>The Dye House<br />Nutbrook Studios, 33 Nutbrook St. London SE15 4JU<br />Screenings will be at 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm, 5pm.<br />Special evening private view: Saturday July 7<br />th<br />5-8pm</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Accompanying both exhibition and film screening will be a free newsprint publication that will include </span><span style="font-size: small;">articles on the outdoor music festivals of the 1970s and 80s by Rob Young, on the architecture of </span><span style="font-size: small;">landscape occupancy by Adrian Friend and an interview with legendary folk-singer Shirley Collins by </span><span style="font-size: small;">Jonathan Watts.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> Sun, 24 Jun 2012 15:03:44 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Bas Geerts, Wojciech Bakowski, Coen Vunderink, Davina Semo, Gino Saccone, Justin Matherly, Noa Giniger - Paradise Row - July 7th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>A group show curated by <strong>Gabriel Rolt</strong><strong>.</strong></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong><em><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></em></strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong><em>Everything's Alright Forever</em> </strong>features works that play on the tension between surface and depth and exemplify the beauty and difficulty of attempting to use aesthetic forms to express the ineffable.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">The exhibition brings together artists from the Netherlands, Poland, the U. S. and the U.K., several of them showing in London for the first time.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Wojciech Bakowski</strong> (Poznań, b. 1979) is an artist, poet and musician, for whom reality is tangible and primarily audible. His projects, such as "Spoken Movies", combine different practices in order to explore the relationship between words and images, arguing that the two are in fact inseparable.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The work of the Dutch artist <strong>Bas Geerts</strong> (Leiden, b. 1971, lives and works in Amsterdam) is characterized by the stratification of transparant layers, using pure pigments, acrylics and metal leaf - often treated with patinas. In designing the layers, Geerts writes his own computer programs, randomizing the positioning and shape of parallelograms.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Noa Giniger</strong> (Tel-Aviv, b. 1977) creates sculptures and installations that demonstrate the tension between existence and essence, and questions the conceptions of space and time. She uses the acts of transformation and dislocation to elicit emotional responses and poetical meanings from everyday objects. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">  </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Justin Matherly</strong> (West Islip, b. 1972, lives and works in Brooklyn) is known for his large-scale cast sculptures, often drawing on the classical past. In his work Matherly concentrates on the interrelation between ideas, different intellectual texts and philosophies forming a fundamental part of his artistic process.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Gino Saccone</strong> (Jersey, b.1979, lives and works in London and Amsterdam) is an artist and filmmaker, whose work explores the fundamental inner workings of language, as well as the ways in which information can be formulated and expressed. By inter-relating different elements of his work, Saccone intends to open up potential psychological spaces, fictions and cultural references.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Davina Semo</strong> (Washington D.C., b. 1981, lives and works in Brooklyn) combines a neo-minimalist formal language with the materials and aesthetic of the contemporary urban environment, utilizing concrete, glass, chains and spray paint, to create a succession of surfaces that speak with a brutal beauty.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">  </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Coen Vunderink</strong>'s (Dalfsen, b. 1979) creates sculptures and paintings that demonstrate an ambiguous relationship between abstraction and figuration. His airbrush paintings, in which he makes use of traditional material such as egg tempera, are closely connected to his sculptures, a cross-pollination of artistic mediums, which forms the basis of his practice.</span></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> Fri, 13 Jul 2012 18:27:55 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Hannes Zebedin, Daniel Wilkinson, Lincoln Tobier, Christian Teckart, Slavs and Tatars, Diego Santomé, Marisol Malatesta, Nils Norman, Oliver Klimpel - Royal College of Art - Battersea, Dyson Building - July 18th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">The Europa Triangle</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"> is a group exhibition about how we imagine Europe today, explored by ten international artists and designers whose work is concerned with public space and current affairs. Curated by Kit Hammonds, Tutor from the RCA’s Curating Contemporary Art MA, with additional contributions by students from the programme. The title of the exhibition refers to a motif present between all the works – triangles. This simple shape is used by the artists to comment on models for public space in society, politics and economics.</span><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Hannes Zebedin’s new commission looks at grass-roots movements resulting from last year’s London riots. Using waste materials from the carpet store in Tottenham where the riots began, Zebedin’s work looks at cycles of deprivation and renewal and the careful balance of order and disorder in society. Diego Santomé’s poetic documentary records immigrants building elaborate sandcastles for pocket change while they await their entry papers, suggesting their imagination of western European continents wealth.</span><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Corporate pyramid structures reflect the power of governance - Lincoln Tobier’s play,</span><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">The Orchestra Pit Theory</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">, looks at the role news media plays in effecting political opinion by reconstructing a television interview with Fox News CEO Roger Ailes. Marisol Malatesta’s series of drawings take images from decision-making in local government with participants’ faces obliterated by black triangular blocks.  Both comment on the representation of political life in the media and its effects on opinions.</span><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Elsewhere, political structures are made visible in satirical works. Daniel Wilkinson’s installation reconstructs the illicit inside George Orwell’s </span><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">1984</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"> which portrays the bureaucratic structure of the Big Brother government – itself a pyramid of Elites, Workers and Proles. Slavs &amp; Tatars’ sculpture, </span><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Triangulation</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">, addresses the geography of Europe, not as a centre, but as somewhere in between, while also alluding to the third way politics dominant in liberal states in recent years. Nils Norman’s satirical maps propose an anarchist view of Romney Marshes, a triangle of land known for its independence and coined ‘the fifth continent’.</span><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">By drawing together various social models </span><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">The Europa Triangle</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"> seeks to relate political issues as being equally formative in Europe’s character. Further research by the curator and students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art programme will be displayed in a space designed by Oliver Klimpel and Christian Teckart alongside a programme of public talks and workshops.</span><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">The Europa Triangle</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"> is the first exhibition in the trans-national project, </span><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Europe (to the power</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"> </span><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">of) n</span></i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">, which will involve contemporary art collaborations with institutions world-wide. It is supported by the Goethe Institut, the EU Culture 2013 Programme, Robert Bosch Stiftung and the Allianz Kulturstiftung, with additional support from Publish and be Damned.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><b><i><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Europe (to the power of) n</span></i></b></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">Thirty scenarios, and thirty different ways of thinking about Europe, form the point of departure for the trans-regional art project. Europe (to the power of) n, which takes place in Brussels, Istanbul, London, Łódź</span><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;">, Minsk, Novi Sad, Høvikodden/Oslo, San Sebastián, and Beijing. The launch of the project starts with a festival at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin in July 2012. From there the scenarios, that have been developed by international artists in collaboration with international curators, are shown, realised, contextualised and extended at nine venues in and outside the European Union between July 2012 and April 2013. It is a project of the Excellence Initiative of the Goethe-Institut.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span face="Arial" size="5" style="font-family: Arial;"> </span></span></p> Wed, 06 Feb 2013 15:45:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Jenny Holzer - Sprüth Magers London - June 1st, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Sprüth Magers London is delighted to present a solo exhibition of work by Jenny Holzer. The American artist finds ways to make narrative a part of visual objects, employing an innovative range of materials and presentations to confront emotions and experiences, politics and conflict. Entitled <i>SOPHISTICATED DEVICES</i>, this exhibition provides a survey of Holzer’s practice, encompassing her spray paint canvases, granite benches, LED works, painted signs, and cast plaques. </span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;">The large spray paint canvases on view at the gallery are the result of collaborations with New York graffiti artists Lady Pink and A-One, whose haunting images are supplemented with Holzer’s provocative statements. In <i>I AM NOT FREE BECAUSE I CAN BE EXPLODED ANYTIME</i> (1983-84), Holzer’s characteristically cryptic phrase is hand-lettered over a scene, spray-painted by Pink, of bodies in despair. The collaborative works feature text from Survival, a series of cautionary texts, in which each sentence instructs, informs or questions the ways an individual responds to his or her social, physical, psychological and personal environments. Just as street art seeks to have an immediate impact on an unsuspecting public, the Survival phrases have an urgent tone, the sentences short and pointed so as to be instantly accessible to passersby. </span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;">The artist’s granite benches will be on display in the front gallery, inscribed with words from the <i>Living</i> series (1980-1982), in which Holzer presents a set of quiet observations, directions, and warnings. The commentaries touch on how the individual negotiates landscapes, persons, rules, expectations, desires, fears, other bodies, one's flesh, and one's self. Holzer began working with stone in 1986. Her idea was to find a home for her texts that was resistant to the vagaries of time and destruction, as lasting as the light of her electronic signs is transitory. The bench form was selected because it offered people a place to sit and converse with others. The utility of the object allows her to insinuate texts that are not immediately consistent with the domestic or park-like settings where they might be placed. </span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;">Similarly delivering messages from the <i>Living</i> and <i>Survival</i> series will be a selection of vintage LED artworks, enamel on metal hand-painted signs, and cast plaques. Recognized as Holzer’s signature medium, electronic signs have been part of the artist’s practice since the early eighties, initially adopted for its association with news and advertising, and as a mode of direct address. The LED work <i>Under a Rock</i> (1986) features text from the series of the same name, here showcasing the words ‘Tick Tick’. Composed specifically for electronic signs and stone benches, this series explores the unmentionable as well as pain’s manifestations and persistence. The plaques and painted signs, installed in the rear gallery, recall those that often appear on historic buildings, lending the writing authority and a voice of the establishment. </span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Jenny Holzer</strong> lives and works in New York. In 1990 she represented the United States at the Venice Biennale where she won the Leone d'Oro for Best Pavilion. Solo shows include ICA, London (1988), Dia Art Foundation, New York (1989), Guggenheim Museum, New York (1989), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1991), Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg (2000), Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2001, 2011), Barbican Art Gallery, London (2006), Whitney Museum, New York (2009), Foundation Beyeler, Basel (2009), DHC/ART Foundation for Contemporary Art, Montreal (2010), and BALTIC, Gateshead (2010). Group shows include Whitney Museum, New York (1983, 1988, 1989, 1996), Documenta 8, Kassel (1987), Centre Pompidou, Paris (1988, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005), MoMA, New York (1988, 1992, 1996, 1997, 2005, 2008), Hayward Gallery, London (1992), Venice Biennale, Venice (2005), Barbican Art Gallery, London (2008) and Victoria and Albert Museum, London (2011). </span></p> Mon, 16 Jul 2012 16:27:28 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list William Eckersley - Vegas Gallery - July 6th, 2012 - August 18th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>VEGAS</strong> is delighted to present <strong><em>DARK CITY</em></strong>, a solo show by photographer <strong>William Eckersley</strong>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The culmination of four years’ work, DARK CITY is a collection of London night-scenes. The project sees Eckersley continuing his investigation of the built environment and de-peopled cityscapes. Described by Monocle as showing “the empty humanity of England’s vast metropolis at its most vivid and alluring”, DARK CITY offers an alternative view of the capital during the Olympic frenzy.</span></p> Tue, 19 Jun 2012 08:43:48 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Titian - National Gallery - April 4th, 2012 - August 19th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">Throughout his long career, Titian enjoyed the patronage of dukes and kings. He still continues to be recognised as one of the greatest artists of all time.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">'Titian's First Masterpiece: The Flight into Egypt' examines the talented young artist's creation of an extraordinarily ambitious and innovative work, 'The Flight into Egypt', which is believed to be one of his earliest paintings.</span></p> <h2 style="color: #ffffff; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">About the painting</span></h2> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">'The Flight into Egypt' gave Titian a subject where he had the chance to display his precocious skills in depicting landscapes. The painting reveals an already bold brushwork and exhilarating use of colour – characteristics that would become signatures of his artistic style.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">The artwork, which has been generously lent to the National Gallery by the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, will go on display after years of skilled restoration. This will be the first time the painting has been seen outside Russia since 1768, when Empress Catherine the Great purchased it in Venice.</span></p> <h2 style="color: #ffffff; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">Works on display</span></h2> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small; color: #000000;">The exhibition will display Titian's masterpiece alongside contemporary Venetian works – both from the National Gallery and loans from other British collections – to demonstrate how Titian adapted ideas from other artists's work in order to create his sophisticated composition.</span></p> Fri, 18 May 2012 16:21:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Jim Channon - Raven Row - July 28th, 2012 - August 19th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A project by Suzanne Treister at Raven Row over four weekends featuring four keynote speeches within a specially designed theatre: A global futurist, a U.S. Security Agency insider, an anarcho-primitivist and the international expert on world's fairs... Alongside an exhibition including three unique libraries, two video lounges and designs for a virtual world's fair. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>WEEKENDS 28/29 JULY, 4/5, 11/12, 18/19 AUGUST 2012</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Saturdays:</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">3pm: Exhibition open. Food will be served</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">5–7pm: Lecture/Performance (see below)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">7–9pm: Exhibition open. Food and drink will be served</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Sundays:</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">11–6pm: Exhibition open, with screenings of previous lecture/performances </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Since London’s Great Exhibition of 1851 world’s fairs have provided a space for nations to represent themselves. They are potent signs of the fantasies, politics and technologies of their times and aspirations for the future. THE REAL TRUTH <em>A </em><em>WORLD’S FAIR </em>exposes aspects of the present and proposes ways into the future.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A contextual introduction will be provided by Robert W. Rydell’s in-depth analysis of the politics and histories of world’s fairs, to be followed by lecture/performances from three visionary speakers: John Zerzan, Jim Channon and Richard Thieme, who actively devote their lives to ideas, visions and projects for the future of the planet.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">During the weekends Raven Row's upstairs galleries will house three libraries: A Military/Intelligence Recruitment Library, <em>Fifth Estate </em>Anarchist Magazine 1965–2012 and Jon Bewley’s ‘Conspiracy Theory’ Library. Historical artefacts from world’s fairs, designs for a virtual world’s fair, and memorabilia provided by each speaker will also be displayed. Screenings in the video lounges will include <em>Strange Culture </em>by Lynn Hershman Leeson (2007) and <em>Das Netz </em>by Lutz Dammbeck (2003).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">THE REAL TRUTH <em>A WORLD’S FAIR </em>will provide audiences with extraordinary food for thought and action.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Suzanne Treister</strong> is a London-based artist. Her most recent project, ‘HEXEN 2.0’, was shown this year at the Science Museum, London, travelling to Hartware MedienKunstverein, Dortmund; D21, Leipzig; Secession, Vienna and P.P.O.W, New York.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">SATURDAY 28 JULY, 5pm</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>ROBERT RYDELL</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">CRYSTAL PALACES, CRYSTAL BALLS, AND CRYSTAL-CLEAR ILLUSIONS OF PROGRESS: FROM WORLD'S FAIRS TO THE WORLD WIDE WEB</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Robert Rydell is Professor of History and Director of the Montana Humanities Institute at Montana State University. He has written books that examine the power of the world’s fairs to define the modern world, especially to lend legitimacy to America’s growing imperial ambitions after the Civil War. Rydell demonstrates ways that international exhibitions reveal intersections between the cultural politics of race, class and gender and afford important insights into the complexities of globalisation.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">SATURDAY 4 AUGUST, 5pm</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>JOHN ZERZAN</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">THE MURDEROUS IDOLATRY OF THE FUTURE: ANARCHO-PRIMITIVISM AND THE END OF TECHNOLOGY</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">John Zerzan was active in the Sixties in San Francisco and Berkeley. A leading participant in the contemporary anarchist resurgence, Zerzan's political project calls for the destruction of technology. He draws the distinction between tools that stay under the control of the user, and technological systems that draw the user into their control. His critical ideas have challenged symbolic thought, mathematics, art and the concept of time. Zerzan has published in the Detroit magazine <em>Fifth Estate </em>and his books include <em>Elements of Refusal </em>(1988, 1999), <em>Against Civilization </em>(1999) and <em>Future Primitive Revisited </em>(2012).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">SATURDAY 11 AUGUST</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">4pm</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">RECITAL FROM MEMORY OF THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS BY MONICA ROSS</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">5pm</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>JIM CHANNON</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">GO PLANET! A STRATEGIC VISIONARY STORY AND ART FOR THE NEXT MILITARY CENTURY!</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em> </em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Jim Channon, a former Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Army, is a futurologist and military theorist. As a professional soldier, he commanded five combat units, with two years in Vietnam, and in 1978 created the <em>First Earth </em><em>Battalion Field Manual </em>for non-lethal warfare. In his work as social architect, philosopher and futurist he remains a key adviser to military think tanks and specialises in ‘Natural Security’ and ‘Global Reconstruction’. He has created designs for a global village, a district, several bioregions and the planet connected with a webocracy, ‘imagining the Army's full potential as an instrument for the future.’ Jim Channon’s history was explored in Jon Ronson’s book, <em>The Men Who Stare at </em><em>Goats </em>(2004).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">SATURDAY 18 AUGUST, 5pm</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>RICHARD THIEME</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A WILDERNESS OF MIRRORS: CONSPIRACY THEORIES AND THE NECESSARY COUNTER-INTELLIGENCE OF EVERYDAY LIFE</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Richard Thieme speaks professionally about the challenges posed by new technologies and the future, and how we might reinvent ourselves to meet them. Clients range from GE and Microsoft to the National Security Agency, FBI, U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Department of the Treasury. Formerly an Episcopalian minister, Thieme has also spoken for sixteen years at the Black Hat Briefings on intelligence and corporate security, and at Def Con, an annual computer hacker convention. Thieme’s books include: <em>Islands in the Clickstream </em>(2004) and <em>Mind </em><em>Games, A Collection of Nineteen Stories of Brave New Worlds and Alternate Realities </em>(2010).</span></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> Mon, 16 Jul 2012 16:43:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Natasha Ratcliffe, Petra Mills, Sara Richards, Chloe Shaw, Phoebe Stannard, Heidi Hinder - Victoria and Albert Museum - February 11th, 2012 - August 19th, 2012 <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Natasha Ratcliffe, Petra Mills, Sara Richards, Chloe Shaw, Phoebe Stannard and Heidi Hinder</strong> are the New Medallists. Their work breathes new life into the centuries-old art of the medal. Usually cast in metal, art medals are small sculptures, made for personal pleasure or contemplation. Often deeply introspective, these objects are best appreciated in the hand, where they may connect intimately with their (be)holder.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In this display, the New Medallists tell us the thoughts behind the medals they created and how works by their mentors and objects from the V&amp;A collections have inspired their practice. The display celebrates the first six years of the <a href="http://www.bams.org.uk/education.php" target="_blank">New Medallist scheme</a>, an initiative run by the <a href="http://www.bams.org.uk/" target="_blank">British Art Medal Society (BAMS)</a> in association with the V&amp;A, the British Museum and the Royal Mint and supported by the E.S.G. Robinson Trust. By nurturing a new generation of British medallists, the New Medallist scheme is designed to stimulate the field’s originality. In making a contribution to the present, the New Medallists will shape the future of medals in Britain and Ireland.</span></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Natasha Ratcliffe (born 1982)</span></h4> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.natasharatcliffe.co.uk/" target="_blank">Natasha Ratcliffe</a> made her first medals as part of the <a href="http://www.bams.org.uk/education.php" target="_blank">BAMS Student Medal Project</a> in which she participated annually while studying Fine Arts at Falmouth College of Arts. After graduating in 2004, she became the first recipient of the New Medallist scheme in 2005. Her work shows a trademark fondness for detail and sense of humour. Growing up in the countryside, she developed a love for the natural world that is reflected in her medals.</span></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Petra Mills (born 1971)</span></h4> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Like her predecessor, 2006-7 New Medallist Petra Mills graduated from Falmouth College of Art and took part in the BAMS Student Medal Project in 2003 and 2004. Her practice shows a fascination for memory, personal or collective, and an interest in the object’s ‘journey’. She sources ideas from her intimate surroundings or uses found objects to create ‘medallic mementoes’. Very personal pieces, some of her medals are based on pure emotion.</span></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Sara Richards (born 1969)</span></h4> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">After studying three-dimensional crafts at the University of Brighton, <a href="http://www.sararichards.info" target="_blank">Sara Richards</a> embarked on a Goldsmithing, Silversmithing, Metalwork and Jewellery MA at the Royal College of Art, when she won a prize in the medal competition sponsored by the Royal Mint. She became the third New Medallist in 2007. Interested in the arts, spirituality and philosophy of the East, her work explores duality and the human condition, in pieces that often blur boundaries between medal and sculpture.</span></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Chloe Shaw (born 1983)</span></h4> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Chloe Shaw graduated from Falmouth College of Art in 2007, and was selected as the New Medallist the following year. Shaw privileges a conceptual approach to the medal: her interest in this medium lies in its ability to embody an idea physically. Her work reflects her interests in the transience of life and longevity, weight and lightness, matter and antimatter.</span></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Phoebe Stannard (born 1987)</span></h4> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In addition to medal-making, 2009-10 New Medallist <a href="http://web.me.com/phoebe.stannard/website/Home.html" target="_blank">Phoebe Stannard</a> works in painting, print and drawing. While studying Fine Art at Norwich School of Art and Design, where she specialised in painting, Phoebe Stannard also participated in the Student Medal Project. She recently completed a two-year postgraduate course in drawing and printing at the Prince’s Drawing School in London. Inspired by classical myths and the Commedia dell’Arte, Stannard describes her work as ‘theatrical, hypothetical and imaginary’, fundamentally questioning self-image.</span></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Heidi Hinder (born 1976)</span></h4> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.behance.net/heidihinder" target="_blank">Heidi Hinder</a> comes to medal-making from jewellery: many of her medals are constructed as assembled pieces. After graduating from Birmingham City University’s School of Jewellery, she was artist-in-residence there when she became the 2010-11 New Medallist. Attracted to medals as objects invested with meaning, Hinder places perception at the heart of her thought and making process. Her medals show her interest in optical devices, sciences and literature.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This display complements the exhibition</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/exhibition-british-design/">British Design 1948-2012: Innovation in the Modern Age</a></strong></span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> 31 March - 12 August 2012</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> Sponsored by</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> Ernst &amp; Young</span></p> <div style="text-align: justify;" rel="vamembed"><span style="font-size: small;"><img src="http://media.vam.ac.uk/media/website/versions/uploads/logos/ernst-and-young-logo_130x86.jpg" alt="Ernst &amp; Young logo" /></span></div> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Part of the <a href="http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/b/british-design-season/">V&amp;A British Design Season</a></span></p> Sun, 20 May 2012 16:31:23 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list