ArtSlant - Openings & events http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/show en-us 40 Rachael Champion - Camden Arts Centre - May 27th, 2012 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This will be a special family-focused afternoon full of activities for all ages inspired by Rachel Champion's ideas.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Champion’s practice is based around large scale constructions and architectural interventions; fabricated environments which interrogate humanity’s shifting and uncertain relationship with technology and the natural world. Typically Champion uses materials commonly found on the sites of major construction projects. These industrial products, often hidden in the landscape, are deliberately presented out of context juxtaposing their alien sculptural qualities with an inherent functionality. The work is informed by such diverse areas of knowledge as municipal architecture, ecology and mechanics. For this residency Champion will be working in both the Artists’ Studio and the garden to research and develop new work. </span></p> Sat, 05 May 2012 15:59:52 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Paula Rego - Marlborough Fine Art - May 28th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;">The Directors of Marlborough Fine Art are delighted to announce their forthcoming exhibition of new paintings and graphics by Paula Rego.  This exhibition coincides with the publication of the revised and updated Catalogue Raisonné by Tom Rosenthal of Thames &amp; Hudson.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">One of Honoré de Balzac's most celebrated tales, The Unknown Masterpiece is the story of a painter who, depending on one's perspective, is either an abject failure or a transcendental genius - or both. The story has served as an inspiration to artists as various as Cézanne, Henry James, Picasso, and Paula Rego.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The sumptuously produced Catalogue Raisonné discusses and illustrates all Rego’s prints, including unpublished work. The second edition includes chapters on five new series produced since 2003 – Moon Eggs, Prince Pig, Wine, Curved Planks and Female Genital Mutilation; on the influence of Irish playwright Martin McDonagh’s work on Rego; and an updated section of Works Out of Series.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Many of Rego’s prints are based on themes, as she says that one image triggers the idea for the next. Among these are Rego’s Nursery Rhymes, which reveal a darkly humorous take on the difficulties of childhood, and provide a rich seam for her precocious girls and individually characterized animals. Her work is known for revealing complex stories about the sinister side of sexuality and family relations, and Rego’s feminism underlies everything she does: the six works in the Female Genital Mutilation series are some of the most powerful images that she has ever produced.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A fully illustrated catalogue of the exhibition will be published with an introduction by Tom Rosenthal.    The revised edition of Paula Rego: The Complete Graphic Work will be available for purchase at the Gallery.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">For further information and photographs, please contact Frankie Rossi or John Erle-Drax: <a href="mailto:frossi@marlboroughfineart.com" target="_blank">frossi@marlboroughfineart.com</a>; <a href="mailto:jdrax@marlboroughfineart.com" target="_blank">jdrax@marlboroughfineart.com</a></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></p> Wed, 16 May 2012 17:25:41 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list - Design Museum - May 29th, 2012 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Enjoy a guided tour of the <a href="http://designmuseum.org/exhibitions/2012/christian-louboutin">Christian Louboutin</a> exhibition followed by a special dinner at the <a href="http://www.blueprintcafe.co.uk/" rel="external">Blueprint Café</a> restaurant with exhibition curator Donna Loveday. Over dinner, Donna will speak about her methods of curation and motivations behind this landmark show. Ticket includes aperitif on arrival, private viewing of Christian Louboutin, presentation by Donna Loveday, three-course dinner with coffee and service charge. Additional drinks excluded.</span></p> <p><strong>BOOKING</strong><br /> Tickets £75<br /> T 020 7378 7031<br /> E <a href="mailto:blueprintcafe@danddlondon.com">blueprintcafe@danddlondon.com</a></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></p> Thu, 17 May 2012 17:13:59 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Rachel Lichtenstein - Tintype - May 29th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p>We are delighted to present Rachel Lichtenstein’s <i>Sight Unseen</i>. The show coincides with the launch of her new</p> <p>book <i>Diamond Street: the Hidden World of Hatton Garden </i>(Hamish Hamilton).</p> <p>Working behind closed doors, both above and below the streets around Hatton Garden, are cutters, polishers, engravers, gem dealers, silversmiths, gold beaters, pearl merchants, assayers and lapidaries. Their skills, knowledge, stories and memories are the source for Rachel Lichtenstein’s exhibition <i>Sight Unseen, </i>a multi-layered homage to the craftspeople operating in the area.</p> <p>Tintype’s gallery space was formerly a watchmaker’s workshop and is located in a building full of jewellery related businesses, typical of the industrious and close-knit world of Hatton Garden.</p> Wed, 23 May 2012 16:33:03 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Howard Hodgkin - Alan Cristea Gallery - 31 Cork St - May 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In honour of the artist’s 80th birthday, this exhibition will take place in both of our galleries and feature a new series of twelve hand-painted intaglio prints in small editions.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A major new body of works on paper by Howard Hodgkin, one of Britain's most important living artists, form the basis of our exhibitionin celebration of the artist's 80th birthday.  These 11 new works are remarkably different in feel to much of his earlier work; each is a surprising and powerful burst of energy, displaying brio and passion which, together, cover the spectrum of emotions, from a sense of deep foreboding in some, to joy, and, possibly, even anger in others. The exhibition title <em>Acquainted with the Night,</em> references the celebrated Robert Frost poem of the same name, often interpreted as a vivid description of the experience of depression, and has a particularly special meaning for Howard Hodgkin as it was the title of his first, and no longer extant lithograph print, made nearly 60 years ago in 1953. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with introduction by art historian, John-Paul Stonard. The exhibition catalogue will also be available in a deluxe version accompanied by a limited edition print in an edition of 50.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Hodgkin's paintings and prints often evoke memories and private experiences. Since the 1950s, he has made a substantial number of original prints and, for the last 25 years, has favoured heavily hand-painted carborundum and aquatint etchings which allow him to bring the physicality of the paintings into his printmaking.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This series of works, some brooding and sombre while others bristle with intensity and physicality, marks a shift in style for Hodgkin, representing a spectrum of emotions while combining confidently pared-down compositions with a sense of spontaneity that belies the extensive process of layering and over-painting by which they have been created.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Born in London on 6 August 1932, Hodgkin studied at the Camberwell School of Art between 1949 and 1950, followed by the Bath Academy of Art between 1950 and 1954. He has served as a trustee of the Tate and the National Gallery, London and in 1992 was knighted for his services to the arts. In 1985, Hodgkin won the Turner Prize and represented Britain in the Venice Biennale. His work has been the subject of numerous major retrospectives, most notably at the Metropolitan Museum, New York in 1995 and more recently, in 2006, at the Tate Britain, London, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid. His paintings and prints are held by most major museums including the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum, New York, the Tate Collection, and the British Museum, London. Hodgkin's previous print project, As Time Goes By, was a pair of monumental, 20ft long carborundum and sugar-lift etchings, which now reside in the permanent collections of the Phillips Collection, Washington DC.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Alan Cristea has been the exclusive publisher of Hodgkin's prints since 1987.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> Thu, 24 May 2012 01:02:42 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Howard Hodgkin - Alan Cristea Gallery- 34 Cork St - May 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In honour of the artist’s 80th birthday, this exhibition will take place in both of our galleries and feature a new series of twelve hand-painted intaglio prints in small editions.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A major new body of works on paper by Howard Hodgkin, one of Britain's most important living artists, form the basis of our exhibitionin celebration of the artist's 80th birthday.  These 11 new works are remarkably different in feel to much of his earlier work; each is a surprising and powerful burst of energy, displaying brio and passion which, together, cover the spectrum of emotions, from a sense of deep foreboding in some, to joy, and, possibly, even anger in others. The exhibition title <em>Acquainted with the Night,</em> references the celebrated Robert Frost poem of the same name, often interpreted as a vivid description of the experience of depression, and has a particularly special meaning for Howard Hodgkin as it was the title of his first, and no longer extant lithograph print, made nearly 60 years ago in 1953. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with introduction by art historian, John-Paul Stonard. The exhibition catalogue will also be available in a deluxe version accompanied by a limited edition print in an edition of 50.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Hodgkin's paintings and prints often evoke memories and private experiences. Since the 1950s, he has made a substantial number of original prints and, for the last 25 years, has favoured heavily hand-painted carborundum and aquatint etchings which allow him to bring the physicality of the paintings into his printmaking.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This series of works, some brooding and sombre while others bristle with intensity and physicality, marks a shift in style for Hodgkin, representing a spectrum of emotions while combining confidently pared-down compositions with a sense of spontaneity that belies the extensive process of layering and over-painting by which they have been created.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Born in London on 6 August 1932, Hodgkin studied at the Camberwell School of Art between 1949 and 1950, followed by the Bath Academy of Art between 1950 and 1954. He has served as a trustee of the Tate and the National Gallery, London and in 1992 was knighted for his services to the arts. In 1985, Hodgkin won the Turner Prize and represented Britain in the Venice Biennale. His work has been the subject of numerous major retrospectives, most notably at the Metropolitan Museum, New York in 1995 and more recently, in 2006, at the Tate Britain, London, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid. His paintings and prints are held by most major museums including the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum, New York, the Tate Collection, and the British Museum, London. Hodgkin's previous print project, As Time Goes By, was a pair of monumental, 20ft long carborundum and sugar-lift etchings, which now reside in the permanent collections of the Phillips Collection, Washington DC.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Alan Cristea has been the exclusive publisher of Hodgkin's prints since 1987.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> Thu, 24 May 2012 01:02:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Asier Mendizabal - Anthony Reynolds Gallery - May 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This exhibition of new works by<strong> Asier Mendizabal</strong> is titled (or, rather, untitled) after one of the pieces in it. This would suggest that this piece, or its title (or lack thereof) functions as a key to access the content, the intentions or the links proposed in the show. It very obviously fails to do so. Not only because its rhetorical self denial as a title shirks this function, but also because its allusion, in parenthesis, to linguistics evokes a formalist approach that hardly helps identify a narrative content. The ‘untitled’ piece is a sculpture of a strange virtuosity that reproduces an exercise of skill, a common task of craftsmanship among carpenters to prove dexterity by carving out a chain, with all its separate links, out of one piece of timber, but this time out of a whole 4m chestnut trunk. The association of the structural elements, the links that form the chain, is one of repetition and difference, each of them being carved in a very gestural manner, reminiscent of an ideologically coded monumentality.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Also included in the exhibition, </span><i style="font-size: small;">Rotations (Moiré/Foule)</i><span style="font-size: small;">, is a series of silkscreens that reproduce photographic representations of multitudes from the illustrated press, mainly from early 20th century publications. Mendizabal has often recalled the moment in which the first photographic representations of massive gatherings started circulating as a moment of self awareness, in the advent of the mass as a political subject, determined by the form of its photographic image. Photography inadvertently introduced an interesting representational paradox, because if the main subject of these representations was the totalizing form of the mass, randomly spread in the available street space, always shot from above, one could recognize the features of each individual constituting this very form, indiscriminately registered in the take. The mass printed reproductions use a dot screen that overlaps the grid of little points with the pattern of little heads forming the crowd, often generating somewhat blurred optical effects very similar to the Moiré patterns that result of overlapping grids. The final form we recognise as symbolic is very often determined by its technical possibilities, and this determination conditions, in retrospect, the very subject matter it represents.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Mendizabal lives and works in Bilbao, He has been the subject of major exhibitions at MACBA, Barcelona, Reina Sofia, Madrid and Raven Row, London and was featured in the 2011 Venice Biennale. This is his first solo show at the gallery.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p><strong>Bank Holiday opening times:</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p>Friday1June - Open</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p>Saturday 2 - Open</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p>Monday 4 and Tuesday 5- CLosed</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span></p> <p>Normal opening hours resume on Wednesday 06 June.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><br /></span></p> Fri, 18 May 2012 19:24:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Pil and Galia Kollectiv - CHELSEA space - May 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;">Pil &amp; Galia Kollectiv’s practice is collaborative and interdisciplinary, based primarily in film and performance. Their work addresses the legacy of modernism and the avant- garde and the relationship between art and politics.</span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"> </span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;">Pil &amp; Galia will discuss the inherent contradictions of post-Fordist labour, the myth of meritocracy and their art band WE. They will also introduce this artist’s talk with a recent two-channel video work, 'We Are Equilibrium,' which was recently shown in Israel, and presents a dialogue between two computers.</span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"> </span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;">Public Programme &amp; CCW Graduate School</span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;">Free Talks Series</span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"> </span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"><b>FREE</b></span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"><b>To book your place email: <a href="mailto:info@chelseaspace.org" target="_blank">info@chelseaspace.org</a></b></span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"><b><br /></b></span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;">For more details visit the Public Programme Blog here: </span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"><a href="http://cltad.arts.ac.uk/users/chelseaprogblog" target="_blank">http://cltad.arts.ac.uk/users/<wbr>chelseaprogblog</wbr></a>/</span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;"><br /></span></span></div> <div style="text-align: justify;"><span face="Arial" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small;"><span size="3" color="#1F1F1F" style="color: #1f1f1f;">The talks series is free and open to the public and will take place in the main Lecture Theatre at Chelsea College of Art &amp; Design, 16 John Islip St, SW1P 4JU</span></span></div> Thu, 17 May 2012 16:01:06 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Frank Bowling RA - Hales Gallery - May 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <div style="text-align: justify;"> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Hales Gallery is pleased to present its second exhibition with Frank Bowling OBE RA. The exhibition focuses on works made over the past two years and have never been exhibited before. <i>Recent Paintings</i> at Hales Gallery coincides with, <i>Drop, Roll, Slide, Drip…Frank Bowling's Poured Paintings 1973-1978</i>, a display of Bowling's work at Tate Britain from 30 April 2012 - 31 March 2013.</span></p> </div> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">In his new body of work, Bowling has focused his interest in the sublime and has continued his habitual forming of paintings around remembered incidents and characters with whom he has come into recent contact. In this respect the works are romantic although their formal qualities are as rigorous as before.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">As a senior statesman for abstract painting whose commitment and approach has spanned over 60 years, Frank's age has meant that he needed some assistance in the making of these large and ambitious works. Close friends and family have been called upon with their involvement becoming an important element in the realisation of the works. Titles of the work are dedications to his family and friends and though we may not understand particular references, a poetic resonance is formed creating a bond between viewer and painting.</span></p> <div style="text-align: justify;"></div> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Bowling's recent paintings continue to enjoy a rich hue and vivid use of colour. Earlier in his career (60/70s) Frank did battle with the formal aspects of American abstraction where Barnett Newman's paintings where a constant challenge to his own oeuvre.  In these new paintings he returns to some of the same formal struggles and explores them with a hugely diverse palette of merged and transformed tones where the paint pools and provides a vivid backdrop to his drips, splashes and distortions. The surfaces are deeply textured from subsequent applications of paint mixed with inclusions onto which Bowling applies fresh coats. Some of the collected and applied 'stuff' has been camouflaged having been cut with pinking shears, a subtle and personal reference to memories of his seamstress mother. These references to his personal life, whether it be past or present, and the history of classical Western art, are key to Bowling's work.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Born and raised in Guyana, Bowling arrived in London in 1953 where he grew up as an artist, beginning at the Royal College.  In the mid 60's, urged by his American friends, he moved to New York where he pursued a successful career, including a solo show at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1971. From the late 70's onwards he has divided his time between his studios in London and Brooklyn. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Frank Bowling's paintings have been widely exhibited internationally including solo exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1971); Serpentine Gallery, London, <i>Bowling on through the century</i> (1986); and UK travelling exhibition, <i>Frank Bowling: Bending to the Grid</i> (2003). Bowling's work can be found in numerous prestigious collections including Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Royal Academy of Arts, London; Tate Gallery, London; Victoria and Albert Museum, London and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.</span></p> Mon, 14 May 2012 17:08:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Nancy Holt - Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) - May 30th, 2012 6:45 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This screening of Nancy Holt’s works will be followed by a Q&amp;A led by ICA Associate Curator of Artists’ Moving Image, Steven Cairns. The event will be held on the occasion of Nancy Holt's solo exhibition <em>Photoworks</em> at Haunch of Venison (8 June - 25 August).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Nancy Holt (b. 1938) is an American artist based in Galisteo (New Mexico). She graduated with a BA in Biology from Tufts University (Mass.). Throughout her career she was working with earth and environment art as well as site specific sculpture, film, installation and photography. Holt was a close collaborator of Robert Smithson and one of the pioneers in experiments with land art. Her environment pieces are located in numerous places aroun the world: <em>Sun Tunnels</em> (1976) in Great Basin Desert, Utah; <em>Stone Enclosure (Rock Rings)</em> in Bellingham, Washington; <em>Astral Grating</em> (1987) in New York; <em>Up and Under </em>(1998) in Nokia, Finland et al. Holt has received five National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, the New York Creative Artist Fellowship and the Guggenheim Fellowship.</span></p> Fri, 18 May 2012 16:14:08 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Valérie Belin - Michael Hoppen Contemporary - May 30th, 2012 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Michael Hoppen Contemporary is pleased to present the latest series of works by the French artist <strong>Valérie Belin</strong>. The new exhibition will showcase twelve black and white silver gelatin prints, from her new series <strong>YOHOHO</strong>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Taking as her subject the famous burlesque, cabaret clubs of Paris, Belin shot all the film at <em>Le Moulin Rouge</em> and <em>Le Lido</em>. She then carefully constructed each image by layering two negatives together, creating luminous studies of a familiar yet mysterious world, and all the time referencing the gaudy, historical stages of those places. Some years ago, Belin photographed two dancers from these clubs, and with this series she seeks to unearth more of that story. The personality and history of places and objects is a constant source of inspiration for her work. And these pieces are certainly more still life than landscape.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">  "<em>In my first series, and especially those dedicated to crystal vases and glasses (1993), I worked only on the light spectrum of the objects and remained very close to the primary process of photography. However, in my later work, whether colour or black-and-white, the new technologies have given me the option of using a freer, more pictorial, dreamlike treatment of the subject - for example, in the pictures of the magicians, of the dancer at the Lido and of the baskets of fruit (2007). Modern tools have led me to see photography beyond the analogue, as a means of creating a pure image captured directly by me at the very heart of my models. Much more than a figurative medium, photography offers me the possibility of probing the evanescent frontiers between reality and illusion, to reveal the profound supernaturalism of my work.</em>" </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Her style is not detached, nor is it clinical or purely documentary. Instead, Belin uses her camera to revel in the exotic details of these stage sets to produce painterly views that are far removed from naturalism, forcing the viewer to question the ambiguous scenes that confront them.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Shot at oblique angles, otherworldly in their great swathes of black, the portraits of interiors are utterly devoid of any human presence and capture cabaret's empty arena in all its disquieting and Baroque beauty. "<em>Cabaret settings are false illusions of an external world; they are artificial images, enchanting fantasies</em>" Belin has noted.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Belin has never conceived of photography as a way of recording what we see, but rather works in a kind of symbiosis with the luminous essence of the photographic medium itself. It could be possible to describe Belin's new series as being more akin to drawing rather than photography: the solid and highly contrasting black and white images resemble thick marks on paper. Reflections and refractions seem to be drawn by light itself or the shapes and forms left in its absence. This effect, combined with solarisation, strips away any physical substance and makes the image appear apparitional and the objects within it hollow.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Belin's work harks back to Laszlo Moholy Nagy's 'photograms' and is even suggestive of Man Ray's brand of surrealism. However, the artist is equally eager to adopt digital technology when appropriate: her masterful control enables her to transcend the limitations of reality and formal resemblance. The precise technical choices generate a tension between the settings and their surfaces, magnifying and accentuating the sumptuous details, creating a chaos which, like the richness, only adds to the visual bouyancy of the prints. Once again, the "sur-réalité" of this French artist's photographs hover somewhere between illusion and image.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">"<em>We could consider that I work on the idea of "cliché", but the difference with a pure "cliché" - empty and meaningless - is the fact that if I photograph a purported "cliché" then my work goes beyond the "cliché", and also beyond the subject itself. It becomes a pure vision, a photograph.</em>"</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Born in 1964 in Boulogne-Billancourt, France, Valérie Belin lives and works in Paris. Her work is in many private, public and corporate collections across the world – including MoMA NY; Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain in Paris; the UBS Art Collection; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the JP Morgan Chase Art Program, New York; and the Huis Marseille in Amsterdam.</span></p> Thu, 22 Mar 2012 16:44:09 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list David Claerbout - Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art - May 30th, 2012 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">On 30 May 2012, Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art will preview a solo exhibition</span> <span style="font-size: small;">dedicated to the filmic works of the Belgian artist <strong>David Claerbout</strong>. The exhibition features works </span><span style="font-size: small;">spanning Claerbout’s practice from 2000 to the present. The time that remains will be the artist’s</span> <span style="font-size: small;">first solo exhibition in a London public gallery.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Claerbout situates his striking work between the complex worlds of digital photography and film, </span><span style="font-size: small;">investigating this intermediate area in concise and thought-provoking installations. Claerbout’s films</span> <span style="font-size: small;">often depict everyday activities or events, which once digitally manipulated negate the linear </span><span style="font-size: small;">passage of time. His work questions the viewer’s conventional ideas of time and narrative processes.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Filmed in a house designed by contemporary architect Rem Koolhaas and using the same episode</span> <span style="font-size: small;">shot at ten-minute intervals from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., <em><strong>Bordeaux Piece, 2004</strong></em>, lasts nearly fourteen</span> <span style="font-size: small;">hours. Three actors repeat flat dialogue and use dramatic gestures. They seem to be the </span><span style="font-size: small;">protagonists of the work, but as time goes by the narrative slowly collapses into the movement of</span> <span style="font-size: small;">the sun and the changing light of day. A different sense of time is created and the protagonist is</span> <span style="font-size: small;">now the natural world. This work contains Claerbout’s first use of dialogue.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;"><strong><em>The Algiers’ Sections of a Happy Moment, 2008,</em></strong> is set on a small soccer pitch on a roof of the</span> <span style="font-size: small;">Algiers casbah. Young men, surrounded by a group of elderly people, pause in their game as one of</span> <span style="font-size: small;">the players feeds a flock of eager seagulls. The succession of images in this ‘happy moment’ </span><span style="font-size: small;">provides a reflection on what Claerbout terms ‘the suspicious gaze’. The artist uses the passage of</span> <span style="font-size: small;">time as a tool for moderating that suspicious gaze, and more generally as a means of reconsidering</span> <span style="font-size: small;">what we see.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Set within the rigorous architecture of Skywood House, near Denham in the UK, <em><strong>Sunrise, 2009</strong></em>, takes</span> <span style="font-size: small;">the viewer into near-total darkness. The film depicts a nocturnal scene inside the villa, where a</span> <span style="font-size: small;">maid goes about her usual routine while the inhabitants sleep. The camera follows her through the</span> <span style="font-size: small;">course of her work and finally films her as she cycles home along a country road under the rising</span> <span style="font-size: small;">sun, accompanied by an imposing piece of music by Rachmaninov. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The landscape of <strong><em>The Quiet Shore, 2011</em></strong>, is that of Brittany, where the tides are known to be the</span> <span style="font-size: small;">strongest in Europe. An empty beach is shown at dusk at low tide. Still soaked in water, the sand,</span> <span style="font-size: small;">with its silvery shimmer and stillness, functions like a mirror reflecting the world around it. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"></span><span style="font-size: small;">Finally, <em><strong>Orchestra, 2011</strong></em>, a recent light box work, is about theatrical silence. The viewer enters a</span> <span style="font-size: small;">darkened room, where the conductor of an orchestra emerges from the dim scene. Both conductor</span> <span style="font-size: small;">and the audience within the work focus their attention on the gallery viewer, creating a moment of</span> <span style="font-size: small;">suspended silence.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Born in 1969, David Claerbout is one of the most internationally acclaimed video artists of his</span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">generation. Recent years have seen his work honoured with prizes and numerous solo exhibitions in</span> <span style="font-size: small;">Europe and North America. Recent shows include a retrospective at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre,</span> <span style="font-size: small;">Belgium, and the touring exhibition <em>The Shape of Time</em>, which travelled between 2007 and 2009 to</span> <span style="font-size: small;">the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Massachusetts; the Kunstmuseum St.</span> <span style="font-size: small;">Gallen, Switzerland; the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, </span><span style="font-size: small;">Vancouver; and the De Pont Museum for Contemporary Art, Netherlands. He currently lives and works</span> <span style="font-size: small;">in Antwerp and Berlin.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The exhibition will be accompanied by a comprehensive publication, co-produced with WIELS,</span> <span style="font-size: small;">Brussels, distributed by Ludion.</span></p> Fri, 18 May 2012 18:03:37 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list - Royal College of Art - May 30th, 2012 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The RCA Fashion programmes will be hosting their annual MA graduate fashion shows to the public on Wednesday 30 May at 4pm and 7pm, and to press and trade on Thursday 31 May. The show culminates with the Fashion Gala on the evening of 31 May.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong style="font-size: small;">Thirty-five MA Fashion students specialising in menswear, womenswear, knitwear and millinery will present their final collections in two catwalk shows on Wednesday 30 May at 4pm and 7pm. </strong><span style="font-size: small;">The RCA graduate fashion shows are a great way to spot the latest trends and ideas coming from some of the world's best Fashion students. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Graduates will be hoping to follow in the footsteps of a new generation of RCA fashion alumni who have set up their own labels and are winning industry awards, including Erdem, Holly Fulton, Eudon Choi, Heikki Salonen, Christopher Raeburn; menswear designers James Long, Lou Dalton, Matthew Miller, Katie Eary and Astrid Andersen; milliners Justin Smith and Zara Gorman; and shoe designer Camilla Skovgaard.</span></p> <p></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Tickets are available on the RCA <a href="http://www.rca.ac.uk/fashiontickets" target="_self" title="Click here for RCA Fashion Ticket sales">website</a>. For any enquiries, please contact <a class="ApplyClass" href="mailto:fashion@rca.ac.uk">fashion@rca.ac.uk</a>.</span></p> Fri, 25 May 2012 17:11:22 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Kurt Tong - The Horse Hospital - May 30th, 2012 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This is part of the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/lon/venues/show/33806-london-festival-of-photography" rel="nofollow">London Festival of Photography</a>.</span></h3> <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">This new body of work by Kurt Tong combines a collection of historical photographs, new photographs and writings that retrace and bring to life Tong's ancestral roots from more than a century ago to the present day. </span></h3> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The exhibition will take the form of a Chinese tea house and visitors will be encouraged to share their own family stories.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Where are you from originally?</strong></span><br /><span style="font-size: small;"> As an immigrant, I get asked this more than I care for. Having spent two thirds of my life in England, I am still often considered an outsider. I was born in the city of Hong Kong in 1977, five years before China wanted it back. Us Honkies have an identity that's very different to the ones of China; after all, I sang God Save our Queen as my national anthem at school. I always knew I was coming to live in England. My father studied here and dislikes the communists; he had always told me that when Hong Kong goes back to China in 1997, we would not be going back. Go back he did. In fact, he never really left. I, on the other hand, got sent here for school and I married and started a family here. Having grown up between three different cultures, one question is always at the back of my mind. How Chinese am I or indeed, <em>who</em> am I?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">My father's grandfather was a deckhand who came to Hong Kong from Shanghai after the fall of the Empire in 1911, lured by better job prospects in the relatively stable British colony. My mother's family were big landlords in Southern China—they came to Hong Kong and probably escaped certain death at the hands of Mao's advancing Communist armies. I am tracing back the history of my family in a bid to find out how two of the most influential people in history affected my family.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Granting equal importance to new photographs, found photographs and writing, the work will reconnect me with the Hong Kong of the past through the recollection of my extended family, humanizing the political and social upheaval that brought my family to Hong Kong and eventually to the United Kingdom.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The project is a visual storybook for my daughters.  It is my hope that when they are older and begin to question their own heritage, they will find answers to their questions as I did during the research and making of this project.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Exhibition curated by Lauren Heinz, <a href="http://www.foto8.com" target="_blank">FOTO8</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Born in Hong Kong in 1977,<strong> Kurt Tong</strong> was originally trained as a health visitor at the University of Liverpool. He has worked and traveled extensively across Europe, the Americas and Asia. In 1999, Kurt co-founded Prema Vasam, a charitable home for disabled and disadvantaged children in Chennai, South India. Kurt became a full-time photographer in 2003. He was the winner of the Luis Valtuena International Humanitarian Photography Award and the City of Port St. Elpidio Prize with his first picture-story documenting the treatment of disabled children in India. He has worked for many other NGOs and covered stories on topics ranging from female infanticide to ballroom dancers.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">He gained his Masters in Documentary Photography at the London College of Communications in 2006 and immediately began working on more personal projects. He has since been chosen as the winner of Photograph.Book.Now competition, the Hey, Hot Shot! competition and the prestigious Jerwood Photography Award.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Tong's photographs have been widely published and exhibited around the world at venues including: The Royal Academy, Impressions Gallery, Abbaye de Neumunster, Fotofest in Houston and solo shows at  Compton Verney, Photofusion and Streetlevel Photoworks. He is represented by Jen Bekman Gallery in New York and The Photographer's Gallery in London.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">His first monograph <em>In Case it Rains in Heaven</em> (Kehrer Verlag) was published  in 2011.</span></p> Wed, 16 May 2012 10:26:20 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list Henry Moore - Gagosian Gallery - Britannia Street - May 31st, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM <blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Everything I do, I intend to make on a large scale... Size itself has its own impact, and physically we can relate ourselves more strongly to a big sculpture than to a small one.</em></span><br /><span style="font-size: small;">—Henry Moore</span></p> </blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Gagosian Gallery</strong>, in collaboration with <strong>The Henry Moore Foundation</strong>, is pleased to present a major exhibition of large-scale sculptures by <strong>Henry Moore</strong>, some of which are being presented indoors for the first time.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Moore’s <em>oeuvre</em>, emblematic of modern British sculpture, is informed by elements of the abstract, the surreal, the primitive, and the classical. His rolling corporeal forms are as accessible and familiar as they are distinctly avant-garde. Moore’s first solo sculpture exhibition was held in London in 1928; by the late 1940s he had become one of Britain’s most celebrated artists with a diverse <em>oeuvre </em>that encompassed drawings, graphics, textiles, and sculpture. In the following decades he continued to receive increasingly significant sculpture commissions, following a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1946 and winning the international prize at the Venice Biennale in 1948.  His heightened success and fame provided him with the means to work increasingly in bronze rather than direct carving, thus achieving the monumental scale that he had always desired for his work. His large-scale sculptures have been placed in indoor and outdoor environments all over the world including Kenwood House, London; Dallas City Hall Plaza; Tiergarten, Berlin; the University of Chicago; Exchange Square, Hong Kong; UNESCO headquarters, Paris; Lincoln Center, New York; The National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; the United Nations Headquarters, New York; the Houses of Parliament, London; St Paul’s Cathedral, London; and the City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">Moore’s large-scale sculptures celebrated the beauty and power of organic forms at a time when traditional representation was largely eschewed by the vanguard art establishment. Their prodigious size and forceful presence have an overwhelming physicality that promotes a charged relation between sculpture, site, and viewer. In <em>Two Piece Reclining Figure No. 2</em> (1960) the rough texture of the patinated dark surface infuses the large corpus with a certain brutalism, the stunted head and blocky limbs akin to arched geological formations, weathered from time immemorial.  <em>Reclining Figure: Hand</em> (1979) is immediately identifiable as a human form despite its modulated stylization; the softly rounded, cloud-like body attests to Moore’s more exploratory impulses when compared to <em>Large Four Piece Reclining Figure</em> (1972–73) and <em>Reclining Connected Forms</em> (1969), where he alludes to body parts using the vocabulary of mechanical components. <em>Large Two Forms</em> (1966) and<em> Large Spindle Piece</em> (1974) evidence an interest in both natural and man-made objects.</span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;"> It was Moore’s intention that these large-scale forms be interacted with, viewed close-up, and even touched. In order that their heft and mass be perceived in myriad of settings, they were most commonly placed outdoors, subject to the effects of changing light, seasons, and terrain. Within the controlled white environment of the gallery space, the sheer volume and mammoth proportions of the sculptures are more keenly felt. Brimming with latent energy, their richly textured surfaces and sensual, rippling arcs and concavities can be seen to new effect.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition, featuring essays by Anita Feldman and Anne Wagner.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>Henry Moore</strong> was born in West Yorkshire, England in 1898 and died in East Hertfordshire, England in 1986. His public commissions occupy university campuses, pastoral expanses and major urban centers in 38 countries around the world. His sculpture and drawings have been the subject of many museum exhibitions and retrospectives, including the Tate Gallery, London (1951); Whitechapel Gallery, London (1957); Tate Gallery, London (1968); Forte di Belvedere, Florence (1972); Tate Gallery and the Serpentine Gallery, London for the occasion of Moore’s eightieth birthday (1978); Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (1983); Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield (1987); Royal Academy of Arts (1988); Shanghai Art Museum (2001); Henry Moore, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (2001); CaixaForum, Barcelona, (2008); Kunsthal, Rotterdam (2006, travelled to Didrichsen Museum, Helsinki in 2008); Kew Botanical Gardens, London (2007–08); Tate Britain (2010); Kremlin Museum, Moscow (2012).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;">The Henry Moore Foundation was founded by Moore in 1977 to increase public enjoyment of the arts, especially sculpture. Today it opens his restored Hertfordshire home, studios and sculpture grounds to the public, tours the world's largest collection of his work, and runs sculpture exhibitions and research at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. It also supports sculpture through an active grants programme. For 2012, The Foundation has launched Henry Moore Friends, an opportunity to help promote the artist's legacy.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><a href="http://www.henry-moore.org/">www.henry-moore.org</a></p> Mon, 16 Apr 2012 15:47:50 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list - Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) - May 31st, 2012 6:45 PM - 8:00 PM <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em>I Am Dora</em> is an artists' publication focusing on how female characters in film affect womens perceptions of themselves. A subjective and personal study, <em>I Am Dora</em> explores how and why women identify with one another and what this means when the identification is with a flawed or misunderstood character.</span><br /> <br /><span style="font-size: small;">Chapter 1 launches with LUX’s restored print of <em>Sigmund Freud's Dora: A Case of Mistaken Identity</em> directed by Anthony McCall, Claire Pajaczkowska, Andrew Tyndall, and Jane Weinstock <em> </em>(1979), and <em>Light Reading</em> by Lis Rhodes (1979). The event will include a short introduction and an informal discussion following the films in the ICA bar. The first 50 tickets sold will receive a complimentary copy of the publication.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">In their original film notes, the filmmakers stated that they chose Dora as a ‘test’ to encourage a discussion, “Understanding hysteria not only as an illness but as the inevitable predicament of women who speak in a language which has never been ours, a phallocentric language” and “to analyse the language, how it represents Freud’s representation of Dora, the representation of female sexuality in psychoanalytical theory, and representation in films”.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;">Interspersing a recreation of Freud’s failed analysis of Dora with clips from television advertising and pornography, as well as exchanges with her mother, the filmmakers explore the status of the female as the objectified site of sexual desire. The resulting film interrogates psychoanalysis, the iconography of the mother and filmmaking itself as complicit in ‘representing’ the female.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.iamdora.co.uk">www.iamdora.co.uk</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Sigmund Freud's Dora: A Case of Mistaken Identity</em>, Dir. Anthony McCall, Claire Pajaczkowska, Andrew Tyndall, and Jane Weinstock, USA, 1979, 40 mins.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Light Reading</em>, Dir. Lis Rhodes, UK, 1979, 20 mins.</span></p> Fri, 18 May 2012 16:16:45 +0000 http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list http://www.artslant.com/lon/Events/list